Fox Racing Shox Float CTD Boost Valve Remote Shock Review

Apr 1, 2013 at 12:32
by Richard Cunningham  
Fox Racing Shox has been methodically working to simplify its shock and fork tuning options without taking away their ride performance. The focus of this activity is on its trail and cross-country offerings, the categories where most of its customers fall into, and where the benefits of a simplified setup and use strategy are most welcome. Remote fork and shock damping are not new and Fox was late to the table with its three-position CTD Remote system, but Fox rarely rushes a project, and after riding it, we discovered some noteworthy attributes, specifically for trail an all-mountain riders. Fox sells two Float shocks with the remote setup, one with and one without its position-sensitive Boost Valve. In this feature, we review the top-range Float CTD Boost Valve Remote shock, as well as its handlebar-mounted control.

Fox Float CTD Remote Shock with lever inset

Fox took some heat for its simplified 'Climb-Trail-Descend' system, but as we discovered, with the addition of a handlebar remote, that the three options become user friendly.




The Boost Valve, first used on the RP23, employs an air
-pocket, trapped under the boost piston that allows internal
shock pressure to compress it against the valve stack.
Float CTD Boost-Valve Remote Highlights:

• Intended for XC, Trail and AM use
• CTD (Climb, Trail, Descend) low-speed compression options are preset at the factory
• Cable -operated system driven by twin-lever handlebar remote.
• Cannot be retrofitted to existing Float shock without replacing the damping dial assemblies.
• Fully adjustable low-speed rebound and spring pressure.
• Spring-rate is adjustable via internal air-volume spacers
• Low-friction composite eyelet bushings
• Internal Boost Valve increases compression damping as IFP pressure rises to prevent bottom-out.
• Eye-to-Eye x Travel options(inches): 7.50 x 2.00, 7.875 x 2.00, 7.875 x 2.25, 8.50 x 2.50
• Weight: 0.46 lbs / 208 g (shock only in shortest option)Lever mech: 80g +/- housing and cable
• MSRP: $460 USD



The Details


Fox CTD remote levers have an ultra positive indexing mech,
so there can be no question about a successful mode shift.
About CTD
Climb-Trail-Descend are three preset low-speed compression settings that Fox believes will give trail riders the most effective options - nearly locked out pedaling firmness in the Climb setting, a compromise between pedaling firmness and suspension action in the Trail selection, and a wide-open shock for fast and furious riding in Descend mode. Non-remote controlled Float CTD shocks also feature a black ring beneath the blue CTD control that gives the rider three levels of pedaling platform when the 'Trail' option is selected. Those extra compression damping settings are missing from the remote version of the shock, presumably because there was not enough room to fit the cable housing stops in the limited space in the damping control head.

Remote Lever
Being asked to comment about the Fox remote CTD lever at first glance is like having your girl ask you if she is fat - there is no proper comeback. There probably is a vantage point from which the CTD remote looks perfectly proportioned, but I have yet to find it. There are two large levers on the CTD remote. The longer silver one pulls cable and the shorter black lever releases cable. As ugly as the remote looks, it operates remarkably well, with a
decisive sound and a positive engagement. The escapment mechanism that indexes the lever is a track, cut into a stainless steel plate - a design that has been in use for a thousand years and which should last a lifetime without missing a click. The cable entry point is exposed, so you won't need a plumber to replace a cable. Its hinged clamp has a three-position shoe which allows the user to set the lever plus or minus 20-millimeters fore and aft, and Fox designed a clever threaded cap that allows the lever assembly to be reversed. This means that the Fox remote can be configured under the left grip for single-chainring bikes, as well as left or right in the conventional top-mount position.

Fox Float CTD Remote details

A look at the zig-zag track of the escapment mechanism (left). Three positions are available on a sliding track (center) to adjust the ergonomics of the levers. Fox learned that simply squeezing a derailleur cable with a set screw (like many fork-crown remotes do) leads to failures in the field. The CTD pulley uses a more elegant through-hole strategy.



Float Boost Valve Shock
Few dual-suspension XC or trail riders exist who are unfamiliar with the air-sprung Fox Float series shock. The Boost Valve version features a small piston that fits inside the damping piston of the shocks that exerts pressure on the compression valve's washer-stack as pressure builds inside the shock. The Boost Valve function automatically slows the shock as it reaches full compression, but it does not affect the damping to a great extent while the shock is in the sag position, where its small-bump sensitivity is most important. By altering the pressure behind the shock's internal floating piston (IFP), Fox engineers can tune the progressiveness of the shock. The Boost Valve tune is printed on the lower seal-head of the air can in PSI. Seal friction can be a problem for air sprung shocks, so Fox employs its Kashima coating throughout the body and the air can, which has been simplified with an enlarged head to add substantial air-volume to the air can. Rather than offering a number of air can volumes, Fox now downsizes the air-spring's volume when necessary using plastic spacers. Low-speed damping functions are stacked at the shock head with a conventional red rebound dial on top of the blue, three-way CTD dial. Fox discovered, like most top suspension firms, that the shock's eyelets were a source of friction, especially at high loads when the shock was asked to move quickly, so it developed a slippery new composite bushing system that makes a noticeable improvement over the metal-backed DU bushings it used in the past.
.

Performance

Setup
No worries here - assemble the system, take the slack out of the cable and clickety click, the CTD remote is good to go. Set your shock spring pressure in 'Descend' mode to ensure that compression damping won't create a false reading, and don't be shy about setting the sag as low as 30 percent, because you'll have all the pedaling firmness you'll want at the push of a lever. Float shocks have a negative spring that activates in the first 15-percent of the shock's compression stroke and it resets to your chosen shock pressure. Don't make the mistake that many users do and assume that the half-inch of sag that the negative spring creates signifies a proper setup. It will settle there at 300psi. Always set your sag beyond the negative spring - 20-percent or more - to get it right.

First Impression on Trail
Most of us will use remote ride settings until their novelty wears thin, after which we tend to leave the shock or fork in the selections that give us the best overall ride. Not so with the CTD. The action of the levers seems odd at first and the fact that the suspension never fully locks out in Climb mode blurs the rider's ability to discriminate between settings. Oddly, we discovered that we began to regularly use the CTD Remote system after a more lengthily time interval. The advantages begin with the notion that those big levers make a lot of noise - the good kind of noise - because each selection comes with a reassuring 'clack clack', there is no angst while the rider waits to sense the impending change. When you aren't interested in the levers, they remain in position, well away from your hands, so you don't get the urge to reach for the wrong lever when you are frantically trying to shift your way out of a stupid error. Later, when the CTD Remote is showing signs of age, the longer levers keep the feel of the levers consistent as the cable gets dusty and doesn't slide so well in the housing.

Fox Float CTD Remote shock and lever multi


Suspension Action
We paired the CTD Remote system with a Fox 34 Float CTD 150 fork so we could play with matched suspension settings. As we are well familiarized with the Float shock, there were no surprises to be discovered on the trail, which was a combination of super fast hardpack, littered with embedded stones and a number of boulder drops. Together, there were enough features with which to measure small bump sensitivity in each mode, as well as to gauge the shock's performance during larger events.

There is a moderate, but beneficial improvement in pedaling effectiveness in Trail mode and it comes with a slight increase in ride stiffness. That said; the difference between the ride quality in Trail and Descend is not so great that it would compromise handling should one forget to switch the shock wide open for a downhill segment. (Something we managed to do, often.) In climb mode, however, the rear end rides noticeably higher and the compression begins to approach lockout. Such an evil combination of forces drives the fork low into its travel and makes descending in technical situations a succession of 'Hail Mary' moments. The ride-height lift in the rear that Climb mode is also a gift, because when you are climbing, it prevents the rear suspension from sagging into its travel and thus provides a much more powerful platform for the rider to get the job done. Experimenting with ride height changes revealed also, that Trail mode provides additional support for the shock while climbing. In the end, we switched between Trail and Descend, only using the Climb position for extended suffer-fests on relatively smooth terrain, as Climb mode compromised rear-wheel traction up steep or loose ascents.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesCross-country competitors who prefer rear suspension must have some sort of remote lockout to go wheel to wheel with attacking hardtail riders. Trail riders, however, have distinctly different needs and the Fox system seems to lean more in our direction than for racing purists. For one thing, the CTD remote takes up a lot of real estate on the handlebar - something that trail riders have in abundance, and more importantly, the heavier action of the levers and the milder, more traction friendly Climb and Trail compression settings seem to be tailored for the needs of a trail/AM type rider. Granted, Fox can fine tune the magnitude of each of the three CTD settings for dedicated XC racers, but for our needs - riding rapidly changing terrain with an emphasis on enjoying technical descending - the stock package is surprisingly well adapted. We banged the levers repeatedly and they look no worse for the wear. We are admittedly against complicated gizmos bristling from the bars, but in the end, CTD enhanced our trail experience - and we used the three options a magnitude more often than we would have, had we needed to reach under the top tube to access the standard CTD lever. - RC

Fox Racing Shox


119 Comments

  • + 141
 I already have enough levers on the bars, Shifters, and a seat post. This is just too much to get in the way
  • + 63
 totally agree,for me this is so unnecessary, just give me the shock that works properly and dont give a fuck for this shit
  • + 36
 With all that levers you`r bike will start to look like a russian military vehicle from the 50`s
  • - 1
 Maybe U can pair it with a grip shifter like Jerome Clementz did with the DYAD...?
www.bikerumor.com/2013/03/11/cannondale-factory-enduro-team-interview-plus-race-bike-weights-photos
  • + 18
 ...and when are Fox going to realise that, if it's absolutely necessary to have 400 levers and cables and whatever on your bars, that it might be wise to make the levers smaller than a gear shifter? Haven't they seen this?: rcdn.mtbr.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/P9200079.jpg (thomsons dropper post lever - SEXAH)
  • + 4
 Also, wider bars please... not because it adds stability or handling or whatever, just more space for levers and remotes and lights and computers and whatever else they decide we need. And seriously I'm a 29er rider so I'm well verse in the "if you don't want it. don't buy it" arguements, but SERIOUSLY?
  • + 3
 I actually like the CB Joplin remote the best out of all the extra remote levers I've seen and used. I also like gear shifting and on-the-fly adjustability on seat posts and shocks, as I like to think of all these controls as strategy. That's just the way I think though. There are people that prefer simplicity and fewer choices I'm not gonna criticize them. Maybe someday, all that clutter is gonna be replaced by some electronic touch screen and there will be people resisting that change too... hell, there's even on-the-fly tire pressure adjustment out there.
  • + 2
 How does it look on the left without a shifter if there is no front derailleur? Can it go under the bars? I like the idea but would like a firmer lock out than my RP23 in climb mode. How quck can it go from Climb to descend? I like being able to full open when something unexpected comes up.
  • + 10
 @Fox "Nice 3 position remote. Welcome to 2006" - Scott (EQ shock on the Ransom)
  • + 3
 A solution looking for a problem. Changing damping on something that doesn`t do a good job anyways. Have a Fox Float and its abyssimal.
  • + 13
 I'm not a "more levers" kind of guy, but if you have to have one for the fork, one for the rear shock, and one for the seatpost, how about one electronic switch you can program to do all three?

Like, push a button and set the seatpost all the way up, fork and shock on "climb".
Push a different position for flowy pedally trails.
Different button for a low seatpost and "descend" damping settings.

Little servos aren't that expensive. Fox already makes all three (fork, shock, post). Integrating them shouldn't be too far off.
  • + 9
 This is just too much clutter, and one more thing you need adjust while riding.

This may be a dumb idea, but why doesn't fox make an air (trail) rear shock with high and low speed compression settings? This way you could set the shock up to how you want it and leave it. I understand this makes tuning more complicated, but someone who wants this level of sophistication from their rear shock will spend the time to get it dialed in.
  • + 3
 Oh no! My bike has 7 controls! How can I possibly keep track?

Seriously, it isn't really that bad guys. If it does something useful, then having an extra lever is worth it. I mean, you car has at least 20 controls and your brain can handle it.

On the other hand, I appreciate simplicity too. Clean bars are cool.
  • + 1
 HalfOrange- brilliant, haha. I got to rip around on the Ransom and do a few races with it and this system is really tight. It's almost as useful as a dropper post for super d enduro races because you can rip on roughness, then when you hit smoother ground, you can flip the switch and hammer down. It's great but having both a dropper post and this would be overkill.
  • + 0
 @coach, two wayyy different things.. cant really compare the two.

we have control over what we put on our bicycles. we have no control over what car companies put in their cars (to an extent, they dont either!- govt standards, etc)
  • + 4
 I thought of something like this yonks ago... Why not link it to your adjustable seatpost control and have it lock the shock out when the post rises, for climbing and soften the shock on drop, for descents. Same bar controls then used for both. Simples....
  • + 4
 2 words: Scott genius. That is all
  • + 3
 People attach a variety of things to their handlebars without complaint, from lights, phones/computers/gps, bells, mini cams, but one alien-looking lever pod thingee and...
  • + 1
 Fox should have perfected their "intertia" technology. I'm loving the brain on my StumpJumper Elite. Last thing I want is another lever.
  • + 1
 just run 1x11 XX1 with grip shift and put that lever on your left hand, not that difficult
  • + 1
 why cant they integrate the seatpost into this? seatpost
and then make it a gripshift kind of adjuster?
like twist to change the shocks and seatpost
although that might be too easy to accidentally twist
unless they made the twist on it very long enough to make it difficult to do accidentally
or just a safety so it wouldn't happen accidentally.
  • + 1
 jonsy- these are only applicable in races where there are varied sections of terrain meaning that they won't be used many times during a run. A grip shifter for a seat post or suspension would be great for multiple and quick changes but disasterous if it was accidentally triggered (as you pointed out) in a steep, rough section for example. Your ass would get bucked and your suspension would instantly disappear , no bueno. Just keeping it simple at a trigger would solve that issue and really a grip shift would be unnecessary anyway... maybe not for the top guys but who the hell knows.
  • + 1
 Wow that cockpit starting to look like a bj- 69 tomahawk supersonic jet special ed ops. You guys certainly like your toys all mounted on handlebars like a bunch of ornaments. Oops I hit the seat lever and shock lever instead of shifting and now I cartwheeling down the mountain waaahooo. Definately look special with the goon wheels, pink shorts matching helmet, fifteen cables running all over bike, and flight simulator cockpit. Ready for takeoff maverick? Roger roger lets pedal down the xc trail weeeeeeeeeee! Haaahaa ya you looking sweet dont let anyone tell you different.
  • + 21
 Im sure Rockshox made the commercial seen on the Pinkbike start page on the top right just because of this shock! "Dude, i got this unnecessary technical named shock that will make me ride like a pro..." hahaha badass Rockshox, BADASS!
  • + 10
 it's funny because they're the ones talking about the 3% of riders only being able to use their shock
  • + 5
 for me, that "3%" thing was never funny and got old very fast ... it is clear that is was just some strange marketing joke to catch attention from the audience... if someone still thinks that RS will release their new vivid just to the top 3% than i suggest you better start training ... and let the YOLO and SWAG be with you
  • + 2
 I think that ad was aim directly at CaneCreek DB shocks more than Fox. RS is just mad that PoS Vivid can't touch the DB in tuning and reliability.
  • + 4
 And care to explain how the CCDB has an "unnecessary technical named shock". It's a freakin' DoubleBarrel, nothing technical about that name at all. Fox on the other hand...

If you didn't catch on that RS are aiming directly at Fox and Fox only then you have unfortunately missed the whole point of that advert lol. It's the perpetual war between the "great" two, considering all else are at the bottom of the pack (as in number of units sold and not performance here folks) when it comes to all things suspension lol.
  • + 1
 Not to mention the pure gold Kashima coating in that commercial
  • + 1
 So i'm not sure if anybody still bitching about the 3% has liked RS's page on facebook because every post they've made about the new vivid has mentioned that it is now available to all...

"Happy Good Friday! As you plan your weekend of shredding, check out the latest tech-talk on the new AVAILABLE TO ALL Vivid & Vivid-Air. Have a killer weekend!"

"Here is a little video to brighten your Monday. Lets hear more about friction reduction in the new AVAILABLE TO ALL RockShox Vivid and Vivid-Air. Hope you all had a killer weekend and got out on a ride!"

"Todays tech talk is about Rapid Recovery. The new Vivid and Vivid-Air is AVAILABLE TO EVERYONE and here is one of the many reasons you want one on your bike. Check out the video of last years World Cup Finals winner Steve Smith shredding it to pieces."

From the past 5ish posts from RS....
  • + 23
 Its been confirmed, the Fox remote lever can be seen from space. No thanks.
  • + 23
 Way too much info just to promote a remote lever
  • + 12
 I can see how this would be useful for XC riders/racers, but it's not for me!
  • + 10
 I just did this:
www.pinkbike.com/u/erlkonig/blog/Autoplatform.html
Works perfect. I can't ever remember to hit the little lever, and that giant remote looks cool but it's so huge.
  • + 6
 Why do we need so much stuff on a shock, why cant we just have a stable pedal platform shock that fully opens a valve when we hit hard terrain then closed again when we let off. All the rider would have to do is set it for his weight along with sag and leave it. Oh this this already available but it not fox so pink bike cant see it!
  • + 0
 you don't even need specialized brain (if that's what you're referring to) it's just as easy to flick a lever on the shock each time or just ride it a medium setting and forget about it
  • + 1
 It wasn't brain in mind but its an example, my point is I dont want to fiddle on the trail, its to complicated and in practise not that effective, any rider with this system is going to end up in the wrong setting at the wrong time and Fox dont seem to have any answer for this. My second point is i'm sick of the mountain bike press praising everything fox sell. There are other options and some have been around for a long time. There are a few people here claiming their bikes linkage does away with the need for a fancy shock, if thats the case there is a gap in the market for a simple air shock with a rebound dial a compression dial and a slick shaft coating but its not available. Only reason I can see is it would be cheap!
  • + 1
 There are more than one but not made by fox and when will we see a fair review of one from Pinkbike, When will the mtb press suggest this is the shock we need? When will the mountain bike press put the short fall of the ctd system in print?
  • + 2
 Awful idea and even worse to look at.
  • + 2
 Monarch baby... Yeah Pinkbike and Fox really seem to share a bed...
  • + 1
 i agree. the solution is a rs monarch..and/or plus rc. no remote. just goodness.
  • + 1
 Yeah seriously, that handlebar looks more like the instrument panel on a jumbo jet!
  • + 1
 The RP23 is basically what you are describing, except it's a light weight trail shock. Can be modified for larger more downhill oriented runs though. Simple lever on the shock body. Works well.
  • + 2
 No way is a Fox23 the answer apart from having something to fiddle with as the trail changes that in most cases requires your hands going out of site and into the moving parts of the bike, it is flawed by the lever partially closing an orifice and restricting oil flow. This works great as a pedal platform but wont change its characteristics when things get fast and ruff so the rider has to slow or stop to adjust the bike. The point is FOX rp2 rp23 and ctd all have the same problem but the bike press keep telling us this is what we need, when in fact a shock that suits your bike and weight and riding is what we need. If you don't think i'm right go ride something else form your own opinion, I can see uses for the Fox system I have one! but don't believe this backhander press system Fox isn't the answer every time.
  • + 10
 that lever doesn't look chunky, out of place or fragile
  • + 6
 I don't understand, bikes the come fitted with Fox CTDA suspension pedal well enough anyway. Why do you even need to adjust the bike constantly off the handlebar of the bike. I'm sure you could pedal the bike pretty much in the descend mode most of the time and i don't know...maybe take your hand off the bar and flick a little blue switch....sounds pretty extreme i know!
  • + 8
 Yet more handlebar clutter? No thanks...
What an unsightly setup for what it does
  • + 4
 I honestly don't see why everyone is getting so upset. The whole "mountain biking is suppose to be simple," is total bs, it's not simple. I personally won't be getting it. Mainly due to it being expensive. If you don't like it don't buy it, but don't hate on a company trying new things.
  • + 3
 I thought this leaver was stupid and bulky until I rode with one on a rocky mt altitude. It worked great. I'm not a fan of cluttering up my handlebars but this would be a great addition to my bike. Don't knock it until you try it.
  • + 2
 what I dont understand is that shocks like this made sence on bikes like the Scott Ransom/ Genius, where frame design wasnt as good/efficient... but frames are sooo good now (things like Lapierre Zesty/Spicy), you just dont need a hyper on the fly adjustable shock.
  • + 2
 Honestly, I think all this remote nonsense is a great thing. Who the hell would rather bend down to flip a switch when its right on the bar?! I think it will make for better flow, and thus a much more fun ride. Plus, people will actually take advantage of all those switches on the shocks. I for one practically never flip the pro pedal lever on my rp23, but if I had a bar switch, I definitely would!
  • + 2
 I have a ctd remote on my canyon strive race bike and I placed it underneath the bar on the left side instead of a front shifter. The reverb lever even fits on the same side with matchmaker X, so if arranged properly it is not that bad. Besides that, a remote lever for front and rear suspension is worth gold in an enduro race, you can use the ctd on timed stages which you would never do if you had to reach down for the lever... I love it and would not like to race without ut again
  • + 2
 At all those afraid of "handlebar clutter" I have a genius lt, meaning I've been using a setup like this fox one for a little more than a yea now.

Yes at first it's a bit overwhelming and the single speed guys will ask what school you had to attend to work all the levers, but honestly after a week you get used to it and it amazing. Instead of having to set your suspension stiff as hell so that you can climb, you can set it loose in full open mode and then just click it up into trail mode. A little bit of intense uphill in the middle of a big down? No problem just lock it out for a sec and stand and crank up.

You all sound like old people afraid of smart phones because they are more complicated... Never realizing how much better they make your life.
  • + 2
 I'm guessing most of you don't race the bikes that fall into the mid travel range. like 140- 170mm. If the shock is set up right these things are great. granted I have ridden the CTD on a couple different frames and I wasn't really impressed but if your into going fast and staying fast it really is life changing to be able to have the range of adjustments really fast. If your just chillin on your local trails having fun then I can see this being highly unnecessary and useless. But for me, I would love to have a system similar to this on my Enduro racer. I dont like having to reach under my seat to flip the propedal switch on my DRCV shock. If I could just stand up and pedal after the decent and have more pedal power I'm all for it. There's a reason all the top enduro guys use this type of thing.
  • + 2
 All up for CTD, but i've said it before in another post if your going to have a remote they should combine the ICD computer rubbish with this.

One control, your dropper post. Seat post fully up = Climb, somewhere in the middle = Trail, down =Descend.
Hide the computer and battery at the bottom of the dropper post so its not as ugly as sin. Internal routing so everything is tidy.

If you ran a single chain ring set up this would be such a clean set up with your one shifter and one Dropper/ctd button.

Plus Reverb posts from what I can see whip them in the market place so this might boost there sales in that department as well.
  • + 2
 I rode this on the Rocky Mountain demo that came around, on their Altitude 770 MSL. I actually thought it was very useful. Just like how droppers with remotes turned out to be game changing for me, and how I adapted and changed my saddle height a lot, finding it super useful, I actually found myself switching CTD around and finding how useful its functions were. Now that I know, I wouldn't even dare think about going without a remote for my dropper, for the sake of avoiding cables and clutter. I don't know if it was a mental thing for me, but for some reason, when I flicked the switch, my riding style also changed. I put it into climb, then sprinted up to about 22 MPH, then started spinning a high gear in the saddle to maintain it, doing this as I crested hills, out of corners, or whenever I saw a stretch that I wanted to blast at high speed. Whenever I needed traction and control, I opened it up... before I wouldn't even bother and just leave it on a setting, set according to what trail I was riding, and leave it there, only considering changing it if I stop, maybe to rest or to wait up for someone. Kind of helps make short travel trail bikes feel like that mythical bike that climbs like a HT and descends like a DH bike. The remote's no bigger than a regular shifter. It actually works like one. Press the big grey lever and it clicks into place. There's 3 positions. On the model I used it on, there's a little cutout on top that says C T and D too, but I don't think you would be able to see that from the saddle. The one lever controlled both the fork and the shock. Pressing the shorter black lever moves the grey lever back. I just went 1x and think there's actually a nice home for it now that I don't have a front shifter, if it works there. Function over form here.
  • + 2
 I'm a big guy and I have the CTD system shock and fork with the remote, I love it, around where I ride it is very very AM'y, nasty climbs, then flow then off a cliff, rinse and repeat. After retrofitting my bike with the CTD system and remote I found a huge difference in my climbing ability, I could lock out the front and back get a really rigid feel and as soon as I crest click and all mussy again for the ride down. I have a dropper post with a remote as well and yes there are a lot of cables but setup right it is a great system. I agree simple is sometimes better but sometimes when some good tech is setup right it does make a ride just a little better Cheers
  • + 1
 I wish they would have made it an option for the rear shock to add this it your CTD Fox shock didn't come with the remote option. They have the ability to add it to the forks but not the shocks. If they did I would love to have this as the area I ride has a lot of long climbs and downhills and to switch quickly would be great.
  • + 1
 I had a CTD shock ... Had. Never used the D setting (waaaaaay too soft and cheesy), and pretty much left it all the time on T setting ... The only time I tried the D setting, I bottomed out on the first "landing", and the few times I tried the C setting, well it wasn't that different to the T setting ...

I'm definitely not for the CTD-like platform shocks ... XC riders on 100mm bikes may want that (afterall, on such travel, adjustments don't matter as much as on 140+ frames), but pleaaaaase don't put it on 140+ bikes! Worst shock I ever had on my Orange Five ... It definitely didn't like the slightly degressive ratio and the single pivot of the frame, and I definitely didn't like the dodgy rebound assembly. Switched to a BOS, and now I have a proper air shock.
  • + 1
 Absolutely right. Fox Float - its not about getting the adjustment right - because an airshock cannot.
  • + 1
 It appears that the whole Float lineup this year "features" CTD. I really wish that there was the option to buy a plain-ol' RP23. No extra doo-dads. I can buy an open-bath (non FIT, non-CTD) fork. Why can't I get a regular RP23?
  • + 1
 I use the CTD rear shock simply no need for a lever switch atall .just reach down a flick the switch how hard is that mmmm. Plus I ride in trail mode all the time decent is just to soft .climb needs to be stiffer if you ask me
  • + 2
 Ever tried putting air in your shock?
  • + 1
 I'm still working out what the fuss is... I have an 05 yeti 575 and an older RP23 (not stock but far from new) and i just leave it in the stiffest pro pedal unless i'm bombing down or need gobs of traction, and honestly i don't really notice the bob if i leave it open thanks to my frame... So how does the CTD make things any better? I like the RP23 better since i can set the propedal for the trail and then open her up for the drops easy enough... idk and the remote seems like a hassle for what it does vs a little lever on the shock...
  • + 1
 I am old enough to remember this the first time around, I and it on my Marin back in the day. We ditched it when suspension and shocks moved on when good damping came out. No need to go back in time and dig out relics of the past.
  • + 1
 How many remotes does it take to....lol

Front lock out remote, rear lock out remote, dropper post remote, nitrous remote, beam me up Scotty remote....where does it end bike nerds? If you need a remote for everything, you should not be on a carbon bike!!
  • + 1
 Therell have to be a meter long bar soon for all these fu@king remotes. And the Fox remote is absolutely effing ridiculous, can you imagine having 3 of those on your bars, eeeewwww. Or is it one remote to rule all, like a universal T.V. remote.
  • + 1
 Maybe this has already been said... But, why not connect the shock settings to the selected gears? Granny gear plus a few gears = climbing mode. Middle gears = trail. Upper gears = descend mode. No need for more levers if the existing ones could also control the shock settings.
  • + 1
 Maybe for racers this is good? For the rest of us, if you really can't let go of the bar and reach a hand down and flip a switch or even just adjust your riding style then maybe you should think about doing something else with your time. I can't believe there is a market for this stuff. . .
  • + 1
 Hi, i saw in Pinkbike, the guy was usinf a left shimano shifter with the Fox Shox Float CTD BV Remote Rear Shock.
Can somebody confirm, please? No need of the specific bar mounted remote lever.
Does anybody have fit a system like that ?? thanks
  • + 2
 Handle bars feature..... Front lever Rear lever Dropper post controls Fork lockout controls Shock lockout controls Front shifter Rear shifter XC bikes will need 800mm bars just to fit all this guff on
  • + 1
 No thanks, I prefer my ctd with trail adjust. I only use the descend setting in wet conditions as I think it lacks support. Trail soft for general riding and trail hard for super d racing. I use the climb setting every time when climbing.
  • + 1
 The CTD was supposed to be a simpler platform for suspension tards, then you add the TA and what are you left with, an RP23 for dummies. Ive got CTD on both ends and dont think much of it at all, the descend is a complete joke. Pedalling hard on that platform and its like being on a trambopaline. I had to take the fork immediately to Mojo Suspension after 2 rides because the brake dive was so horrendous I nearly went over the bars about a bagillion times. And yes I had the forks set up correctly, they added some oil to the talas leg and it seems to have been eradicated for now. But you should not have to do this with a brand new and quite expensive fork. They should come rider weight tuned. I loved my Rockshox Revelation RCT3 I had briefly and I hate the fact I cut the steerer too short and had to get rid. What a complete cock.
  • + 1
 ignoring all of this. The Rocky Mountain variable geometry is awesome, on the top right of the first pic. I want it on my bike but when i tried to make it myself my bike became a hard tail Frown
  • + 4
 I like the "set it and forget it" method.
  • + 1
 the whole world has gone mad with adjustements, what happened to a Van RC, great shock, the rest is down to the rider. too much bollox/Hype.
Keep It Simple!!! and Ride the damn thing.
  • + 1
 This should package this with a deal on Lycra and spandex The XC racing crowd will be into it. The rest of us will spend a couple of hours finding a setting we like and leave it there
  • + 1
 On my XC bike I have one gear lever on my bars, and one light bracket. And that will do. To be honest even if I could afford that Fox lever I would forget to flip it between modes while riding.
  • + 4
 Dw link... why do we need all this lock out stuff...
  • + 0
 Better to get a good frame and keep the shock simple.

My RP23 has 3 settings on the blue dial.....I've still not bothered finding out what they do. My Trance's Maestro linkage is so effective that it eliminates any pedal-bob when I'm cranking up hills.

Climb mode ? Well, it's a good idea if it lowers front travel. My DT Swiss forks have a red button that I slam down before a steep climb, and it lowers the front end by 40mm and locks it. Works great, doesn't really need a remote lever.
  • + 4
 Or you could just ride.
  • + 1
 Just replace lever with a more standard front grip shift shifter....it will still work along side a front rapid fire shifter too.
  • + 1
 I'd rather have a light bike then a bike with so many levers and adjustments it's almost a transformer. Easier to maintain toSmile
  • + 1
 From what i have seen full on XC rider's don't care too much about how much stuff is on their bars . I'm still wondering what's wrong with pro pedal .
  • + 1
 God I hate these low volume air shocks, i don't know why they put them on every single bike. Either too stiff or they blow through their travel
  • + 3
 Luv ctd not sold on the remote lever......
  • + 1
 It would be great if it was the same configuration as the rear meck shifter but on the left . Most people will be 1 x soon I am and a on the fly like this would be great .
  • + 2
 Complication leads to unreliability. Leave already well conceived stuff alone !
  • + 1
 Judging from some of the reactions its as if fox is forcing everyone to use remotes. I agree it's pointless but choice is good
  • + 1
 both geoff kabush and Cathrine pendrel are running it on their race xc bikes. but they have electric versions so its probably less bulky on the handle bar
  • + 1
 Unnecessary! If you are that worried about a little shock flex.... You should riding a hardtail.
  • + 1
 Wow the pic witht the brake lever in it makes me want to wonder how easy it would be to grab a handfull if required
  • + 1
 I have the non -remote shock and love it It's pretty easy to figure out and is Definitly a step Above the RP23 that I had
  • + 1
 Those levers are GIGANTIC!!! Why would I want to put Ron Jeremy on my handle bars??
  • + 1
 More paddles, shifters, levers, flickers, pads, switches, flips, pulls, buttons, cables.
  • + 1
 And yes, there are more it sells more! Smile
  • + 2
 There's some bar under the shifters ^
  • + 2
 Love you fox, its because of your tail It looks so fluffy.
  • + 2
 Fox (and others) = Apple, make essential unnecessary!
  • + 1
 DOn't fuck with the FOX!
  • + 1
 For a pro rider, this is a good product! But for somebody who just wants to shred and wants to have fun it's to much...
  • + 1
 When it comes to new bike technology, we go along kicking and screaming on our own volition.
  • + 2
 Missing a small pair of scissors, nail file, and a toothpick....
  • - 1
 Fox is way ahead of everybody in technology of the suspension world. I wonder what RockShocks or another brand is going to make to counter this.
  • + 1
 Low speed compression preset at the factory? GAY!
  • + 1
 I would never have another lever like fookin dangerous IMO
  • + 1
 What frame is the shock on?
  • + 1
 Up to seven cable's on a MTB, Get a Motorbike way less complicated.
  • + 19
 FOX- WHERE THE F**K WILL I PUT MY BELL, HUH?!
  • + 1
 why have they attached a lawn mower to the bars?
  • + 2
 looks very good
  • + 1
 It´s a Rocky Mountain frame???????
  • + 1
 That switch would take half on my handlebar! Why so UGLY?!
  • + 0
 Holy lever Batman!~That is one big lever, fugly
  • - 1
 C T D ............
  • + 3
 incorporate an inclinometer--gyro thing, inside the shock, to choose with no user intervention the shock mode , going up --> climb, level --> trail, down -->descent....
  • + 3
 I'd be inclined to agree with gaoxiang89

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