Pinkbike Announces 'Trailforks'

Oct 16, 2014
by Trevor May  
Trailforks is a trail management system for riders, builders and associations. It aims to provide the very best tools to inventory, maintain, promote and showcase trail networks. Tools such as statistics empower each group to have accessible data to show local city councils, governments, tourism boards and parks, conveying the popularity and potential economic impact of cycling on their area in order to receive further support to grow trail networks.

Trailforks is not just any trail mapping website, it's a user contributed database that puts the control into the hands of the people who have worked so hard to preserve and maintain the trails we love. Did you know that many trail Associations don't own the GPS data for the networks they support. Many areas have maps owned by private interests and not all, if any, of the profits make it back to the associations. Trailforks' mission is to provide a direct funding model to put 100% of the money back into the association. On Trailforks users can directly support the people that are swinging the hammers and digging the dirt to maintain and preserve the trails we all love to ride.

www.trailforks.com

Dynamic maps 3D maps elevation profiles.

Why Another Trail Website?
Trailforks is built by mountain bikers for mountain bikers with a singular focus on mountain biking, providing unique features, a modern design and a focus on maps. Trailforks is created and supported by Pinkbike, a large, well known name in mountain biking that has the resources to make this project a success. With the experience of running a site used by millions, Pinkbike gives Trailforks the technical power to make the site fast and highly available. Pinkbike will ensure Trailforks' longevity, with no requirement for it to be self supporting. So many other trail sites have come and gone, never taken off, have paid access to useful data or are locally focused. Trailforks is free, world-wide and automatically integrated with tens of thousands of photos and videos already on Pinkbike.

The goal is to offer unique features and tools to help promote local clubs, business and trail supporters. Trailforks promotes associations on both trail and region pages, and encourages users to join and/or donate. Trailforks also promotes local products like physical maps and guidebooks. Ultimately, it's about promoting your region and growing the sport of mountain biking. Associations can use Trailforks to help serve the locals that support them or promote their community as a mountain bike destination, boosting local economy.

We have been in open beta over the summer and Trailforks is already the largest directory of mountain bike trails in the world, with over 13,000 trails. There has been a bunch of enthusiastic users mapping their local riding areas, now is your chance to join them!

We are only getting started!

1. Explore Trails


Explore Trails



Trail networks can be viewed in 3D
using integrated Google Earth!

Whether you're searching for something new to ride in your local area or planning a road trip, you can browse trails from all around the world using the interactive Trailforks Map. Trails are organized into 'riding areas'. You can mark which trails you've ridden, add to your wish list, or create trail lists and save them for upcoming rides.

Trails are added by users and once a trail is submitted it goes through an approval process. The most basic approval is a crowd-sourced process where other Pinkbike users can confirm or reject submissions. If this sounds familiar it's because it works the exact same as Pinkbike's directory:Places. The secondary approval process is where the trail associations come in. Each area can be assigned admins who can edit, delete, approve and reject trails. Admins can range from a single trail builder, to the entire board of directors of a local trail association. With this feature we prevent your favourite secret trail or loamer from appearing on the site for every Tom, Dick and Joey to see, something major social fitness websites don't do. Sensitive trails can be hidden to all those except region admins.



Explore Trails




2. Explore Bike Parks

Explore Bike Parks from all over the world, whether it's the Whistler Bike Park or the Bike-Circus in Saalbach-Hinterglemm, Austria.

Trailforks also maps local skill parks, so you can find where to practice your technical skills or where to rip it up on a BMX track.


Skill Parks





3. Add Ride Logs

One of the key features of Trailforks is the Ride Log tool. The benefit for you, the user, is tracking all your rides in one place, the choice to share them is up to you. Trailforks easily syncs up with Strava. If you already use Strava you can add all your rides in one go with the Bulk Strava Import. See your ride overlaid onto a trail map, to easily identify which trails you rode! Use your ride log data to add missing trails to the database.

Trail Associations benefit from being able to collect important statistics on who is riding what trails and when. This trail usage data can be a valuable tool for seeking trail funding. Associations and users can easily view statistics on every trail and region on Trailforks. It doesn't matter how big or small a riding area is, gain detailed statistics, like the ones below, on all of them.


Ride log features



4. Report Trail Conditions

Come across a downed tree or damaged bridge? Submit a trail report. Check the status of your favourite trail before a ride and get the details on the conditions.

Trail reports amp conditions.



5. Mobile Friendly And Apps

Trailforks has a simplified mobile website m.trailforks.com and the desktop version of the Trailforks website has a 'responsive' design which also works well on mobile. We are currently developing mobile apps and a full Trailforks map app will be coming out this winter. In the meantime we've created this simple Trailforks Report App.

Mobile friendly website



6. Photos And Videos
Trail Photos

Ever notice that 'trail' field when uploading a photo to Pinkbike? Now it has a purpose! Attach Pinkbike photos and videos to Trailforks trails, regions, bike skill parks, reports or POIs. A trail info block will show on your Pinkbike photo's page.

When you add a new trail, existing Pinkbike photos and videos will automatically be matched to the trail based on the name and geo location. This means that when riders are looking for new regions to travel to, and new trails to ride, they will see these great photos and videos. A picture's worth a thousand words and on Trailforks we've harnessed the incredible power of Pinkbike's photo and video catalogue.


7. Trail Karma Donations

Trailforks Trail Karma feature.

Donate some cash to your favourite riding areas to help local associations and builders maintain and develop the trails! If your association has their PayPal email setup, donations will go directly to them! No middle man, Trailforks or Pinkbike don't see a nickel. If a PayPal isn't entered, the donation is kept by Trailforks and will be distributed quarterly in a bulk payment.
www.trailforks.com/karma/
Donating will earn you "Trail Karma" which will add an icon beside your name giving you recognition. On region karma pages, one can see how much has been donated, the top donated to regions, associations and more.


8. Activity Feed

Keep updated on content being added to Trailforks with the 'Facebook style' activity feed. Narrow down the feed to your nearby area, your favourite riding areas or just your friends activity.

Trailforks also sends Pinkbike dashboard notices for various actions. You can 'subscribe' to trails or entire regions to get email notifications of new content added, or a report added to a trail you help maintain.
Global Activity Feed




9. Trail Association Features

How does an association generate revenue for a region?
- Trail Karma (donations)
- Trail Supporter program
- Mobile App

How does an association take control and become an admin for a region?
Associations can apply to become an admin of any region on Trailforks. Our staff will then contact applicants and verify their affiliation with the appropriate trail association.

Trail association promotion.

How does an association receive money from trail karma?
Simply provide us the PayPal email address for your association or you can enter it yourself by editing the Places listing.
Now when users contribute money to a region or trail managed by an association, the user is sending the money directly to the associations PayPal account. 100% of the contributions on Trailforks go to the associations; no other party is involved.

What about illegal trails?
There are always going to be unofficial trails and we believe it is better for an association to be aware of them and manage them accordingly.
We have talked to many associations and have built tools to allow various ways of handling illegal trails.
- a trail can be visible
- a trail can be visible with a warning that it is a not sanctioned, not maintained and to ride at own risk
- a trail can be visible, but clearly marked as closed and marked do not ride
- a trails location can be hidden, but its name is still visible in lists for users to add photos and reports.
- a trail can be hidden but available to only certain groups
If a trail is hidden, users can't keep adding the trail. Having the data in the system allows associations to inventory their network and have the data available when needed for the future.

How does Trailforks make money?
No money is made directly from Trailforks. Empowering and supporting the trail associations with a system and tools to maintain, create and legitimize the trails is a good thing for the industry and society. More trails, more riders, more riding, more bikes, more industry growth, more support for trails. Repeat often!

How can an association use the data?
At Trailforks we believe in access to data and use a Share-Alike policy. Access the Trailforks data using our many widgets, RSS and KML feeds and JSON API. As well as data dumps for entire regions in KML or OSM formats.

Trailforks has various statistics pages for each region and each trail as well as ride log/checkin trail usage stats.

Vancouver's North Shore trail stats: http://www.trailforks.com/region/north-shore/stats/
Squamish ride log stats: http://www.trailforks.com/region/squamish/ridelogs/

Trail network stats and trail usage stats from ridelogs amp checkins.

Conclusion

There are SO many features packed into Trailforks, these are just a few to get you started. Start exploring the site to find more, and follow our Facebook page where we highlight features. We also document features on our help page.

Like what you see so far? Just wait for the more inclusive mobile app, which will be available this Winter. The development of Trailforks is continuing and we have many more exciting features to come!

From everyone here at the Trailforks team, we hope you enjoy the site and discover how you can use it to find, share or track your ride. If you have any questions or concerns, visit the feedback forum or send our Community Manager an email at brent@pinkbike.com.


Riders, check out your local trails here: http://www.trailforks.com/local/

Associations, learn more about Trail Karma here: http://www.trailforks.com/karma/

Builders, add and share your latest creations here: http://www.trailforks.com/contribute/

http www.trailforks.com

196 Comments

  • + 164
 This is by far the best idea in mountainbike history.
[Reply]
  • + 125
 Except maybe for wheels, wheels have been "around" and probably aren't going anywhere...
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  • - 50
 Only if it can be edited like wikipedia. Everyone should have access.

What reason does a local MTB group have to keep trails hidden from other users?

Every trail should be able to be edited by anyone. Maybe a local MTB group can moderate, but to allow them to hide trails from other people? Ridiculous.
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  • + 44
 This idea is awesome, but to make it epic we need a phone app
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  • + 40
 The problem with making everything viewable to anyone is that some trails are illegal and would be shut down if they get popular due to the attention it would draw. I'm all for sharing trails but not if it means that they get torn down and riders get tickets.
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  • + 18
 Any trail can be edited by anyone, but the revision needs to be approved by a regional admin or moderator. So it is like Wikipedia in that way, there is also a log of all past edits. Almost all content types on Trailforks can be edited.

A mobile map app is in the works over the winter. But there is also the mobile map site m.trailforks.com
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  • + 26
 Android/iphone app is in the works. Out later this year...
- offline mode
- trail reporting
- trail photos/video
etc.
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  • + 5
 awesome cant wait for the app!
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  • + 16
 You had me at offline mode....looking forward to it!!
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  • - 2
 Pick your battles. Riders getting tickets is better than riders getting killed or injured due to trail conditions or negligence. Not to mention the negative environmental and public impacts from illegal trails. Riding illegal trails does NOTHING for the sport except give it a bad name and put people at risk. I prefer the idea of viewing illegal trails just so I can avoid them.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 The trail forks team are super helpful with any questions, edits needed and going the next step behind the scenes to help you out. I have been somewhat addicted to adding trails in the area and finding others that I have ridden over the years. It might be a little confusing at first but the layout is awesome, lets you toggle between different layers and base maps. Everything is just so easy and contained in one spot and it's already populated with tonnes of trails. Really well done.
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  • + 9
 EastCoastDHer I seen many legal trails that are worse then illegal trails. Getting hurt is part of the risk you take when you get into any kind of sport for that matter.
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  • - 1
 Great site and good info It will rule the web soon for all your dirty needs.
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  • + 3
 Oh god, hopefully nobody uses this on trails around here. Fish and Wildlife already know where enough of the trails are...
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  • + 1
 Explain that risk to Mary Beth Lablonski (Aka:Idiot of the year) who rode into a painted yellow gate on a marked paved trail and then sued the town. She claimed the gate was dangerous despite being marked, signed and painted. The town for some reason awarded her millions and she put an entire trail system at risk of closure to cyclists, pedestrians, joggers and hikers.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 One problem with that, if there were no illegal trails round me then there would be nothing to ride?! It may be the case for you that you have plenty of autherised trails near you or within driving distance but for many of us it's different!
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  • + 14
 Yep, I have a big problem with the term 'illeagal'
Illegal as in selling crack? Or robbing houses?
We're riding dirt bikes in the woods for f*cks sake
Please find another word like 'unoficial' or something
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  • + 21
 We don't use the term illegal on Trailforks, I also don't like it. We use "unsanctioned".
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  • + 2
 EastCoastDHer not sure what that has to do with illegal trails since it seems she was hurt on a legal one but anywho... In my area if the only trails you rode were the legal ones you would get bored really really fast.
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  • - 2
 This is a stretch, but how about a blackberry app for myself and the other. 05% of us? Wink
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  • + 1
 This is brilliant, and brilliantly made. From starting idea until the site arrangement it has been superbly developed. Congratulations for such superb work.
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  • + 13
 If even 1 great illegal trail gets shut down anywhere because of this, then it isn't worth it.

You can pretend you are going to try to keep them hidden, but consider this scenario: Bob spends 3 years building a trail and doesn't even have computer access or many friends that he even wants to share the trail with. 'Administrator' Mike, who doesn't even know Bob, discovers his trail, thinks it's great, and decides he wants to share it with everyone on Pinkbike. Trail gets overrun with users and is shut down by land agency or land owner. In this situation TRAILFORKS becomes TRAILF**KS! When it comes to the internet, I have learned to not trust people' s best intentions. Or websites best intentions for that matter.

And for those who say unsanctioned trails are bad for mountainbiking, I will simply remind you many of the best trails around the world started as illegal trails built by rogue builders.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I agree... with Protour I have a hard enough time being the "internet police" for a local trail system that is built primarily on private land by a handful of individuals who have permission to do so. Builders don't have ANY problem with people riding but landowners have requested NO MAPS, and NO online exposure or directions etc.. It's pretty much the scenario above. Strava doesn't give a crap if you keep your ride private or not, all the rides pretty much show up on the heat map. People have been smart enough not to make segments out of trails... and the ones that have been made have been flagged. Now "pinkbike admin" are going to be responsible for knowing my local trails and how to manage the online exposure if someone uploads a ride to "trailforks"?
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  • + 3
 Yeah, they are putting way too much trust in the 'administrators'. I'm guessing nobody at Pinkbike has ever put a bunch of effort into a trail only to have it destroyed because some loudmouth couldn't help himself from telling everybody about it. If they had I can't imagine why they would be so naive not to see the trail closures and other problems this will create. But then again maybe they don't care about that because Pinkbike will undoubtedly be making alot of money from the extra advertising revenue that the Trailforks website will generate. They are trying to pretend that they are helping trails with the donations and the exposure it will give to some, but the bottom line from my perspective is that Pinkbike is selling out the hard physical labor of rogue trailbuilders here to make extra money. Strava was bad enough, this could end up being Strava on steroids.
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  • + 2
 And the comparisons with Wikipedia are completely laughable. When somebody makes a mistake on Wikipedia it gets edited. When somebody makes a mistake on Trailforks trails could be permanently deleted.
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  • - 3
 Could see this coming, as PB were already mapping the WC courses this year. PB will drag in all the meta data and then sell it off. In the future data will be brokered just like currency is on the exchange.
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  • + 9
 You're missing the point. Strava is already out there. Lots of "hidden" or "unsanctioned" trails on there. I'd rather work with something designed and managed by the mtn bike community rather than a faceless org like Strava. Or you could stick your fingers in your ears and go "nanananananana".
[Reply]
  • + 1
 we monitor strava usage on said trail system L-train and have managed to get it down to zero segments.. so good luck navigating a 50+ mile trail system without any trail names. Strava does however take all the info and use it for they're "heat map" which I'm guessing they use your ride data for, even if you set it to private.
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  • + 2
 I dont use STRAVA but I have been told people are posting/boasting about riding unsanctioned trails. Does this not advertise to every one where the stashes are.
Some times to much knowledge is not a good thing.
I prefer to be shown by some one who knows the trail to show me a new trail.
Land managers knowing what we are doing can be good but dangerous to the status of trails built by individuals that just want to ride with out all the bureaucratic BS.
Most trails I ride were build with out any ones authority. Now some fat office bound city official that is payed with my tax dollars is going to decide which trails are good for the public.
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  • + 4
 Great idea - for blowing cover on all those trails you have been trying to keep secret !
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  • + 2
 At least with Trailforks there has been someone you can ask if you want unsanctioned trails removed. With Strava there is no person to ask; no accountability. The CS People have no interest in removing down-low trails off their stupid heatmap. Strava is the demon here. Not Trailforks.
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  • + 1
 If you have some secret unsanctioned trail you built and want to secret, just don't submit it to Trailforks in the first place, or anywhere on the internet! You can subscribe to your local region to get email updates when a new trail is added to monitor if someone else might add it in the future, if they do you can report it to us and we will remove it, simple! The Strava heatmap data is cool tech, but very bad for unsanctioned trails, we would never do something like that.

Trailforks doesn't make money, there are no adverts on the site, not saying there never will be a single ad ever, but it would never be plastered with ads, maybe more corporate sponsor prizes for contests and such.

We have no plans to sell the trail data, we have a Share-a-like policy, others can use the data if they also retain free access to it.
I've already given a data dump (for free) of all the trails in BC to a new bcadventure website and those BC Offroad map books, which have a new edition coming!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 It doesnt matter who posts pictures and gps data and directions...thats the point.

Joe Schmo has to take a piss mid ride. He pulls to the side of the fire road, hops the embankment, and drops trou. Mid piss he notices the tire tracks under his feet and wonders why they're here. After poking around and spotting glorious single track that myself and friends have built and ridden to our liking, he grabs his bike and wheels it through a couple bushes...

After enjoying himself, he doesnt forget to take a few pictures, mark some coordinates, and share his "new" find with the trailforks world. Then Im out working on trail and find myself almost getting run over by the sheer volume of people who would've never given this place a thought before.
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  • + 2
 Ok then , for example , lets say Trailbuilder makes a trail he wishes to be off the radar , like usual it's miles from anywhere and all the usual stuff , a random rider finds it , the random rider then posts it on this site and the the trailbuilder makes a complaint about his trail being added.

How does this service know whos in the right there ?

Unless you know the trail builder personally there is no way of knowing if it's his trail or not , how do you go about proving some thing like that?
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  • + 2
 If you can delete a trail once and never have to worry about it popping up again that's one thing. But im not sure that's possible...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So... how do you subscribe to a region? I've already looked up my home state and found 11 trail systems already up and on the database but I don't see a "region" listed for my area or anyway to subscribe to my "state" etc...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 There is a "subscribe" button at the bottom of most content pages like regions & trails. here is a video tutorial http://www.trailforks.com/help/view/15/
'Region' is the term we use for all geo containers (Country->State->Sub Region->City->Riding Area)
[Reply]
  • + 2
 @SeaJay if there is a submitted trail with gps track, and is marked hidden or unsanctioned, it will not display to users. Since now the system is aware of this trail and the location of it, future attempts by people to upload this same trail, even under a different name wont work.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Pretty solid idea bit so many issues..... so far doing a terrible job of interpreting my strava data and I've noticed a ton of blatant errors. Like there is a trail in Massachusetts called Split Rock so I added it go trail forks and automatically some video from a trail called Split Rock in a completely different state is assigned to the trail.... cause that makes sense

Not to mention myridelog is telling me I went riding in a bunch or areas I've never been any where near. How does a ride in Groton, MA get interpreted as being in Nashua, NH?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Have you not run into a ton of errors like I have? To call it superbly developed is laughable
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The reason why I think it could end up being Strava on steroids is because of the photos and videos that can be linked to the trail, along with the social media aspect of Pinkbike. You can find unsanctioned trails on the Stava heat map but it's hard to see what the trail is really like and you usually have to look hard to find them.

@canaduka. Can you give me a rock-solid guarantee that no unsanctioned trails will ever be closed as a result of the emergence of Trailforks?

What is the vetting process when determining who becomes administrators?

How is the hierarchy of administrators determined?

Approximately how many Administrators are there in all of Canada, America, and the world respectively?

If one administrator thinks a trail should remain hidden and 10 think it shouldn't who resolves the dispute? Does the builder have any say if he doesn't have internet access?

You are essentially focing builders of unsanctioned trails who don't want them discovered to spend time on your internet site making sure they stay relatively secret.

There are undeniably positive aspects of this but I would hate to be the trailbuilder who had his trail shut down because of it.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Just don't add illegal or secret trails on the internet, if someone else happens to do it, report it and it will be removed or hidden so it can't be added again. There hasn't been any of the "DS" trails in Vancouver posted to Trailforks in the past year. yet its all over OSM and Strava heatmap.

If a trail is hidden and photos matched to it, the trail info/name is not show on the PB photo page.

Of course I can't guarantee that, we just try our best to put in place safe guards and ways to deal with it, which is more than others have done.

The whole region admin system is still a work in progress, needs to get used more to find the best procedures. But secret or illegal trail issues really have not come up that much in the past year.
Its mostly someone from a local trail association that has applied for region access. We've only setup about 30 so far.

The same is true for the various other trail websites out there, a builders unsanctioned trail can be added. We offer some tools to deal with it. If they don't care to check the TF website, it takes only a few seconds to setup an email notice for any new trails added to a region. So I subscribe to Seymour, to monitor if anyone every posts a new trail there. So I can check it immediately and contact Mark@nsmba if needed. Another feature on my todo list is to create blackout zones, with a region you can already draw a polygon to define its area. But I wanna add a 2nd type where one can draw a zone, and have it so any trail added in that zone they get notified and the trail is flagged immediately.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 About 3 million people in the greater Vancouver area, and people think their unsanctioned trails are secret in that area. Users hike and bike those trails by accident all the time, eventually the trails will be mapped because they are accessed everyday. I doubt if anybody finds a real "secret trail" (over a hour drive away from any major population center) would report it, because they know it will be lost. Real secret trails are fragile, nobody would report them because they get damaged every time someone takes a ride. I see Trailforks as a way to get informed, so to stay away from all those supposed secret trails you end up ridding by accident anyways.
[Reply]
  • + 29
 How will the "validity" of trails be determined.

Strava has been quickly destroying the previously lesser known and well guarded trail systems of the Santa Cruz area.

Singletrack that has existed for 20+ years now gets blown out, and then fenced off and shut down, due to everyone knowing where it is and the massive increase in traffic that results.
Strava Heat Maps are the enemy of trail builders!

I want something user based, but more fight club style. You must be invited to join a group and see the rides. No public access.
Hell, I'd even pay cash money for such a service!
[Reply]
  • - 7
 I can't think of any trails in ac getting fenced off?
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Once a trail is submitted it goes through an approval process. The most basic approval is a crowd-sourced process where other Pinkbike users can confirm or reject submissions. If this sounds familiar it's because it works the exact same as Pinkbike's directory:Places. The secondary approval process is where the trail associations come in. Each area can be assigned admins who can edit, delete, approve and reject trails. Admins can range from a single trail builder, to the entire board of directors of a local trail association. With this feature we prevent your favourite secret trail or loamer from appearing on the site for every Tom, Dick and Harry to see, something major social fitness websites don't do. Sensitive trails can be hidden to all those except region admins.
[Reply]
  • + 9
 What if I want my trail(s) hidden from regional admins? Basically everyone. I dont need my (or my friends) work part of some silly database. This is like being forced to have a facebook but being told "oh, its ok, no one can see it.".

All I'm worried about is involuntary participation. Maybe I read it wrong but thats the understanding I've gotten here. No one should be able to submit a trail to this database other than the trailbuilder.
[Reply]
  • + 13
 If you want a secret trail to remain secret.. don't post it on the internet! Smile
It would be next to impossible to verify a person is a builder of a trail wordl-wide.

The builders & sponsors of a trail can be listed though, to give some credit and history, example: www.trailforks.com/trails/expresso
[Reply]
  • + 8
 If your trail is secret enough that none of your buddies use Strava on it or record their tracks, than it should remain hidden. It's not like Trailforks is gonna hack your phone for your location data and upload the track without your knowledge. That kid down the street that follow you to your secret spot, you can't really do anything about him except send a note to the local admin telling him that the trail added by so-and-so user is on private property and closed to biking.

Will it still exist? Yep.

TLDR: no electronics on hidden trails, make sure no-one is following you.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Haha "cash money"...I didn't know Drake rode mountain bikes!?
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  • + 2
 If your trail ends up on strava
Edit it an re'name it
"stay off or I'll kick your fkng spokes in"
Simple
[Reply]
  • + 2
 So... who decides who is a "regional admin"? I'll volunteer right now for my area..
[Reply]
  • + 4
 brenthillier: "Once a trail is submitted it goes through an approval process. The most basic approval is a crowd-sourced process where other Pinkbike users can confirm or reject submissions."

So essentially, any random person who discovers a secret trail can submit it regardless of who built the trail, who maintains the trail, or whether they even know them or not. Then the boards of directors of the local trail association who administrator finds out about the secret trail and it isn't secret anymore. At the very least some of them are going to go check out the trail and more people will end up hearing about it and riding it. At worst they don't like it because it isn't a lame sustainable flow trail and they get it shut down and there are no more knarly DH trails in the area.

People don't keep secrets well, especially when they aren't the ones who put the hard work into building the trail. Combine this factor with the internet and its a recipe for disaster. They are putting way too much trust in these 'administrators', some of whom could just as well be undercover land management or law enforcement officials.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Damnn Protour. Damn. I spent years with two buddies building a trail where one wouldn't even consider riding a bike...only to be out working on it one day and have two fully kitted dudes come flying through. I got to talking to them and discovered that my trail was called stoner ridge and and was 3 miles long and yada yada.

This was a couple years ago, so strava wasnt too wide stream yet and unknown to me. But thats all it took for me to have a hatred for strava and any " internet lets go find all the awesome trails and have a rad f*cking database for them so every mtb er in the region can easily find them." f*ck THAT
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Thanks for doing this Trevor. Thanks for supporting this Radek. And thanks to both of you for being so respectful of keeping certain trails on the downlow. To the readership at large whenever Sharon or I have had concerns about trails Pinkbike has been ridiculously quick in responding Special shout out to Tyler Maine who whenever advocacy issues need to be put out for the public has helped me get the word out.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Thanks Lee! Also thanks for all you do to help promote mtn biking and all the trail work you do.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 its so frustrating looking up new trails online. many times ive visited a new spot that i read stellar reviews about only to be sorely disappointed. sooooo pumped for this didnt realize how deep it was going to be!! finally what the mtb world has been waiting for!! also cant wait to check out trails worldwide on the site even if visiting them isnt feasible
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You're right. There are too many variables. Reviews of the same trail can come from newb to pro level riders. Relative difficulty and technicality ratings vary wildly by region. Some people factor scenery into ratings, where others primarily rate on flow, terrain, or style. The same trail can yield drastically different experiences if a rider is on a rigid vs 6" bike.

You can mitigate bad trail experiences by widening your scope. Check ratings, youtube, google, and regional forums for alternate info. Cross reference yields more reliable results.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I have been having a go at it for a while and there is definitely work to do on the usability side of things. But having seen all the work you have done with Pinkbike and the concepts you have for Trailforks then Im confident this will become a great resource with time. Thankyou and good luck with the new venture.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "existing Pinkbike photos and videos will automatically be matched to the trail based on the name and geo location. This means that when riders are looking for new regions to travel to, and new trails to ride, they will see these great photos and videos. A picture's worth a thousand words and on Trailforks we've harnessed the incredible power of Pinkbike's photo and video catalogue"....
Think this needs some elaboration!!!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 When a new trail is added, the site searches for any Pinkbike photos along the entire gps track that are within a certain 30m radius. But a fairly small percentage of PB photos have GEO data. So we also try and match photos using the name of the trail and any keywords used in the PB photo description or title fields. But the photo needs to be in the same country/province as the trail to do a name match.

You can also add photos to trails manually, either via the normal Pinkbike method, there is a "trail" field when adding a photo. Or on Trailforks you can link to existing PB photos or upload new ones from a TF specific interface that reduces the steps in uploading a photo to PB. It auto selects a "trailforks" album and can auto-populate the "trail" field.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Ok, so removing the location or trail name from a photo takes it "off the radar"?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You can edit any of your own photos and remove a "linked" trail. Also if a photo is linked to a trail a "trail detail" box is shown on the PB photo page, there is a link at the bottom of this to flag a photo to a moderator if you want it removed.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 How about PB asking users first if they want their photos being used for this purpose? A simple "click to accept your following photos being linked to Trailworks..." ??
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ah, forgot about the disclaimer when users sign up... probably says somethign about Pinkbike owning all rights to material uploaded, etc, yeah?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I could send out a PB dashboard notice if one of your photos gets auto-tagged. From your TF profile page you can see all the PB photos that have been linked to trails.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 @canadaka sending out a notice would be awesome! love the service, but definitely want to keep some zones on the dl
[Reply]
  • + 1
 well dl trails probably won't be added to Trailforks and thus won't have auto-photo matching. But the notice is helpful regardless.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yep. Sounds good.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 canadaka a dashboard notice wood be grate. After all it is nice to know when someone uses one of my photos.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Tried adding one of my personal trails. The only option was DH or CC for type of trail. Had no luck drawing the trail in. Then it said it wasn't published when I submitted it and that my computer didn't have google earth installed. I usually don't want any one to know about my trails but its getting over grown and some traffic would mean I get to ride a trail instead of wasting energy beating a trail.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 You added a regoin, not a trail. It's confirmed and you can now add trails to it.

www.trailforks.com/region/spearwood
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Should have known my lack of computer savvy would let me down. I was rushing before work though. Thanks for the heads up.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 "What about illegal trails?
There are always going to be unofficial trails and we believe it is better for an association to be aware of them and manage them accordingly.
We have talked to many associations and have built tools to allow various ways of handling illegal trails.
- a trail can be visible
- a trail can be visible with a warning that it is a not sanctioned, not maintained and to ride at own risk
- a trail can be visible, but clearly marked as closed and marked do not ride
- a trails location can be hidden, but its name is still visible in lists for users to add photos and reports.
- a trail can be hidden but available to only certain groups
If a trail is hidden, users can't keep adding the trail. Having the data in the system allows associations to inventory their network and have the data available when needed for the future."

Only the last of those options is even remotely acceptable. Location OR a name still leads to the same problem. Please don't screw this up. -anyone who's ever tried to work with an irate private landowner after the fact of trails being built.

Otherwise this looks like a cool endeavor, especially tying in regions with advocacy and building groups.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I do like the idea of hidden trails overlapping other trails and making the other non-hidden trails hidden as well. Downside? Someone accidentally makes the local public trail system hidden and nobody can see it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 PHeller, that won't happen without admin approval.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 I'v used TRAILFORKS for several months now with only positive results. Not sure why so many DRAMA QUEENS a pitching a fit about. Trail exposure will only increase the masses. There is power in numbers. TRAILFORKS will not be able to change private property. It will always re mane private.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 properp doesn't dig.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "Trail exposure will only increase the masses"
Yeah... power in numbers. Power to widen, dumb down features, build reroutes, make braking bumps etc. The city council might even acknowledge that the trail is important to users and sanction it... they'll even foot the bill for pavers and grading it 5 feet wide. If you think that is a "dramatic" response then I don't know what to tell you. How many technical downhill trails have you built, and how many people are riding them on Strava?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 ianmp Iv built trails since the 80's and they are still being rode, expanded on, changed, shredded, burmed, signed, and modded. This is life. You cant control it just roll through it. Enjoy what you have. When it is gone fiend some new. Just quit crying like a 2 year old about stupid shit that hasten happened. The earth can get struck by a meteorite also and you lose all your trails so it is what it is. Just saying.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I cant blame a meteorite for being dumb as a brick and a sub-par cyclist. Therefore meteorite is void of any blame. It was just doing its job and destroying humanity. Mainly Trailforks.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Properp, your profile says you're 39. So at 5-15 years old, you built trails. Trails that are still being 'rode' that are now established? Nice work man. Really nice work. No really. You riding with Joe Breezer on Mt Tam during that period 'inventing mountain biking' too? This conversation isn't yours because it's one that deals in reality. And there's a reality of entitlement in this sport that a lot of the people creating the infrastructure for, are a little sick of. Not everything needs to be accessible to you WHEN you want it.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 wait, isn't entitlement also saying "i should be able to be build secret trails without anyone knowing and have them stay hidden forever." That sounds like a pretty skewed reality.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Of course it seems skewed if you think rolling your bike down a hill and telling your friends about it is the equivalent of actually building something. Disapprove of that? Then express that disapproval and stay away from them and go build your own. Let me put this in simpler terms illustrated by someone who understands what work is.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/9284162

www.pinkbike.com/photo/9284096

The truth is that someone who spent months/years working on a trail is probably going to have a lot more understanding of the given property ownership, be it amenable to the presence of a trail or not. Just because you found out: 'hey there's a trail over there' doesn't mean you have an understanding of what it means to have more people and/or cars around. Just because you don't know or understand the reasons in any given scenario, doesn't mean there aren't any. And remember.......someone else has a lot more blood sweat and tears in the situation than someone who just wants to ride, be it digging or working on logistics with a land owner. And yes, there are situations where a property owner is completely fine with a controlled number of riders because hey! They actually know each other! And they don't want strangers on their property. That's not entitlement, that's a relationship.

Let me state this as clearly as possible: Just because you know about a trail doesn't mean you know the story behind that trail. So have some manners and do 1% of what the builders did and find out. The reasons for wanting to keep a trail off the radar could be one of many, even one of simple timing. The argument of 'but I wannnaaaa ride it noowwwwww' is yes, absolutely, unequivocally, juvenile entitlement.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The entitlement thing is partly true, but nothing is black and white, and it's a matter of statistics. If you build a trail and someone's friend tells their crew about it who tell their friends and you end up having 20-50+ riders frequenting your trail, making their own changes, that's life. You can be a dick about it but there will be diminishing returns.

What we are talking about here is different though, and it's happened with Strava where I live and ride. This is a MASSIVE influx of riders on secret lines, and absolute awareness of the traffic by land management. I ride Laguna with all the cute trails you see on Pinkbike, and before Strava it was already absurd that someone in Florida might know where Telonics or PG are. Now there is a segment for almost every secret trail, and anyone can go test their luck. This will sound even more dramatic, but I guarantee the airlift statistics have risen as a result of that democratization. Do you think the city response will be to make a skills-building area? No.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Haters gona hate. Babies gona cry. Everyone is welcome to ride any of the local trails in my area. If your not sure where they are see TRAILFORKS. Iv mapped them all there.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 This is super cool, from IMBA Arg. we colaborate in this proyect in the BETA stage, and is awesome. We hope people love this idea, and start uploading trails around the world. WELL DONE Pink Bike. Congratulations.
[Reply]
  • + 6
 Not bad pinkbike, not bad!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The original Trailforks was actually created before mtbproject and work on the new PB Trailforks began before it was released. Trailforks is world-wide, mtbp is mostly only focused on the USA. We are not tied to imba and lots of local clubs are not imba members. The 2 projects take different approaches, Trailforks is more wiki-like, mtbp is more strict on its submission and approval process by imba. We believe we have a much better product, features and the resources to make it succeed in becoming the definitive source for mtb trails online.

Mtbproject is also only partnered with imba, not run by it. Its created by a private company making money from adverts on the site and their deals site. Trailforks is also owned by a private company (Pinkbike), but the website itself has no adverts or requirement to generate revenue to be self supporting. Money generated through Trailforks through features like "Trail Karma" goes 100% to the trail associations.

There are other trail sites as well, but we strongly feel we could make something better and its something the PB audience has been asking for years.

And I will quote from the article above "Trailforks is created and supported by Pinkbike, a large, well known name in mountain biking that has the resources to make this project a success. With the experience of running a site used by millions, Pinkbike gives Trailforks the technical power to make the site fast and highly available. Pinkbike will ensure Trailforks' longevity, with no requirement for it to be self supporting. So many other trail sites have come and gone, never taken off, have paid access to useful data or are locally focused. Trailforks is free and world-wide."
[Reply]
  • + 2
 IMBA and affiliated clubs can use Trailforks just like they can use mtbp, they are not tied to either. We have had international imba chapters adding their trails to Trailforks for months (since the imba partnered mtbp is usa focussed). Many chapters or clubs might choose to add trail data to both, but we are confident we will continue to provide the best tools & greatest value add.

We are not anti imba, we are helping with one of their core missions "We inspire more people to experience the outdoors on bicycles". This is something Pinkbike has been doing for over 15 years.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Having browsed both, trail forks is far better, easier to navigate, and has way more info. It also seems easier to submit trails and has a better system in place for keeping track of illegal vs legal trails. Good job pb!
[Reply]
  • + 9
 Thanks for recognizing that trail association legitimacy isn't necessarily tied to IMBA membership.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 ^^ Hell yeah. We do not want or need IMBA in Washington.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I appreciate the inclusion of supporting local trail build/advocacy groups. Spot on!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This is an awesome idea, but they might run into a lot of issues (illegal trails, private ones, etc... etc...).
The update system is gonna have to be on point.
This is not the first try at this type of service, but I really hope this one makes it thru.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this is the beginning to the end of what mountain biking was. At least some not so really mountain bikers will be making a profit. If every trail has to be approved, then why would u included illegal trails? this should only be legal for legal approved trails and leave the rest alone.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Who you calling not so really mountain bikers? the staff at pinkbike! Razz
If an unsanctioned/illegal trail gets posted & approved by a mod and shouldn't be there, then anyone can report it and it will be quickly investigated and taken down or marked hidden to prevent future attempts at adding it. We can't vet every trail in the world, that's where the power of crowdsourcing comes in.

We don't encourage illegal trails being added, but lots of trails are in a unsanctioned grey-zone and different regions & associations have different policies towards them, so they can decide themselves. We provide methods to keep tabs on possible illegal trails being added, subscribing to a local region to get notified when a new trail is added, marking a trail is hidden, flagging a trail so regional and site admins are notified. Over time we will build out a network of local region admins that will monitor their local areas and they can approve or deny trails themselves. We already have around 30 regional admins from local associations, bike clubs or trusted users setup with access. Trailforks has been running in the Vancouver, BC area all year with no issues of illegal trails getting added. The sky has not fallen.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 So I have to check up on this site from time to time to see if my trail that I don't want publicized has been publicized? Someone is making money here and it's not the people that are out doing the work. Shame.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @bradwalton , you can subscribe to the an area and get notified anytime any new content is added. Also you can just put up this trail, and mark it as hidden so no one ever can put up the same trail. Even if they try to put it up in a different name they won't be able to since it would be based on the gps track. Also since you are then the admin of the trail and the trail is hidden, only you will see statistics from the trail when people ride it.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Brad Walton speaks the word.

....Radek.... seriously though? Do you not see that what you just said is literally like holding someone's trail at ransom?

#hideyokids #hideyowife #Pinkbikesr@pingeverything
[Reply]
  • + 3
 The trail builders that are worried about this app DO NOT want to join your club to receive updates as to whether or not their own trail has been compromised.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Business ethics...... Business>Ethics, right Pinkbike?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Those controls I mentioned were built based on requests from some other trail builders and associations. They wanted a way to permanently remove a trail on the system and prevent anyone from EVER putting it on in the future. They can't control that on the rest of the internet. They cant prevent people from sharing info on other mapping, fitness, social sites, but they wanted the controls here so this ability was added.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Brad and DigorSHUTup. I'm one of the paranoid builders Radek is talking about. My own trail association which I helped start does not approve of my penchant for building unsanctioned down-low trails and I am therefore somewhat of a pariah. My trails are sprayed all over Strava Heatmap and Strava does sweet FA when I've asked for them to be removed. Trailforks is the only trail website where the people behind it have respected my wishes. So my support for them is based on my interactions with them.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 There are several websites that are trying to accomplish this, but their names are spoken rarely. Pinkbike is big on the net, so big, that when I go to drive to a trail head it's no surprise to see a PB sticker on another PB members car/truck in the parking lot. And when I go to Hood River to hit PC, it would be a surprise to not see at least one vehicle with a PB sticker.

This is a much needed improvement to trail tracking. I would like to add a suggestion, each trail should have a link to the trail stewards that maintain the region. This would make it easier for volunteers to find schedules with regional trail stewards to give a helping hand on authorized dig days.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 A trail page does list the local trail association if its setup in the PB Places directory.

Also trails can have 'Supporters' listed, being trail sponsors, builders & maintainers. here is an example: Severed D
http://i.imgur.com/VYIh3Ym.png

When adding/editing a region the land owner can be listed and website linked.

We will have some Trailforks stickers coming soon too! Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @canadaka I will be buying one!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This idea seems awesome. So many other failed trail databases, but PB doing it right will be rad. I used to look at MTBR trail info - what a joke.

I scratch my head playing devils advocate, what are some of the drawbacks? Call me old, but I used to walk into town and hit the LBS and shoot the sh!t and get route info from them, buy a water bottle, and leave. Yet another jab to the LBS? It's a stretch, not much to critique. Nice Work!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 fantastic idea if you happen to live in canada, will check back in the spring - sooo many glitches navigating the ui i gave up after 30 seconds. when click bike park/regions takes you to canada. clicked skills parks can find facilities in any country but cant get straight to info about wether they have dh or trails or 4x at the same center it just takes me to the skills page.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This would be a great tool to post trails in San Diego Proper and surrounding areas. Then City and County Managers with the assistance of BLM, Fish and Wildlife, State Park Rangers, County Sheriffs, Dept of Interior Agents and the Forestry Service can then locate and close more trails in Southern California. Since the land grabbers, ECO nazis and Pelosi inspired Socialists know whats best for us, thus can tell us what fireroads we can ride or where we can stand and just gaze upon the great land that is ours but not accessible. GO the other 49, GO!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Question, when uploading my strava history, should I just upload MTB trails or can I just upload everything (road rides, canal tow path rides etc...) Because my riding is varied and filtering through my strava rides to just find the true MTB trails would take forever !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 When uploading or linking from strava you can specify which bikes to upload. Presumably if you exclude your rode bike, then you would upload only mtb data.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You would think ! Unfortunately my mountain bike gets used for a lot more than just "Mountain Biking" !!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 The Trailforks bulk import and auto import of Strava activities only imports "bike" activities that have a gps track and are public. If the activity is marked as a "commute" it also will not be imported. And like radek mentioned, you can also filter by specific bikeid.

But if your using your mtn bike for lots of road rides that aren't commutes, then were kinda out of options! Smile You can of course just delete it from your Trailforks Ridelog, I like to only import & show my mtn bike rides. MAYBE one day Strava will actually have a separate type for mtn biking Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thanks for the suggestions, deleting seems like the simplest option for me at the moment, more importantly does leaving a load of commute / leisure rides on my Trailforks ride log cause any problems ?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 not really, just kinda useless data (unless you want to log them with Ridelog, but its meant for mtnb rides). It can count towards some of the region ride state, but since your not riding any trails its more the trail usage state that are important, which it will have no effect on.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Thanks again, gonna delete all the mundane crap !, but may take some time ! As long as I know i'm not clogging up this great new site meanwhile ;-) Cheers Canadaka.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 this is going to have such a huge impact in weather the group i started can get the trails we want and get our local ski hill to be even more interested then they arleady are thank you pinbike i can now shoe examples of other parks elevation and how they made it work best idea ever
[Reply]
  • + 1
 "Many areas have maps owned by private interests..." Same with Trailforks, owned by Pinkbike. This is an ambitious and interesting project. But if this project is as successful as it might be, what guarantee is there that the resulting database and website, given its value by the free crowd-sourced labour of riders/members around the world, won't be sold or otherwise monetized by its owner? Consider incorporating a non-profit society to own and operate TF with PB's support?
[Reply]
  • + 5
 connect with MapMyRide please, i dont like strava.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 added to my todo list, they have an API so it shouldn't be too hard.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 RunKeeper is my go to. I think they also have an API.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm opposed. Now a thousand more riders can come from outside the area and trash trails that are already overridden. The ratio of riders vs people who actually do maintenance is becoming more out of balance every year and this will only enable people to discover/ride trails they never knew about before. Great if all you do is ride, those people are gonna love trailforks, but for those of us that spend hundreds of hours every year building, it's very disheartening.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 So wait, as a GIS Professional, I'll be able to export a region of user submitted tracks to make fancy maps and sell as profit to my local bike shop? Or will Trailforks actually own the user submitted information?
[Reply]
  • + 14
 Share-a-like policy. Means that you can get the data for free, but it also means that anything that is created with it has to be free, or 100% of the revenue goes to the associations.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yeah why would you take peoples free work to sell it to a shop, so lame. Nobody would buy it anyways when the shop could tell them to use trail forks. D*ck move
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Depends what you consider peoples free work. Google collects lots of information daily that people don't associate as working. When I ride a trail, I don't consider that work. My question was to clarify a case where lets say I have put work into making my maps and trails and I want the community to use them. Then some company comes along and uses my trails to make maps that they sell to the public. I want to know if my "work" is protected. It sounds like it is, to an extent. Someone could just come along, change a few vertex points and say "nope, this was my track, it's different, see?"
[Reply]
  • + 1
 i think its a great idea, but is anyone else remotely worried about trail secrecy? i agree theres trails that should be ridden all over and others only locals should know about, the ones you're guided to or find on your own. I just don't like the idea of letting randoms ride blindly into trails guided by lines on a phone. And thats what Strava Segments is for anyway so...
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Wait, so this whole time its been in beta?! ....that means i finally participated in a beta, woohoo!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Many of Google's services are actually technically in beta as they're constantly changing and being tweaked.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 lol YouTube Beta? Confused I don't know if i could quite follow that logic
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If you use Windows as an operating system you have been beta testing for a while , just with out the Microsoft salary
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Hehehe, ok thats a good one!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Finally a trail website with some modern webpage design You'll shall expect me to be a top contributor once I'm back in the MTB game
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If you can't ride, you can always start by adding riding areas!

www.trailforks.com/ridingareas
[Reply]
  • + 2
 As someone who put together a trail map website for my local spots, thank you so much for making the data share-alike! It's such a valuable resource.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 This is a great idea, and it's good to see an approval process to protect some of the secret trails.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Yes it is a problem building trails that get overgrown due to not getting used enough, that is the only reason would want my trails known about, so I can build more!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Another trail database??? There's already at least three incomplete ones. Buuut, still waiting for one that does it right, maybe this will be the one.....
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This is great but in Europe we have red graded trails. You can't just lump them in with black graded trails, so that's a massive shortcoming.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @LemonadeMoney we already support red graded trails "UK Forestry Commission trail grades". If you try to add a trail in a UK region, it will present a different list of trail difficulty choices. A bunch of Red trails added in the UK already: http://www.trailforks.com/region/united-kingdom/trails/?difficulty=9
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Well I took a look at Les Deux Alpes and there were no red trails shown. All the red trails were classed as black. Why would you not follow the bike parks own classification?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Horrible idea. There are already people posting illegal trails all over OC. All this does is provide yet another avenue for THE MAN to crack down on fun.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Trails must be approved first so this won't happen. The North Shore has been on Trailforks for a while and non of our illegal trails are on the site.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 They're already there. I'm looking right at them on my screen. They have been for a while.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 You can always report them and have them hidden. It's not going to be perfect without user input
[Reply]
  • + 1
 its not going to be perfect unless the people making money off this deal put in the time and effort to make it what it could be. Not leaving it up to joe save my trails to come in and edit the bs he wishes didnt even exist.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Now all we need is a Pinkbike 'Trailview' bike to go ride all the trails! Any volunteers?!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 we have thought about this!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I'll ride the bike with a monster camera on my back
[Reply]
  • + 1
 @canadaka It would be incredible to get standardised POV footage of the most popular trails. Sign me up!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's on my list to add gps video support, for cameras like the Garmin Virb. See the video with a map beside it and a marker moving along as the video plays. We may work on a promotion around this in the future Wink
[Reply]
  • + 2
 please please please add functionality to tag trails as single track, dual track, fire road, etc.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Any trail can be setup with a variety of options, including what you mentioned. Here is a screen shot... www.pinkbike.com/photo/11534030
[Reply]
  • + 2
 you can! There us a "Trail Type" field with the following options:

singletrack, doubletrack, mixed, machine groomed, dirt/gravel road, paved path, gravel path, other

Also trails can be added as "Access roads" or "Secondary Access roads"
[Reply]
  • + 2
 This is great! Really happy to see something like this released for mountain bikers only.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What is with this? Receiving this message when trying to bulk upload: "Strava API rate limit reached! Please try again later."
[Reply]
  • + 1
 yah we've been hitting the Strava API rate limit today with the initial rush of people bulk importing strava rides, almost 5,000 rides have been added today so far. Strava only lets us make so many calls to their service per day and per 15 minute period. So just try again in a few hours or after the initial rush tomorrow. I will be working on adding a queue system for the bulk import to get around this.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Ah ok, makes sense. No problem I was just curious - thanks for the info.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 been adding/ looking at the site for a while already and its kind of difficult and buggy but i like it anyway.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Game Changer, Bravo
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Such a great idea - I have long thought that mtb needed a cohesive guide to trails. Amazing work by Brent and the folks at Trailforks!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Fork my trail and I'll bury you in it, right beside your Stravabating homies.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Awesome! Glad to see an offline mode for mobile!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Can i link my gopro videos with the trails?
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  • + 1
 Of course. On any trail you can add videos or photos, and you can either upload, or simply link to the video on existing sites like pinkbike, youtube, etc.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 PINKBIKE I LOVE YOU. 3
[Reply]
  • + 1
 What an awesome service. I just added my favorite trail.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That's awesome! You guys rules!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 guess what? its coming out whether you like it or not.....
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Trailforks is awesome!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Doods truly awesome work!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 if u dont like the trails ur riding go find em and get off the internet
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love trail forks! Fab
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Trailforks uses strava for trail mapping.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So it'll be as inaccurate ,people will use smart phones to get a better time .Segments won't register from one ride to the next.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Trailforks uses any gps source for data. Whether its strava, everytrial, a garmin device, or any number of other devices, trailforks will be able to process the data. The accuracy only matters for the initial trail import and that can be edited by the creator at any time. The ride statistics that are most important to associations for trail usage, don't have to be accurate as primarily the detection of which trails have been ridden is important.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I didn't have a problem uploading my RunKeeper GPS file from the iPhone. It worked great.
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  • + 1
 If my phone gives me a better time o am even slower than I thought. Dang.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 B I E (best idea ever )
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