Trek Carbon Session 9.9 - Exclusive First Look

Jul 14, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
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Pinkbike takes a close look at Trek's carbon-framed Session 9.9 downhill racer and its special Fox Hybrid Air 40 RC2 fork and custom-tuned RC4 shock. Is this the fastest off-the-shelf production bike ever produced?

Aaron Gwin's Trek World Racing Team 9.9

First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  You're looking at Aaron Gwin's Trek Session 9.9 carbon downhill race bike, the very bike that he rode to victory at the Mont Sainte Anne World Cup just two races ago. That race also happened to be the 9.9's coming out, as well as Aaron's first race aboard the new machine, having thrown a leg over it only a short time before heading to the Canadian round of the World Cup. Not a bad debut! While the 9.9 is almost identical to the Trek World Racing aluminum team bikes, it should really be thought of as an entirely different animal from the 2011 Session 88 platform. That isn't solely down to its carbon construction - for about a year and half now the team has been riding a version with a slew of changes, including big modifications to the new bike's geometry and suspension layout that greatly effect its performance. Oh, and the new carbon frame happens to be about 800 grams lighter than the 2011 aluminum team frame to boot, with the complete production version of the 9.9 projected to weigh in at around 35 pounds. Pinkbike photographer Ian Hylands sat down with Aaron for a few minutes at Mont Sainte Anne and asked him a few questions about the bike:

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This video tells Gwin's incredible story aboard the Session 9.9
  This video tells Gwin's incredible story aboard the Session 9.9



First Look at Trek's Session 9.9 Production DH Racer
  The 2012 Production Session 9.9 in all its glory. While any new downhill bike stirs up the rumors, Trek's new carbon Session took speculation to a new level. Forums were filled with wildly different details of the new machine, but everyone seemed to agree on one point: it would be made of carbon. Then, at the Mt. Sainte Anne round of the World Cup series, the carbon Trek made its public debut as Gwin rolled out of the pits for his first practice run aboard the new Trek. The internet immediately went into overdrive, with photos of it popping up worldwide on mountain bike websites. At that point, little was known about the new bike, beyond that it was obviously made from carbon and that it would be called the Session 9.9. Pinkbike spent the last four days in the Austrian Alps with Trek, learning about the Session 9.9 and about the technology that Trek used to construct the new chassis. The 9.9's carbon frame includes an impressive range of geometry adjustment - the very same setup the the Trek World Racing team is using - and a new quick-change leverage-rate feature that tunes the suspension to better handle square-edge bumps on a race track and to hug the ground - or to pop better and pedal firmer for pedal-heavy tracks, or sessions in the bike park. The production 9.9 sports Trek-developed proprietary Fox suspension, including a radical Fox Hybrid Air fork that uses an air-assist spring that you'll find only on the 9.9, and a custom shock tune that is currently used by the TWR team.

bigquotesOur goal was to create a bike that any rider could use on the World Cup circuit and not be held back. We feel that the stock Session 9.9 will actually outperform many factory race bikes, it's that dialed, off the shelf. - Jose Gonzalez, Trek suspension engineer




Trek Session 9.9 Details

First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  From a distance, it would be easy to mistake the new carbon frame for the aluminum model. It follows the same lines and basic layout. Trek claims that not only is the frame 800 grams lighter than the TWR aluminum frame, but it also performs even better in strength and stiffness testing.


First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  The new carbon frame features new bolt-on fork bumpers to keep the frame from being damaged during those inevitable crashes that every downhill bike sees, and they also serve double duty as the entry point for the internal cable routing. Both the rear brake and derailleur can be run through the frame, making for smoother lines and a setup that is less likely to be damaged in a crash. The Session 9.9 still gives you the ability to route both shift and brake lines externally as well, making it easier to replace or shorten them if the need arises. Trek created what they call 'MicroTruss' housing guides and according to Trek, the MicroTruss system is lighter than standard cable guides and also makes the frame stronger. Aaron's bike, pictured above, is fitted with a standard Cane Creek headset, while production models will be equipped with Cane Creek's adjustable AngleSet that allows riders to tweak the steering geometry to their liking.


First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  Carbon rocker link: The 9.9's front triangle, seat stays and the one-piece HexMC EVO Link are all made from carbon. (The swingarm is still a welded aluminum part). The red link is said to be both lighter and stiffer than the original welded version, and the main pivot bearings have been moved inboard into the frame as opposed to pressed into bearing journals within the link itself. Fox Racing Shox puts a huge effort into dialing in Gwin's suspension to his exact needs, whether that is custom valving (his tune comes stock on the Session 9.9) or special low-friction seals. Aaron's custom-tuned Fox RC4 damper sports a sticker with his initials - a clear reminder as to who it belongs to. The TWR shock tune on the 9.9 is a great example of racing improving the breed. Aaron uses it to win World Cups, and then we get to take advantage of it.


First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  Although the Session 9.9's basic suspension layout looks quite similar to the previous model's, changes to the pivot locations have altered the leverage rate. The main swingarm pivot is still in the same location relative to the bottom bracket, but both the EVO Link rocker's shock pivot and seat-stay pivot locations have been changed slightly. Trek has also altered the length of the swingarm's 'Full Floater' extension at the lower shock mount. Why? Trek is adamant that the suspension's leverage rate plays a much larger role in allowing the bike to carry momentum over rough ground. The new design features a slightly flatter rate through the middle of the stroke - where the bike spends a lot of its time - which allows the rear wheel to react quicker to abrupt impacts that try to suck your speed away. In simple terms: the rear wheel can move out of the way faster if the suspension uses a flatter leverage rate, and the faster the rear wheel can move out of the way, the more momentum the bike will carry. That flatter rate also adds an extra 10 millimeters of rear-wheel travel, upping the total amount to 210 millimeters. It isn't quite that easy though, as there is always a trade-off from one realm for improved performance to another. In this case, Trek World Racing found that the flatter rate didn't hold the bike up quite as well in the corners, especially at the speeds that they hit them at World Cup races. The answer was simply to tune the Fox RC4's compression adjustment to better hold the bike up in its travel, which is an ideal solution given that the TWR team found that they had to set their compression settings quite light on the original design. The result is that the new bike allows riders to use a wider range of adjustment on their shocks.


First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  The new Session makes good use of Trek's Active Braking Pivot (ABP) out back, that keeps the suspension active and tracking the ground while the rider is on the brakes. ABP works by minimizing the angular change in the tire's contact point through the rear axle in relation to the ground as the suspension cycles. The smaller the change between the two, the less effect braking will have on the suspension. The rear end also features 12 x 157 millimeter spacing, referred to by Trek as 'ABP DH Convert'. Now, before everyone gets up in arms about another new axle standard, it needs to be said that the system is easily converted to fit standard 150mm hubs simply by swapping out the hardware with some included parts. Trek's wider, 157 millimeter axle spacing nests into a small shoulder which automatically aligns the through axle with the dropouts and hub. (Same as the 142/12mm hub design). The system lets you easily center and install the rear wheel without struggling to align the axle with the hub. Easier is better, right? If you want to use standard-spaced, 150-millimeter rear wheels, just install the standard dropouts and you're set.


First photos from the Trek Carbon Session 9.9 http www.pinkbike.com news trek-session-carbon-9.9.html
  Trek is well aware that there are many different crank options on the market for downhill use and didn't want to limit the choices by building the new Session frame with a Press Fit bottom bracket shell as on their other carbon models, so you'll find a standard, threaded 83mm bottom bracket shell that will accept any downhill crankset on the market. The frame's ISCG-05 chain-guide tabs are machined into the threaded- aluminum bottom bracket insert to ensure perfect alignment.


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  Some of the 9.9's most interesting technology is hidden within the frame. Like all top carbon frames, the Session frame is built using a bladder - a lightweight inflatable balloon is inserted within the frame to apply pressure to the layers of carbon as they cure inside the mold. A rubber bladder cannot apply even pressure to tight and or complex-shaped sections within the frame. According to Trek, instead of adding extra carbon to reinforce these trouble spots, it uses a proprietary low-density, ultra-stiff material inside the frame to evenly pressurize these areas from within. Interestingly, Trek claims that this method, referred to as 'InTension', actually results in tube sections that are four times higher in flexural strength and eight times as stiff. InTension helps build a lighter, stronger carbon structure by replacing inner layers of carbon with a material that fills more volume, but with significantly lighter weight than a carbon-only structure. Presently, the Session 9.9 is the only frame in Trek's lineup that currently uses InTension, but Trek is so pleased with the performance that it is likely to be found on other models in the near future. Photo by Sterling Lorence


The Secret of the Session 9.9's Suspension Tune

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  World Cup Suspension: The Session 9.9, along with the aluminum Session 88, comes equipped with a custom tuned Fox RC4 damper that was developed by Fox and the Trek World Racing team. Listen to Jose Gonzalez, Trek's top suspension engineer, explain the shock's inner workings in the audio below. Photo by Sterling Lorence

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  Found only on the Session 9.9 and developed by Trek's Southern California suspension lab, Fox's Kashima coated 40 Fit RC2 Hybrid Air fork makes use of a lightweight titanium coil spring and an air-spring, combined to allow riders to tune their spring rates more precisely. Instead of having to swap out the coil spring for the lighter or heavier option, you can simply add or remove air pressure via the Schrader valve atop the left fork leg. Jose Gonzalez explains how the system works in the audio below. Photo by Sterling Lorence

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2012 Trek Session 9.9 Specs

Session 9.9 Frame:
• Intended use: Downhill racing
• All new carbon frame
• Carbon EVO Link and seat stays
• 210mm of rear wheel travel (up 10mm from last year)
• Tapered 1-1/8'' - 1.5'' head tube
• Frame is approx. 800 grams lighter than the TWR team's aluminum version
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• 12 x 157 ABP DH rear axle spacing (slotted 150mm rear end for easier wheel alignment, can also accept standard 150mm wheels)
• Internal or external cable routing for both brake and derailleur
• Custom Fox RC4 shock with TWR tune
• Adjustable geometry allows head angle range from 62.5 to 65.4 degrees
• Revised suspension rate for great square bump performance

Session 9.9 Parts Spec:
Frame - OCLV Mountain Carbon w/ InTension main frame and seat stay. Carbon armor, ABP DH, Full Floater, E2 tapered head tube, HexMC carbon EVO Link, 210mm of travel
Sizes - sm, m, l, xl
Fork - Fox Factory Series 40 Fit RC2 w/ Hybrid Air and Kashima coating, 203mm of travel
Shock - Fox DHX RC4 w/ custom TWR tune
Color - Carbon Smoke
Shifter - SRAM X0, 10 speed
Rear Der - SRAM X0
Cassette - SRAM PG-1070 11-26, 10 speed
Crank - SRAM X0 DH Carbon
Chainring - 38 tooth
Pedals - Wellgo MG-1
Wheelset - DT Swiss 240s 20mm front hub, 12 x 157mm rear hub, DT Swiss FR 600 rims
Tires - Bontrager G4 Team
Saddle - Bontrager - Evoke 4, titanium rails
Seapost - Bontrager Rhythm Elite, 31.6
Handlebar - Bontrager Rhythm Pro Carbon
Stem - Truvativ Holzfeller
Headset - Cane Creek AngleSet
Brakeset - Avid Elixir X0

2012 Trek Session Geometry:
Between the Session's Mino Link system (rotatable chips used to attach the seat stays to the EVO Link), the Cane Creek AngleSet headset that comes stock, and 12mm of adjustability in the Fox fork’s axle-to-crown length, The new Session has over 28 different geometry settings. This unique combination of adjustability gives you 1/3 of a degree adjustments at the head tube, and bottom bracket adjustments down to the millimeter. Excessive? Certainly not considering the bike's intentions as a top tier race machine. It should also be stressed that although using a combination of the Mino Link and AngleSet allows you to select a head angle between 62.5 to 65.4 degrees, the Mino Link's prime intention is to tune the suspension (by varying the leverage ratio to either devour square edge impacts or to pop, enabling the rider to clear rough sections easier, while the AngleSet and axle-to-crown length are used to compensate for the geometry changes made by altering the Mino Link.

MINO LINK RACE - big bumps, super fast, steep, maximum square edge absorption
Mino Link Race
MINO LINK PARK - maximum pop for jumping, higher BB for super rough and rocky, fast-pedaling courses.
Mino Link Park
*size medium, applies to both carbon and aluminum models



Behind the Scenes with Trek's 9.9 Development Team

Pinkbike photographer, Ian Hylands, was on hand when the first Session 9.9 prototype was being built for testing a year ago. The photo above shows it being assembled for the very first time in Whistler, with test and development rider Andrew Shandro being the lucky pilot. This prototype was painted up to look like a much less interesting aluminum frame so as not to arouse any suspicion from casual observers. The ruse worked, with Trek spending much time on Whistler's trails, dialing in the settings, geometry and learning about how the new bike performed without anyone noticing.
  Pinkbike photographer, Ian Hylands, was on hand when the first Session 9.9 prototype was being built for testing a year ago. The photo above shows it being assembled for the very first time in Whistler, with test and development rider Andrew Shandro being the lucky pilot. This prototype was painted up to look like a much less interesting aluminum frame so as not to arouse any suspicion from casual observers. The ruse worked, with Trek spending much time on Whistler's trails, dialing in the settings, geometry and learning about how the new bike performed without anyone noticing.


Andrew Shandro riding at Whistler on a prototype Trek Session 9.9
  Andrew up to speed on the early prototype Session 9.9. At this point it still wasn't a given that the bike would ever see production - Trek was still evaluating the possibilities of a carbon framed Session and whether it made sense or not. They obviously came away from the test happy, as a lot of effort was then put into further development.
bigquotesMy first impression of the bike before before I had the chance to ride it was how incredibly light it felt. And once I got the chance to actually ride the 9.9 it blew my mind how fast and stable it felt. I was little skeptical at first, I thought it might feel too light, but it was the complete opposite. The bike is an absolute weapon on the trail, light, fast and stable. The characteristics of carbon are amazing, the bike floated over the terrain and took the harshness out of the trail. - Andrew Shandro, Trek test rider



Aluminum Session gets the same treatment:
While the carbon Session 9.9 is no doubt the king of the lineup, the aluminum models will certainly appeal to more riders due to their more cost conservative construction. Less expensive won't mean that they'll lack any of the bells and whistles though, and the aluminum frame will feature all of the same geometry and adjustments, internal or external cable routing, as well as the 12 x 157 ABP DH Convert rear axle spacing. The top of the line aluminum model, the Session 88, will even come equipped with the same custom TWR tuned Fox RC4 rear shock. The aluminum models should be popular with many privateer racers who will use the left over money that they would have otherwise spent on the Session 9.9 to travel to races and pay entry fees.


Availability and pricing:
Unless you're Aaron Gwin, or another member of the Trek World Racing team, you'll have to patiently wait until this coming October before you are able to throw a leg over your own Session 9.9. Pricing is yet to be decided upon, and while the new carbon bike certainly won't be inexpensive, Trek has been very forward in making it clear that the Session 9.9 will be priced quite competitively.


Pinkbike's take:
Lighter, faster, stronger? That is always the goal, isn't it? The new Session 9.9 is simply stunning in more ways than one. Not only does the bike obviously perform well, with Gwin taking it to the win on its debut race, but the production version should also build up to a lightweight bike around 35lbs. Trek has taken a shot at producing what they feel is simply the best off-the-shelf race bike available. And although we have yet to ride the new machine in anger, we're willing to bet that they have succeeded. The 9.9, along with the aluminum version, make use of the same suspension dynamics, same geometry, and even a Fox Racing Shox custom shock tune, that were developed for the Trek World Racing team to allow you to go faster. In what other timed action sport can you go out and purchase equipment that rivals what the professionals use? You or I will never sit in a Formula 1 car, straddle a MotoGP bike, or be able to get our paws on the same machinery that James Stewart uses. But we can jump on a bike that is very, very similar in spec, and exactly the same in geometry, to the one that Aaron Gwin has been absolutely dominating World Cup downhill racing aboard. You may never win a downhill race, or even want to enter one, but you do have to admit that it is pretty damn cool.


Visit the Trek website to see their entire lineup.



Do you like what you see? Let's hear what you make of the new lightweight Session 9.9. from Trek!

292 Comments

  • + 77
 Excellent review that just makes me shit myself for having purchased the 2011 session.
  • + 14
 Just to add, such an inspirational rider that Gwin. His style it makes everything look so smooth and flawless, but at the same time you see how hard he works at it.
  • - 92
 my next bike?? or will the frame snap on me when I hit a 20ft gap??
  • + 28
 If you're measuring gaps and jumps, the launch that Aaron rode off in the video was at least 30ft from takeoff to landing. It was one of the more impressive things I've seen -- he'd never ridden it before, and just came in charging so hard that the first time he flew through tree branches. incredible.
  • - 7
 Hey, what about the PRICE???? unless i missed it somewhere..... Cause I want one!!!!
  • + 12
 I need to get another job so I can buy a trek! my mouth is watering
  • - 13
 looks pretty good... this makes me feel a bit better for getting my 2012 40's ... with an air cartage they will be almost as light as boxxer wc, and ride much better Razz
  • + 1
 dream bike
  • + 12
 WOW did they really have to make this right after i got my 2011 -___-...........Fml
  • + 9
 We can slip the air cartridge into current 40rc2 fit models? Hell to the yes!
@stevecabrera, you and me both Facepalm
  • + 4
 well its not like our bikes suck or anything but dam 35 lbs
  • + 3
 Not to mention smooth lines, improved, geo, and air cartridge. Plus the paint job is just sick.
  • + 8
 im tryin to convince my self that my bike is still good but dam ur not helping hahaha and you forgot the new leverage ratio lol
  • + 4
 Geo covers leverage ratio. Lol, I know what you mean, just step out and ride yours for a few minutes.
Just around the neighborhood. You'll feel better
lol
  • + 3
 hahahah your right its still amazing Smile
  • + 3
 Hahaha, you did it? lol
  • + 6
 this bike has mad sex appeal
  • + 3
 October seems like decades away
  • + 6
 I'm having one of those 'what would you do for a Klondike Bar' moments
  • + 1
 hahah yea depending on the price of the new one i just mite sell mine haha
  • + 1
 my would never let me, she'd freak. Or let me sell it and take the money. Something about having to use a bike until it breaks for years and years
  • + 1
 yea id proly be the same story with me too haha
  • - 14
 im not gonna lie..im getting sick of all this carbon sh*t...
  • + 4
 Interesting that he runs minions but the production model comes with bontrager tyres. i'd of thought trek could take a hint from the pro about which tyres are better...
  • - 26
 Trek suck they should stick to making their XC bikes. 88's snapped and dented like kona's all over the place and the warranty help you get when they snap is shit. It's Gwin thats winning races with the support he gets from the team the bike isn't winning shit once you get a descent enough bike thats not a shed with half good geometry its down to the rider/training/support. Gwin is destroying because of all the hard training with Tomac and the mega factory support from Trek this year compared to minor yeti team support in the past.
and he got on the bike and felt comfortable right away? no way?!? f*cking witchcraft? it's basically the same fuking bike dammit add an inch of travel to my bike id probly be pretty comfortable as well... plus he's as pro as it gets.

overated by a million like the 88, Aaron Gwin is a god, Trek suck

But hey I'm just a hater...
  • + 1
 What is your problem man, I have seen many session 88s from 09 still functioning, sure there were problem, but gradually those problems were solved, especially with the 2011 frame. I ride a '11 88 and yes, it is easy to get used to, it is in essence my first ever DH bike and took only a day to get accustomed to. Trek warranty support is some of the best I have heard of, maybe you have had your problems, but that doesn't apply to everyone else out there, please take your internet testosterone somewhere else.
  • + 23
 I had a 2005 Trek Session 7... I cracked that frame after 4 years of abuse at Highland. Within 4 days of Trek receiving an e-mailed picture of my cracked frame I had a 2010 Session 88 with an RC4 in my hands.. You have no idea what you are talking about. Their warranty is ridiculous. Aron Gwin is a god. Trek is amazing, and you are mad at something else in your life (probably a shitty childhood)... Don't blame Trek.
  • + 5
 @ lewismc, A good rider deserves a bike like this, sure, trek started in the xc scene, but I believe they have, or have come very close to, building the perfect downhill race bike. All lines of bikes have a few select bikes that snap, and judging by Semenuk's rampage win, I'd say the 88's must have been a pretty damn good bike.
  • + 4
 @fetus oven, nice name and a story Trek win.
  • + 2
 Tader16, i think if you have to ask, you probably can't afford it Razz
  • + 5
 @lewismc, haters get neg props Razz
  • + 5
 first race - first place... cheeky move trek, you sly dog you
  • + 1
 i wanna fave this video but i cant find the link ... can anyone help me out?
  • + 1
 amazing bike, inspirational rider. Smile such hard work! But looks so sick, i want one Razz
  • + 3
 @lewismc dood trek has got their shiz so dialed it's ridiculous. i don't know what you're talking about trek's warranty program sucking. i work at a bike shop and have submitted several warranty claims to trek and know from firsthand experience that they are phenomenal to work with and replace frames everytime no question. the only time they haven't is when it's not the original owner, which is completely understandable. just earlier this week i submitted a claim on for a 2002 trek fuel 98 and seriously within an hour had an email correspondence back letting me know that shiz was getting boxed up and shipped out. haha. Go Trek! Go Gwin and Moseley!

oh, and that bike... oh my gosh. that thing looks soooo sick. the amount of R&D, technology, and straight up genious engineering has got me all worked up. so stoked. hope to ride one soon!
  • + 2
 @sledshed
being able to deal with warranty is one thing but having quality frames and quality workmanship is another. i have not once measured a trek frame that was in alignment and once i got a trek frame that was 4mm out @ the dropout and they said "well thats within our normal tolerances" and thats why i dont deal with treks. they are generally aesthetically pleasing but alignment is important too... and dont even get me started on bontrager.
  • + 1
 @d-Owen
You're entitled to your opinion and you're basing it off your experience. That's fine. My experience, which I will agree is limited to fewer than 5 years, however I do run a bike shop, and sell trek, has been that trek bikes as a company and as bicycles are exceptionally well built and exceptionally good to work with. Trek will get nothing but love from me.
  • + 1
 fair enough. how often does your shop measure alignment of new frames? just out of curiosity...
  • + 0
 @Lewismc I would listen to what this kid has to say about companies getting their start in XC and making the bandwagon switch to the DH circuit. He rides a Spesh Demo. Now I know why he's so angry. It's tough living life knowing your a hypocrite....OUCH! Ive ridden at least 10 different frames over the last 15 years and the 88 is by far the most comfortable / nimble (lightest feeling) frame so far. That's not an exageration. As far as longevity goes....I have an 09 and Ive been running the "ghetto/modified clear PVC downtube protector since it was out of the box and have not had one dent or crack in 2 seasons. just sayi n
  • + 1
 What's an alignment? XD
  • + 1
 tisk, tisk, tisk... you had me for a sec!
[Reply]
  • + 18
 I had a chance to ride the Session 88 and it was amazing in every way possible. Leaps and bounds over any other DH Race bike I have thrown a leg over. And now Trek has made it even more Gucchi? I think this is just the beginning of Treks World take over. Get ready for this tech to spill out everywhere though. This is gonna take years of sperm donation to buy though. But I will think of this bike every time I donate. Bahaha.
  • + 2
 while i agree the 88 is an amazing bike (i was thinking about getting one) have you had a chance to ride a carbon v10? i just got mine a couple weeks ago and it is sweet. i think the crop of new bikes out now are all so good you cant go wrong with many of them
  • + 0
 See I disagree... I'm struggling with the v10 carbon and feel my session 88 2010 was a much better bike to ride... It's person preference I guess and all the current line bikes are amazing, I think she will be up for sale in October ;-)
[Reply]
  • + 16
 well, lets give some credit to gwin here, bike is cool but honestly its not why he is winning
  • + 1
 Absolutely! While it is certainly important to have quality tools, it is the craftsman that makes it happen. I'm sure Gwin would attribute his success to his amazing talent combined with the whole package the Trek racing team offers (and not just the bike). Let's face it, he is just fast.
  • + 1
 Gwin owns.
  • + 1
 i would care to doubt that. gwin has been training just as hard as before and now that he is getting more support and has a bike with much less lateral flex, he is able to dominate.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 When are they going to Project1 this frame is my question?

For all those who don't know what Project1 is at Trek: it is a program they have with their road bike for customers to customize their bikes. Includes a custom paint job: including graphics, colors, themes, and your name or team painted on. To top it off custom parts selection. Cool thing is that it allows you to computer generate the look before it is ordered. Hot bikes when you see them.

DHer are some of the most image driven riders and would go over really good if ever implemented. Especially for regional teams who are looking to distinguish themselves from the rest. It will allow all the image whores to color coordinate their team kits to their bikes.
[Reply]
  • + 14
 I usually don't care too much about weight.... but 800 grams lighter? That is going to make a big difference in being able to throw it around. Crikey.
  • - 3
 Is that sarcastic ? I shit 800g.
[Reply]
  • + 11
 Trek, I really have to hand it to you guys. You've gone and out done yourselves. I am completely BLOWN away at the amount of technology and engineering that you have put into this product. Do you guys need any military members on your race team? I'll just wash the bikes and gear, I dont care. Y'all can call me "The Sarge" like in NHRA.
  • + 4
 Trek.... Hire this guy...^^^^^^... thank you moutnbiker.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 I'm actually happy my bike was stolen, cause now i have insurance money for this!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 @ GLORYOUS and Meathooker. I love the V-10. I have ridden a few myself but the 88 I rode felt like a rocket ship compared to all else and the new one is lighter with who knows how much more R&D. And this was right after I had ridden Ethan Quehl's fully decked and pimped Demo 8 with the newest Dorado man can acquire. His bike weighed 37 pounds and felt incredible with his pro tuned Double Barrel . Don't get me wrong, all the bikes you guys are naming are incredible machines, I just feel like Treks engineers have taken the 88 and 9.9 to the next level. Its not even the weight that draws me, it is the fact that every detail has been tweaked for the one thing we race DH for... SPEED. Better bikes will be born out of the 9.9, but Trek did it first. I cant imagine the amount of hours that went into the final development of this bike. The most major difference that sets this bike apart is the fact that the developed a whole bike, not just a frame. Its a whole bike. One unified unit of two wheeled custom tuned ridable orgasm. No body else has taken this approach to date. Correct me if Im wrong.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Marzocchi has been using coil/air forks for the past 7 years.
  • + 4
 very different technology -- this allows you to use the lightest weight spring and adjust it to your rider weight by adding air. nothing else like it!
  • + 1
 not with gret success on the dh models. heard all the shit about ATA?
  • + 2
 the DH ATA's werent coil. they were straight air.
  • + 6
 acually that´s exacly how the marzocchi forks work. You adjust the fork to your weight by changing the air pressure
  • - 2
 this 40 still uses a spring. the old Marz air DH forks didnt.
  • + 3
 the newer marzocchi´s aslo use a spring and are adjusted by air, just like this hybrid 40.
  • + 2
 2004 Marzocchi Z150 FR, coil spring with air preload to adjust it for the rider weight, same principle as this Fox40 as finnbjorn96 and lopez65 said, 7 years:
www.marzocchi.com/template/detailProdotti.asp?LN=UK&idIU=2462&idC=1561&IdFolder=113&idMY=2456&uf=IU&IdOggetto=2616
after the discontinued of the "Z" series the used it also on the 55 series and others

From 2008 they started to use it also on the DH specific 888 RCV model:
www.marzocchi.com/template/detailProdotti.asp?LN=UK&idIU=2463&idC=1561&IdFolder=113&idMY=55897&uf=IU&IdOggetto=55971
  • + 1
 On the current RC3 EVO forks the 888 doesn't have air preload. The 66 has a standard coil preload, and an air preload on the damping side of the fork, NOT on the coil side of the fork. It looks to me like the air preload on the 40 has a floating piston or something to help make the fork feel good without having it be overly harsh with some air pressure in there... I'm no suspension tech though...
  • + 1
 I'm surprised fox haven't released this earlier, they were prototyping Air Sprung 40s with the Yeti team back in 08/09 when it was Leov and Blenki but nothing ever came of it.
  • + 1
 @scandiumRider, yeah, you're right, after rechecking carefully only the old Z series and 2009 55 R (maybe some other lower travel model but didn't checked) have the air on the coil side similar to the trek F40s
  • + 0
 Its about time Fox is going with Air adjusted coil... RS next?
  • + 0
 rs next? umm... the boxxer wc is an air fork.
  • + 1
 He means like the team, not fully coil, air assisted, like Zocchi 55s/66s/44s are now.
  • + 1
 Oops, sorry. i should have realised that. Facepalm But yeah, I agree, it's a brilliant feature. I'm 125 lbs and run no air preload in my 66 RC2x. And just like 5 pumps of air in both legs and it's stiff enough for a 180 lbs rider.
  • + 1
 It sounds a lot like the MARS air system on some of the manitou forks if anything except with an air negative spring.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 Pinkbike rules!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 If thats 35lbs stock...

Change the parts for...

Boxxer Wc, Vivid Air, Single ply Minions and ZTR Flows and maybe a change of stem/bars and Carbon i-beam seat/post, would probably get this below 30lbs wouldn't it?
  • + 20
 single ply tires really on a downhill bike?
  • + 1
 Definitely below 30 is a possibility... It was already accomplished with the old model. www.ridemonkey.com/forums/showthread.php?s=6efd286dfe2ff3eced9a45709c5ad6f8&t=230348 At least now, if that's your goal, there need not be quite as many compromises.

Interestingly though, AG himself mentioned bike stability suffered as the weight got too low. It will be very interesting to see where world cup winning build weights stabilize at.
  • + 2
 30lbs is unrealistic with those specs you mentioned. it can get to probably more or less 33.5 lbs but not 30 lbs. and probably swap some bolts to titanium to make it lighter and bring down the weight to 33.25 lbs. also, the problem with single ply tires is that there is a high possibility you'll get a flat if you're as fast as aaron gwin or any one riding at a world cup level. for the average rider, a single ply might work.
  • + 2
 @mattpatt: i don't think I would like to ride that bike. 180mm front rotor (rear is okay), no taco or bashguard, rims won't take a lot of beats, xtr cranks, etc. This bike would be great if it had about 15.00kg, because it would still be super light and you wouldn't have to worry about breaking it all the time.

I ride a Cove Shocker wich currently weighs 19.10kg which is too much I think, but once you have speed you don't feel the weight at all and it has great momentum. I want it to be about 17.50-18.00kg because you feel the weight a bit when you're accelerating. But look at Gee Atherton, he's super fast with a bike that weighs just as much as mine. So I think a light bike can help you to become faster, but e.g. a good suspension is more important.
  • + 2
 @Gweggy, agreed, the sub 30lb build Cyklist on RideMonkey built took things a bit far... but if you read the whole thread, which includes his reason for doing it, and his thoughts after a season on how it performed, it's food for thought.... That build with a Vivid Air and the carbon Session you're potentially talking a 27lb DH bike! Crazy light. Not that I'm saying I'd run that...

I ride a 2011 Session and it's reasonably light with NoTubes ZTR wheels and a few other weight savings here and there (~36# all told), and it's by far the most fun, agile, and responsive DH bike I've ever owned. Does it monster truck through the rough stuff as well? Maybe not, but I could easily alter that by running heavy wheels with DH tubes.

Hopefully people that have opinions on light vs. heavy bikes can base them on actual experience vs just repeating something they heard somewhere...
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Did anyone else notice they used the wrong front brake adapter on the production model photo? You can see that the rotor doesn't sit in the caliper it's below it. Oops
  • + 1
 Haha, didn't notice that!
  • + 2
 Weird, commencal did the same thing on their old Supreme DH WC edition photo.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Why are so many production DH bikes using Sram products. I'm a Giant bike guy myself although this bike is just pure sex, but why not run Shimano Saint products like Gwin, Leov, and Mulally? Or are there going to be two levels of Session 9.9's? Just curious if anyone knows about the Sram to Shimano deal really?
  • + 5
 Without going into any other details the XO DH cranks are stiff, and at least 300 grams lighter, almost 3/4 of a pound right there...
  • + 0
 So this is what I don't get. If Trek is selling the bike with the Sram XO shifter/derailure, MRP chain guild, Avid brakes, ext....Why not Shimano. I personally don't care about weight. I have Sram X9 shifter/derailure And have already broken the pulleys. Crazy I know but I switched to Shimano pulleys because they are solid and haven't had a problem. I don't really know how I shredded the rear pulley but I did because of the holes that Sram cuts in them. Oh well....thanks for the info Ian.
  • + 2
 KJS9, the Giant DH Team are now running Sram. That may flow on to the Glories.
  • + 3
 @KJS9:

Because you broke the pulleys on one rear der you think that you found a flaw in all SRAM products??? If you are such a Shitmano wh0re, just sell the SRAM kit and put your own kit on...Jeez. It all comes down to money and SRAM has the muscle to get the big deals. Get over it.
  • + 3
 its business, not biking, at this point
  • + 2
 LOL groupset fanboys. If people think a gear system will make you go faster, then you need to book a skillz course!
  • + 3
 Sram will sell OE product to manufactuers in much smaller quantities than shimano will, and at a great price, only problem is when you as the consumer break it you then have to pay sram's retail prices to replace/repair it (which i find alot more expensive than equivilant shimano product) Basically sram still need to push their product to stay close/even with shimano so they do whatever they can to get their kit on off the peg bikes.
  • + 10
 @ iamamodel, I know that team Giant is running Sram now, and I know that the Glory 00 comes with all Saint products compared to my Glory 01 which is all Sram. I've had a chance to see Riffle and Neethlings bikes up close and in person at Diablo back during the US Open and they are very happy with Sram as it appears as well am I.

@Audeo03, I'm not bitching at all. Just asking a question. No reason at all to get bent over it, right? I like plan on getting a Saint set up but not until the Sram Kit goes, which I know it probably wont go anytime soon because they do make great products.

And @ Wallheater, I never said anything about a gear system making me faster. I can't see the point in spending $240 on a short cage Sram X0 derailure when I can spend $140 from pricepoint.com on a Saint rear derailure.

Thanks for the comments, good and bad. I didn't know there are so many haters when it comes to simple questions.
  • + 1
 This bike looks awesome, although as someone who is new to downhill/freeride, my riding would do a complete disservice to a rig like this.

But my question in general is about a production bike like this in the first place. Do people really buy such high end off the shelf complete bikes? Like I said I'm new to the sport (its really my first year riding and I just do it for fun), but if I were ever to get to the point where I was about to drop $6-7K on a bike (based on the 88's current price), I would think I'd buy a frame and spec it myself, with all the parts/components/colors to be exactly what I want. I always figured most people would feel the same way when laying out that kind of cash. I knew nothing about the sport before last year and got my first bike this year and I even built mine up from scratch. Its nothing nearly as high end as these fully spec's TREKs but I was able to build a pretty sweet bike piecing together some good deals.
  • + 3
 When it comes to high end bikes there are two options, build it yourself, or purchase something like this off the shelf. This bike has a pretty amazing part spec, and it will come far cheaper than you could buy the parts yourself. The bike companies get a far better price in the parts than you will ever get because they buy in bulk for hundreds if not thousands of bikes. It's call OE or OEM pricing, and it stands for Original Equipment. This savings is passed onto you the purchaser, the only disadvantage is that you're stuck with what they offer at that price. If you want to swap something you'll have to pay for it. So to spec this frame with all the parts to be exactly what you want you may end up spending hundreds if not at least a thousand more than just buying this bike. I know just looking at this bike spec there are only a few things that I personally would change. Tires, pedals, seat and post. Also possibly the handlebar and stem to get the cockpit how you want it. Every other part on this bike is top of the line and works amazingly well, and even the spec tires are probably great, that's just often a personal preference. Some people also don't like the avid brakes, while others do. again personal preference...
  • + 2
 Hey Ian, thanks for the insight. I do understand how all the OEM parts and pricing and all that work, and of course like you said, this thing is spec'd out extremely nicely. I was just more curious about that on a such a high end bike, since like you said (as well as on display in this thread of posts) alot of people have deep personal preferences on parts and brands. I always just assumed that anyone who would lay out the cash for such a badass rig like a carbon Trek, would probably be a pretty serious rider, and serious riders would tend to have preferences and be picky about setups. I was just curious how well full setups like this would tend to sell, as opposed to people buying frames and building them up. I personally think buying a frame and building up a bike from scratch, exactly how you want it is part of the fun. Sort of a sense of accomplishment to have done it yourself and getting it really dialed in.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 The Session 88 is currently the most balanced, best feeling downhill bike on the market... Congrats to Trek for building this carbon beast. I can't wait to ride it.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Stunning! I was always wondering why trek did not go the carbon fiber route for a while. I believe all bikes with a lot of hydroformed and thin tubing should be made out of CF or at least the front triangle a la v10.
  • + 1
 hydroforming is used on aluminum parts. it has nothing to do with carbon.
  • + 0
 I did not say otherwise...

Hydroformed frames look like they can be easily converted to CF... G3 951, M9, Revolt (now undead), Demo etc.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I have heard from several Trek employees that this bike will be close to 10,000 for the carbon and air fork. Too much for me but the aluminum version will be badass. I got to spend some time with Gwins yesterday and its a beautiful and light machine. I want to buy a 2011 before the seasons over but also want to wait until the 2012 aluminum is released. what to do...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The great thing about this bike is that since the frame is so light, you dont have to hang super light and not as strong parts on it for it to be 37 pounds or lighter. You can still run a Fox 40, full Saint setup, a set of really strong wheels and have it be an absolute tank while still keeping it at a reasonable weight.
  • + 1
 you're referring to Gwin's bike - Atlas isn't lighter than X.O crank Wink
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wow I was skeptical to be honest where this would go a few years back, but this is impressive, I like Treks approach of providing options to people, if you can afford it and want it Carbon is there, if not Alloy is still another option with all the bells and whistles the the carbon frame has, and finally someone who allows GEO to be set to suit the rider, whether people dial it right is up to them, but I like it, well done Trek.

That video was sick and now I see a humble human GWIN lol I think I'm a new fan too, his riding is different to the rest, even to Hills moto style, GWs is like a fully blended evolution of DH/Moto great to watch.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 All this carbon carry on is gonna end up pricing me out of the mountain biking game.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Is it me or does the carbon one just feel so much more attracting than the aluminium one?....Even though they have the same paint job!

It makes me want to sell everything I own just to get it! The retail on one of these is going to be Insane!

I hope they do just a Frame and shock version!
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Alright every one get ready to drop $8K+
[Reply]
  • + 1
 that bike looks super clean, all the integrated cable routing and fork bumpers nice job trek. oh and that air sprung fork has taken way to long in the making why havent they put a float cartridge in a 40 i dont know but this coil/air seems awesome
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I rode for 5 minutes an Ibis Mojo some weeks ago, it felt stiffer and a bit heavier than my Aluminum bike, it felt great! I can only wonder how these big bikes work and feel, sadly they are too expensive Frown , and for a privateer it might be a very expensive way to go. I think I will look for a IH Sunday, heavy as heell but I know it can take the lots of abuse (At least while I get a better salary to save for a carbon V10, although the Session is looking good, and Evil is looking great too).
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Its kinda cool to see this guy railing on a trail I and some close freinds had spent several years and many dark nights working on so some buds could have a fun, private place to ride...this is what happens when you turn the wrong people onto your playground..although I am very stoked to see him rideing on stuff I have put ton of my own sweat and blood into..I fear this little clip may spell the end of what was once the best kept secret in the SoCal MTB world....other than that it looks like a great bike and I am super stoked for Aaron..one of my favorite pros....good to see an American who can make it to the top of the podium again...hope you had a good time enjoying my handy work bro...
  • + 1
 look on youtube, type in the place this is on, theres a video of this place with the name of where, you gotta tell him to change the name of his video
[Reply]
  • + 1
 For the record Marzocchi has been using an "air assist" valve since the begining of 2011. Just so its clear that when it gets released on a consumer fork, that everyone isn't making comments that they have just stolen Fox's idea
  • + 1
 marzocchi has been using air assist for a long time.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So what happened to Fox' self-imposed rule that only aftermarket forks get kashima coating ? I mean compared to buying complete bikes with Fox forks already fitted, aftermarket fox forks are so expensive, so at least you got the advantage of getting the kashima coating.
Other than that, the bike looks very nice.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This design is doing surprisingly well. A lot of suspension "experts" are saying that a higher main pivot (pre-ABP Session had a high pivot) for more rearward travel allows for a better response to square edge hits (hang up less and therefore retain more momentum). I figure Fort William has the most square edge hits, considering how much of a wheel destroyer the track is, but the standings on the qualifiers and finals this year saw quite a few riders, on bikes with pivots placed near the BB (for better pedaling), quite high in the rankings.
  • + 4
 I'm not a suspension engineer by any means, but you'll notice on the adjustment chart that with the Mino Link in the 'race' position they mention maximum square edge bump absorption, and it gives it a lower bottom bracket. Maybe a lot of people are wrong? I don't know but it seems to work like this...
  • + 1
 If they figured out the square edge hang up situation then it will be the greatest DH bike on earth in my exceptionally amateur opinion. I love my 2010 88 more than life itself, but every once in a while it does hang up on the square edges real bad.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Dear Trek.


Why are the bolts in the one-piece HexMC EVO Link left hand thread ? See pics 6 and 9. The decal indicates anti clockwise to tighten ! Unlike the other 99.9% of bolts on the planet.


What's the craic with that like ?
  • + 2
 i'm not trek, but i believe its for the same reason left pedals are reverse threaded. so they don't loosen themselves
  • + 1
 Aha !! Thanks sledshed. Kinda obvious now you mention it =/
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Overall the bike looks amazing, especially that new hybrid fox 40. Ive been hoping that Fox would come out with a lighter 40, too bad its only on this bike. The Sram parts are a whole lot of meh, especially the brakes, so I guess even after dropping $8k you're still going to have to spend a few hundred to get the bike setup like a real race bike. There is a reason the pros use saint equipment.
and I do find it odd that gwin uses bontrager rims but not the production bike..
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I have now decided that this is my favourite performance dh bike that i haven't tried, this blog has me convinced. and sexxier than the session 88, but the look of the frame still hasnt got my win
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So, for the past couple weeks before i go out and riding i watch that video, gets me so stoked!

Anyways, this bike is absolutely insane! I hope to see Gwin get a couple more w's this year Smile

Trek! 3
[Reply]
  • + 2
 will the frame-only version look the same like the complete-build frame?
will there be a kashima coated fox dhx rc4 be equipped once the bike is available?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The bike in my opinion is alright. The bike doesn't make the rider, it does help but won't make you win. Aaron is a fucking animal and I think he would still be on top on a different bike period.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I want one as much as the next guy. But I could only put in less then 2% of its capability so no, its not for me. Sweet freak'n video btw. Oh and I love the M83 for the soundtrack. Good choice Trek (:
[Reply]
  • + 4
 gwin could win on Hill's 08 Sunday right now.
  • + 2
 Yeah, he was winning by a greater margin on the aluminium frame Trek too.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 carbon is simply a amazing material .... but guys ... come on think about it ..... who really wants to drop huuuuggeee amounts of cash for something that is really just lighter? and i mean does it really matter to the armchair downhiller that we can go a little bit quicker ? ..... not really ! we have some of the best riders in the field at the moment and watching them ride and seeing there pure skill come through is what matters most !! so i mean nice work to all you bike designers out there for bringing us cutting edge technology but you know what ... id rather get my trusty alloy stead out and go have fun.. just as well as you can Smile
  • + 2
 I think that's why they still have less expensive alloy models for riders like yourself... and the nice thing is, all the suspension advancements made are available on a non-carbon version, if that's the route you choose to go. Me, I'd love to try a carbon bike. They're typically quieter, there's weight savings and stiffness gains, and I think they look cleaner and sexier. Personal preference tho... Cheers!
  • + 2
 Its not like the everyday biker is going to buy these, this is for the bike enthusiast who has 6000 laying around and wants the creme of the crop.
  • + 1
 If you listen to what Gwin has to say, and what Shandro said, the bike takes the harshness out. Carbon is very damp compared to aluminum, much less vibration and harshness at the bars, and it's also very much like a spring. When you load up a carbon bike into a corner it unloads afterwards and gives you that energy back. And I'm not talking about the suspension, this is the frame itself. So while the weight is a definite benefit on certain tracks, I think the other benefits are just as important.
  • + 1
 well yes carbon has a natural flex in the material ! but do we honestly need it is what im saying ...... its carbon fever and i mean ... yep fantastic benefits but .....do we need a different frame to improve our skills ?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I'm a bit upset they've cut them 40's up to be honest!!.
  • + 6
 such a small price to pay to show the world the difference between a normal Fox 40 and a Fox 40 with Trek patent-pending Hybrid Air.
  • - 3
 In that case I want a set mate. Hook me up. Haha. And what's to stop fox putting it on say one of the athertons bike?
  • + 3
 read: "patent-pending"
  • + 1
 Yeh. It's a fox patent. So fox can give it to any one?
  • + 4
 No, it's a Trek patent -- so, distributed through Trek only. But I guess if someone wanted to buy the Session 9.9 and put the fork on their bike, they'd be welcome to. Not sure why you'd want to do that though...
  • + 1
 Oh rite so it's nothing to do with fox then? I was confused. Sorry mate!
  • + 3
 I would not say that Fox had nothing to do with it — Trek conceived the technology and owns the intellectual property, but Fox was a major partner in figuring out how to manufacture it...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 For win WC must be excellent pilot with excellent bike. Both are indispensable. If the kid is getting, the bike is excellent, no doubt.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I never really liked the idea of carbon DH bike before now... but wow!!! that thing looks amazing. I am now willing to trade in my old session for a new one!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 This is the ultimate suckers bike, a couple clever claims and some shiny new parts and you got a winner!!! Trek and intense have it down to a science, 157mm hubs, WC tune, REALLY???? dont get me wrong im sure its amazing for a top national pro or privateer WC rider who can ride to the bikes potential but for the average joe that is just way too much bike to handle, and it'll probably hinder them more then help.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Hmmm... the 2011 trek session 88 is already $6900, this one will be like $7500+. Especially if they put all the components they said on it.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Reminds of a slacked out Sunday with a better paintjob. Its basically DW link with Trek on it. Its a sweet bike. Sam Hill would still be dominating if he was riding the old Sunday. Gwin is the man and honestly I dont think anybody could beat him this year. Im just glad to see that d bag atherton having such a hard time this year. Never met a bigger prick in my life.
  • + 4
 What did Atherton do to you? Just out of curiosity.
  • + 2
 I've met Gee twice and he was easy to talk to and seemed like a nice guy both times... If he's the biggest prick you've ever met then count yourself lucky, the guys a legend.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Just yesterday at work (the Trek store) I was sayin that carbon DH bikes are beginning to become more popular, and here it is!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 will the frame-only version look the same like the complete-build frame?
will there be a kashima coated fox dhx rc4 be equipped once the bike is available?
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Looks like a Trek!
  • + 1
 it's kinda funny that your flag$hip proto gets built up while laying on the floor. can i get a stand, pls?
  • + 2
 hahah... it was a funny day for sure to do all that wrenching on the floor. had to stay low key, and shipping product into Canada ain't easy. let alone getting it home.
  • + 1
 it would be cool to see a cleaner graphic/paint option available. maybe save the stickers for the tool box once in awhile cuz the bike has really clean lines. that raw finish of the proto was nice.
  • + 2
 LOL! I want a "Looks like a Trek" tee-shirt! Let's get on it Downtown Wink
  • + 1
 @MattPatt -- funny, we've tossed that T idea around before. Rather than that, we opted for a #Gwinning shirt as a special one-off project.

Now we just need the right slogan for T-Mo t-shirt to remind people how awesome she's doing this season!
  • + 2
 @trek - just have his name on the back of a tee moto style BUT spell his name with the corresponding race wins...

G W 1 1 1 1 1 1 N. ..and can I get hooked up on some product if you use my idea? ..or if he wraps up the WCDH in first..just one would work... G W 1 N.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Wow, what a machine and a stunning peace of art! wonder how much that setup would set you back?
  • + 1
 probably your first born child
  • + 5
 Kids are overrated
  • + 2
 should be a bargain then!
  • + 0
 ha ha you can't spell piece !!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Awesome Bike, Is it me or is the front brake calliper not set right in the Production Version image? Looks well off the disc
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Expect to pay close to $10k for the top-level complete Session 9.9, given Trek's already-higher-than-average pricing.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 great to see that Trek has finally designed a (carbon) downhill bike that compete with the weight of the (aluminum) Demo 8II!
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  • + 2
 I've never wanted a full on DH rig until I saw the '11 Session 88 and this is just too sexy.
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  • + 2
 i want to cry, you guys are changing the game of mountain biking.... i love it (:
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  • + 1
 I like it, will be freakin expensive though and I would liek to see some geo stats, other then headangle, TT lenght, reach ect
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Front brake caliper is installed incorrectly... Couldn't find the right spacer, guys?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This isn't really aimed at the session but why are no companies offering BOS suspension (other than morewood and a few others maybe)? Or even elka for that matter
  • + 1
 I think availability has part to do with it. BOS is hardly available in North America as compared to the likes of Fox. Plus Fox has obviously established a relationship with Trek through their TWR team.
  • + 1
 Good point, but I'd still like to see a lot more bikes come out with more aftermarket oriented brands (at least thats what i consider them). Foes and Cove do Elka shocks on dh frames but its hard to come across.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 The Ultimate Cheater Bike
[Reply]
  • + 1
 awesome video.. and that bike - one of the nicest I have seen in a long time.
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  • + 1
 Gwin should not change his jersey, from american flag to just white jersey :-P
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I've been a specialized fan boy for awhile but I think I may switch DH brands... sick bike.
[Reply]
  • - 2
 i dont mean to shit on everybody's happiness here but carbon is extremely weak. even if you reinforce it which i hope they did, it still can snap quite easily if you crash. ive seen it happen. so im just putting this out there for anyone who wants to buy this bike, you need to be extremely good and be very smooth even on rough terrain. one big crash and its done, or if you crash in a rockgarden, remember, aluminum can dent and still work safely, if carbon dents, its done. so just think about that when you buy this 6000 dollar bike, the frame, although its very light, is also very fragile and if it snaps or dents, or even get a scrape that goes through a layer of carbon, you have to replace it and thats a lot of money. not trying to be a dick just saw that a lot of people are saying they want one and i thought i would just make them fully aware if what they are buying so they dont have to learn the hard way.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The "Big Three " will have their own carbon dh race bikes next year. Wait and see the giant glory and specialized demo 8
  • + 1
 I'we heard somewhere that there will be NO carbon Demo 8 next year? Correct me if I'm wrong!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 ~2400g + shock DH frame? People have heavier hardtails.
  • + 1
 My medium size Santa Cruz Nomad carbon frame weighs 2780gr with a RP23 shock. There must be some mistake...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So judging on those two spec lists, am I right to assume this will be available in frame only aswell as complete build?
  • + 3
 That's correct — frame and complete
  • + 1
 And not sure if this was mentioned and I missed it, but is it a session 88 replacement or just expanding the range?
  • + 1
 Range expansion. I think the 2011 88 frame will be downgraded to session 8 status (or phased out completely) since the 2012 88 is supposed to have updated geometry and internal cable routing.
  • + 1
 The cool thing about this launch is that the alloy bikes are all new as well.

The 88 and the 8 get the same frame, and they both share geometry and the same features as the 9.9 (increased travel, new leverage rate, Mino Link adjustable geo., AngleSet compatible).

Those 2 price points aren't going away.
  • + 1
 Will there still be an alloy frame option ? If so would it be cheaper than the 2011 frame?
  • + 1
 No alloy frame option — but the 8 and 88 builds are pretty dern good right out of the box.
  • + 1
 @trek - Sooo glad you have a single platform for 2012. 2011 with the variation between 8 and 88 made for an even tougher choice for the cash-strapped consumer. Hat's off to you guy on this launch. I'm floored ;-)

Regarding the Slash... will we be seeing this in CF form?
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  • + 1
 I though it would have 9.9 inches of travel, which would be cool and perhaps a good competitor to a carbon v10
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  • + 2
 Great write up, very cutting edge bike from Trek. Wicked.
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  • + 1
 thank god i have a 2010 . but its about the same weight as my current session
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  • + 2
 that vid gave me chills! This bike is the Big daddy of all bikes
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  • + 2
 that is fuking lush i so want it
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  • + 1
 really looking forward to see Commencal's response to a carbon dh bike! Could we be seeing a Carbon V3 proto?
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  • + 2
 Those sly dogs! Wink Looks amazing.
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  • + 1
 Am I the only one who actually read that Trek has a proprietary Fox 40? Air+spring is interesting for the least.
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  • + 1
 did anyone else notice on the first picture of gwins bike the little rubber band on the stanchion was above the first crown
  • + 2
 that's actually a tie holding the number plate on. The rubber band travel indicator thing-a-ma-jiggy-doo-hicky-ma-bob is the white thing above the green seal thing at the top of the slider...
  • + 1
 ahhh that makes much more sense
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  • + 1
 It looks like a heavyweight bomber, but still light.... and another dream for me.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 i saw this bike at the mont-sainte-anne WC and i have one word to describe it wow .... i need one but ....i don't have the budjet ....this bike cost like 8000 $ ???
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  • + 1
 My aluminum Session 88 weighs 35.2 pounds/16kg... I'm not impressed too!
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  • + 1
 wow. just wow. looks like i need to get like 7 g's lol
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  • + 2
 That bike, is so fit 3
  • + 1
 I tried doing a heart... but the triangle thing before the 3 isnt there Frown
  • + 1
 Huh !!! Mine was there and then it went !!
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  • + 1
 id have it in a medium Smile
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  • + 2
 How much will it Cost???
  • + 2
 They said it's going to be competitive with other top bikes on the market. We'll find out in October. I'm saying $6500-7000, but that is just a guess.
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  • + 2
 that wallpaper sux!!!!
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  • + 1
 wow, Realy tough mouantain bike in the world
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  • + 1
 Ive heard the frame is $4000 alone :/ :/?
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  • + 1
 holy crap!!!! i got to get me one of those!!!!
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  • + 1
 I wonder , what will be the price only for the frameset ?
  • + 2
 Probably $3500-4500.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Why Gwin never won on the Yeti frames? Any theory?
  • + 3
 Jon Tomac says: “I am really looking forward to helping Aaron in 2011. I believe my racing experience and my training approach will help him rise to another level. I’d really like to see an American back on top of the podium in both World Cup & World Championship Downhill Racing.” ...hey Jon Tomac was my idol when I was a child, now I realize that he is behind of everything!! O_O
  • + 2
 He did Win with Yeti, he was on the top5 in 2010, particularly in Austria
  • + 2
 top 5 is not winning. hes never won a WC until this year
  • + 3
 yes, but you have to realise that he only started downhill racing a few years ago. It's incredible how fast he's progressing. Last year he probably just didn't have the experience you need to win a worldcup. So, I wouldn't say it's all down to the bike. And don't forget how much better his training is now, compared to last year.
  • + 2
 @cesalec, haven't you heard.....2nd place is 1st looser. so I definitely wouldn't say 5th is winning
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  • + 1
 is 2:19 the same place that Mati broke his neck?
  • + 1
 nope this trails in america
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  • + 1
 That is 100% sex on wheels, I want one so.
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  • + 1
 I'd almost sell my kids to get my hands on one..!
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  • + 1
 well nice better be cheapish
  • + 1
 The non carbon 2011 trek session 88 is 6900, this will definitely be around the 7000 dollar mark.
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  • + 1
 i need one of these. when r they out and how much????
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  • + 1
 Two bottom bracket spacers on the non drive side cup eh!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 That is a sexy looking bike
[Reply]
  • + 0
 ''Is this the fastest off-the-shelf production bike ever produced?'' NO! Its not the bike!!! Its the RIDER!!!!!!
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  • + 0
 im surprised its not lighter, my 2009 aluminum session weighs 35.5 pounds. i would say im impressed but im not...
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  • + 1
 Most beautifull bike in the World !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 2
 ...wouldnt go that far?
  • + 1
 well everybody has his own opinion ... and this is the most amazing bike in the world so far !
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  • + 1
 awesome video with gwin....reminds me of sam hill a few years ago....
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  • + 1
 wow, another carbon dh rig
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  • + 1
 .........speechless.....WOW.
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  • + 1
 MUST have this baby with the semi air 40!!
  • + 1
 ha ha - semi....
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  • + 1
 I would have children, just so I could sell them to buy this bike
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  • - 3
 Ya blaa blaa angle on these, how much we talkin bout$$$??? Complete and or frame? 35 lbs is nice for racing I guess but us weekend warriors going to destroy that setup quick. Not even talking about cold temp riding and snow, carbon go buyaaa!. I really think team giant has a carbon frame in the works if not usung one already.
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  • + 1
 My GT Fury will be past in my life soon...
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  • + 1
 Now it just needs the inverted fork.
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  • + 1
 anyone notice in the second pic they routed the chain wrong on the guide.
  • + 1
 Yea... i think its like a computer generated image cuz if you look at the front brake its like not even covering half the rotor... and the chainguide thing as u mentioned
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  • + 1
 very sexy bike i definintely want one!
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  • + 1
 Do they call it the 9.9 because it is not perfect?
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  • + 2
 that bike is so light!
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  • + 1
 they should put a vivid air on that, then see how light it is.
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  • + 1
 keep that in mind budies;Its not the ride its the rider !
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  • + 1
 Finally Big Grin ! Thats my next bike
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  • + 1
 Just take out the coil altogether and make a 40 float RC2 already!
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  • + 1
 Hopefully ording mine next week
oh the joy of working in a bike shop Smile
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  • + 1
 One word... AMAZING!!!!
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  • + 1
 Oh yes she will be mine!
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  • + 1
 She looks so good
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  • - 1
 Pretty cool except for the fact its a TREK! They've got one hell of a marketing department.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 pretty sick, wheres the carbon fork lowers?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 If you buy that bike you can be as fast as GWIN!
  • + 1
 Oh no - did you really say that !?
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  • + 0
 i would put my penis in that
  • + 1
 Dude - that bikes male, so that makes you a gay.
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  • + 1
 Looks like a Norco
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  • + 1
 I so totally want one!
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  • + 1
 Amazing in all languages
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  • + 1
 fox 40 air??? :p
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  • + 1
 mint best bike ever seen
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  • + 1
 That its pretty!!!!!!
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  • + 1
 sram x0 dh is sooo sexy
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  • + 1
 I want one, fast!!
[Reply]

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