Ragley Launches 2017 Range: First Look

Aug 28, 2016
by Ragley Bikes  
Ragley 2017 Range


At Ragley, our design ethos has always been simple, yet effective. We make quality components and hardcore hardtails that will help you to push your limits. With well thought out features and progressive geometry, we focus on the details, handling, ride quality and fun above all else. If you aren’t having fun on a Ragley then you’re doing it wrong!

We specialize in Hardtail bikes as they are the most fun kind of bike to ride, no matter what kind of rider you are. They are great for beginners as they are harder to ride and properly teach the fundamental skills of mountain biking. They demand that you read the trail ahead, picking the best lines, riding smooth and carrying speed. They are also great in the hands of an experienced rider as they can be used to sharpen and refine skills, making you gradually smoother, faster and more efficient in all aspects of your riding.

Building on the success of 2016, the new 2017 range is really more about evolution than revolution with subtle refinement throughout including geometry tweaks, fresh new graphics and up to date components. Our range is made up from 5x frames and 6x Complete Bikes which cover a variety of styles, wheel sizes, materials and fork lengths depending on the type of rider you are and what you want to ride. Each model is available as a frame only or as a complete bike: ready for action straight out of the box.


Ragley 2017 Range

Marley 27.5”

Re-launched in 2016, the new Marley quickly became known as one of the best trail hardtails around; with many media test wins to its name including the much coveted ‘2016 Hardtail of the Year’ award! Designed for exploration, adventure and play, the Marley is our entry level frame and the Alloy version of the Steel Piglet. It leans towards the aggressive end of the trail bike spectrum with a long front center, short chainstays, low stand-over and relatively slack head angle.


Frame: Key Points
• Long Front Triangle (Reach grows by 18mm once sagged), 50mm BB drop (Rides at 305MM) and 65.5 Deg Static HTA (67 degrees when sagged at 25%)
• Fits 27.5” wheels with tyres up to 2.4”
• Improved stand-over
• Custom Butted 6061-T6 heat treated alloy
• Optimized for a 130mm fork (Can take 120-140mm)
• Tapered Head tube to keep the front end low and stiff
• Revised 3 Finger Bridge for better clearance
• ISCG 05 Tabs
• QR Rear Hub
• MSRP: £249.99
Ragley 2017 Range

Ragley Marley 2017



Marley 1.0 27.5”

• Fork – 130mm Manitou Minute Comp – 15mm axle
• Drivetrain – 1x11 SRAM NX Groupset with FSA Comet Modular Crank
• Brakes – Shimano Deore
• Tires – Front WTB Vigilante TCS (Light/High Grip) /Rear WTB Trail Boss TCS (Light/Fast)
• Tubeless Ready Wheels – Novatec Hubs on WTB STI 23 Rims
• Cockpit: Ragley OEM Stem, OEM Bars and Tracker Saddle
• RRP: £999.99
Ragley Marley 2017


Marley 2.0 27.5”

• Fork – 120mm Suntour Raidon XC LO-R – 15mm Bolt Thru
• Drivetrain – 2x10 Shimano Deore/FSA
• Tires – Front WTB Vigilante Comp (High Grip Compound) /Rear WTB Trail Boss Comp
• Tubeless Ready Wheels – Novatec Hubs on WTB STI 23 Rims
• Cockpit: Ragley OEM Stem, OEM Bars and Tracker Saddle
• MSRP: £849.99
Ragley 2017 Range


Ragley 2017 Range

Mmmbop 27.5”

First launched back in 2008, the original Mmmbop defined what a modern All Mountain Alloy hardtail frame should be: Strong, light, stiff, adaptable, agile and huge fun to ride! In case you are not familiar with the Ragley range: the Mmmbop is the Alloy version of the Steel Bluepig.

Frame: Key Points
• Long Front Triangle (Reach grows by 18mm once sagged), 50mm BB drop (Rides at 305MM) and 64 Deg. Static HTA (66 Degrees when sagged at 25%)
• Fits 27.5” wheels with tires up to 2.4”
• Improved stand-over
• Custom Butted 6061-T6 heat treated alloy
• Optimized for a 150mm fork (Can take 140-160mm)
• Revised 3 Finger Bridge for better clearance
• 142x12mm axle with exchangeable dropout system for QR
• Stealth dropper cable routing
• ISCG 05 Tabs
• Stealth Ragley Rear Axle
• RRP: £299.99
Ragley 2017 Range


Ragley 2017 Range


Mmmbop 27.5”

RRP: £1349.99
Fork – 150mm Manitou Mattock Comp /Dorado Air – 15mm Bolt Thru
Drivetrain – 1x11 Shimano SLX Groupset with FSA Comet Modular Crank
Brakes – Shimano Deore
Tires – Front WTB Vigilante Comp (High Grip Compound) /Rear WTB Trail Boss Comp
Wheels – Novatec Hubs on WTB STI 23 Rims
Cockpit: Ragley OEM Stem, OEM Bars and Tracker Saddle
Ragley 2017 Range


Ragley 2017 Range

Piglet – Now for 27.5” and 27.5+ wheels

First launched in 2009 to acclaim and rave reviews, the Piglet is the Steel version of our Alloy Marley. Designed as a trail friendly bike with all mountain capabilities, it leans towards the aggressive end of the trail bike spectrum with modern aggressive geometry and 27.5”+ Compatibility. The new Piglet is for people that ride with their saddle up as much as their saddle down. At home on any terrain, from tearing around your local trail center, snaking down your local singletrack, to backcountry adventures in the middle of nowhere, it will push your skills to new limits and beyond!

Frame: Key Points
• Same award winning geometry as the Marley
• Long Front Triangle (Reach grows by 16mm once sagged), 50mm BB drop (Rides at 305MM) and 65.5 Deg. Static HTA (67 Degrees when sagged at 25%)
• Fits 27.5” tires up to 2.4”/27.5”+ Tires up to 2.8”
• Improved stand-over
• Custom triple butted 4130 chromoly tubing
• Optimized for a 130mm fork
• Revised 3 Finger Bridge for better clearance
• New lighter Dropout design with replaceable Alloy hanger
• Stealth dropper cable routing
• ISCG 05 Tabs
• QR Rear Hub
• MSRP: £449.99
Ragley 2017 Range

Ragley 2017 Range


Piglet 27.5”

• Fork – 130mm RockShox Yari RC – 15mm Bolt Thru
• Drivetrain – 1x11 Shimano SLX M7000
• Brakes – Shimano SLX M7000
• Tires – Front WTB Vigilante TCS (Light/High Grip) Rear WTB Trail Boss TCS (Light/Fast)
• Wheels – Novatec Hubs on WTB ASYM i23 Tubeless ready rims
• Dropper Seatpost – Brand-X Ascend dropper - 120mm travel
• Cockpit: Ragley Wiser stem, Wiser bars and Tracker saddle
• MSRP: £1649.99
Ragley 2017 Range


Ragley 2017 Range

Bluepig – Now for 27.5” and 27.5+ Wheels


Introducing the new and improved Ragley Bluepig: Designed as an All Mountain/Enduro Race friendly bike, our top of the range steel Bluepig is built for those who want to go faster and play harder. In case you are not familiar with the Ragley range: the Bluepig is the Steel version of the Alloy Mmmbop.27.5”+ Compatibility means the Blue Pig is now more versatile than ever! It is a blend of DH stability and uphill tenacity. It will descend and climb with such contradiction that you will be left scratching your head! It is at home on any terrain but happiest when ridden hard, roosting turns and hammering the descents


Frame: Key Points
• Long Front Triangle (Reach grows by 18mm once sagged), 50mm BB drop (Rides at 305MM) and 64 Deg. Static HTA (66 Degrees when sagged at 25%)
• Fits 27.5” wheels with tyres up to 2.4”/27.5”+ wheels with tires up to 2.8”
• Improved stand-over
• Custom triple butted 4130 chromoly tubing
• Optimized for a 150mm fork (Can take 140-160mm)
• 44mm Head tube
• Revised 3 Finger Bridge for better clearance
• 142x12mm bolt-through as standard using exchangeable dropout system for QR
• Stealth dropper cable routing
• ISCG 05 Tabs
• Stealth Ragley rear axle
• MSRP: £549.99
Ragley 2017 Range

Ragley 2017 Range

Bluepig 27.5”

• 27.5” Wheels
• RRP: £1699.99
• Fork – 150mm RockShox Yari RC – 15mm
• Drivetrain – 1x11 Shimano SLX M7000
• Brakes – Shimano SLX M7000
• Tires – Front WTB Vigilante TCS (Light/High Grip) /Rear WTB Trail Boss TCS (Light/Fast)
• Wheels – Novatec hubs on WTB ASYM i23 tubeless ready rims
• Dropper Seatpost – Brand-X Ascend dropper - 120mm travel
• Cockpit: Ragley Wiser stem, Wiser bars and Tracker saddle
Ragley 2017 Range


Ragley 2017 Range

Bigwig – Now for 29” and 27.5+ Wheels

The Big Wig is our top of the range Steel 29er frame. Designed as a Trail/All Mountain/Enduro Race friendly frame, the Bigwig is the Enduro weapon of choice for our Brand Ambassadors around the UK and Ireland and has graced the top step of many an Enduro podium in 2016. For 2017, you can now fit 27.5”+ wheels with wide 44mm rims, and up to massive three-inch tires, making the Bigwig even more versatile that it was before.

Frame: Key Points
• Long Front Triangle (Reach grows by 17.5mm once sagged), 65mm BB drop (Rides at 305MM) and 65 Deg. static HTA (66.5 degrees when sagged at 25%)
• Fits 29” wheels with tires up to 2.4”/27.5”+ Wheels with 3.0” Tires
• Improved stand-over
• Custom triple butted 4130 chromoly tubing
• Optimized for a 130mm fork (Can take 120-140mm)
• 44mm head tube
• Revised 3 Finger Bridge for better clearance
• Boost 148x12mm bolt-through as standard
• Stealth dropper cable routing
• ISCG 05 Tabs
• Stealth Ragley rear axle
• MSRP: £549.99
Ragley 2017 Range

Ragley 2017 Range



Bigwig 29”

• 29” Wheels
• Fork – 130mm RockShox Yari RC – 15mm Bolt Thru
• Drivetrain – 1x11 Shimano SLX M7000
• Brakes – Shimano SLX M7000
• Tyres – Front WTB Vigilante TCS (Light/High Grip) /Rear WTB Trail Boss TCS (Light/Fast)
• Wheels – Novatec hubs on WTB ASYM i23 tubeless ready rims
• Dropper Seatpost – Brand-X Ascend dropper - 120mm travel
• Cockpit: Ragley Wiser stem, Wiser bars and Tracker saddle
• MSRP: £1749.99
Ragley 2017 Range




Ragley 2017 Range
Even when climbing very steep terrain, our Enduro Hardtail: The Bluepig (The slackest in the range), will never be slacker than 64deg which is already steeper than a typical modern full-suspension Enduro bike which you know can climb great.


Ragley Trail Geometry Explained

Geometry is taken very seriously at Ragley; we take delight in obsessing over the angles until they are exactly how we want them. It defines the bike and ultimately dictates the way it will interact with you and the trail. Our updated trail geometry has been tweaked for each model and the type of riding that each is designed for. One thing they all have in common is that they are long, low and slack which translates to a confidence inspiring ride whether you are a beginner or an advanced rider. The main geometry changes are:

Shorter Seat tubes: All Models are 25mm shorter in seat tube length Vs. MY2016.
This gives the rider more Size choice and increases dropper seatpost options.

Slack static head angles: Designed to mimic the characteristics of a modern full suspension bike with a


rider on board, but obviously without the sag at the rear. This is why our bikes seem slack when static. However, once the rider is on the bike, the front suspension will sag, steepening the head angle by the desired amount.

Longer front triangles and shorter stems: All Models are 15-20mm Longer in Reach Vs. MY2016:
a. The riders arms are moved forward opening up the lungs to make breathing easier
b. Gives the rider more room to move around, stay in control and makes it much harder to go over the handlebars.
c. It lengthens the wheelbase to increase stability at speed and over technical terrain.
d. Moves rider weight forward to load the front wheel giving better traction in corners and helps to keep the front wheel on the ground when climbing steeper sections.



For full details on our new 2017 range, please visit the Ragley website / @ragley-bikes






138 Comments

  • + 50
 One minute there I thought it said £549.99 for the Bluepig frame.I'll make myself a coffe and read it again.
  • + 5
 Yeah these seem pretty pricey when you can get something like a Honzo ST frame for like $150 less. I thought Ragley frames were pretty cheap in the past?
  • + 7
 Yeah seems expensive, especially if you compare it to a Cotic bike which uses Reynolds 853 tubes on parts of the frame.
  • + 2
 ...
  • + 2
 Yeah, you can get an NS Surge frame for £200 less - pretty poor vfm on the Ragleys!
  • + 2
 I bought a Dartmoor Primal+ because it was less than half the price of the Bigwig, and that was the 2016 frame, the 2017 is more expensive again.
  • + 1
 @Steezysix: The surge is not a direct competitor the the Blue Pig. The NS Eccentric is, I should know as they were the final two I chose between and the Blue Pig won
  • + 6
 Ahh your forgetting the cool tax for steel hardtails these days. p7 has gone up £50 since last years, stantons are now £600, ragley are way over the top, NS eccentric is £440. seems only cotic some how have kept their head screwed on although the bolted version of the bfe is 400, still the axle costs that nearly so its fair game. Blame it on brexit i guess ? trolololol
  • + 3
 @jaydmf: lol at the cool tax, it's so true. I'll take the Al alternatives of these all day personally. I love the look of skinny tubes, but a decent fork and some 2.4" tires mute out any meaningful difference between steel and Al, IMO (except the weight). Can't easily justify steel when Al frames are coming in at half the cost.
  • + 2
 550 for a steel frame is extortionate for a far east made, none Reynolds frame. Piss take expensive. CRC better get it on "sale"
  • + 1
 @bkm303: I agree... I keep reading about steel's compliance vs alu harshness but can't help wondering how much of it is left after adding low pressure 2.3-2.4 tyres and 120-150mm forks. The added weight with most "cheap" mass production steel frames doesn't help either.

If I had the money for a custom, bespoke frame I'd go with steel or titanium, but for my current needs and budget alu is fine.
  • + 1
 @justwan-naride: It just takes the sting of an Alu frame out, still rough on the really rough stuff but it damps out the worst of the vibrations. Its worth a bit extra than alu but not the prices that are being charged atm. Still theres always on-one with the 456 and inbred, theyre a bit stiffer than most steels IMO but you cant knock them for price at all.
  • + 1
 @justwan-naride: yup. You're actually seeing this with carbon vs aluminum in the road bike world now - running slightly bigger tires at slightly lower pressure is the latest craze, and plenty of road bike reviews this year (GCN, Bikeradar, etc) are saying that aluminum (or low end carbon) with a 25c or 28c tire provides ride quality on par with much more expensive carbon bikes. And if they're saying this for a **road** bike, then there's no way you're feeling steel vs aluminum through a fork and a big ass tire at 27psi!
  • + 1
 @bkm303: you can still feel the difference between different manufacturers steel frames so yes a big tyre run low will take out some of the harshness but any vibrations that come thru the frame are still there. from my experience alu sends it straight through your feet even with impacts on. even the cheapest steel seems to take most of that away and the 631/853s just seem to damp it a slight bit more. but at the end of the day its whether you feel thats worth the money theyre asking or not if your only bike is a hardtail then id say its worth paying a bit more for (cotics/on-one prices anyways) but depends on what your riding i guess.
  • + 3
 @jaydmf: agree to disagree I guess. I've had steel and Al road/CX bikes side by side and could only tell the difference when the tires were rock hard (>80psi). Let 10+ psi out of both bikes and there was basically no noticeable difference anymore, even on rough surfaces. And this is with no suspension and 30mm tires. Numerous road bike reviewers even as far back as the late great Sheldon Brown have noticed the same thing.

Personally I think if you feel a difference between different mfr's steel frames it's probably more an issue of frame design (geometry, tube butting and forming, etc) than the material itself. Well-designed frames use butting, ovalizing, bending, and dimpling to achieve much more design freedom than material choice alone would allow. That's why Giant Aluxx SLR and Cannondale CAAD frames are pretty much universally praised, and feel great despite being made of a 'harsh' material.

But anyway, in my experience, even if you do have a cheap ass frame, you can get like 90% of the way there in terms of ride quality by just letting out some tire pressure.
  • + 1
 @bkm303: Yeah its defo more than the material itself its the whole thing, ive had cheap alus that are just way too stiff and then things like the identitis which whilst still stiff seem to have more give. you gotta go out there an give all different frame materials, manufacturers and designs a go and see what suits at the end of the day.
  • + 2
 I think it's because they want you to buy the full bike. They have a good spec and very good price on the complete bike.
  • + 25
 The market of affordable hardtail bikes with playful geo is one that manufacturer's should've tackled ages ago. Up till now the cheaper options have been mostly limited to XC-style frames and geo and the barrier to entry with the fun stuff has always been to high in terms of price... Glad to see times are a changing...

Now if only Suntour or Manitou can push out a workable $100 dropper post too then we will have a game changer to match!
  • + 4
 Hello
  • + 5
 It's called Dartmoor Hornet. It's been around for quite some time. I still don't like it as it's an aluminum frame, too stiff for me.
  • + 3
 There have been loads around for a long time, at least in the UK. Times are changing but unfortunately in the wrong direction; these frames are seriously overpriced.

For a well priced dropper look up the Lyne Contour, basically the same as the Brand X on these bikes. I've been testing the BX version and it's pretty impressive.
  • + 3
 The ks eTen goes for about 125 to 150 usd. Ive had one for 2 years, still going strong.
  • - 6
flag iqbal-achieve (Aug 29, 2016 at 10:02) (Below Threshold)
 @darkside720: damn right. Yet again I see a price increase of ~£100 on a frame I learned to ride (properly) on. Hard tails like these are superb for riders new to the sport or still on a student budget yet I have bought far better full suspension frames second hand consistently for the last few years. Save your money, £500 is a good budget for a nice full sus frame and somebody else has already taken the initial depreciation hit.
The reason hardtail bikes with playful geo aren't a thing (outside the uk) is because the only good reason to have a hardtail is because of your budget (which in this case is a joke) or because you spend more time riding up hill, on flat, on Tarmac, etc. Which is not where you want a 66° HA bike with fat ass slow tyres and a long travel fork.
  • + 4
 @ThomDawson: er no. The reason to have a slack hardtail is because they rip and they keep you on your toes and they save you wrecking your £4000+ carbon rig in the winter.
The escence of this sport is smoothness. Without that its just smashing and skidding. Keep up your skills on a hardtail and riding a full sus is like riding a magic carpet.
That said, my big bike has barely left the garage this year because Im loving my Stanton Switchback so much. So much so I need to sevice the damn forks!
I know plenty of folk parking their Capras and Tracers and building hardcore hardtails.
  • - 6
flag iqbal-achieve (Aug 29, 2016 at 15:53) (Below Threshold)
 @ilovedust: utter horse shite dude. The Stanton switchback is the worst bike I've ever ridden. It's bad for a hardtail let alone anything else.
But 'Keep up your skills on a hardtail'..couldn't agree more. If you really wanna pretend you're a good rider then go ride bmx, go ride dj, go ride street, go ride slalom and 4x. But don't bother riding real trails on a hardtail that's pretending to be like a full sus, just ride an actual full sus.
Alternatively try not giving a f*ck about how many fake hundredths you are off ratty on lady cannings and just ride a bike that's designed for the terrain and forget all the absolute bull crap about 'proper technique' and have fun.
Those people you mention leaving their capra and tracer in the garage to build a shit hardtail have too much f*cking money. But if that's what they want to waste it on it's not for me to say either way. But they're idiots.
  • + 6
 Sorry for that outburst. Something pissed me off and I vented on you for having a differing opinion. My bad. I usually try and be more constructive with my arguments.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: thats alright. I recently started riding a road bike. The full lycra get up and every thing. I hate it but equally I enjoy it. Its a totally differant sport to mountain biking but I only do it to make me a better fitter rider. I have kids and I work long hours. When I pull my mtb out of the garage I want to have the best fun I can have. If I have a spare hour I can go do 30km from the house and reap the rewards on my mtb when I have more time.
My point is that keeping it simple makes the less than simple simple. If that makes sense!!
Ive been mountain biking (inc bmx -street and ramp though not these days!!) for 20 plus years. I have ridden and raced my fair share of shite bikes both full sus and hard tail in every discipline. I can say this, you are right. Its all about how much fun you have. I used to ride miles on my rigid hardtail with thumb shifters and frame pads. Now I can afford the nice stuff but I cant afford the time. You can bet your arse that if I find the time for a 2/3 day trip ridding, I want to be getting max smiles per miles not cursing my way up and getting arm pump back down. I have a hard day at work and ride that evening with my mates, I dont want to be casing every jump, skidding every corner, etc, I want to be grinning like a grinny thing at the bottom as I stand there in the dust of my awesome run. Not looking at a wrecked rim or a snakebite.
And thats where a hardtail rules king. We never stop learning and actually in terms of riding I think we get shitter especially after the broken bones dont heel so quick. Trouble is bikes are better at letting you get away with it and frankly, thats not so fun.
If I can run it smooth on a solid bit of steel, see how quick I am on my 'I worked my nuts off for this' all singing all dancing full susser.
  • + 23
 I'm a large fan of the 25mm reduction in seat post length. Given the advancement in dropper posts this is something all companies should be doing. I've been of the opinion for a while that bikes should be measured and sold via reach or top tube length, instead of seat post length.
  • + 10
 But I have short arms and long legs! My dropper is sky high as it is! Help! Haha
  • + 6
 @JacksonTM: and I have long arms and short legs and have to ride a bike with a cramped cockpit! Help! Haha!
  • + 1
 I have short arms and short legs and I don't give a shit I just ride the bike that feels most awesome. Because I'm not a roadie.
@JacksonTM can you not reach the bars on a larger size frame? You T Rex bro?
@Jaffaman if your arms are long and short legs then you should have a really roomy cockpit? Since it's usually the knees that makes things cramped?
Stop with the 'bike fit' bullshit measurements and just find a bike that doesn't feel shit.
  • + 2
 @ThomDawson: are you saying that geometry numbers don't matter? Because you would be wrong.
  • + 1
 @Buggyr333: no, that's not at all what I'm saying?
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: So then what is "bike fit" bullshit measurements?
I'm just confused with your phrasing evidently.
  • + 1
 Apologies. A 'bike fit' is this old fashioned thing where a shop tells you that you have short arms and long legs so you're gonna have to compromise or that you're 5' 5" and you need an XS frame. And they're based on the opinion of some bloke who sells town bikes to city workers on a cycle to work scheme. They are pretty much completely useless for a dynamic sport like mountain biking; there are too many variables. Hence it is, in my opinion, BS. I don't believe that the way in which ones limbs are proportioned should necessarily have an impact on the bike you're riding. Crazy, I know.
  • + 16
 Nice argumentation, well played Ragley, well played. Sometimes this hardtail sentiment turns on in my head and I envision myself riding something simple, saying to myself, that's all I need, why would I ever need more. I'd get closer to the nature to why I started mountain biking. But then I open my eyes, find myself sitting on my 160mm super bike, take a deep breathe, break a neck of a puppy and drop in to experience godly cushion...
  • + 33
 wait what? are we 100% certain that breaking the puppy neck was an absolute necesity on this instance.
  • + 10
 I will never not have a hardtail. They tighten up your riding and reward you like nothing else. I bet you'd be twice as smooth and fast if you rode a hardtail for a week. When you got back on your enurbro machine you would be amazed at how much more capable it and you can be.
  • + 22
 @makripper: I use to be a romantic kid, and thought that poetry will get me mad puss, but all it got me was being laughed at and getting beat up.

hardtails feel a lot like poetry the idea behind it is quite a noble one but the actual experience is dull and painfull.
  • + 21
 @fercho25: Aaaw, bro- you should have just spat your poems to a dope beat: ill flows pull mad hoes.
  • + 4
 @fercho25: then you are going to slow and lacking the flow
  • + 6
 Do you have a garage / box full of old stuff though from the 26" days? - You could get a hardtail together out of odds and ends / ebay purchases to go out on when the weather is horrendous or the big bikes being spannered on.

If it stops you abusing a puppy then it can only be a good idea.....
  • + 2
 @fercho25: Seems like you were really reaching to try and find something to compare hardtails to.
  • - 3
 @makripper - Endurbro? - STOP! STOP! STOP! - isn't Enduro no longer the bro bit since it's been laughed at so much? Isn't laughing at Enduro being the bro thing now? You know, if you stare long enough into an abyss, the abyss starts to stare back at you? - here's your poetry @fercho25 you see we both looked into the abyss of lots of rear suspension... and you blinked. Yes, the puppy had to die abruptly. Puppy serves here as a metaphore for my romantic relationship with HTs, a kind of bike that I started riding on: it also represents the unease of riding a bumpy, crappy ride while having the desire to once own an awesome full susser, the alpha bike. By breaking puppys neck I say that I am worth the fully, I am ready to move on, leave the minority complex behind, I muster the courage of taking the responsibility of riding something fast and having no excuses to not ride fast, to be judged "if I can live up to owning such bike".

Poetry... the food for those who do not dare to jump into the abyss, those who need big words to make up their fear of seeing themselves for who they are, of world for what it is. They fear the abyss, affraid of death, and nooo, not of the fall, deep inside they know, oh yes the do. They know that they will land on something but they are just affraid of starting frm scratch in the new world. They are not affraid of dying, they are affraid of being reborn!
  • + 8
 @makripper: I agree with you completely. Since getting a hardtail again for the first time in a looooong time I just love it. My 160mm bike mostly sits there gathering dust. Considering parting it out because I just don't ride it enough. I can only think of a couple trail networks where it's even worthy. Riding a hardtail makes you more nimble, shows you bike control and teaches you to carry your speed.
  • + 29
 @WAKIdesigns: you try too hard to sound clever but you don't even make sense. Hardtail or no hardtail, you're a pain in the butt.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: Odd, you talk of a minority complex, yet then go on a long painful to read rant about how full suspension bikes are just the bestest things ever ever. Seems like the complex is held firmly with you on this one.
  • - 5
flag deceptivereality (Aug 29, 2016 at 6:51) (Below Threshold)
 I agree with you Waki. While it would be nice to be "smoother" and more "nimble" at the end of the day I ride for fun and the full suspension provides enough of it, not to mention the added comfort and extra safety net. It doesn't bother me that i'm not using the bike to its utmost potential or that I could be more hardcore with a hardtail. Maybe if I was into racing and wanted to better my technique or I wanted to stroke my ego I would get one but otherwise I personally don't see the point.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Aug 29, 2016 at 6:59) (Below Threshold)
 @mgolder - that's because you don't know how long I've been stuck with HT ideology. I even designed one and got it made. After all that is my personal opinion which I do not wish to impose on anyone, and the long rant was just another sample of my verbal diarrhea triggered by one dude talking of poetry and me listening to a documentary about Nietzsche... things aren't thought to be as deep and tried as hard as you may think. I take full responsibility for what they may seem to be though. For me your post seems as if you stay on one side of the argument and feel the need of defending your position. I have no evidence to support that.

Good day and please ride as you please
  • + 3
 @deceptivereality: You understand that that point works both ways right? It doesn't bother hardtail riders that they could have a more 'comfortable' ride if they wanted. Maybe hardtail riders are having this 'fun' you speak of as well so don't feel the need to have full suspension.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Correct, you do have no evidence to support your suggestion. So why make it then? I didn't say anything negative about full suspension bikes though, so my 'position' as you call it is unknown to you.
  • + 3
 @deceptivereality: I ride a hardtail for 2 years now, I do not have any problems on it (much more less than a fully) and I ride all the black diamond trails in my bikepark which is sooo gnarly, hardtail make you a better rider, is so simple and pure feeling and I am not slowing down, you juste need to be on your toes for lines and that's it
  • + 5
 Jesus..you and THAT super bike vibe,it's in every post.how many times can you drop it in waki?lol
  • + 8
 @WAKIdesigns: BRAVO! that was beautiful!

@mgolder: dont try to poke into waki's logic, many have tried beofre you and failed he will always win in the long term because his logic is that he has none.

and if we were praising full suspension he probably would get into a rant about hardtails being better.
  • - 7
flag WAKIdesigns (Aug 29, 2016 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 @Earthmotherfu - I have a complex. Bigger, longer, faster. Did I stop saying that I like 29+ Trek and E-bike from Trek? I may be biased because I hang around a lot with guys from Trek Factory Store Gothenburg and they help me service my s... my bike.

@fercho25 - NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!! (implodes like Witch king in LOTR 3)
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: you have officially gone full enduro. Its ok though. you aren't alone. You should call endurobro ananoymous

but in the mean time. visit this site. burnsurvivor.com
  • + 3
 @makripper: nah,more wendyeurobro..tup
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: it's like the fella down the local with the giant knob....haha.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: I actually find a hardtail easier to ride than a fully, actually. Sure I can bomb something rough quicker on the fully than on the hardtail. Maybe I should spend more time on the fully, but I just feel the hardtail is more predictable. If I land a drop on the hardtail, I can get right back up after absorbing the impact and get ready for the next hit. If I do this too quickly on a fully, the rear suspension rebounds and throws me otb. Same with riding steep and tight downhill switchbacks. Of course at some point it is too steep to keep your weight centered and the front suspension is going to compress and steepen the geometry. What the fully is going to do is also extend the rear suspension and steepen matters up even more. Luckily I discovered that the rear brake helps to compress the rear suspension so that helps a little but of course you can only go so far until the rear wheel loses grip.

What this probably illustrates more than anything is my lack of skill/experience on the full susser but hopefully it also goes to show that for some, riding a fully is harder than riding a hardtail over similar terrain at a similar pace.
  • + 3
 @vinay: man I cant wait for chapter 2 of that book of yours.
  • + 7
 @vinay: what this indicates is how poorly setup the full sussers you have ridden were more like!
  • + 2
 @Racer951: You're probably right to a degree. What he is explaining is why trials riders mostly use hardtails. support, feedback and predictability for drops and maneuvers. High speed drops are definetly easier on a FS though and same with tech gnar.
  • + 1
 ...
  • + 1
 I literally came to these comments just to see what kind of bullsh*t Waki was going to spout against hardtails this time. I was not disappointed.
  • + 1
 @MustArgueWithWAKIguy: Never wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it.
  • + 3
 @Buggyr333: I didn't write anything against hardtails, rather people who spread bollocks like: "riding a hardtail makes you a better rider". Actual, mindful, deliberate Practice makes you a better rider and there are different tools suiting different drills. Happy trails!
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Go ride a BMX or a hardtail for a day or two then go ride your dual suspension wunderbike. Also, explain why so many kids who grow up riding BMX go on to get sponsored and be successful in DH or other MTB genres.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm sure you see it that way, and you can play it off that way, sure, but your initial post here is biased against hardtails in general, never mentioning anything about making anybody a better anything, posted just for the sake of argument, which i suppose is par for the course for you. Won't bother posting anything unless you feel like you can get a rise out of someone with it.
  • + 3
 @makripper: like hardtails,like soft.the latter is much kinder on me farmers thoughSmile
  • + 2
 @Earthmotherfu: haha for sure. I have a FS too. they are all fun. just taking the piss @WAKIdesigns is entertaining
  • + 0
 @Buggyr333: no I didn't. I wrote that I sometimes have that romantic vision of riding an ht because it seems so simple, but then in the end I love the cushion of a full susser so I tend to ride that. Do I have to add how much time I've spent bumping my arse into worst sht in my area on HT while owning a 160 bike to state my credentials? That I never ever had a problem to keep up with ful sussers, that Inever ever backed out from any sketchy sht while riding one? That I raced DH on a HT? That I used to ride in the bike park on 120mm bike on DH trails?

I had enough argments with people who say suspension makes you lazy, hipocrites who say that and then demand, slack head angles, long wheelbases and 160 forks. What Ragley wrote here is purest own-agenda driven marketing bollocks of the kind that challenges what Trek wrote about Boost or latest Slash. And they even told us all that we all believe that hardtails are the most fun. Oh thank you Ragley, I did not know what feels most fun to me until I read your article.

Go eat your long stable wheelbase and playful rear end. Fkng short stem for a more nimble ride, easy to change directions with super stable slack head angle. Geo chart has nothing to do with description but fk it, by the power of stoke and Ragley not being Trek or Spec, a stable bike can be playful. Buy one of those and you are Olly Wilkins right away, except you are not, you feel like one but you are the same dude, it's just that there is a Ragley in your garage. You are a grand short on your wallet, but feel awesome. You can do sooo much more now. Two weeks and you manual do a mile long stoppies and send tables like vanderham.

I don't pick a side, because I believe that picking sides is for idiots who need dogmas to function.
  • - 1
 @makripper - guys with bmx background are successful in mtb and mx because they ride on bmx track which demands from you power and speed, perfect air control, immense pumping power or you fkng die on the first double. And it so happens that Bmx or 4x bike is one of the best tools for the job. Same goes for the pumptrack: one of the best exercises an mtber can get: pumping, jumping, cardio, cornering, all in one: best done on HT. Prefereably Dirt HT. But taking a hardtail with 160 fuking milimieters of travel to the woods and just riding it, doesn't make you a better rider on full susser. I could argue it makes you worse. So sorry but keep any rationality other than budget, away from long travel hardtails. There is nothing wrong with anyone making a bike like that, owning a bike like that. There is problem with people using bollocks to justify why their way of doing things could benefit others. Heeey do what I do. It's the best. Don't listen to those other guys, C'mon on, you're with me? No? Fk you then!
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Please explain to me how using the imagery of breaking the neck of a puppy (in this metaphor, the puppy is of course, the hardtail) is not a negative post? I'm sure breaking puppies necks would be considered anti-puppy, wouldn't it?

As for Ragley's post in the article, sure it is clearly an opinion, but every post on every new bike from every company has some opinion laced paragraphs explaining why their bike is the best. It does not mean there is no merit whatsoever to what they say.

You post simply to start an argument, purely for the sake of negativity, Is there not enough negativity in this world already to quench your thirst?

I've said it before and I'll say it again, I truthfully don't care about any of these supposed benefits of riding a hardtail, I don't ride one to be faster, or to choose better lines. I choose to ride a hardtail for the thrill, for the fun of it, and I feel like just because you decide it is not for you, doesn't mean you should be poisoning others against it. You don't see us hardtail riders ranting negative rhetoric every time pinkbike posts anything about a 160mm superbike, but everytime anything gets posted about a hardtail, here you are, putting your 2cents in.

You don't pick a side, but you vehemently argue for your side of not having a side. Yet we're the hypocrites.
  • + 1
 @Buggyr333: fair point too
  • + 4
 Damn Ragley, you knew your article would fire up another PB war, didn't you. Not as bad as saying something like "27.5+ is the best ever tyre size for the metrosexual rider with mustache", but close.

As I mentioned earlier, (rear) suspension can help but you need to learn to work with it. It is like another captain on your ship. It can safe you work. But if you don't know what to expect it can be a handful. Sure I could probably learn to ride it better than my hardtail, but I'll have to put some time in (as well as time to set up the suspension properly, apparently). Until I'm there, I don't know what the geometry is going to do when I'm railing a corner so I don't know how I'm going to exit it. Good enough in most cases, but simply not as accurate as I can corner my hardtail. But maybe that's just me. I also never got along with automatic transmission in cars, it just doesn't shift when I want it so it feels like I don't have full command over how they accelerate. And I don't know how to recover from a skid if I don't have a clutch...

So at the end of the day, both riding hardtails as well as fullies require different skills. I can't tell which requires more and I don't care really. You can't just take the terrain out of the equation. If the terrain only has smaller obstacles (roots, rocks etc) a bike without rear suspension and/or nimble geometry will challenge you properly depending on your current skill level. A more stable bike with more suspension might bore you. If the terrain has bigger obstacles (and smaller ones as well, obvously) the short travel/nimble bike makes you lose so much speed over the stutter bumps that you might be rolling the bigger obstacles in such a way that they aren't that much of a challenge anymore. It is a horses for courses thing. Same goes for the BMX racing thing. Sure the top level riders have got skills that transfer nicely to other disciplines, but only if they're on the right gear. ACC was your first ever Olympic champion BMX, Jill Kintner got bronze. Sure they have roots in BMX but no doubt their mtb skills they developed over much of their career contributed to their medals as well. And no way they would have been faster riding an mtb down that course.

So yeah, riding both full sus and hardtails will probably make you a more well rounded rider. So does riding BMX, road, track, unicycle even. But do you really want to be that well rounded. Ride the bike and terrain you want to do well on and you'll be fine. Not as good maybe, but so wouldn't you if you'd force yourself when you should actually be enjoying yourself.

As for Olly Wilkins, I don't think the DMR bikes he rides are particularly long and stable. That's not what DMR is about. In fact I've been thinking lately about replacing my current fully frame (a Cannondale Prophet) by a DMR Bolt Long to filter out the stutter bumps and simply go faster on certain trails. I read they ride more like a hardtail so they might be easier to get used to. Plus they don't necessarily require you to go into funny modern standards so nearly all components transfer nicely.

@fercho25: Please enjoy.
  • + 3
 i mean, i rode a hardtail at bikeparks for years, then switched to a fully and I still suck at riding!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: where did u get long travel hardtails from?
  • + 1
 @jaycubzz: waki got his first endurobro ride so he's negging all the "lowly hardtailers" I love them both personally and both have great tradeoffs. I always have fun on whichever bike i use. Always a challenge and for different reasons. @WAKIdesigns meth isn't legal in canada, better stay home ahah
  • + 1
 @vinay: well played sir, well played.
  • + 0
 @makripper: I had Enduro bro ride ( Nomad) back in 2008, before Enduro had its own specific jokes Wink
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: don't you have an endurorborbo bike now? your antidote is the pinnacle of bro fashion. CCDB what looks like a lyrick (maybe a pike) you are mr. enduro ahem wakduro
  • + 1
 @makripper: ha ha endurabunga bunga bike,last ridden hard by berlusconi
  • + 15
 The one positive point to the "plus size revolution" is that frame manufacturers are finally telling us what size tires will fit on frames.
  • + 8
 Trying to figure out a way to have all of Wakidesigns comments not be shown to spare me from seeing the run out crap he writes on a constant basis. I know there is a google chrome extension that eliminates all articles that have to do with the kardashians.... Sooo this technology does exist...
  • + 8
 "Mmmbop?" Seriously, is no one going to talk about this? No one remembers Hanson?
  • + 5
 All of us "Fansons" remember. #FANSON
  • + 4
 Love the slack long low steel hardtail. Got a Cotic Bfe with some pikes etc and its a rocket. So much fun everywhere. So so capable too. Only the steepest rocky dh tracks are beyond it but then thats what my dh bike is for. Sure pedals well too ;-)
........wouldnt mind a spin on the Big Wig though. The thought of the rollover of the bigger wheels is pretty exciting!!
  • + 4
 Been on the Piglet this summer, cant praise it enough!! Only thing that got me annoyed was how easily the hanger broke after it got just slightly bent. But as long as they are easy to source and remain cheap that isnt a big issue but still.
  • + 3
 With the amount of time wakidesigns spends on pinkbike ranting on everysingle article, you wonder if he ever has time for actually riding his bike. It would he hilarious if waki turned out to be a sociopathic lunatic who doesnt even own a bike and he is just on pinkbike nike posing and trying to fit in. Lol.
  • + 3
 I hope the build quality is better now. I don't know if it was just my frame, but my Marley 2016 came with the dropouts surface sanded or something. I think it's going to be a PITA to change the derailleur hanger because I will have to sand the surface to make it even. Not sure how straight the wheel sits there because I haven't able to build the bike yet.
I didn't return the frame because that thing went thru several continents to get to my hands, to expensive to send it back.

www.pinkbike.com/u/passwordpinkbike/album/Ragley-Marley-2016
  • + 6
 I like how they quote geometry figures static and sagged. Excellent.
  • + 1
 Get it right on a suspension bike feels pretty good. Get it right on a hardtail and it rewards like no other. If you're saying "I don't get it" or "what's the point" then you haven't experienced it. Unless you're going warp speed in the gnar or hitting fest sized jumps the hardtail is more fun period.
  • + 2
 The Marley complete (not the cheaper one) is very competitively priced/ spec'ed. Add a dropper (tranz-x at about 100€) and you have a functional, modern am/trail ht and no excuses.
  • + 1
 I don't get how the big wig is expensive, compared to what ? I'm looking for a steel hardtail and have often googled Kona honzo but they're not steel anymore and they are expensive. Al Dl 2017 is £2000 and the kit is not up to the level on the Ragley which is quite a lot less. Two friends have Ros niners, now they're lovely but prices start at £2600, doesn't this make the big wig look like good value ?
  • + 1
 Bought a Big Wig last year. Got a large even though I should be medium for the longer reach. Great to see this is now revised. It's an amazing bike to ride. Does it all. I'm a downhiller at heart and this bike shreds but it rolls so so good. Perfect winter bike for the schlomp we have here in Irish winter's
  • + 3
 Steel prices on the floor and they want to charge all that money? On one are better value!
  • + 5
 I love my on one 456 evo2 - only cost 120 for the frame in a sale!! Yesterday I dropped in to one of the more techy dh trails in wharncliffe on it, the look on the face of the fat 40-somethings on their 5k super bikes was awesome haha! Really under rated and capable bikes in my opinion
  • + 4
 Geometry is somewhat lacking on the On-one bikes though - The 456 etc frames are very short with a 410mm reach for the largest frame - The new Deedar is a bit better but still comes up a little short and is quite high in the bb department with long seat-tubes.

When On-One started selling the steel hardtail frames they were way ahead of the competition and were fast to react to changing demands from riders but they seem to have slowed down of late - Brant leaving possibly the cause?

I had a 456 years ago and loved it - Make them a bit longer / lower and very little could touch them at the price.
  • + 2
 I'm a 40 something on a 2016 ragley blupig and enjoy rolling up on 20 somethings with their 5K super bikes politely screeming "on your left!" I wouldn't say I'm fat though. And yes, veeerrry capable in the right hands.
  • + 2
 All these people complaining about price, which at best is £100 here or there. I will continue to support Ragley as my 2016 Blue Pig is frikken amazing.
  • + 1
 Did nobody else see where they said 64deg HTA is steeper than the typical enduro rig? I have yet to see an enduro rig with that slack of a HTA.
  • + 2
 Their claim was that when climbing on an enduro rig (presumably in the 65-67 HTA range), the rear suspension will compress more than the front due to the steep incline and slacken the bike out.
  • + 4
 BRINGBACKTHETROOF!!!
  • + 3
 Bring back the Bagger aswell
  • + 1
 @jase111171: I came here just to post exactly THIS!!! Bring back the bagger!
  • + 3
 Dear Ragley, please make a 26 inch frame like the NS Clash!!
  • + 6
 Cotic just brought out a 26 Bfe with stealth dropper and 142/12! Very nice!
  • + 3
 Just look for a secondhand -2014 blue pig, they are 26" and can be picked up reasonably cheap, I bought one recently, best decision ever, a lot of fun, not that many in Aus though.
  • + 1
 @freeriderayward just what I was thinking, I got a 2014 piglet 2 26" it an awesome ride.
  • + 2
 I like that big wig. I'm saving now! The brand X dropper post has just had a dam good write up in what mtb!
  • + 1
 looks good, really solid and good options. bit pricy but that the new thing.
  • + 1
 Seriously overpriced. Cotic and Stanton for the Blue pig prices. Graphics are crap too
  • + 2
 Is that £100 more than the Blue Pig frame was last year?
  • + 2
 Want that Blue Pig please.
  • + 1
 Ragley nailed it in 2016 and 2017 is looking good too. Some SS dropouts would make them a bit more appealing to me.
  • + 1
 Piglet looks like just the ticket now with its revised geometry. I don't even care about the 135mm axle.
  • + 1
 Haha was meant to say flexy sorry bout that ????
  • + 1
 only on pink bike the words ragley and affordable in the same sentence
  • + 0
 Nice bikes - shame Wiggle will probably can the brand once the takeover takes speed.
  • + 2
 Hardtails ain't dead!
  • + 1
 what up w trading on the marley name?
  • + 1
 Two sugars please
  • + 1
 Mmmm... bluepig
  • + 0
 "hardcore hardtails" lol cracked a frame in less then a full season
  • + 2
 That's why you get a steel one. Pedal and rear hub bearings do wear out quicker though.
  • + 1
 @huntingbears: they had ZERO frames on the market at the time. even if that had covered it under warranty they wouldn't of had a frame to replace it with.
  • + 1
 I like aluminium
  • - 1
 bikes are too expensive but the alu frames are well priced
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