FOX D.O.S.S. Dropper Post Review

Aug 8, 2012
by Mike Levy  
FOX's new 620 gram D.O.S.S. (for 'Drop On Steep Shit') telescoping seat post features either 100 or 125mm of mechanically controlled travel, as well as a 40mm drop 'Trail' position for rolling or technical terrain that still requires pedalling. The D.O.S.S. is part of FOX's 'CTD ride dynamics system', which refers to three distinct phases of riding: Climb, Trail, and Descend, with the post's three height postions - full height, 40mm drop, and fully dropped - corresponding to the CTD acronym. FOX has designed an interesting dual lever remote, with the smaller paddle only offering access to the 40mm drop 'Trail' position, in an effort to make finding the middle setting easier on the trail. The post uses a standard shift cable to control its mechanical internals. Our 125mm drop test model features a minimum insertion to saddle rail clamp height of 290mm, and measures 190mm from maximum insertion (bottom of the top cap) to the saddle rail clamp. Both numbers were measured with the post at full height.

FOX D.O.S.S. seat post
The cable operated D.O.S.S. features mechanical internals and a low pressure air return spring, as well as a novel dual lever remote that simplifies finding the post's middle height position.

FOX D.O.S.S. details:

- Mechanical internals
- Air return spring (10 - 25psi to adjust return speed)
- Three postions: full height, 40mm drop, fully dropped (Climb, Trail, Descend)
- 100mm or 125mm of total drop
- Two-bolt saddle rail clamp
- 30.9mm or 31.6mm sizes
- 620 grams (post, lever, hardware, cable and housing)
- MSRP $439 USD


The Details


Dual Lever Remote

The D.O.S.S. is the first telescoping post on the market to utilize a dual lever remote setup, with the shorter lever restricted to activating the post's 40mm drop 'Trail' position, and the larger lever letting the user run through the post's entire stroke. Why would FOX go this route? If you've ever spent time on any of the numerous mechanically operated posts that feature a secondary, slightly dropped seat height postion, you know that it can sometimes be tricky to find that middle setting. Struggling to position the saddle correctly while in the heat of the moment is the last thing a rider needs when approaching a tricky section, and the D.O.S.S. looks to remedy this.

FOX D.O.S.S. post
The larger, outboard paddle (silver) allows you to use the post's entire travel, including stopping at the 'Trail' position. The remote's smaller, inboard paddle (black) restricts movement to the 40mm drop 'Trail' postion.

Pushing the large silver lever allows you to stroke through the post's entire 125mm of drop, including stopping at the 'Trail' postion that is ideal for fast, rolling terrain where you want a bit of extra clearance, but still need to pedal. The inner black lever will only allow the seat post to drop to the 40mm 'Trail' setting, a system that should make searching for the middle position a thing of the past. The design allows the same remote to be mounted on either side of the bar, top or bottom, without having to swap out clamps, and it is also features three different fore and aft positions. The remote lever isn't nearly as trim as what some of the competition offers, but its ability to be mounted every which way on the handlebar should allow most riders to find an ergonomic setup they can get along with, and it also employs a hinged clamp for easy removal.

FOX D.O.S.S. seat post
A view of the bottom of the remote shows the three fore/aft position options.


Ball Bearing Internals

The D.O.S.S's internals are like nothing currently used within telescoping posts. Eight stainless steel ball bearings roll on three different length grooves - one for each of the three height options - that have been machined into the inner wall of the main tube. The bearings are captured at the bottom of the post's stanchion, with them being forced outward by a locking cam. In the locked positioned, the largest diameter of the cam pushes all of the balls out and secures them into the corresponding grooves.

Fox D.O.S.S. telescoping post
The locking cam is the flanged component on the far left of the rod. Notice the machined, angled pockets that either push the bearings out or allow them to retract.

When pushing the short lever to move the post to the 'Trail' position, the locking cam moves halfway through its travel, with four pockets machined into it allowing four of the bearings to move out of the grooves and drop into the pockets. The four remaining bearings sit in a linear groove that correlates with the 'Climb' and 'Trail' positions, allowing the post to fully lower to the 'Descend' position when the larger lever is pushed. Releasing the lever allows the cam to force all eight of the balls to move out and lock into the groove. Pushing the larger lever lets all eight of the ball bearings move inward, letting the post stroke through the entire length of its travel. The D.O.S.S.'s mechanical internals mean that the post should still function if an air seal fails, or you manage to damage the cable or the remote, by manually moving the actuation arm on the side of the post's head.

Fox D.O.S.S. dropper post.
The exploded view above gives you a look into the inner workings of the D.O.S.S. seat post, with the one piece forged upper tube at the top (unfinished and cut in two), and a cutaway of a fully assembled D.O.S.S. post at the bottom


Self Adjusting Steel Keys

Four stainless steel keys act to keep the post's stanchion from rotating, with each one being forced outward by both the keyway cam and four ball bearings. The cam forces the bearings outward when the post is locked into position, pushing the steel keys out into four grooves machined into the inner wall of the tube. Pushing the remote lever to move the post up or down also shifts the keyway cam, allowing the keys to relax inwards and the post to go through its travel. The layout means that there is very little friction from the keys when the post is going up or down, simply because the keys have retracted when the lever is depressed. This, combined with the post actually rolling through its travel on the ball bearings, mean that it should move very freely when activated.

The keyway cam is actually an entirely different unit from the locking cam, and has been designed to have no free play. The system has also been designed to be self-adjusting, with the locking cam pushing the keys out further as either the grooves or the keys themselves wear over time.


Installation and Setup

Setting up the D.O.S.S. post is a piece of cake. The two-bolt saddle clamp is easy to work with, and the remote's hinged clamp means that you don't have to remove any controls to install it. The remote can be configured to fit either above or below the bar, as well as on the left or right side, simply by loosening a single bolt. There is also a three position fore/aft adjustment that allows you to tune its position to best fit your hand. We initially began with the remote on the top of the bar, on the left side, but swapping the position is so easy we ended up changing it while on the trail. Because we're using SRAM's Grip Shift, we are able to run it underneath the left side, a setup that won't play nice with trigger shifters.

FOX D.O.S.S. seat post
The actuation arm is positioned at the side of the post instead of the more common location at the rear, and can also be swapped from right to left simply by flipping the seat rail clamps by 180 degrees. This setup is not only less likely to be contaminated by spray thrown up from the rear tire, but also makes for smoother cable routing.

Our D.O.S.S. arrived with 25psi in the air return spring, which is the maximum recommended amount. It rebounds quite fast at this pressure, with a very audible top-out noise to let you know that it's at full extension. We dropped the pressure down to about 15psi, which enough to still have the D.O.S.S. rebound quickly, but in a more controlled manner. The top-out 'clunk' was still present, which we far prefer over completely silent action.

The post's side-mounted actuation not only makes for smoother cable routing, but also means that you don't have to tilt, or even remove, the saddle to access the clamping bolt. This small detail was greatly appreciated given that clamping the cable requires moving the saddle on nearly every other cable operated dropper post we've used. Adjusting cable tension on the D.O.S.S. is easy via the remote's barrel adjuster, with two full turns making a big difference in the post's action. Too little cable tension and we found that the post had trouble lowering past the 'Trail' postion, hanging up slightly before lowering further. Turning the barrel adjuster counterclockwise a few turns, adding cable tension, eliminated this. Too much tension resulted in the post knocking up and down slightly, or even moving on its own if tension is excessive. Interestingly, the D.O.S.S. has a small amount of vertical play to it even with the cable undone, something that we were never able to remove from the system.


Performance

The funky looking D.O.S.S. remote had many riders asking us what was going on, but we have to admit that the dual lever design has major merits on the trail. Pushing on the smaller, inboard lever left no question as to if the post would find the 'Trail' position - it will simply only drop to that height. Contrast this to other designs that have left us searching for their middle settings, even after many miles of getting used to them, and we can see why FOX went this route. The remote also proved to be quite resilient despite its vulnerable looking position when mounted above the handlebar - it shrugged off quite a few crashes, as well as us flipping the bike over to perform trail-side repairs. We have to eat some humble pie here because we originally took issue with the remote's design, but the dual lever setup makes complete sense in use. Having said that, its ergonomics are a bit strange, with the paddles sitting at a bit of an odd angle for us. We never really found a position that we were completely happy with, despite the three fore/aft positions to pick from.



Required lever effort is about on par with anything else on the market, although we'd say that the long paddles should help over come the friction of a contaminated cable. The effort does increase for either lever if the seat has your full body weight on it when when you push them, but it isn't enough to be a deal breaker in our books.

The D.O.S.S. is incredible smooth throughout its travel, moving up and down with what feels like zero resistance, and making other posts feel sticky and slow in comparison. This is down to its ball bearing internals - the stanchion actually rolls up and down - and the post's low return spring air pressure of between 10 and 25psi. The action is remarkably effortless, and has remained so throughout our time on it. The air spring feels very linear as well, with us never having trouble fully lowering the saddle during those split second moments when the front tire is rolling over the edge of a precipice. When the paddle is pushed to raise the saddle back up, it happens rather quickly. The D.O.S.S.'s undamped rebound stroke is very similar in speed to Specialized's Command Post, with it returning to full height with zero hesitation. We view this as a plus, with it coming back up quickly and consistently when needed. This is especially helpful when navigating tight climbs and descents, as the return speed and very audible top-out noise left us with no doubt that the saddle was at full height once again. Finding the 40mm drop 'Trail' position on the post's upstroke could be tricky, so we usually resorted to bringing the post to full height and then pushing the 'Trail' lever to lower it part way back down.

The comparisons between the D.O.S.S.'s set three positions and an infinitely adjustable post are inevitable, and there will no doubt be many riders who are happy with the post's fully dropped and 40mm drop 'Trail' positions, but we couldn't help but find ourselves wishing for more range from time to time. It could be that our technical local terrain made the 40mm drop middle setting feel a touch tall (45 - 50mm seems like it would be ideal, but that's just us), or that we missed being able to drop the saddle only by 10 or 20mm for a steep, technical climb that had us spooked about high-siding off the edge of the trail, but we still prefer the ability to set our saddle height exactly where we want it.

FOX D.O.S.S. seat post
The ambidextrous remote can also be mounted above or below the bar, with us far preferring the latter option. Keep in mind that trigger shifters would keep you from mounting it below the bar, though.

When FOX debuted the D.O.S.S., many riders showed their surprise that it didn't feature a stationary actuation point on the lower tube. While we admit that we also questioned the positioning on the seat post's head (after all, why not eliminate one of the biggest hassles concerning dropper posts?), we were amazed to find that the location on the side of the post's head made a huge difference when it came to cable management. Yes, there is still a loop of surplus cable when the D.O.S.S. is lowered but it seemed to be far easier to deal with, staying off to the side of the bike instead of looping straight out the back to buzz on the rear tire. We also commend FOX for employing a two-bolt saddle rail clamp that is immune to tilting, regardless of how hard you come down on the back of the saddle. Sure, a single-bolt, clamshell design might be a touch lighter, but a two-bolt setup is really the only way to go.

FOX D.O.S.S. seat post
The D.O.S.S. lets riders choose from a fully extended 'Climb' position, a 40mm drop 'Trail' position, and a fully dropped 'Descend' height.


Issues

The D.O.S.S. proved to function very well on the trail, but the FOX dropper has a few quirks that we'd like to see addressed before we'd call it ideal. Our chief gripe concerns the small amount of vertical free play in the post at each of the three positions. While the play really only boils down to one, maybe two, millimeters, the knocking noise emanating from the movement turned out to be very annoying. It never got worse from new, but we found it to be disconcerting when we were concentrating on the trail ahead of us.

Our only other issue centers on the rather sizeable remote unit that, while fitting nicely between the other controls on the bar, is about as far from integrated as possible. When mounted atop the bar, it sits much higher than any of the other controls, not to mention that flipping your bike over to repair a flat will see it resting directly on the ground. It is much more incognito when mounted under the bar, though, which is where we preferred to attach it. Besides the questionable aesthetics, the remotes ergonomics are a touch off. The levers felt to be at a bit of an odd angle for our hands, with us consistently wishing for some type of rotation adjustment on the remote head that would keep us from having to reach so far with our average sized thumbs.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesWhere does the D.O.S.S. sit in the dropper post hierarchy? Does it dethrone the Reverb for top honours? There is no doubting that the FOX post is a top quality unit - just look at its Swiss watch-like internals - but the post's odd rattle and slightly-off remote ergos detract from its great action. Having said that, the novel dual lever setup scores it major points, though, with it eliminating having to hunt for that middle seat height, and its incredibly smooth travel does make all other dropper posts feel as if they've left underwater for a few weeks. If FOX can remedy the two points of discord mentioned above, we'd have to say that there would be a new boss in town. - Mike levy


www.ridefox.com


186 Comments

  • 57 9
 Fox expects people to buy this because its fox...not because it is better than anything else out there (reverb ftw!!!)
  • 22 3
 400+ dollars for an adjustable seatpost with the actuator mounted on the seat clamp instead of the collar makes this thing a huge fail in my opinion. Just because the actuator is mounted on the side doesn't make it any less succeptible to dirt. Nice try with the marketing nonsense.
  • 5 0
 Agreed. I like Fox products for the most part - but to develop a dropper post that is a 'me too' option was not a smart move. This post is no different than others out there, and frankly is a several year old design. Maybe it has improved feel durability, but if any company truly wants to develop the best post, they need to invest into the technology to produce a collar mounted post that has that same reliability. CB tried - and time will tell if their design will last - but others are in the back seat when it comes to innovation on these posts.
  • 4 0
 from what i understand, unless they fix it, the kronolog is already a cooked goose: it stops working due to the steel-aluminum interface that makes the post stop.
  • 5 2
 Having used posts with both fixed cable actuation on the lower tube and many with the cable attached to the head, I honestly don't feel that it is a deal breaker IMO. With so many dropper posts not even working well in the longrun, I'd say that action, ergos, and reliability are more important than a fix cable location. I've never really had trouble (for the most part) w/ routing the cable by using a hose guide or two. Just my 2c.
  • 2 1
 actually id like to try the kronolog sometime^^
  • 2 1
 Still Reverb for the win, especially the stealth Reverb if you can get it, solves all of the problems in my opinion, just wish they would sell the stealth aftermarket, If I want to poke a hole in my frame, that should be up to me right?
  • 1 1
 Seems like Fox is starting to go down the whole with their all new " technology '" lol ..
  • 3 1
 mikelevy, a post with the actuator mounted on the seat clamp requires the cabling to move up and down with the seat. I don't know how you can say with any degree of honesty that this system is equivalent to a seatpost where the cable actuator *doesn't* have to move up and down, thus not requiring a silly amount of cable slack to acommodate movement.
  • 1 0
 like Levy said, should all of the posts work correctly and for a long time (they, generally speaking dont) the LEV or static cable design would be better surely, BUT SINCE these posts have bigger more glaring issues than the inconvenience of setting up your cable so it isnt dragging on your tire when the post is down... the cable position, head or collar, cannot be considered a deal breaker in light of much bigger problems. its like saying your beef cow looks good... but the meat is horrible... levy just wants a steak.
  • 2 1
 I will not buy a dropper post without static cable routing. It is just ridiculous to have that much cable flopping around. A few more years and everyone will have figured out how to terminate the cable at the frame clamp rather than the saddle.
  • 7 0
 @blaaaaaaaaaah - Don't get me wrong, a stationary cable entry point is a huge plus, but a reliable post with good ergos is more important overall. Combine the two and you'd have a real winner.
  • 3 0
 Mike, I agree that having both would make a superb product. But for some people, the floppy cable is a deal breaker. It's hard to be "more important overall" than that. On the other hand, if the floppy cable isn't a deal breaker, then yeah, reliability is the most important feature.
  • 1 0
 i have a floppy cable style came on my enduro. it has never been an issue, and i hit lots of trail gaps and rough terrain. the long cable looks ridiculous, honestly, but it has never actually foiled me or caught my leg/tire in a years time.
  • 2 0
 My friend has a Reverb and has experienced a lot of problems with it. It has needed a rebuild every other month since he bought it. I know it's just one data point, but it has been shockingly bad, and worthy of a replacement part IMO.

I have a Specialized Command post, and have had no problems with it. It works great, has 0 play at the saddle, and the mechanical mechanism (similar to Fox's) is more reliable and lighter weight than the hydraulic posts. the Specialized has 3 positions like the Fox, and that's all I need. I use the intermediate setting for flat technical sections, the down position for downhill, and the up position for everything else. I can't think of any situations where I'd need something other than those options. It's too difficult to pedal below the intermediate position, and if you don't need to pedal, why not drop it all the way?

I would prefer if it had the cable clamp at the bottom like the Reverb, but I don't really notice the extra cable while I'm riding. My only complaint is that the lever design kinda sucks, and bruised my knee pretty badly when I hit it during a crash (this might be fixed in the newer model, lot's of people complained about it).

I just hope more options in the market will start to bring prices and weights down, because I'd love to get posts for my DH and XC bikes in addition to my trail bike, but they are too expensive to justify for DH and too heavy for XC.
  • 33 1
 Why no KS review other then this
www.pinkbike.com/news/First-look-2013-KS-Suspension-seatposts.html

I think its a little big saying Reverb is number 1 when you haven't reviewed the other contender for the top step.

LEV's been out for sometime now ?
  • 1 0
 I have one of LEV's. It's working great. Main advantage: cable mounting... You have to try itSmile
  • 4 4
 yeah i am voting for the KS post aswell.. also the choice between a lever.. or remote..is a nice touch..
and for the more capable human.. finding middle height on your dropper post aint that hard .. (if your not retarded !! )
  • 15 1
 Good call. We'll have to get some time on a LEV. I'll rephrase... the Reverb is king of the posts that we've used so far.
  • 3 0
 I quit like the look of the LEV tbf! i've had the previous KS dropper post before and it's worked reliably. I like the way the cable is at the collar of the post, obviously less cable when dropped. and i'm not fussed that i have to zip tie the cable outboard of the frame, less hassle getting it on and off if it was internally mounted! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Good point - I have KS supernatural 150mm, I can't imagine that I would need to use anything else...
  • 2 0
 +1 on the Lev!
  • 1 0
 when oiled and tightened up, the KS supernatural 150 can be lifted from the seat without it slipping upward in travel. when i first got it the collar and the nut at the bottom were a little loose, and it got those characteristic stanchion scratches... but since i've tightened everything up.... that scratch hasnt grown at all. +1 KS... +2 LEV!
  • 1 0
 i run a KS Supernatural 150 on my VP Free.... great dropper, even with the standard behind the saddle cable routing.... only issue i've seen with KS dropper posts is that they ability to lock the saddle in position tends to fade over time... my post is already starting to creep up in its travel from the fully dropped position... albeit only a 1/4 of an inch so far... also, i cant seem to remember any other company offering a 150mm drop post, though i could just be having a brain fart...
  • 2 2
 once again, fox kills everything they make.
  • 1 1
 nahh don't be like that.. but with all the lever thingy's and the trek editions with the combined sus adjustment.. it does make me a bit sick..
  • 1 0
 Another vote for the LEV. I absolutely love this post and it performs perfectly. Only gripe is set up. It can cause issues down the road if it isn't set up properly, following the instructions thought are quite simple.
  • 1 0
 the LEV has all the improvements the the Supernatural needed....which was already a great post
  • 2 0
 where does x fusions post stand?
  • 1 0
 i have a KS aswell...works flawlessly....
  • 12 0
 120 g heavier than the Reverb
1" less drop than the KS
$440 US sticker price
Cable loop to seat clamp
Ridiculous remote lever
_________________________
All adds up to: WTF. Fox, you're doing it wrong.

I still like my 36 Float, but after all this time I expected more. Biggest let-down since Matrix Revolutions.
  • 2 1
 Yeah i agree with you guys! Fox need to stop taking the Pish and drop their prices to something more reasonable! I seek other alternatives now when i come to Suspension forks, i went back to Rock Shox. Just as good and not over priced! As for the Reverb post, I do like the look of it and the lowest UK price i seen so far is around the £245 mark. Smile
  • 1 0
 and a KS supernatural is 159E w/o remote..
and the new lev stays under the 245pounds aswell..
  • 1 1
 It's not nearly as good as the Lev or the Reverb.
  • 1 0
 I've been looking at getting the LEV as the LBS has said that the cable will fit through the 4mm pre drilled hole so I can internally route part of the cable. Is anyone knowledgeable enough to know the cable size for it just before I order it from America?
-One more thing, I've heard it sometimes has issues holding the seat in place. Anyone any thoughts on that?
  • 18 1
 full on piss take price. when is the mtb industry going to get its head out of its arse where pricing is concerned. im sure they just make up a price they think they can get away with. its a seat post, yes it moves but its still over $400, for a seat post.
  • 3 0
 Agreed. I bought a complete frame (Iron Horse MKIII) including rear shock and headset for $400 a little over two years ago. Granted it wasn't factory direct (bike shop stripped it for parts) but it was brand new and has proved bullet-proof despite several big hits due to my lack of skill, so I can't help but feel this is overly expensive in comparison.
  • 10 1
 Price is set according to how much people will pay. Nothing to do with cost of manufacture. Want cheaper parts? Everyone has to stop buying them for that to happen. That's why carbon is a dream come true for the bike industry: cheaper to produce but they can sell it for more.
As for this post, it looks shit compared to the reverb. If Fox release a mechanical disc brake and say it's as good as hydraulic, are you going to believe them? Fox Rockshox
  • 4 0
 not mtb pricing, cycling pricing* tri, road, dh-xc they're all heavily overpriced
  • 1 1
 How much do you think you should pay? I agree with Jaame that it is about what people will pay and not cost, that's business right?, and I do think this one's a bit steep. That said, a huge amount of design and development goes into these products, it's not only cost of manufacture that needs to be recovered, and that should be taken into account as well.
  • 1 0
 Look what happened with the reverb, rock shox realized they had the best product and raised the price by $70. They changed nothing but with such a superior product people still buy...
  • 2 1
 I was expecting more form Fox with their dropper post. I bought a Reverb (2011), hoping that Fox were not going to release a "game-changer" .... Then the Fox product drops .... no infinate adjust, lame cable actuation.
Gumbly (mini-fingers-for-trail-setting-button) *twin paddle actuator*? Happy days fitting the remote to a bike with trigger shifters, if you wanna run it under the bars - Happy days if you run the remote above the bars if you need to flip your bike upside down on the trail etc....

Reverb = Infinate adjust, easy install for novice (with correct tools and watching online instructions), easy to bleed, no cable stretch, no cable contamination, easy-too-bleed, did I mention INFINATE ADJUST !!!!

Fox D.O.S.S. = FAIL (admittedly a rare one)
  • 1 0
 @bfe89
Not to sure of the prices at your LBS, but I picked up a Reverb aftermarket for ~ AU$350 !!! (Including full bleed kit) Thats a lot cheaper than $4xx for a mechanical, cable mech cluker .... If that is Fox's best effort at a dropper then they should give themselves an upper cut !!!
  • 3 1
 God I love coming to fox posts for the bashing! where are you guys when I talk about how sick rockshox is on other posts and I get neg propped?!
  • 1 0
 in the marzicchi/manitou tent...
  • 1 0
 tbh, when I pictured a mechanical dropper post in my simple mind, this is what i pictured, not the CB kronolog. I can see that it is at least robust and should stand the test of time, and trail abuse. Still, we are now getting a few generations in to dropper posts and it seems that the RRP from fox is unreasonable given the fact that their really isnt anything new here. Sorry fox, ima gonna struggle on with the Joppy for now
  • 1 0
 This post is still way too expensive for what you get. You can still find a KS (non LEV) for less than $280, $160 less. And I think it's even the same weight with the remote. The bar mount for KS is better too. I use triggers so the Fox would ride on the top of the bar. There are other companies out there, that's just one example.

I didn't have a "man that's cool" moment reading the review. Just hope it doesn't sell "like mad" because that will have other manufactures thinking about their pricing. I saw a CTD Fox ad and with a shock, post and fork, it would set you back around $1500 to run that. And that's the basic stuff!! Don't understand why they sell the "low tier" forks for $600. It's not special or even new. Look at what it is, it's been around for 10 years!! Rock Shox Sektor has more adjustment for about $200 less and that's not even the low end. Guess Fox wants to be the Gucci of mtb...
  • 15 0
 Holy shit that price :/
  • 5 0
 Ya, for a post that's kinda getting to the point of ridiculous. Glad I'm a trials rider and don't even use one tup hahaha
  • 16 2
 wheres the kashima? lol
  • 15 0
 probably in a year or two. gotta keep something in the bag for updates I imagine.
  • 1 0
 Fox said it would be too expensive to produce with Kashima.

So, probably around $600 with Kashima then?
  • 1 0
 I don't think that there would be any benefits...
  • 2 0
 no obviously but its the bling factor everybody wants and at this price it could use some
  • 11 1
 "MSRP $439 USD", hahahahahahaha........
  • 1 0
 i got my x-hilo for under $200. 2 years later it still works great.
f that fox price!
  • 6 1
 I wonder why they've not gone for the flexibility of the Reverb (Stop it anywhere in its travel), I can see an advantage of 40mm but you can do that on the Verb and more..I agree with dbarrett96 comment, people will buy it because its fox mainly.

There is one good point to this post...being mechanical instead of hydraulic. Far more simple and fewer things to go wrong, and easier to adjust and maintain, and cheaper to maintain..quite a few things good about it actually..
  • 7 0
 personally i strongly prefer the three travel settings, its consistant and you never have to mess around with where you want it, just choose which of the three best suits what youre doing. Im in the process of buying a new bike now to replace a stolen one, and if whatever i get doesnt have a dropper post, thisll probably be the one i get for it. although the price i think is a bit unreasonable
  • 6 2
 get a reverb!
  • 3 0
 Yea, but the price will come down soon after the rich kids buy them and us joe public realises that its way too expensive.. I can see your point Lester22291. The thing for me is that it IS constant and not flexible. Maybe a system where you can choose the 40mm drop or choose a random place would work then. Maybe even a place you set yourself, just say you wanted it to drop 50mm all the time..
  • 5 0
 Having used a Reverb intensively I've found that the settings I normally have it in are up, down or down just a bit, ie somewhere between half way and fully up. Yes, you can infinitely adjust it but in the gravity enduro side of things you don't want the faff of guessing your release point on the lever. After two weeks spent riding with someone who had one of these out in France for the Mega and Mountain of Hell I went from severe scepticism to actively wanting one. Why? Because while I was holding the release lever down over rough terrain and trying to guage an approximate point at which to release the lever my mate was instead hitting it once and that was it. It's a neat system which, although possibly not for everyone, is good. The cable I'm still however a little dubious of as it did seem to require a little too much TLC. That said, my Reverb had to be replaced by SRAM at 4 months old while we were out there so perhaps occasional TLC is better than all out replacement... It's another choice for the consumer that works and brings something new to the table - it's up to you as one of those consumers as to whether it's for you or not!
  • 1 0
 patent license issues... the hydraulic open/close and adjust travel anywhere in between top and bottom feature is licensed technology. Suntour has used it on several models of suspension forks as has Manitou (their IT system as they called it). But they both licensed it from the actual patent holder. That the hydraulic valve is now being applied to a seatpost instead of a suspension fork doesn't actually make it a new invention.
  • 1 0
 Ahrrhaaa, That makes sense. Fox going mechanical!? surely a bad move but I'm sure they made the best out of a bad situation.

Cloverleaf I understand your point about the travel. I've only recently bought the Verb and I literally haven't been on it yet so I shouldn't even be comparing the two Smile What TLC could you mean for the Cable system?? Surely none in comparision to the hydraulics of the Verb..

Still prefer the look of the Verb at the end of the day, again thats subjective...
  • 2 0
 @ rift you have the technical issue encapsulated in your first post. The decision to go mechanical over hydraulic is what pushes the design toward a small (2 or 3 or 4), finite number of preset stops. The inner post's mechanism has to lock into a (selected/drilled/machined) spot in the outer post, whether we're talking Gravity Dropper's pin, DOSS's ball bearings, or Command Post's collet. When you sit on a mechanical post you are sitting on metal attached to (stuck into) metal. When you sit on a Reverb you are sitting on metal floating on a column of trapped oil. Try to imagine what the maximum number of little holes/grooves/etc for those pins/balls/collets to stick in may be. The only infinitely-adjustable mechanical post is the Kronolog, which has that innovative but jury-is-still-out bar clamp mechanism. If you can think of a way to do a fully mechanical, infinitely adjustable post that does not use a bar clamp, I bet there are product managers at name-your-bike-company that would like a word with you.
  • 1 0
 You're saying thats an improvement that you restrict the movement?

My point continues in my later posts, whereby the ideal solution is to have a mechanical and hydrualic operation. Even futhermore a memory adjustment... This could be achieved with what I believe you're saying is the mechanical post and the Hydraulic post combined.

One more point, surely by making the post sit (Some cases forced if you're puching down on the saddle hard) into holes etc, it'll soon wear out and produce a loose fit.
  • 1 0
 ^^Good point, I've sheared the hose off of my Reverb at the remote with a tiny sapling hitting it just right. Done. The fitting at the collar is about to go also from a plane ride (most likely my fault, like the sapling). Had to order the more expensive "hose AND fitting kit" when I had it fixed cuz the "fitting ONLY" kit was out of stock in Ontario. No big deal, I was able to "ride out" and it is VERY good...just putting it out there.
  • 1 0
 Tell me if I'm missing something but I have a reverb and honestly I only use the "all the way up" and "slammed down" settings... Anything in between seems rather useless to me.
  • 5 0
 i've personally ridden on both the Reverb and DOSS and currently have the DOSS installed on my bike. I would totally recommend this seatpost to anyone looking for a dropper. The small play that Mike speaks about in this article is noticeable after the initial drop/lift of seat before it is locked into one of the CTD positions, once it is in the desired position the play ceases. It is pricey but worth it if you have the means.
  • 1 0
 That's not our experience. The play is present at all three height positions, and isn't cable tension related - it's there even with the cable undone. This is still true with the seat fully lowered, especially because the rider is hovering over the seat and it knocks every time that you use enough body english that you touch it with the side of your leg or ass. Best action on the market, but the knocking is annoying.
  • 3 1
 Just wanted to say great work on the review Mike! Despite everyone having their own opinion I think you did a good job objectively reviewing the product and being honest about the good and bad aspects of the design, keep up the great work!
  • 2 0
 For me the play is most noticeable when the post is transitioning into one of the CTD positions. I just went out to my bike and played around with it and there is a very small play in the shaft after it is in place but it hasn't been anything that has concerned me personally while riding. But like you stated in your review it is there. Its not something that would deter me from buying though. Great writeup and thanks for the reply Mike!
  • 1 0
 I was looking at the D.O.S.S also coming from two Reverbs. I understand that nothing will ever be perfect, but others said it's pretty solid. The only reason that I still have my Reverb is the infinite adjust on the post. My 2011 was in the shop most of the summer and my 2012 is in the shop at the moment.....Here's hoping Thomson will get it right!
  • 4 0
 Thomson is working on a dropper post also...
I want i-beam compatibility in a dropper post. No one really does it yet. That said, I'll prob never justify the cost and stick with my "regular" SDG i-beam setup. These prices have got to come down before that changes. And I'm not looking to argue about tooling and engineering costs in relation to retail prices.
  • 4 0
 Gravity Dropper does i-beam, and being a lighter mount offsets the weight of the dropper post. Been running with it for a year without a single service needed. Sweet.
  • 2 0
 KS also does a i-Beam dropper post, i use one and it's pretty nice.
  • 1 3
 Regarding SDG I-beam the compatibility issue for me is my ass, I understand these saddles are uber light but huh the comfort is next to none. I ride one of the comfiest saddles out there from Selle Italia and still my ass hurts after many slams of my ass into Reverb, I actualy bought a chamois cream to get rid of that issue! I don't even want to imagine how hectic hemorids would I get from Ibeam on dropper post!
  • 2 0
 Huh ? What does the i-beam have to do with comfort ? Unless you're saying that since the i-beam is more stiff than traditional rails its more rigid, i don't see how being i-beam or not makes the saddle any less comfortable.
Besides there isn't anything like "comfiest saddle", everybody has a different bone structure and as such everyone needs a different saddle, saddle X might be the comfiest saddle for subject Y but that doesn't mean that it's for subject Z.
I have no problem riding 50 or 70km with my i-beam saddles from Kore, surprisingly the one with less foam/thinner is better for me.
  • 2 0
 @danielsilva - Some of the I-Beam saddles, especially the early ones, had a very stiff shell to them. Part of this was down to how the beam attached to the shell itself, directly under your ass and w/ no consideration for flex. This made them quite stiff. The newer ones use a different arrangement that allows for some give to the system, as on a more traditional seat.
  • 2 0
 Oh sweet, guess I was wrong. Haha, WAKI, maybe you should stand up sometimes instead of letting your saddle slam you in the ass? I noticed the extra firmness when I switched to SDG but I found it enjoyable. Gives me the impression of a sporty feel. But that's just my ass, every ass is different.
  • 2 0
 @ mikelevy

Yeah that was what i thought but these new designs feel no different than the traditional Xmm rails, i notice no less flex from my Kore on the KS Beam than the traditional rail on the 27.2 KS Supernatural.
  • 2 0
 @danielsilva - Agreed. Personally, I'm a big I-Beam fan. The system makes sense, and I'd certainly being using an I-Beam saddle if more dropper posts had that option.
  • 5 1
 439 dollars? Sorry Fox ye can suck me tail. At £150/200 I was like ok I can see the argument for buying one over stopping and messin with my quick release, but that is absoloutely ridiculous. I don't even bother lookin at new forks amymore for the same reason. It begs the question why do I see so many operators and scalps on the trails? Because they were sold for a price that didn't take your f*cking eyes out.
  • 4 0
 The reverb has to be one of the WORST dropper posts on the market.
As a Mechanic i have never seen a dropper post brought in for repair
more often than the reverb. Why use anything but a shift cable to run
to the post? hydraulic line? too fragile, hard to shorten etc.. makes no sense.
  • 5 0
 400+ for a dropper seat post................when or if is this craziness going to stop....I guess when we stop paying these "WOW" prices !!!!
  • 3 0
 One more note in general:

For tall riders it would be better to have 150 mm travel ( I still use the clamp for very steep terrain to lower the post fully)
Designing a protective item around the post lever (on the post itself). Or better, implement the actuation mechanism that is not raised or lowered with the post itself (Lev idea)
I have an impression that some posters did not live with the Reberb for more than 6 months, try and you will see what will happen.
Also the Reverb has a very flimsy creaking seat mounting mechanism that I could not do anything about. You have to struggle with the Reverb to appreciate DOSS design. Fox, make the price $250. Lots of people will follow. If my DOSS fails I will buy a Gravity Dropper and will stay with it forever.
  • 3 0
 i love FOX suspension & their products, but $440 off the bat MSRP for a dropper seatpost is insane! this is their first seatpost in production, i'm always sceptical when new products hit the market especially when they are in their infancy. how much will they be when they work out the flaws of the 1st gen DOSS & upgrade it to kashima... $550??

imo, KS has the the best seatpost hands down @ a very reasonable price along with great customer service.
  • 3 0
 reverb reverb reverb, blah blah blah some people need to look outside of the marketing blurb and not just follow the herd
( though i have just bought a reverb and am awaiting delivery) and as for having a Kashima coat on the DOSS, i really hope that was said to be sarcastic at the price.

this reverb will be my 4th seat post having initially had one of the original infinite adjust KS ones, then have had 2 spesh command posts - still have the one - and now have ordered the reverb - so unlike some i would say that i've got experience of this type of product

looking at it without riding one the DOSS just seems to be a reengineered spesh command post with an overly complex release lever and a very high price. Though the in line seat is a good thing and i've had no reliability with the spesh so hopefully the DOSS should also be reliable but i cant help having my doubts about this particular fox product.

having gone from a infinite post, the ks, to the 3 position spesh posts until now i have prefered the 3 position but as my riding has got even more tech i'm finding that the 40 mm drop is not enough and the all way is too much, would agree that a better first drop would have been 45-55mm or even put a 4th drop in it and simplify the lever
Also my current frame really needs an in-line seat where as the spesh is set back about 25mm, hence why i'm giving the reverb a go- plus it was cheap
  • 6 0
 Fox is just overpricing anything!
  • 14 0
 I know.
They are turning into Apple. They have some of the best products (apart from this dropper) but you pay the earth for them.
This makes everyone try to charge similar prices because they think they can.

This is the biggest problem I've seen and I think most other riders feel the same. The price of things is getting to be a joke. I'm embarrassed talking to non bike friends about how mush things cost.

I can get 2 tyres for my car for the same price as pair of double ply Maxxis
  • 1 0
 You said it!!!
  • 1 1
 Maybe its cause all of fox's internals are made in the US of A
Higher labor and production costs. But it also means a super active R&D department, that is much more affective.
  • 1 0
 yeah its a bit crazy saying I wouldnt get much change from 8k for my bike if i needed to replace it. When a road bike, carbon with electronic shifting costs half that... this sport is starting to become more than a bit elitist. I really hope there is a retro, hard tail hipster scene soon, with povo pinners with judy's smashing rich kids on carbon demo's
  • 2 0
 I think the internals may be made here, but they send the stuff to china to be assembled and then sent back here. Still too expensive and they keep the margin high, so a "sale" price would be $399???? If I wanted to spend $440 for a dropper, I would buy a KS and hand a free beer to the first 160 riders I saw on the trail, at least I'd feel good about it....
  • 3 1
 i bought an orange patriot 66 for 450 pounds last month with great wheels and its an absolute dream to ride goes to show what you can buy for that kind of money this seatpost in my opinion is an absolute rip off very few people have 400 pounds to spend on a friggin seatpost this just sums up marketing in other words buy second hand lol
  • 2 0
 Does it come with a fox model for this price too ? LOL looks neat, seems cool, but the price just doesn't justify it . Every company puts time , knowledge, research, and design into all their products , so thats no excuse . I had a reverb that never failed me and did its job which i was happy with .

Triggers seem cool but where you going to mount this for people that have FD's ? Seems like it would be a big clutter in the cockpit or your just looking to target 2 groups , 1xXX setups or gripshift setups. Give me something that i cant justify spending over $400 on . Maybe we need Chris King or Hadley to produce a dropper seat post .
  • 2 0
 disappointed that fox didn't have the cable actuation at the seat collar like all the big shots are doing these days. congrats now there's another dropper post with a floppy housing. the LEV post is awesome Stealth routing with the reverb. usually fox comes out with the new technology to keep up with everybody else's designs. not the case go back to the drawing board fox.
  • 2 0
 I agree with the review except that the remote does not bother me at all.
After having struggled with the reverb I found very pleasant the following:
Very easy to install the remote, no need to bleed anything
No stiction going up or down
Two observations:
It seems it would be easy for the water to enter the housing through the open section on the remote
The price should be more affordable for it to become more popular (it is cheaper to buy it online in the US, Canadian stores have exorbitant price tag on the item)
  • 2 0
 I've only used the Speshy CP blacklite...... and never had a problem with it. I don't see myself trying a more expensive, heavier, and what looks like an (inferior) idiotic side cable mount as I don't have any problem (and prefer the next-to-nothing level of crud-collection) design of the blacklite's head. Don't miss the 2-bolt head whatsoever. I love the consistently repeatable 35mm drop, seems the perfect in-between. Very tight, no play post.

I don't see myself trying the reverb unless my CP blacklite gives out..... so I might not ever use one.
  • 4 2
 I love Fox but i don't want to have this Doss even for free,this dropper is ugly i've ever seen and big and heavy,price kill at the market, at the moment Reverb is number One The best, i imagine to use I-Beam with reverb Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I have tried the Joplin the Joplin 4 the reverb and the new kronolog. To this date in my opinion the kronolog has it. Not to sure about this fox though I love fox I think they have some work to do
  • 2 0
 Find it funny that Fox went to all that length of 2 lever to find he 40mm drop when the specialized all you do it let go of the lever and as soon as its at the 40mm drop it clicks into place
  • 1 0
 Specialized probably have that method patented so Fox wouldnt be allowed use. I think thats probably the best system out there for 3 setting dropper posts.Technically Rockshox would also be able to do a similar setup with their hydraulic remote.
  • 1 1
 Two entirely different beasts, in my opinion. The cruiser positon can be tricky to find on the Command Post, even after a lot of time on one. There are real benefits to the dual lever setup that the D.O.S.S. uses.

www.pinkbike.com/news/Specialized-Command-Post-Blacklite-Tested-2012.html
  • 1 0
 I use a command post, and if you're in a rush and dropping into something, finding the middle position is damn near impossible. If you're just cruising along, sure, easy.
  • 1 0
 hey Mike...have you had a go at the Giant Switch? Cable actuated, infinite adjustment and a decent $$. Only issue I have had so far is cable/housing contamination.
  • 1 0
 I personally have not used one yet, but RC has: www.pinkbike.com/news/Pinkbike-Product-Picks-march-30-2012.html
  • 1 0
 cheers.
  • 1 0
 Hey Mike,
Just curious ... Even if Fox fix the angles of the bar-mech and the vert play in the post, won't the 'CTD' design limit the use compared to infinatly adjustable posts (Cable or Hydro)?
  • 2 0
 @mothy - Yes, the D.O.S.S. would still have three set postions, regardless of if the play and remote ergos were improved upon. Some riders like this, though, and some prefer infinite adjustability. I've heard that many enduro/super-d racers like the set 3 positions because then they don't have to faff around with getting to the middle setting in the heat of the moment when they are redlining.
  • 2 1
 so its $400 plus US dollars for post that you can't put on the underside of the bar if you have EZ fire shifters, only has 3 positions which when compared to the Reverb, its rubbish. the line is run to just under the seat so theres a chance that when you have it in the descent position the cable might catch on your pedals or possibly tyre, when compared to the reverb they are the same but with a crankbros kronolog the line is attached to the piece of tube that doesnt move. Basically dont get this post. get a second hand joplin with the lever under the seat. you can fetch one of them for around £100 on ebay.
  • 2 0
 There are pluses and minuses for sure, but I don't think that you'd ever be able to catch the cable on your pedals. I think that some people will always prefer a post with mechanical internals over a hydraulic version, regardless of the Reverb's infinite adjustment feature.
  • 5 0
 I want a shimano di2 motor acuated downer and upper. Get to work Japan!
  • 1 0
 Dropper post manufacturers - are you listening -
Infinite adjust ability
cable actuated
cable at bottom
one easy push lever/button - either right/left/under/over comparable
Affordable - under 200.00 sounds good
reliable/sturdy/and can take a beating - time and time/ year after year/over and over.
  • 1 0
 I'll pay 500 for that same post if it's made here in US/Canada. Oh, and it's gotta work as good as my current post.
  • 2 1
 Lighten up guys, it's not a TOTAL fail! It does have a two bolt clamp working in it's favor. So it's only like a 90-95% fail. The mechanical actuation totally does not make sense to me. Fox is supposed to be pretty well versed in pneumatics and hydraulics, so I can't fathom why they went the mechanical route. Maybe they did not want to be viewed as having copied Rockshox. At my house we have a KS Supernatural and a Reverb, both posts are exceptional. Reverb is so easy to bleed (found out when I shortened the hose) and comes with everything you need to do it, peepls need not fear! This DOSS does not make any sense to me, especially with the way it is priced and that ridiculous remote. I gotta agree with the other comments about Fox dumbing down things this year (CTD is uber-dumb). I do not appreciate that and what it implies they think about my intelligence. We want MORE adjustment, NOT LESS. Don't tell us what we want, ask us what we want. DUH! I am not buying ANY Fox products this year.
  • 1 0
 I'll probably get some abuse here.... I've been using a gravity dropper classic for 2 years now, needs servicing every now and again but generally works well, if it starts sticking, grease it. Having stripped it several times I don't see why any dropper post would need to be any more complicated, it's a post with 3 holes in it that sits on spring, pushing the lever pulls out the pin allowing post to move.
Friends have tried many similar products, one has been through 4 different posts (cb, ks, reverb) and all hydraulic models have caused grief, the reverb has needed several bleeds.
This DOSS looks over complicated in comparison and then there's the price.
Gravity dropper should drop their prices to around £100 (I'm sure they could, simple mechanicals) then everyone would buy one.
  • 1 0
 KISS, maybe cb, rockshox and fox have forgotten this principle?
  • 1 0
 for the price of 2 DOSS would buy a used motorcycle not a tube with a hidraulic inside.....

who wants a mecanical droper for only 110 € ?
new ,with warranty , funcional and so far not a single problem.

www.ice-helmet.com/next/index.php?option=com_k2&view=itemlist&task=category&id=9:ice-lift-tige-de-selle-t%C3%A9lescopique&Itemid=91
  • 1 0
 Not to hate on Fox, they make kickass suspension but in my opinion they got nothing on the reverb with this thing Cost, Weight and Looks wise. Now that RS got their shit together with the reverb (first production came pretty faulty) it still is the benchmark for all dropper posts
  • 1 0
 I have been trying alot of dropper posts. Most leave something to be desired. I have 3 reverbs now, and have to say once you get them bled, they work great. It looks like a great first try by Fox. I look forward to seeing fox's nest dropper post offering.
  • 1 0
 Awesome review and comments. I greatly appreciate the care put into this analysis by Mike and the commenters. It is amazing how complex a posterior support system can be Wink

Trying to choose between the DOSS and Reverb, I am focusing on mental workload, i.e. how much thinking is needed during the physical action. This centers on making a choice between options vs. executing a control task (do action until condition).

Mike observes: "...you know that it can sometimes be tricky to find that middle setting. Struggling to position the saddle correctly while in the heat of the moment is the last thing a rider needs when approaching a tricky section" and "“Pushing on the smaller, inboard lever left no question as to if the post would find the 'Trail' position - it will simply only drop to that height. Contrast this to other designs that have left us searching for their middle settings, even after many miles of getting used to them..."

But then in closing he praises the Reverb: "...we still prefer the ability to set our saddle height exactly where we want it."

I'm sure that each has its merits. Ideally I would like to have both. But I have to choose one.

As an intermediate XC rider I'm thinking I want to perform a choice task (low, medium, high position) and let the seat post automatically deliver the position to me. With the Reverb, I would need to perform a control task: manipulating the controller until the seat "feels right".

Cloverleaf's comment seems spot on: "Because while I was holding the release lever down over rough terrain and trying to guage an approximate point at which to release the lever [with the Reverb] my mate was instead hitting it once and that was it [with the DOSS]."

Makes sense to me. Further thoughts on the "user interface" of these posts? Thanks again!
  • 3 3
 i have had the pleasure of running into the fox guys out at demolition forest a couple of times while they were riding their prototype DOSS. They couldnt tell me anything about it really but it got me pumped to see the reviews on it. I mean I'm always excited to run fox suspension but i really think they could have done better with this. They have been working on this project for over a couple years and this is their final product? look at that price?!?! i am proud to see them look for new ways to make dropper posts but this is not the FOX i know.
  • 1 1
 It is the most expensive dropper post on the market, but the D.O.S.S.'s internals are far more involved as well. Action aside, its mechanism is quite involved and I'm sure tricky to design and manufacture. Not trying to make excuses, it's expensive, but I can see why it costs more than some of the simpler designs out there.
  • 4 1
 As much as it hurts to say it, FOX has officially pissed me off. Last purchase from them will be a new 180 float rc2
  • 1 0
 high 5 on that brotha!
  • 2 0
 I don't think I would buy this if it was one of the cheapest options. The remote looks clumsy and feels like an after thought. Would really appreciate a KS LEV review.
  • 3 0
 notice the GRIPSHIT on the handlebar. I can't take the reviewer seriously. I am sticking with my reverb. Sorry Mike.
  • 3 2
 Is looks like a similar build quality and design to a specialized thing my mate has got ....... And his is absolutely shite !!!
  • 1 0
 The Command Post and the D.O.S.S. use two entirely different designs. Here is the Command Post review: www.pinkbike.com/news/Specialized-Command-Post-Blacklite-Tested-2012.html. Compare their internals.
  • 1 0
 Wonder if Cannondale will jump into the world of dropper post? Use some of that lefty magic for the internals.
That might just work.
  • 2 0
 Yes, that could be awesome! A square, left-esque stanchion on roller bearings, along with licensing Reverb internals from RockShox as they do within some of their Lefty forks.
  • 3 1
 Make a seat post that can fit my asx
  • 2 1
 Doesn't your ASX use a 30.9mm post? If so, a D.O.S.S. will fit, as will many others on the market.
  • 1 0
 I dont know the size i know its small and skinny ;( i cant find he measurrment anywhere
  • 1 0
 Tape measure...... If it looks smaller than most standard hardtails its probably a BMX size, 25.4 oom.
  • 1 0
 Its 27.2 so i dont think a dropper has been made that size yet
  • 1 1
 Ah, I see. Check out Gravity Dropper and KS. They both do dropper posts to fit your ASX.
  • 3 0
 There is also Rase, X-Fusion and a GD clone called Força Vario. I've been using a 27.2mm KS Supernatural with no issues so far.
  • 1 0
 Do u know a place i cam buy from? I really want a dropper.
  • 4 2
 Someone compare it to a reverb, I dare ya
  • 3 9
flag CaptainLip (Aug 8, 2012 at 0:29) (Below Threshold)
 DOSS hands down
  • 3 1
 Agreed, Reverb still is the benchmark for all other dropper post. The closest competitor (although I have never tested it) would be the KS Lev, still reverb is way ahead of the competition.
  • 19 1
 Seriously. The read of every review of a dropper post on here feels like they're scared to mention the reverb. Not one issue with mine. Never been bled. No more play after two years than the doss has out the box. how can infinite not be better thn three position? and why the hell do I need extra shit on my bar. But its oh so hard to bleed anything avid/sram/rockshox. I feel like thats the only reason anyone recommends shimano brakes or advises against the reverb. simply mechanics that don't want to bleed things.
Fox has really hit the novice rider/shit product nail on the head this year. CTD is stupid dumbed-down bullshit. Same with autosag. You don't know how to set up your suspension? buy a shock pump, ask a friend, and ride more. They should have made a rear shock to compete with the db air: more tuning options!!! that's all I ask. There are a few of us who know how to ride and set up our bikes.
  • 1 0
 best reply ever haha
  • 2 0
 Totally with unfknblvbl. Get yo self learnsed some.
  • 3 1
 The D.O.S.S. is compared directly to the Reverb in the review. As for Autosag, that isn't a FOX-specific thing, but rather only found on Specialized's bikes. RockShox also manufactures a type of Autosag rear shock (again, found only on Specialized models), although it is executed differently.
  • 1 0
 +1 with unfknblvbl ...

People that actually RIDE i think enjoy and need to make adjustments to different various terrains , all this auto sag and auto this bullshit is for the birds.. I like adjustments and i like to fine tune for what i ride.. Sometimes im on flowy fast downhill stuff and sometimes im on steep rocky chunky gnar shit...

Fox is turning into cadillac lol
  • 3 0
 If 1 million people new to MTB buy CTD tech we are ALL better off for it. Think about it. Just bought my wife an Anthem 29/3 (first bike ever). She has no idea what part is the seatpost but she is stoked to ride for the first time in her life. "Mainstream", "Trickledown", "Bud Lite at Crankworx"....Whatever! It all brings prices down and people and trails to the sport.
  • 2 0
 Why the hell dont they make them 150 mm drop???
  • 7 0
 Look at the KS lev 1. They do 150mm travel 2. The cable comes out next to the seatclamp removing the annoying loop 3. The remote replaces the clamp on ODI grips its tiny, wont break and also looks good.
  • 1 0
 This would be confusing as hell if you had trigger shifters, a scott travel adjust remote, and this travel adjust remote.
  • 1 0
 Not only the most expensive dropper post out there but also the heaviest by a long way. Fail.
  • 5 3
 What ever happened to a normal seatpost with a QR clamp?
  • 3 0
 Nothing. Alot is happening with dropper posts, though..... cheaper than an iPad, or xbox, or rims for your car, etc. Priorities, bro.
  • 1 0
 Over priced!!!!!!! Looks cool though. My x-fusion holo works fine .2 years no problem.
  • 1 0
 I would like to get a dropper post but both my bikes are 30.0! Anyone have the same issue with a solution?
  • 2 0
 Gravity Dropper or KS with a 27.2-30.0 shim.
  • 1 0
 ks LEV uber alles. Fox is the only one I haven't owned, and I won't bother.
  • 2 0
 The price tag is outragious...even for Fox!
  • 2 0
 almost 500 $
its made of gold!!!
  • 1 0
 The only way I'd pay that is if it's made in the US/Canada or Europe. Even then, design is a fail.
  • 1 0
 youd think with all the research they probably did on dropper posts, they still put the cable actuation on the head. DUMB!
  • 1 0
 As per usual,fox steal the show with their insane prices,seriously though,they need to lower their prices a little bit!
  • 2 0
 Yep, that lever sucks.
  • 1 0
 Anyone else notice the mud on the brake?
  • 1 0
 We need a KS lev Review please!
  • 1 0
 At 620 grams its too heavy!
  • 1 0
 That's one fine looking dropper, to bad droppers are always so expensive
  • 1 0
 Wow. Leave it to fox to overcomplicate a simple design.
  • 1 1
 Unless you race and every second counts, dropper seat posts are pure laziness. No other way to look it.
  • 2 1
 If you do all your climbing in one go before descending, then yes, they don't make a lot of sense. Just curious, have you used one for any length of time?
  • 1 0
 I'll be honest ..no. I have not used one for an extended period of time. But none the less a major reason for that is the price tags on these. Don't get me wrong I wouldn't mind one on a straight backcountry even XC rig, but my life I work allot and can't afford to have multiple high end bikes or fancy parts laying around. I guess I should have said, for the price tag I'm sure you can find something much more worthwhile for your bike, or even riding gear. Also in regards to my comment, bikes are becoming like cars these days, too complicated, to many unneeded and high failure parts. Nothing beats a solid steel basic ford truck, seem to last forever. Innovation is great but I'll take the 3 seconds or so to lower and raise my seat. Onnne more thing, I don't base my builds of weight(not including the my old amp)these weight nothing but in my opinion ..dropper posts are silly looking(I'll leave it at that).
  • 1 0
 430 sheets?! Come on fox, give a brutha a break!!!
  • 5 5
 Honestly it looks cheap and tacky compared to the reverb......
  • 2 2
 Doesn't it. Looks a bit "Rushed Out" to compete with the Reverb.
  • 3 0
 I don't think that I'd call it rushed... it has been in the works for awhile now (I seem to remember seeing proto versions two years ago at tradeshows). Having seen the internals first hand, I can vouch that it is very sturdy looking and a lot of design work and engineering has gone into it.
  • 1 1
 Wheres the Kashima coat Fox ?
  • 1 0
 Kashima Please
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.057662
Mobile Version of Website