Devinci Dixon RX - Reviewed

Dec 10, 2013
by Jordan Carr  
REVIEWED
Devinci Dixon RX

WORDS Jordan Carr
PHOTOS Colin Meagher

Canadian brand Devinci may be best known among mountain bikers for their recent World Cup downhill overall title that was delivered by Steve Smith on his Wilson Carbon, but much of the Wilson's technology, including the Split Pivot concentric axle pivot design can also be found on the more compact Dixon RX that's tested here. In fact, Smith chose to run the 145mm travel Dixon rather than his downhill bike on the tame Sea Otter DH track for the last two years running, as well as in Crankworx's Air DH race in the past. The $4599.99 USD RX model is fitted with a 160mm travel FOX 34 CTD Talas fork that offers 10mm more travel over what's fitted to the standard Dixons, as well as a 780mm wide Truvativ BooBar that's considerably wider than what is found elsewhere in the lineup. Those two talking points certainly make the RX model more appealing to aggressive trail riders who may or may not find themselves on some hairy terrain every now and then, although there is also a frame only option if you are wanting to build up a Dixon to be even more tailored to your needs. Looking to spend a little less? The base model aluminum Dixon retails for $2699 USD and still employs the same suspension layout.


Dixon RX Details

• Intended use: all-mountain
• Wheel size: 26''
• Split Pivot suspension design
• Rear wheel travel: 145mm
• Carbon front triangle and seat stays, aluminum chain stays
• SRAM dual ring X9 drivetrain
• Weight: 30.4lbs (size med, w/o pedals)
• Sizes: small, medium (tested), large
• MSRP: $4599.99 USD




Dixon RX Construction Details

Devinci's DMC-G carbon manufacturing combines bladder molding with silicone inserts to create more strength through consistency at complex junctions such as the bottom bracket and head tube areas, with the inserts working to evenly apply pressure that is said to greatly limit voids in the carbon layup. The silicone inserts are removed from the frame once the process is complete, and Devinci boasts that this process creates a flawless frame inside and out time and time again. Regardless of their confidence in carbon, the Dixon utilizes aluminum chain stays as the weight savings on this frame component would be minimal when done in carbon, and it is also an area that can see a lot of abuse when a bike is ridden hard.

  The bike's Split Pivot suspension sees it rotate concentrically around the rear axle (left), and offset chips used in the pivot hardware on the rocker arm (right) allow for geometry adjustment.

To give the Dixon maximum versatility, Devinci chose to allow for an adjustment in geometry between "LO" and "HI" settings. This adjustment is done via a 4mm bolt on Devinci's FRG suspension chip, the hardware that ties the seat stay and rocker link together, and is responsible for half of a degree in the head angle, 66.2° - 66.7°, and 6mm of change in the bike's bottom bracket height. Cable routing is kept clean with the lines for the rear derailleur and rear brake running along the top of the down tube, while the front derailleur and Reverb hose are on the underside of the top tube. Up front, a tapered head tube adds to the stoutness of the Dixon's aesthetic while housing an internal zero stack Cane Creek headset. Subtle touches like uniquely shaped carbon tubing and an integrated headset give the Dixon a clean polished look. ISCG tabs that feature replaceable threaded barrels allow for an easy chain guide install and some extra peace of mind if you happen to over-torque the bolts.

Jordan Carr testing the Devinci Dixon in Sedona AZ
  The 145mm travel Split-Pivot suspension design activates a RockShox Monarch RT3 shock.

Suspension Design

As a proclaimed enduro/trail rig, the Dixon is undoubtedly designed to offer a balance of efficiency and burly capability, and for this Devinci chose to utilize Dave Weagle's patented Split Pivot suspension design. Split Pivot refers to a concentric rear axle pivot that helps to separate acceleration forces from braking forces in the suspension design. This type of layout is based on careful pivot placement to reduce excess suspension reaction to acceleration forces, and at the same time reduce excess reaction to braking forces. The Dixon was also specifically developed to work with available off-the-shelf shocks, so no custom shock tunes are required to get the best out of the bike.



Riding the Dixon RX





Climbing and Fit

Though it boasts a stout wheelset and meaty 2.35'' Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires, we were pleasantly surprised with the Dixon's readiness to climb, although the bike did benefit from use of the RockShox Monarch RT3's on the fly compression adjustment when things smoothed out. This isn't uncommon on a bike in the Dixon's travel bracket, and we found ourselves utilizing the shock's middle compression setting for most smooth climbs and rolling terrain.

Jordan Carr testing the Devinci Dixon in Sedona AZ
  Out of the saddle climbs benefited from utilizing the Monarch's on the fly compression adjustment to gain maximum efficiency, and the lever was in an easy position to reach down and flip.


Technical climbing is where we found the Dixon to be most at home when headed upward, something that we were admittedly surprised with given the common assumption that bigger diameter wheels rule in such situations. The Dixon made short work of tricky switchbacks, and the ride position placed us nicely within the wheels, making it predictable and responsive, a feeling that was aided by the bike's 360mm bottom bracket height that allowed us to maneuver through such sections without having to stop turning the pedals over. Short 424mm chain stays also gave us confidence on steep, loose pitches where our weight was positioned nicely over the rear wheel. The 26" wheels did struggle a bit when ledgey terrain was encountered, though, with the bike losing momentum when faced with a particularly stepped section of trail. Once on smooth singletrack or jeep road ascents, the Dixon's weight became a bit more noticeable when compared to a lighter duty 145mm trail bike, although it should be said that most of those lighter duty rigs don't feel nearly as solid when the trail turns downward. As we pedalled our way up numerous gravel climbs it was quickly clear that the Dixon does offer comfortable geometry for those long seated ascents, and the cockpit offered what felt like perfect length, especially when combined with the 780mm BooBar.


Descending / Technical Terrain

Aiming the Dixon RX through some rowdy downhills was our first order of business given the bike's burly stance. We knew how well other axle-concentric suspension designs have performed recently, so we were excited to spend some time pushing the Dixon to its limit, and our first decent ride on the bike was on a technical trail in Sedona, Arizona, which offered mainly slower speed do-or-die sections with a few short spots that allowed us to open the bike up a bit. At medium speeds the Dixon was well versed and allowed us to come through rolling technical portions with relative ease, another welcomed attribute of its 360mm bottom bracket height when set to the HI mode, although maneuvering through tight switchbacks took a little more effort than we would have preferred when the speeds dropped. It seems the bike's short chain stays and higher bottom bracket made balance a bit more of an issue when slow, tight turns were encountered.

Jordan Carr testing the Devinci Dixon in Sedona AZ
  Descending was predictable and was most enjoyable when the Dixon was setup in its 'LO' geometry mode.


Swapping the Dixon from HI to LO geometry mode was as simple as unscrewing a 4mm allen screw and rotating the FRG pivot hardware, and although half of a degree change in head angle and a 6mm lower bottom bracket height may not sound like much, it made an appreciable difference in the bike's handling. In fact, we ended up settling on the LO setting, a choice that brought out the Dixon RX's capabilities on the faster downhill sections. Given how confident the bike's low, slack geometry made us, the 145mm travel carbon bike was a little harsher than we would have preferred, although we do suspect that the 160mm travel fork might have been contributing to a slightly unbalanced feel. And while the rear of the bike might not have been the most forgiving, the entire package did feel incredibly solid when things got rough - this isn't a machine that feels as if it will rattle apart under a heavy or fast rider. Changing the bike to the LO setting created a potent package that seemed tailor made for tight downhills that require constant finesse and commitment, as well as continued power put through to the pedals.

Jordan Carr testing the Devinci Dixon in Sedona AZ
  The bike is incredibly solid through rough, rocky terrain, although not as forgiving as some other options.


Component Check

Our Dixon RX Test bike was outfitted with SRAM’s X9 2 x 10 drivetrain, which after spending most of our time aboard single ring drivetrains lately took a bit of adaptation time on the trail, but proved to be a smart spec given the bike's intended usage and the steep sections of trail we pointed it up. An X9 Type 2 clutch derailleur helped keep drivetrain noise to a minimum, but we did still experience the usual drivetrain clatter that one associates with a dual 'ring setup. Avid's Elixir 7 brakes offered up a good amount of stopping power and adjustability, and it's worth noting that they felt firm and consistent right out of the box, not something that is always guaranteed. The wheelset is a combination of Mavic E321 hoops paired with Sram X9 hubs and Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires, a setup we found to be substantial enough for heavy trail use and that never gave us a hint of trouble.

Jordan Carr testing the Devinci Dixon in Sedona AZ
  A full SRAM X9 2x10 drivetrain offers durable versatility for a variety of terrain but was a bit cumbersome after spending most time aboard 1x systems.

• Schwalbe tires: The Hans Dampf tires connect the Dixon with the dirt quite nicely. The tried and true 2.35" rubber offers a burly rounded tread pattern paired with Schwalbe's tacky Trailstar compound that creates predictable cornering traction and excellent braking. As usual, nothing to complain about with Schwalbe's top tier rubber.

• RockShox Reverb: Hard to really call it a trail bike without a dropper post, and the Reverb rounds out this build nicely by providing reliable saddle height adjustment with the push of the bar mounted remote.

• Truvativ BooBar: With the recent emergence of wide bars on the trail market, many manufacturers have been slow to realize how important bar width is to overall bike feel. Devinci did it right, though, by spec'ing the 780mm wide BooBar.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesTrail riders looking for a solid feeling bike to allow them push the envelope will be fans of the burly Dixon. No, it isn't the most forgiving trail bike on the market in terms of rear suspension performance, but the 145mm travel bike offers class leading rigidity that will greatly boosts a rider's confidence, and we'd recommend the bike to an aggressive rider who might not have had much luck with other bikes of similar travel. It is also a machine that proves 26" wheels still have a place in our hearts and on the trails, with it displaying solid technical climbing prowess and a well-versed, functional personality. Devinci obviously feels the same way because the Dixon platform will continue to utilize 26" in 2014, a decision that is in contrast to much of the industry, but one that we can't blame them for making.- Jordan Carr


www.devinci.com


146 Comments

  • 109 2
 Good to see 26" wheels still in action. Over 31 lbs for a 145mm bike seems heavy.
  • 57 4
 That is quite heavy actually, especially for a carbon frame.
  • 26 4
 ^+1... I'm looking at this bike thinking "my slayer has 15mm more travel and weighs about a half pound less with an average parts-spec and thick tubes".... then I factor in what PB said about its DH performance and I can't help but think "meh"
  • 11 12
 The weight isn't over 31 pounds, unless your adding pedal weight.

But it's a good weight for its price, plus it has a dropper which will add weight.

The real weight culprit here are the wheels. If you really want to shave weight, swap the wheels out for some tubeless Stan's Flows or Mavic UST crossmax's .

To get a semi carbon bike with x9 , a good dropper , and good suspension design and components for $4500 is a pretty good deal.
  • 18 6
 It's also 2x not 1x. And it doesn't have 711mm Easton carbon bars. Seems like a pretty acceptable weight for the price.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick, The new Marins, while not 26", are about the same price and they weigh a bit less with a bit better spec. Don't get me wrong though, I would love to own/ride a dixon.
  • 16 0
 @SENDIT1122 Actually that is pretty heavy my Stumpjumper FSR Comp EVO alloy comes in at 28 pounds and 10oz stock without pedals and I paid a lot less than 4500$. @saidrick its going to be close to 31 pounds though unless you can ride without pedals haha.
  • 7 1
 That weight seems like it is off, My devinci dixon is right at 28 lbs, 1 x9 setup, rock shox revelation, slx cranks, x9 drivetrain, ibis/alex wheelset, maxxis tires, seems odd to be 31 w/ pedals and Im running flats
  • 5 0
 and my frame is aluminum!
  • 2 1
 @Preston , I do like the look of the new Marin's, but I wasn't comparing prices to any other bikes or weight.
  • 1 0
 @Nismo, the weight seems okay to me. My mojo HD has the same component group (X9,2x) and weighs right around 30lbs with pedals.
  • 6 0
 @SENDIT1122 I see what you mean about the carbon bars... but the thing is they came stock on my bike and I paid $3400 brand new.... plus I have RF atlas FR cranks and BB so the lightweight handlebar doesn't really matter in this case. Its actually a pretty lame weight for the price IMO.
  • 4 2
 My Banshee Rune is 650b, built balls to the wall, weighs less than 30 lbs
  • 2 5
 @saidrick I shouldn't say its heavy cuz 30 pounds isn't bad but for a carbon frame i would expect more.
  • 2 0
 @JLevandoski,
Interesting, the pinkbike review of the Rune said it weighed almost 32lbs.
  • 4 8
flag dustyduke22 Plus (Dec 10, 2013 at 14:02) (Below Threshold)
 I love that we are not calling a $4500 bike a 'good deal'.

This is why I have and probably always will buy used bikes.
  • 26 1
 knew someone like you ^ would appear..... anything can be a "good deal".... the fact that you can't afford to buy a new $4500 bike does NOT mean it isn't a "good deal".... there are bikes that cost 1k and are good deals and there are bikes that cost 10k that are good deals.... just like there are houses that cost 100k and are good deals and houses that cost 10 million that are good deals....

Don't let your poorness blind you... (i'm poor too)
  • 7 3
 All of a sudden 26" has a place in our hearts again? I swear the PB journalism agenda changes with the wind.
  • 4 0
 Don't forget their car in bikes come with a lifetime warranty. I know they will honor it as my buddy broke the first ever Wilson. They had a replacement frame to the bike shop in just a few days.
  • 1 0
 @Saidrick: In Devinci's defense, my Rune is built up custom where the Dixon looks bone stock to me. And I don't have pedals yet which might push me just over 30 lbs.
  • 3 1
 This bike has the word 'FUN' written all over it. The wallet won't find it fun though.
  • 3 3
 do you realise that you are arguin about a 2 pounds weight difference on a +/- 30 pound rig? That's two butter brick.
  • 3 0
 2 lbs (900 grams) is a huge difference in weight. If you shaved half that weight in the wheels, it would be night and day difference.
  • 3 0
 @Gabriel Dugas: I'm arguing that my aluminum 160mm bike is lighter than a carbon fiber 145mm (with 160mm fork) bike
  • 5 2
 the weight debate... here we go...
  • 5 0
 Don't forget that my Rune is 650b! Now we're adding fuel to the fire. I just want everyone to know that I mean no harm. I just wonder why a carbon trail bike weighs more than an all mountain tank.
  • 5 2
 The Dixon could be a bit lighter, and it could also be $9000-$10000 like some others instead of $4500.
  • 5 0
 The weight seems off. Mine is an xl aluminum with a pike in the front and CC dbair out back and saint brakes to boot. Burly setup all around and it comes in at 29.5 lbs. That being said, piss on the weight. This bike is a masterpiece and it only takes one ride to figure that out.
  • 2 0
 Definitely something is off. I do agree though, this bike could be so much more expensive than it needs to be. And this bike is such a great value with a carbon frame, RockShox, and SRAM.
  • 1 0
 @Jlevandoski, Off course, if you modify weight of the most weight dependant part only to compense than you'll notice something (the wheels, for their influence on unsprung weight and inertia). But if the parts are mostly the same on both bikes, the weight difference will be located on the frame and will not be as easily notable. On the other hand, carbon is not only used to save weight, but to play with rigidity all over the frame with very high precision, allowing more flex or more rigidity. On those hypothesis, i'm pretty confident that both bike are very comparable.
  • 6 1
 most weight is in the rider. lose 5kg off body weight helps more than losing 5 grams in carbon composite materials. my mate has a carbon 29er and i beat him on my long travel heavier 26 inch bike up and down everything. i'm 5ft10 and 65kg, my mate is 6ft3 and 113kg. cue the negative props for bucking the trend the industry has set...
  • 4 0
 I think the downhill performance in this review may be attributed to the shock. The 2013 and earlier Monarchs are known for being over-damped, and it looks like that is what this test bike is spec'd with. I have a 2014 Monarch RC3+ (revised to flow more oil) on the Dixon and it absolutely crushes, performing better than my previous 6.5" Pivot Firebird on descents.

The 2014 carbon models come stock with a Float X, but this shock also felt over-damped. It wasn't until I put the RC3 on that the frame came alive. I bet Stevie would agree seeing as that what he has equipped.

I'd be curious to see how their review of the aluminum frameset would compare, which comes with a Monarch R+. That is the ideal shock for this bike, as you don't really need the compression lever.
  • 5 0
 surprisingly they didnt call it enduro bike.
  • 1 0
 i like how the industry has tagged what most of us do at the weekend - ride up the mountain with mates and race them to the bottom Razz
  • 3 6
 I'm 5'9" and my turds weigh more than you, granted that's after 10 pints of Guinness.
  • 2 2
 10 points for the most irrelevant comment ever ^. Besides I ride all the British Gravity Enduro series, so being light and fit helps enormously. I'd rather be fast and skinny than be a large weighty rider who has trouble getting up hills because of his bulk.
  • 2 3
 10 pints, not points ^
  • 3 0
 The whole Carbon thing just seems a little OTT if you're not racing every weekend. The Aluminium frame is £1500 and the Carbon is £2000, £500 extra just to shave off 180 Grams. I'd rather put that money towards better Forks, brakes or just save it so I can regularly service the thing!
  • 1 0
 @mrgoogly: Absolutely right. Weight is not a determining performance factor. The weight difference between an heavy and a light frame on 80kg rider on a 15kg bike is less than 1%. Take a leak, blow your nose before riding and you are there.
  • 1 0
 My Dixon is 26 pounds and it rips fine
  • 1 0
 28lbs tops for the bike. The build they have on there isn't very good.
  • 1 0
 Mine (med 2013 RX Carbon dixon) was 29.7lb stock without pedals. Changed wheels for Eastons Havens, set the tires tubeless. Now i'm a tad under 28 with XT clipless pedals. So Wheel change and drop the tubes have drop more than 2 pounds..
  • 2 1
 Serious question... which is more important to you, saving 2 pound in weight or saving 200/300 pound, dollar, etc? if it's a matter of say a kilo then yeh it's worth doing but for only 2 pound... unless you're upgrading for more hard-wearing gear or for comfort, what's the point? you'll be no faster with that 2 pound less than what you were before. as I say, sorry for being cynical but the logic of spending loads and saving only a few grams is illogical.
  • 3 2
 2 lbs for $200/$300.... bargain. Ride a bike that weighs 30 lbs and ride the same bike at 28 lbs. Night and day difference.
  • 2 0
 just realised the fallacy of my argument, I said saving a kilo would be worth it, but 2.2 lbs is a kilo XD epic fail.
  • 14 3
 Great parts and I'm sure it rides nice, but I still cannot get over the design of the frame. That top tube split is so freaking ugly! A single top tube would be preferable to me in terms of aesthetics, and would surely reduce overall weight as well.
  • 4 3
 I used to really like the look of this frame, then one day I looked at it and my perception totally changed. It was strange. Overnight, the bike became somewhat unappealing for me, mainly because of that top tube split.
  • 4 2
 I agree, the frame looks bad. Nowhere near as sexy as a Wilson. Looking back at the Dixon, if they took that top tube split and trashed the design it'd look an awful lot like a Trek Remedy 26'r
  • 5 2
 I bet in the flesh this bike is a beauty though. Most bikes are better looking in the flesh. Except the new mondrakers, those are but ugly now.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree on the top tube - and when you see the bike in a large/xl sizes, it really starts to look terrible.

cdn.media.cyclingnews.com/2013/06/12/1/smith_devinci_dixonrc_01_670.jpg
  • 14 1
 Kona Process 153! Review it!
  • 5 0
 Buy me one and i'll let you know how it goes! pretty please?
  • 1 0
 I actually own a 153 DL and love it, but I want read an in-depth review because I've only ridden hardtails my entire life so I have nothing to compare it to. Bikemag gives it a good review, but I appreciate the detail pinkbike gave the Process 111 when they reviewed it. Also, they did a favorable first look of the 153 a few months ago, so I'd love to read their final thoughts. Vitalmtb is testing the Process in Sedona along with a bunch of other bikes. They'll be wrapping up testing on the 15th, so reviews are coming!
  • 2 0
 Sounds like you won't have to wait long! i must say though the process 111 & 153 are very sexy bikes.
  • 9 0
 We're currently in the midst of testing a Process 153. Stay tuned.
  • 3 3
 hum, another 31 lbs and 4k bike?
fat isn't sexy...
  • 6 4
 go ride road if you're a weight weener
  • 2 5
 sorry for not being a "chairlift assisted"
  • 3 2
 nah i'm only messing with ya, my point is that mtbs and especially full sussers are heavy. the more aggressive the heavier they get. my scott genius lt is about 38lbs but its a beast on descents!
  • 2 1
 thomaspearson - weight wiener - ahaha, good one!
  • 2 0
 So... WAKIdesigns comment about me saying weight wiener has +2, yet my original comment about weight wiener is -1... dat logik O.o
  • 2 2
 thomas - that is because we are all irrational beings, and don't pursue logic at all costs because looking for rational explanations of human behaviour (like pursue of rationality) is extremely irrational. Yesterday I watched few bits of the Nobel Prize Gala where the prize winner in Economics... Fk WAki... where the F am i going with this?! screw it, At least by my standards weight wiener was a very funny thing to say!
  • 1 0
 Touche!
  • 1 1
 And i don't understand what it means
  • 1 1
 Zede really? Do you take a poo in on-suit?
  • 2 1
 My english is limited to scientific and mtb vocabulary
(and "weight sausage" doesn't mean anything to me)
  • 1 0
 haha, What isn't funny about "weight sausage"? Try and say that with a straight face, I dare you.
Isn't wiener german for sausage?
Its a perversion of the saying "Weight wienie", kinda like how rocket scientist is way funnier as rocket surgeon...
  • 1 0
 Good lord look what I started... And wurst is german for sausage, a weiner is a small sausage... one of those cocktail sausages that taste like reconditioned spam
  • 5 1
 I'd say Devinci currenty makes the best bang for buck down hill bikes out there. And unlike many of the other top dollar downhill bikes which are built using cheap labor from Taiwan, this bike is designed, engineered and made in Canada by people earning a good wage so they can provide their families with a good life. I think its time we boycott any bikes costing over 3 grand that are built in Taiwan.
  • 1 0
 Correct me if I'm wrong but I think the carbon frames are off shore. Still with a lifetime warranty though!
  • 2 0
 Silocycle is correct.

Devinci only make their aluminium FS frames in Quebec. Hardtails and carbon fibre all made in TW.

Dixon = awesome, really loved my custom build but it made my riding in south-east England too damn easy so I sold it and got a 29'er hardtail...
  • 4 0
 Bought my Wilson for two reasons: 2-loved my old Wilson But the number one reason I chose it over a couple other contenders was the painted "Handcrafted in Canada" on the headtube. Ride with pride!
  • 6 0
 Just picked one up, 26 for life, kind of wish I got the carbon one now! Such a playful and nimbul bike, love mine!
  • 5 0
 sweet looking bike, 26 wheels, but 145mm travel is not necessarily faster on the ups, but clearly slower on the downs. why not 160?
  • 4 2
 www.devinci.com/bikes/bike_382_scategory_102
vs
www.votec.com/assets/download/VE160.pdf (the cheapest build)
for my next bike.
These are some sweet rigs and both have a lot of what I want. The devinci is looking pretty sick right now. Come tax time I'll have a hard choice to make.
  • 1 0
 Not complaining, but wondering why I got neg'ed. All I did was ask how people thought this bike stacked against another.
  • 4 0
 Gave you positive. Your back at 0! I don't know anything about Votec, but that bike you linked looks really nice. I have a Dixon and like everything about it except for the high bottom bracket. It is nice on the climbs because I never strike pedals, but I will never enjoy climbing without a motor anyway. You can feel the high BB on the descents in the corners for sure. Not that it's that bad, but I would rather have a Mojo HD, or a Transition Covert. The Dixon does jump awesome, and I ride it as hard downhill as my TR250 without any issues. For a 145mm trailbike it is definitely burly. Mines a 2012, but I don't think they've changed the geometry. I do know that they have made changes to the chainstays and seatstays in order to accomodate running a larger rear tire which was definitely needed. There is very little tire clearance with an ardent 2.4 on the rear of my bike.
  • 1 0
 That's good info! No body knows much about the votec ve 160. It is pretty new. All I have to go by is the google translated german bike reviews that say it is pretty nice, but I want to be sure before I order something from the other side of the pond. The build for $2900 is extremely attractive, except I'd rather have the pike and monarch that come on the dixon RS.
  • 2 0
 Ive sort of been riding this bike in Alu for 20 months...
except Mine has a Fox36 TALAS ..

I thought my old full sus was good until I got on the dixon... it made my old BMC feel like it was a hardtail the difference was that significant!
And they put my Surname on it so why would I not ride it!! #signaturebike ;-)
  • 2 0
 I have last years rc aluminum stock except dropper post &man bars. had a good friend lend me his carbon rc, it's not that it's that much lighter no, but it's like burning premium after running regular. One take you to the moon the other to mars. They're both rockets. Almost makes me glad my aluminum nomad was stolen so what it had good lines and was baby blue I like Dixons more. less flex in the back end devinci is Canadian ps the carbon rc looks better in person then in photos.
  • 2 0
 My carbon dixon is fun and goes real good over bumps,it also does poppa wheelies like no ones bizniss, my friend case goes real fast over bumps and his dixon is only aluminum! Dixons are awesome. Biking is so rad.a lotta people get to rip like superheroes these days! Ride on, token to the shrine! Thank you
  • 6 3
 I ride the Devinci Dixon and it is hands down the most confidence inspiring bike to ride all mountain on. It gives you wings.
  • 1 0
 My DMR BOLT slopestyle/mini dh comes right in at 34 pounds with heavy ass wheels,cro mo bmx cranks and 170 mm fork
And it is a steel frame.

i just ordered a set of crossmax sx to go on that bike i should be shaving like 750 grams if the weight mavic claims is right... that should get me in the 32 range.

here is a pic : www.pinkbike.com/photo/10268515
  • 1 0
 If you want to pedal up to the gnarliest trails in your area with ease and decent like your being electricuted in the butt hole. Then strap a 160 on the front of this beast and you will not be disapointed, you will not notice the weight and you will question any potential 650b purchases. I did
  • 1 0
 Out of the box my dixon carbon rx was under 29lbs weight has never been an issue while riding it this bike is amazing and feels completely solid you can tell devinci did their homework with this one. i would recommend this bike to any aggressive trail or enduro rider. I don't have a single complaint. Added a mrp 2X bash guard and chain tensioner and the bike is still under 29lbs. i did shave my bars down to 750 because the 780 was too wide for the tight single track trails i ride on a daily basis
  • 1 1
 I dont get why Devinci would throw a 160 fork on a bike that is set up for 145mm. Can someone enlighten me?

In my opinion this bike is really not gonna cut it compared to other bikes on the market in the same category. However, I have not ridden it so take that with a grain of salt.
  • 1 0
 It's for the "Aggressive descender" type of trail rider, hence the weight aswell. Although the longer front end would undoubtedly feel slightly unbalanced I imagine, as is eluded to in the review.
  • 1 0
 i understand the aggressive descender, I mean heck that is what i like to do. There are plenty of bikes that are capable to do that and I know Devinci could build a great one, but what is the benefit of creating such an unbalanced bike?
  • 2 0
 I don't see a problem with more travel in the front than the back. Remember hardtails? They all have 0 travel in the back, and most sensible people will be running a suspension fork. I have a 2012 Dixon with a Fox 36 on it and I like the 160/145 combo just fine. I've never noticed an unbalanced feeling.
  • 3 0
 Good point about the hardtails, I never thought of that. Cool yeah and I guess its nice to have the option to run a bigger fork if you want on a smaller bike. Thank you for enlightening me
  • 2 0
 Shorter travel with a high bb is more pop friendly. Gets you off the ground! Seems like a good design for places with slightly smoother trails than the desert. If they tried that bike out here in the east I bet it would have gotten higher marks.
I don't like comparing this bike to other bikes in the same category because, frankly I don't see many in this category. Are there a a lot of 5.5" travel burly rigs with short high geometry? Seems to me like the market is saturated with bikes moving the other way. Long and low describes every bike that comes out these days. An exception is a breath of fresh air.
This bike just hit my A list.
  • 1 0
 interesting
  • 2 0
 I got a dixon with a 36float 160mm up front. It doesn't feel odd at all. The rear has that mostly bottomless feeling and if you ride agressively with a lot of weight on the front, it makes a lot of sense on rugged terrain. Sometimes I feel it would probably feel a little bit more "racy" on the uphills with a slimmer 150mm but at the time I bought the fork, 34s weren't available and 32s are getting a lot of crappy-wet-noodle-feeling reviews so yeah...

It's my swiss knife bike on trips where I can only bring 1 bike and all I can say after riding a lot of true DH trails on the dixon is don't get fooled by the 145mm rear, it's not slowing the bike down one bit.
  • 1 0
 Maybe Devinci is going with what wins on Sunday sells on Monday. The fact that 1st and 2nd overall in the EWS were 26" should mean something for sales. You know it would if 27.5 took those spots.
  • 1 0
 Yeah and I dont even think Fabien was on that prototype 650b canyon all season long. What is also interesting is I know Yeti is making 650b bikes and yet Graves rode 26 all year. Granted Yeti might not have a prototype ready.
  • 2 0
 Devinci makes the Troy which is basically a Dixon with 650B. I think it's a smart move. Why would they commit to 1 wheel size when there are 3 different sizes that are suitable for different personal preferences. Good to see a company that is keeping a level head through all the hype about bigger wheels these days.
  • 1 0
 Nevermind I was wrong. The sb-75 is available and yet Graves never raced it.
  • 1 0
 650b wheels can fit in (some) 26" frames so i guess if ever thinking of converting to 650b... borrow a mates 650b wheelset. i for one am not fussed about wheelsize, i think it's more about the rider.
  • 3 0
 I wish a Dr. would prescribe this RX to me so my health insurance could cover the cost.
  • 4 0
 yea! 26 is back. Screw your 650b!
  • 1 0
 Seems heavy, particularly with the advent of these new longer travel carbon 29ers which are way under 30lbs. Cube stereo 29er with 140mm of travel is lighter and cheaper, and has better componentry (arguably).
  • 2 0
 different bikes for different purposes i suppose
  • 1 0
 Most 29ers don't come with 160mm forks, 2.35" tires, that kind of tube thickness, bashrings and or even a dropper post either. I took mine down some very gnarly world cup DH trails and althought it wasn't the perfect tool for the job (it is still a trail bike after all), it did the job just fine which is not something you could say about most lighter 29ers out there. The burlier the build, the heavier it's going to be, be careful not comparing apples and oranges.
  • 5 2
 I would use this in a bike park. If stevie can do it, any one can
  • 1 0
 I didn't recognize the sarcasm for a second.
  • 3 0
 Im staying with my commy meta
  • 2 3
 A 2008 Spec Enduro sleeps with a 2010 Trek Fuel and births this bike, that is not as capable as either of these machines. "Split Pivot" seems like a fancy work-a-round to Sepc's FSR patent, and Trek's full floater/ABP patent. I'd love to see the engineering audit explaining how lowering the drive side chain stay angle creates significant anti-squat characteristics. This bike is way behind the pack.
  • 2 0
 @Kellenp,
Dave Weagle shared his split pivot design with Trek about a month before Trek applied for a patent their ABP system.
  • 1 0
 Let me attempt to pull my foot out of my mouth here...

Out of curiosity, why would DW share a concentric pivot idea with Trek? Seems like a very valuable patent. Am I missing some backstory drama?

Either way, the bike looks dated, and doesn't appear to do much well aside from tech climbs..largely due to higher BB placement. Still looks like a cross between and old spec and a trek.
  • 2 0
 Uuuummm, as far as i know, DW was working around the Split-Pivot idea to lend it to Trek in the first place... And then Trek copied it and called it ABP, thus giving The finger to DW. Guess that's why they sued eacj other...
  • 1 0
 Trek and DW ended up in court over the Split and the ABP. It's been going on for a long time and has only just been settled. It was decided that they where developed simultaneously.

Sorry to be vague. Anyone know any more about this?
  • 1 0
 Somebody here on Pinkbike did explaiin the whole saga in details some time ago, but i can't seem to remember who it was and under which news it was....
  • 2 0
 this bike is built like a brick sh*t house but does not feel to heavy, Upped my confidence no end
  • 1 0
 I was shopping this bike against the SB66c for my new ride. Went with the Yeti. I think this is a sweet bike but went with the lower number of pivots.
  • 2 0
 My 2011 aluminum Dixon has been rock solid. The confidence it inspires has upped my game. Just point and pedal.
  • 4 1
 Such a solid bike
  • 1 3
 Well... Having not ridden one, I'll at least say this;
Let's hope the ride is that much better than the MBA review a few seasons ago.
There was pretty much no love for the geometry and feel then, but some of it seems to have been addressed!

Sticking to 26" when 27.5" offers a perceived advantage in this market is gutsy, but could pay off well in the long run too.
  • 1 0
 They have a 27.5 bike as well, its called the Troy.
  • 1 1
 I heard Devinci will drop their 26" line soon.
  • 1 0
 Yup they will, just the way the industry is going
  • 6 0
 "Pick a wheel size and be a dick about it" is the way the industry is going.
  • 1 0
 I love the long bar length its nice to have an option to cut it down rather than buying a new bar altogether!
  • 1 0
 This is a solid trail bike with no fancy crap. 2700$ for the base model? nice! Now about that FOX CTD fork....
  • 1 1
 Seems like a sweet bike, but a single-pivot location that high and no mention of pedal feedback? Lets not pretend ABP/Split pivot is magic
  • 1 0
 just weighed my dixon again and it is 29.5 lbs with thomson dropper and 2x10
  • 1 0
 That helmet... huh?!? Where are my shimano storm trooper shoes? I feel a fancy dress ride coming on!
  • 1 0
 there's 661 shin pads and elbow pads as well, white
  • 2 0
 Colin really knows how to accentuate those biceps... haha
  • 1 0
 That Reverb is a 2011 no? Not the best year for that post.
  • 2 0
 oh lawdy lawdy lawdy!!!!
  • 1 1
 "No, it isn't the most forgiving trail bike on the market in terms of rear suspension performance..." Ouch.
  • 2 0
 To me this says more about the shock than the layout no?
  • 3 0
 "And while the rear of the bike might not have been the most forgiving, the entire package did feel incredibly solid when things got rough - this isn't a machine that feels as if it will rattle apart under a heavy or fast rider."

Not everyone is looking for the rear suspension to be "forgiving". For some, firm and solid are more important attributes. Quoting a single line from an article is very misleading.
  • 1 1
 Agreed tetonlarry, I changed from an uber plush mother of five that Nomad is to 125mm Blur TR and I discovered a new dimension of riding, things get rough sometimes but just as it punishes you for your mistakes it rewards you for your input. I was never pumping the terrain so much on Nomad as I do on firmer Blur now. Then if your ride in the bike park, you can't really go so aggro on the rough bits, you have to find a different amplitude to fit the bike to the terrain but at times all it takes to pop the bike off the ground is a slight lean back and tensioning the feet and the bike just flies over stuff. I like firm bikes!
  • 1 0
 So, bikers these days grow up only up to 188 cm?!
  • 1 0
 Thats why they make chocolate and vanilla men...
  • 1 0
 Are you going to be reviewing the Devinci Troy also?
  • 1 0
 Troy will be reviewed in the near future. Stay tuned!
  • 1 0
 Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Could you post some pictures of the slow speed do or die sections. THANKS!
  • 1 0
 Get testing the Norco range carbon!
  • 1 0
 just got my alloy one!the bike shreds!!
  • 1 2
 Sweet looking bike, quite distinctive in my opinion. IT's just this one thing, the front mech - Avada Kedavra!
  • 1 0
 beautiful!
  • 2 3
 26"? Is it 2011 model?

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