First Look: Trek Debuts 3 New Bikes for 2016

Jun 30, 2015 at 1:34
by Mike Kazimer  
Trek has three new bikes on the way, two of them aimed squarely at the cross-country race crowd, and one that's for the trail riders out there. From a distance, all three resemble models that are already in Trek's lineup, but each one has received a number of refinements that keep them on the cutting edge of modern mountain bike technology.


Trek Procaliber

Procaliber SL

Trek's new Procaliber SL carbon hardtail takes technology originally developed for the company's Domane road bike and adopts it for use in the mountain bike world. It's called IsoSpeed, and it involves detaching the top tube from the seat tube and then joining the two together with a pivot that allows for up to 11mm of 'compliance'. Trek is careful not to use the word 'travel' in their description of the technology – after all, this is still very much a hardtail, and the rear end doesn't move in the way a traditional full suspension bike would.

The technical difficulty of World Cup XC courses has increased over the last few seasons, causing riders and manufactures to seek out new designs that improve handling with a minimal weight penalty. Weighing in at a claimed 1012 grams, the 17.5” Procaliber SL frame is around 100 grams heavier than the Superfly SL, but according to Trek their racers were willing to take the minor weight increase for the performance benefits.

Designed to be run with a 100mm fork, the Procaliber SL has 29” wheels in the 21.5", 19.5", 18.5" and 17.5”, frame sizes, and drops down to 27.5” wheels for the 15.5” frame size, which Trek says is to maintain a similar riding position throughout all frame sizes. All of the bikes use a Boost 148 rear end and Boost 110 front, standards that will become increasingly common over the next few seasons.

Trek 2016
The IsoSpeed decoupler separates the seat tube from the top tube, allowing for up to 11mm of compliance.


Geometry

Trek 2016 Geo




Trek Top Fuel 2016

Top Fuel

The Top Fuel is the successor to the Superfly SL, and will be taking its place in the hierarchy as Trek's elite 100mm full-suspension XC race bike. The suspension layout has been changed to use the Full Floater design, the same basic configuration that's used on Trek's longer travel models. Adjustable geometry is also in place via the Mino Link chip on the seatstays, which allows the head angle to be changed by .5° and the bottom bracket height to be changed by 8mm. That might not seem like a lot, but when races are won or lost by milliseconds, the ability to make sure a bike is as well suited to a course as possible can be immensely beneficial.

The 17.5” frame reportedly weighs only 1900 grams, and is said to be stiffer than the Superfly SL it replaces. The highest end model, the Top Fuel 9.9, is constructed with a full carbon frame, chainstays included, while the next model down uses aluminum chainstays Boost 148 and 110 spacing are in place, as is Trek's new Control Freak internal cable routing design that has housing entering on either side of the down tube before exiting just below the bike's water bottle mounts.


Trek 2016
Trek's Full Floater suspension design, complete with adjustable geometry, makes its way onto the Top Fuel.


Geometry
Trek 2016 Geo

Trek Fuel EX 29

Fuel EX

The Procaliber and the Top Fuel may be cross-country specialists, but the Fuel EX is more of an all-rounder. Sure, it could probably toe the line at an XC race and do just fine, but it's designed more for trail riding, with 120mm of travel and less pointy geometry than its shorter travel siblings. For 2016 the Fuel EX's chainstays shrink to 436mm down from 452mm, thanks in part to the use of Boost 148 spacing. This made it possible to tighten up the rear end while still leaving enough room to run a 36 tooth front chain ring, along with clearance for a 29 x 2.4” tire.

The bike's overall frame stiffness is claimed to have increased as well, and according to Trek a 30 gram weight penalty resulted in 11% more stiffness in the bottom bracket area and a 14% increase in overall frame stiffness. To go along with the carbon fiber Fuel EX 9.9 and 9.8 models, Trek will also be producing an aluminum Fuel EX 9 model that gets a 130mm Fox 34 up front to relax the head angle even further, as well as a SRAM X1 1x11 drivetrain.

Geometry

Trek 2016 Geo



Check out more images here.

www.trek.com, @trek



192 Comments

  • 220 20
 Looks like a Session. *I'll walk myself out, don't reply*
  • 73 4
 Don't tell me what to do!
  • 15 33
flag JacobSpera (Jun 30, 2015 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 I was thinking the same thing to hahaha
  • 15 7
 Beat me by 17 minutes dammit
  • 18 7
 Could anybody tell me where does the meme "looks like a session"come from.....
  • 10 4
 secret sessions on a kona v10 session
  • 76 2
 You would be surprised at how much a difference 11mm can make. -thats what she said
  • 10 2
 for once this actually applies. these do have the exact same design as a session.
  • 8 19
flag ti6996 (Jun 30, 2015 at 9:21) (Below Threshold)
 what about every new dh bike today??????
  • 14 2
 I wonder what impact the 11mm "compliance" can have over time. Would hate to see cracks
  • 9 7
 @Speeder123 Since trek put the 4bar system on their entire full suspension line, most other companies have been switching over to the same concept of the 4bar system.Although the designs may look similar to a "session's", even the slightest changes in geometry will give the bike an entire different feel. So even though most full suspension bikes look the same today, they feel and ride completely different. The joke is that they pretty much look the same because they use the same concept.
  • 10 2
 ^ true story. i think the meme started on pb and was a genuine opinion at first by users that a lot bikes did actually look like the session. people started arguing that not every single bike could look like the session, which always devolves into a discussion about how bikes look like bikes and there cant be that much aesthetic difference overall (until the Polygon uggo was released). that morphed into the joke/meme of saying any bike on the front page "looks like a session".
  • 6 6
 Hey @Rokan14 come back here. Good, now get out. Smiley face.
  • 9 4
 U wot m8? Bye bella.
  • 10 3
 @scapegoat2010 Sorry but the treks are not four-bars!
Even though treks look like on first glance they are single pivots as there is one solid piece of rear frame connecting the main pivot and rear axle with no other pivots altering the wheel path in between. The whole seat stay and rocker arm on top is only to actuate the shock and have no influence what soever on the path of the rear wheel like they have in a four-bar design (you can take them off the bike and the wheel path is the same) with the extra pivot like a specialized demo a norco aurum or the new transition patrol.

other than that you are right, the slightest change can change everything...
  • 1 0
 Ridemonkey
  • 2 1
 Apart from the abp pivot.....
  • 8 1
 Yes, the ABP makes it act like a 4 bar (FSR) under braking, and a single pivot for pedalling/weight transfer/bump absorption.
  • 1 8
flag snl1200 (Jun 30, 2015 at 12:14) (Below Threshold)
 @michibretz Very similar to the DW Link (hence the legal battle between Trek over ABP vs. Mr. DW).
  • 6 2
 Trek's ABP bikes are single-pivot linkages with intergrating floating brake links, nothing more. They're not true 4-bars in the sense of long or short link virtual pivots (VPP, DW, Horst FSR, Rocky Smoothlink, Ellsworth ICT, etc).
  • 5 0
 Sorry...DW's Split Pivot...not the DW Link...
  • 5 0
 @snl1200 Not at all similar to the DW Link, the legal battle was over DW's Split Pivot system, and the ABP was determined to have been independently designed during the same time frame, so no patent infringement.
  • 2 0
 @TucsonDon Yep. I knew it was a Weagle design and just got them mixed for a moment. I must have caught the mistake as you were typing. As I recall, in addition to the timing, Trek also emphasized the floating shock mount as a way to show the designs were different.
  • 1 0
 They may have emphasized that but its not like floating shocks were an original idea either. Don Richardson invented them for motocross rear suspension decades before Trek used them.
  • 4 2
 Looks like a trek session, it started when Norco launched the Aurum
  • 4 0
 Floating Shock: GT LTS mid 90ies comes to mind first which actually was a four-bar design.
sure there where more, it's pretty much impossible to come up with original ideas for simple mechanical systems these days...
  • 3 0
 AMP Research? remember those?
  • 5 4
 Amp never floated the shock between upper and lower links though they DID come up with the horst-link dropout pivot, and they did design the FSR and have one of the first functional disc brake setups (albeit an XC oriented disc brake) as well. Amp was more known for having the first truly successful XC full suspension bikes and a design that was copied/licenced by a dozen others in the form of the mac-strut B-2 thru B-4.

They were (for the folks not around back then) called Mac-struts because the shock was incorporated as part of the seat strut assembly and formed part of the structural member before anchoring to the main frame (much like Macpherson Strut shocks do on cars). This basically made the bikes VERY high single-pivots, because the wheel was attached to the seat strut, and pivoted off whatever anchor point on the main frame that the shock was mounted to, but because of the horst-link dropout connecting the chainstay to the frame behind the BB, the bike didn't pedal like your typical single-pivot would have with such a high pivot location. Also because the shock stroke was in-line with the strut, the wheel took a sort of diminishing radius arc path as the shock compressed. By the time most designers started looking into the interacting kinetics of suspensions and drivetrains, the industry had largely moved on from macstruts.

As to the GT LTS/STS, yes they were floating shock 4-bars with horst-dropouts. They were discontinued because GT had refused to pay Amp to license the horst-link patent and then when Specialized bought the patent, they actually had the money for lawyers to force GT to abandon the usage of the pivot.
  • 3 5
 11mm seriously?
  • 2 0
 @deeeight uhhh.... macs with their ever leaking shocks. I must have suppressed that memory.
That design was like having an auto-bleed feature for the shock, 3 bumps in a turn and all the oil was gone.
You never had to bleed anything when rebuilding one of these shocks, just fill up with fresh oil... Good reason for elastomers... talking about elastomer's, Marin FS with a pair of manitou forks in the back anybody?

Anyway, my points where:
1)Trek no four-bar
2)Trek not the first floating shocks on bicycles.

Another thought... A few years back stumble across a Binachi WW1 military bicycle built for the Mountaineering Corps of the Italian Army. It was full suspension with a Harley-Springer style fork and a split pivot to a leave spring in the back.
It came in a folding and non folding version and the split pivot allowd to fold away the rear triangle after taking out the rear wheel. I did not know back then but the best was It did not use the usual 700C rims like the Germans did but a smaller diameter.... something more like 650B but thats just guessing... Oh, it also was a one by setup Wink one by one... History repeating...

sadly the owner did not want to sell even thou i offered something like 50 million Italian lire...
  • 3 0
 @speeder123
the whole thing blew up when Dartmore bikes did a 'name that frame' competition. with over 4000 entries, - it looked like a session and there was a huge number of entries saying 'Dartmore Session'

I have no idea what the bike is called, some meh name won out.... but look for the one that looks like a session if your interested ;D
  • 1 1
 @speeder123, I recall first seeing 'looks like a trek' on dirtmag maybe 5-6 years ago, can't remember which bike it was tho' that first looked like a trek...
  • 2 0
 the current looks like a session meme was started by someone called coleman on downhill memes and yes there is t shirts promotionracing.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&path=18_61&product_id=94
  • 1 0
 I'll take two please
  • 55 1
 Wow, Raceface got on Trek OEM.
  • 15 4
 I won't really complain about that.
  • 17 0
 On the high end!
But they've been on Trek's Staches for a couple years...seeing how Trek's relationship evolves with Shimano, Fox/RF and with SRAM/Rockshox is going to get more interesting Razz
  • 14 10
 Gotta remember that Compass Group owns Fox/Easton/RaceFace, so they have more power to push their products to manufacturers. Plus, would you rather have the ugly XTR cranks or this beauty?
  • 3 0
 No, just happily surprised, considering my previous employment with Raceface. Keep it up fellas!
  • 5 54
flag cunning-linguist (Jun 30, 2015 at 8:49) (Below Threshold)
 Race face is shyte... Broken every single component I've ever owned of theirs. Sixc stuff, the lot - complete bollocks...
  • 5 2
 That means either trek dumped their silly BB, or RF started making BBs for it. Race Face spec is smart; it works better retaining chains and it is less than 1/2 the cost of XTR.
  • 1 0
 The 2014 Slash 8 had a RF crank on it, well before this giant push of RF cranks. As the onwer of a Slash 7 I searched HIGH and LOW to find a way to put a RF crank on my Slash and came up with nothing and couldn't find much on how they put a OE RF crank on a 14 SLash.

My guess, RF is making custom OE stuff in the BB95 for Trek?!?!?!?!

Thoughts? Questions? IDeas?
  • 8 2
 Not very impressed with the durability of the RF narrow wide 1x rings. Absolute Black rings last a lot longer for me. RF's cranks are the bee's knees, though.
  • 23 5
 The less Bontrager parts the better
  • 3 8
flag davidfregoli (Jun 30, 2015 at 15:14) (Below Threshold)
 I love RF but if there's one thing they can't get right it is BBs.
  • 8 1
 You obviously haven't tried one of their BB's in the last 5 years.
  • 3 1
 Trek got away from that BB90 to a BB95 to fit RF Cinche stuff....
  • 2 5
 Or maybe I tried a Team DH that lasted 9 months and a Turbine Cinch that lasted 2?
  • 6 0
 Race Face is owned by Fox now. You'll start seeing it on a lot of OEM packages because it can be offered cheap with the purchase of the fork/shocks.
  • 2 0
 They do a BB92 THAT works, have in on my 2015 remedy with cinch cranks
  • 3 0
 I'm curious to know which way it is! Is love to fit some Next's on my Slash 9.8...
  • 2 0
 And so the hard-ish tail was born.
  • 3 0
 Soft tails have been around decades lad...
  • 18 2
 Dear Santa
  • 7 11
flag mate1998 (Jun 30, 2015 at 13:01) (Below Threshold)
 I've been boosting my goodness and kindness all year so please bring me a bike with boost hub
  • 12 0
 That Fuel EX looks so clean!
  • 11 4
 I'll start saving now..... maybe in 2098 I will have enough to buy one.
  • 9 2
 I am suprised i don't see any plus sized models.
  • 16 1
 Yeah!! Oh, wait, you're talking about tire size...
  • 5 0
 They already have the Stache which is a 29+ wheel size.
  • 2 0
 Yeah i saw the stache a bit ago, i just thought they would be trying to make their XC riders get chubby.
  • 3 0
 Who wants a 'Stache ride?
  • 1 0
 Trek also released a full line of their Farley fat bikes. Including a carbon model!
  • 9 6
 I am often in Trek Factory Store and damn, they stepped it up in recent years. They shook off some of this Mercedes like, prestige image and really make some eye pleasing fresh bikes. Fuel EX, Remedy, Slash and Session are bloody sweet. But if I was to put my money on Trek, I'd buy Powerfly to my wife Big Grin
  • 9 3
 Trek makes the lamborghinis of the bicycle industry, such precision in everything they do! Thank you Trek!
  • 1 11
flag SlodownU (Jul 1, 2015 at 6:28) (Below Threshold)
 They break like Lamborghinis too.
  • 5 3
 Not sure about Trek's solution compared to BMC's soft tail. The thing is, Trek's decoupler has been primarily developed for road racing and it works great there because roadies spend 99 % of the time in a seated position. However, MTB riders on XC courses spend a lot more time out of the saddle. And when they are out of the saddle, Trek's IsoSpeed does literally nothing. BMC's MTT elastomer however works even when you're standing up.

Well, I guess that in the end it's a tie. Treks are probably going to be better (stiffer) when climbing out of the saddle while the BMCs will be the better descenders.
  • 4 0
 Its very minimal movement, just enough to ease the back and knees on extended races.
  • 7 2
 I think if the IsoSpeed allows for a smoother pedaling cadence when seated and riding on bumpy stuff that wouldn't require standing for balance or power, it will be a benefit over time, resulting in a less tired racer. Trek does this on their Boone cyclocross bike as well, which I've been itching to try, because it would seem to make sense. Cyclocross and XC racing are becoming more and more similar in machinery and even courses.
  • 6 0
 Cross courses are not becoming like xc courses and xc courses are become more technical and aggressive. Perhaps cross courses are becoming more like the xc courses of yesteryear but they are completely different.
  • 3 2
 Yeti asr5c does this also. no pivot so the rear seatstays flex. also Moots was doing this with their ti frames in the 90s.
  • 4 0
 Cross courses are nothing like XC courses. As @Hammm said, XC courses are becoming quite nasty.
  • 3 0
 Yeah agree, overstepped in my comparison there. If anything cx courses have become flatter and faster with less mandatory dismounting where xc courses are now including sizable drops. Modern cx courses do include more technical terrain 'features' though - just not spread throughout the course. Some of the up/downs on the Louisville course for example, or the 'radical' flyover bridges that some courses use, are a couple examples.
  • 1 0
 Okay, okay now we are on the same page twozerosix.
  • 3 1
 I wonder how hard it is to clean out that "compliance" pivot. I imagine this being a potention place for an annoying creek to sneak in given that you can't really pull it apart to get the grit out the same way as with a more mobile joint.
  • 7 0
 i work on domane frames quite a bit and i have only had ONE that got gross from a sweaty rider. they are WELL sealed and hidden from dirt and crap, so the bearings inside stay pretty buttery.
  • 4 0
 And if you do need to pull it apart that is fairly easy.
  • 5 0
 Should be 4. 4 new bikes. There is a new Madone as well.
  • 7 0
 That new madone is incredible.
  • 3 1
 The Venge ViAS looks good, too, but more industrial. The Madone 9 looks like a Ferrari.
  • 4 1
 I've never wanted a trail bike under 150/160mm travel, but i would heavily consider that fuel as my trail bike!!!!!
  • 4 1
 not slack enough 68.8 doesnt cut it. remedy at 67.5 however
  • 4 3
 Ran into a guy with a new Kona 130mm (Process?). His previous bikes had 150/160 but said this new bike was his favorite by far.
  • 5 1
 looks like i'm getting a fuel ex next
  • 2 1
 Do it. Fuel EX is my favorite (EX 9 from 2013). In fact, I would select exactly Fuel EX if I would be asked to choose "one bike" for everything.
  • 1 3
 I've got one for sale if you're interested...
  • 2 0
 these things are carbon (not literally) copies of the old GF rumblefish and THOSE were the swiss army knives of bikes. i totally agree with @milkdrop in that... and i cant tell if @PaulLehr was trying to make a crank joke?
  • 1 0
 I agree, do it! We had a demo '14 Fuel EX8 29 and it was one of my all time favourite bikes, couldn't tell it was a 29er most of the time. Hell it descended better than a lot of 140mm travel bikes I've tried, and was almost overly confidence inspiring making me hit tracks it probably shouldn't have been on. The changes they've made for this year should only make it better.
  • 4 0
 Dat red paint job tho.....
  • 4 0
 Love the new Fuel Ex. That bike in the colour looks hot!
  • 1 0
 i wish they would show the full lineup of colors and not the just top models. some of the alu frames look like hot sex im tellin ya
  • 1 0
 If you go on there website they have all the models and colours now up. Some pretty sweet bikes. The only one I don't see up yet is the special edition all bare aluminium one they have said to still be making. My Trek Fuel Ex 9 is the bare aluminium one and I love it.
  • 1 0
 @ChaosChris yea they have them on trek. i was saying i wish PB would show off the actual bikes we normal buyers would look at..
  • 1 0
 It also looks like they've moved away from the 27.5" models on the Fuel EX and only provided in small or xsmall frames. It will be interesting to see if they will do the same for the Remedy Series.
  • 3 0
 i don't think that will be the case. Trek has always said for trail bikes let the rider choose wheel size depending on riding style. But i would expect a 27.5+ Fuel
  • 3 1
 A 34 Fox on a Fuel? Interesting.

Is it Boost 110? (if it were, couldn't you run a 27.5+ tire?)

What about a Talas 130/110? That might make it the ultimate Midwest weapon. Run 110 for my local stuff, and 130 for my trips to Copper Harbor. Dreamin'.
  • 1 0
 What do those model graphics on the top tube and seat stays look like in full? Are those holes in the Procaliber and Top Fuel top tubes for zip ties or some other plug-in guides for dropper post cables?
  • 1 1
 It is for a front derailleur cable as they are only running single rings.
  • 1 0
 I looked again and see there are similar holes in the downtube (for zip ties) near the cable exit port, behind the bottle mount. Trek uses that cable exit port for the FD too, since they use Shimano side swing FDs. See for yourself:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/12401178
  • 3 0
 The holes are the Micro Truss system holes for zip ties when doing external hose/cables.
  • 3 0
 Oh i see what you are talking about, thought you were asking about another area!
  • 1 0
 Why are the seat tubes always so far back?
Handling obviously but wouldn't it be better to have a more vertical seat tube (so efficient pedalling) and then just stand for descents?
  • 2 0
 Looks like the end of DRCV...but keeping the RE:AKtiv? Hopefully they've fixed the knocking.
  • 6 0
 yeah DRCV is gone. they are saying the Fox Evol air can basically achieves the same thing
  • 2 3
 Thank god
  • 4 2
 Are Bontrager no longer making wheels? All three of these bikes are shown with 2016 DT Swiss wheels.
  • 6 0
 trek doesnt make any boost hubs at the moment
  • 2 17
flag nyles (Jun 30, 2015 at 11:05) (Below Threshold)
 Bontrager is junk...
  • 2 0
 Hadn't though of that, thanks.
  • 2 3
 IsoSpeed detached frame...marketing BS? Look at that linkage and some other Engineer tell me what has to flex to give you 11mm? That doesn't look like a functional hinge more like a fixed connection point putting all the stresses onto the axle linkage instead of point load to the exterior side of the seat tube. Would be nice to see a factory flex test showing the deflection in the fame under stress because right now I don't get the point.
  • 3 1
 They work extremely well on their cross and road bikes. The IsoSpeed Boone is the best CX bike I've ever ridden. It's an eccentric pivot, like the Yeti SB66 and SB95 used, IIRC. The seatstays and chain stays flex as the seat tube moves up.
  • 1 5
flag allix2456 (Jun 30, 2015 at 11:32) (Below Threshold)
 Deleted
  • 1 1
 yeah I think the same, the axle linkage will get most if not all of the stress while the rider is sitting. if someone has a closer picture of the axle please share it, they might have done something in there to either make it tougher or to wiggle and release the stress.
  • 5 0
 The bike is a hardtail. The Isospeed has no effect on the rear axle whatsoever. There is zero rear axle movement. The Isospeed pivot allows the seat tube to flex more easily than most because it's not being held rigid between the top tube and seat stays. In a seated position the rider is "Iso"-lated from the terrain a little bit by this 11mm of flex, or compliance. There is zero flex or compliance when out of the saddle, because there is no weight on the seat tube when standing.
  • 1 1
 by axle I meant the bottom bracket, i know it might've been confusing but from an engineering stand point it is also an axle or an axis, it has a driven shaft going through. Anyway the seat post will want to pivot in that bottom bracket area, put that on an FEA and it will be totally red or orange colored.
  • 4 1
 All thsee bikes are deadly sexy!! I want!
  • 2 0
 I haven't wanted a Trek MTB in about 20 years. Fuel EX and Top Fuel are both compelling...
  • 1 0
 now is a good time to get on it....
  • 1 2
 I have been running the new Race Face Next SL carbon crank on my XC bike for the past few months. The stiffness and power transfer of this crank makes it a joy to ride. I have xx1 on my other rig and I can not tell the difference in performance.
  • 3 0
 Sweet bikes.
  • 1 3
 I like the direction but allowing the ST to move is like fitting a more compliant post in terms of function and I am not a huge fan of a "pivot/ bolt" on a HT. The appeal of a HT is that it it has nothing to wear, nowhere to get full of crap and is easy to maintain. In that respect I like the BMC approach better but would still love to try both to see how much difference 10-11mm can make. I hate to sound completely negative, but what a mess of cables on the Top Fuel!

On the plus side, Trek Factory red is literally the coolest paint jobs there is and we all know red has been scientifically proved as the fastest colour Smile
  • 3 0
 The bikes look super sharp. I agree - that deep red paint is gorgeous.
  • 2 0
 Why the loop on the Top Fuel XX shock?
  • 1 0
 remote lockout
  • 2 2
 I know, but couldn't it just go straight from the exit of the bottom tube to the shock instead of taking the long way round?
  • 1 0
 I think that would cause a kink in the cable at the base of the shock is my guess.
  • 1 0
 The shock compresses and the cable moves, creating rubbing issues. Not enough clearance designed to flip the shock upside down, and even then the full floater design will still result in some movement.
  • 1 0
 remote lokcout is a must
  • 1 0
 The Fox iCD remote lockout cables go straight down. Probably has more to do with how stiff and how sensitive to sizing the Rockshox hydraulic lines (and mech cables for other remote lockouts) are, compared to the electronic wires.
  • 2 0
 I must say, Trek bikes looks gorgeous in last few years, all of them!
  • 1 3
 Sweet sweet stuff.we truly are spoiled to see soo many new bikes every year.....the top fuel looks awesome for a 100mm XC bike. I wonder if they'l re:aktiv it next year.

My only complaint....ugly& uninspired paint jobs\graphics. Spending several K on anything should get you something that looks awesome. I guess that's where project one comes in? Razz
  • 2 1
 The Damone is a super comfy bike with that separated seat tube, smart move bringing that to the race HT XC category.
  • 2 0
 Wait until you see the new Madone.
  • 1 0
 Awesome sleds, but I'd love to see them move away from proprietary i2i rear shocks!!!!
  • 2 0
 Apparently, negative rise stems are back.
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous bikes. Was just talking to my coworker about that top tube tech on road bikes yesterday. LOL.
  • 1 0
 and here i am in the midst of all these hardtails and xc bikes, just waiting for the 2016 session to be unveiled
  • 11 10
 News just in: Boost 148 found to cure both AIDS and Cancer.
  • 2 2
 I was like what if they revamp the remedy and slash. Bu then once I saw this I cried.
  • 1 1
 theyre coming soon man havent unveiled
  • 3 3
 The people on the ProCalibur frames will be forever stuck trying to determine if their dropper has developed play.
  • 2 2
 "For 2016 the Fuel EX's chainstays shrink to 436mm down from 452mm, thanks in part to the use of Boost 148 spacing."

How?
  • 3 0
 by the chainstays being wider so easier to move the wheel forwards
  • 2 0
 Chainring is also moved outboard 3mm.
  • 3 2
 Show me the new slash now!
  • 3 1
 Same as 2015.
  • 3 4
 Dear Trek.
Please could you make a 180mm freeride bike?
Something like the Scott voltage or the Cube Fritzz???

Ps, you would earn lots of money.
  • 3 1
 You realize they already did that was the scratch a few years ago? It didn't make them much money... I had one and while it was fun the only reason I'd want it over a slash was the coil suspension.
  • 2 1
 But I'm saying they should make a new one to the same standard as these new ones @andnyleswillriot
  • 3 1
 They made a Session Park with 180mm of travel last year.
  • 1 4
 "For 2016 the Fuel EX's chainstays shrink to 436mm down from 452mm, thanks in part to the use of Boost 148 spacing. This made it possible to tighten up the rear end while still leaving enough room to run a 36 tooth front chain ring, along with clearance for a 29 x 2.4” tire."

Canefield has 414 mm chainstays on their last 29er without boost hubs...
  • 3 0
 But the Canfield can't use a double crankset, single only.
  • 2 2
 Why is no one now complaining about Boost? Seams like this is when they should be : )
  • 8 0
 We have conformed, and are saving our rage energy for the next standard change...duhhhhh Razz
  • 1 4
 "...use a Boost 148 rear end and Boost 110 front, standards that will become increasingly common over the next few seasons"

Why??!! Why do we need another freakin' "standard"?? This is so ridiculous! Should I wait for Boost Plus 149 rear and 111 front in 2016?

Enough! Just give me better suspension front and rear, better pedaling characteristics without (or while improving) sacrificing downhill plushness, and lighter and cheaper bikes period. No more new "standards"!
  • 1 0
 How do you expect better suspension and pedaling without new standards? Clearly what we currently have isn't working and we need to "improve"
  • 1 1
 Apologies... MTB Newbie here... 1st bike... please help... New Trek EX 9 alloy vs Rocky Mountain Instinct alloy BC edition.
  • 2 1
 Sweet!
  • 2 3
 Trek's bike naming department really needs to step up their game. Super solid bikes though.
  • 1 0
 The BoSS said it!
  • 2 4
 All of the bikes are drop dead sexy but I hate the idea of boost and how everyone keeps pushing the idea. They should have just stuck to 150mm!!!
  • 1 1
 $3500 seems rather steep for the frame only option.
  • 1 1
 So when soft tails go out of style again can 26" make a comeback?
  • 1 1
 Bring back the Supercaliber!
  • 3 6
 "chainstays shrink to 436mm down from 452mm, thanks in part to the use of Boost 148 spacing" what a load of crap. Boost go away! Bring back 20mm thruaxles!
  • 5 4
 Trek's engineers needed to invent a new axle, hub spacing, bb and crank standard just to fit 43.6cm stays onto a 120mm travel 29er. Meanwhile Specialized managed to make 430mm stays fit on a 155mm travel 29er with the existing 142x12 standard and normal (if horrible) PF30 bb. I bet this is Trek's revenge for all those square peg round hole tests they had to do at the special school.
  • 1 2
 At first i thought the top fuel was a road bike...
  • 3 1
 Easy mistake since there are so many full suspension road bikes with 2" tires. /s
  • 1 2
 Evrything is sexy on this page besides that hardtail
  • 1 4
 They still look like a Trek Smile But that's one helluva Boost to their range!
  • 5 7
 They lost me at boost
  • 1 2
 me too....
  • 2 5
 IsoSpeed....facepalm.
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