Ibis' New Ultra Wide Carbon Rim Wheelsets

Apr 7, 2014
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ibis



Welcome to the wide world of Ibis wheels and rims, what we refer to as The New Normal and The New Wide. The 928 is a 29er rim with 28mm width that delivers enhanced tire stability and high strength at low weight. The 741 and 941 are 27.5 and 29er rims with monster 41mm widths that deliver super tire stability even with large tires at low pressure. The 741 and 928 are available as optional upgrades on the Mojo HDR 650b and Ripley 29 now, the 941 is scheduled as an option for the Ripley beginning next month. We anticipate that these wheels will be availalble in the aftermarket in June.

Wider rims are better than narrow rims. A wider rim delivers better sidewall support so you you can run lower pressures in your rubber. Lower pressures do several beneficial things, including increasing the contact patch, which results in better traction. Tires mounted on wider rims don’t burp as easily. Running lower pressures on varied terrain actually reduces rolling resistance. Wider rims are stronger and stiffer. With increased traction comes increased braking control.

In 2013 the first wide carbon fiber rims came out, called Derby Rims. Derby is our good friend and in fact Ibis liked his idea so much we funded half the original tooling expense of these rims. Having access to the Derby Rims proved invaluable in testing for our own concepts and designs. Derby’s rims are made in a different factory than ours, as we will be needing a much larger quantity than his source can provide. For now, we will only be selling complete wheels, so if you’re looking for rims only, we heartily endorse the product that Derby is selling. If you can get them that is, Derby Rims have been regularly selling out each production run.

''You can’t have too much traction'' - Ancient mountain bike proverb.



Dramatically Increased traction
Wide rims support the tire’s sidewalls better, allowing lower pressures without the tires folding over or burping. This dramatically increases stability and traction. This shows up as faster cornering and braking, better grip in all conditions. How much lower pressure can you go? In general, for a given rider, using tires you've used before in a given locale, you will be able to run lower tire pressures with wider rims. How much lower can only be determined through experimentation. Typically, riders are running 4–6 psi less than normal. Light riders on moderate terrain are running as low as 15-17psi.


Ibis


Tires: Go Big, Go Small
Big - If gravity is your thing, bigger tires and lower pressures equal more traction. The problem is, you can only go so low with large tires on narrow rims before they become unstable. Enter the wide rim. Select the pressure you want without having to over pressurize the tire to control stability and burping.

Not-so-big - If you’re leaning more toward XC use, you can actually go down one tire size and achieve the same or higher levels of traction and performance, only at a reduced overall weight.


Less Tubeless Burping
Wider rims dramatically reduce the incidence of burping. With wider rims the tire sidewall can’t exert as much force on the bead to unseat it and allow air to escape.


Low Pressures Equal Low Rolling Resistance
Anyone who wants to ride really fast off-road needs to decrease tyre pressure. The rougher the ground, the more pronounced the effect. Traction and comfort increase too,” said Peter Nilges, Editor, Bike Magazine (Germany) Our wide rim profiles provide better sidewall support, allowing you to run lower pressures with no ill effects. More from Peter’s university thesis: “Any such unevenness means that part of the forward propulsion force is required to lift machine and rider upwards. This is equivalent to riding a short uphill grade that requires a certain amount of lifting energy. A tyre with less inflation can adapt to unevenness more easily. The total system needs to be lifted to a lesser degree and less frequently. Resistance is reduced, less power is required.Read the great article here

Ibis


Hookless Bead Rims are Far Stronger
Impact damage is the way most carbon rims die. The rim we’ve designed is much stronger in the area where impacts occur since it's a solid rectangle instead of an inverted "J". This spreads the impact out over a larger area that is also supported by more material. We tested the impact strength of several major brands of carbon fiber rims and discovered that the change to hookless bead was a major advantage in impact strength. We also optimized the layup to further increase strength. In the end, our rims are 50 to 300% stronger in impact than competing rims we measured. We don’t want to throw anyone under the bus, but we do want you to know that these are well-respected and well-known manufacturers.


Stiffer and Lighter
The switch to carbon fiber as a rim material has allowed us to build a 475 gram 41 mm wide rim, which is lighter than the much smaller and weaker alloy rims it replaces. The 928 is 100g lighter and several times stronger than alloy rims of the same size.


More Predictable Steering
Without wallowing sidewalls, and with dramatic increases in rim stiffness and contact patch area, the front end of the bike feels more precise and firmly planted than it ever did before. The difference is even greater than the improvements that came from tapered steerers and through axles in recent years.


Tire Fit
We’ve carefully sized the bead area so that it’s easy to mount and dismount most tubeless tires by hand. Many tubeless tires will inflate and seat with only a floor pump.


History Repeating Itself
Mountain bike rims were not always narrow. The venerable Araya 7X, a popular rim from the ‘80s, was labeled 26x1.75" and had an inside width of 25mm. That gives a tire to rim inner ratio of 1.78. A 2.35 tire on a modern 19mm gives a ratio of 3.14, even higher than our 3:1 outlier number mentioned above. A 2.35 tire on our 741 rim results in 1.73:1, back to the original Araya number. Read more about the history on the story tab to the right.


What to Expect
The 41 mm wide rims typically increase the tire width about 3 -5 mm at the widest part of the casing. The diameter stays about the same. The shape of the tread cap will be flatter as well. The 741 and 941 change the shape of the tire and you will want to select a tire that has a good profile on the wider rims. Generally we have found that tires that start with a rounder profile across the tread cap work the best.

Ibis



ibiscycles.com/wheels


178 Comments

  • + 156
 Not hating on other wheels sizes but no 26"? Come on some of us don't want to have to buy a new bike yet to get good wheels. Derby please make some 26" rims.
  • + 52
 I 2nd this... I can't do a rim upgrade for my bike that I got last year?... camon!
  • + 8
 if it's not a carbon or death scenario, syntace and velocity have some choices
  • + 41
 If you can't afford a new bike, you certainly can;t afford these wheels.
  • + 56
 my 26" is officially a legend. within months they will become mythical creatures of days passed.
  • + 3
 Just get nextie carbon rims
  • + 7
 If you want 26" rims or wheel set my suggestion is Light Bicycles. $800 for the wheel set with hope hubs or $150 a rim
  • + 5
 Derby is coming out with 26" hoops. I think he said they will be available in Spring/early Summer.
  • + 10
 "If you can't afford a new bike, you certainly can;t afford these wheels." HAHA you serious? Derby rims are like $300 a pop so if I use my same hubs I can get a set for around $600. $600 vs. $3500++ huh yeah try math class again.
  • + 11
 Agreed, for a carbon wheel set this is quite affordable.
  • - 3
 Unfortunately the writing is on the wall for 26 inch wheels. Tooling up carbon molds is very expensive. I don't blame them for deciding not to invest in a declining standard.
  • + 6
 They're not going to produce tooling to make wheels that will sell poorly, if at all. For every person here who claims they'd buy a set...talk is cheap and manufacturers know it.

That being said, while Derby doesn't offer a wide 26er carbon rim alone, Woven Precision here in Ottawa does.

www.wovenprecision.com
  • + 6
 It doesn't make much sense to me. Surely, by not making it in 26, they are losing out on potential profit?
  • + 3
 all these people saying if you cant afford a new bike you cant afford these, its not about money even if i was to buy a brand new bike money no object right now i would still get a 26" because they are more fun. companies shouldn't be restricting the choices just because of trends. If i owned a bike company I would make all wheels in all sizes so people can have a choice.
  • + 17
 I can afford to buy a new bike, I just choose not to because there is nothing wrong with my 2010 Nomad carbon and I love it. Why would I buy a bike every year for incremental improvements? I do plan on buying a new bike in a few years. Does that mean I can't get upgrades in the mean time? Pretty dumb logic saying if you can't afford these you can't afford a new bike. Also looks like they are planning on releasing a 26" Derby rim according to some of the comments here and I will buy them as soon as they are available.
  • + 13
 bikes are fun
  • + 6
 @jordan no you wouldn't, because as a smart businessman you'd know that making 26" wheels would mean having 50% more inventory, 50% more tooling/molds, and more processes. As much as you want to give people a choice, it doesn't make sense to engineer super high cost 26" hardware when virtually the entire performance mtb market has gone to other wheel sizes. People who care enough about weight/performance to consider insanely expensive carbon wheels are probably already considering new 27.5" and 29" rigs, just like every other competitive racer we see in the EWS and even DH now. On the flipside, if you're buying 26" for 'fun' you won't need the performance of pricey carbon wheels.
  • + 7
 GBeard - there is only one problem with your 2010 Nomad carbon - there is a new Nomad hehehe. Give them some slack for the pricing guys. Easton Haven Carbon were one of the first mass produced cf wheelsets and they costed double! And hubs were crap! Look at prices of ENVE. In Europe two Enve rims cost more than this wheelset. I just hope that those aren't laced to American Classic hubs with their ratchet system made out of cheese grater. Now this perfectly reasonable story of wide rims superiority is a perfect example why lab assumptions are virtually useless in mountain biking. I like wide rims myself but that is only about the feel. Jerome Clementz is ridin medieval Mavic rims 19mm inner and he will still kick arses.
  • + 7
 good lord, are they trying to set the internet on fire with these new wheel sizes? This will tear the MTB community apart... thanks Illuminati.
  • + 5
 The logic says that wider rims thus lower tyre pressures provide larger contact patch thus increased grip and smoother roll over thus decreased rolling resistance, also lower rotating mass as we no longer need 2.5" tyres but 2.2 to get desired grip and cushioning... the logic says that widening the rim gives more positive effect than increasing its diameter. I am so confused...
  • + 22
 Yep, and here's a perfect example of what I've been saying all along. An example of what we all know. Adding 12.5 mm to the radius of a 559 mm rim has nothing to do with any proposed performance gains, of which there's really none. It's just another tactic being used by a sick & greedy industry to keep selling shit to sheep. That's all it is.

People say "no one's forcing you" but the reality is, they're only not forcing you if you're willing to stop doing what you're doing altogether. It's like saying no one's forcing you to stop using Windows XP. However if you want to continue using the internet (which is what most people use a computer for, mostly or at least partly) then when Pinkbike no longer supports your old, yet perfectly fine browser & the new browser is no longer supported by your old, yet perfectly fine OS then you either "acquire" new everything or do without something that has become so important to you that it feels impossible to do without.

I love the sport but this industry with its derailleurs, 15 mm axles & stupid wheel sizes can eat shit & burn.
  • + 3
 Windows XP is a browser? whoa... lolz Wink
  • + 3
 I agree with you GBeard, I can afford a new bike too but like my 2012 Commencal Meta AM enough to spend money on XX1, Pikes and ENVE's, unlike bkm303 assumption about weight / performance and "insanely expensive carbon wheels" buyers are probably considering bigger wheel sizes. (And Commencal's are heavy) I don't care about the wheel size debate at all, I've had a 29er and god forbid ride a road / track and fixie bike too, but when you read manufacturers wading in on forum debates like Yeti did some time ago about them believing the SB66 was their best bike but they won't produce them for the time being because the market dictates they won't sell you have to wonder about the genuine value of the wheel size over marketing hype. Don't forget bkm303 these 'competitive racers' you speak of are likely paid to ride that wheel size, not heading to the lbs with their wallet.
  • + 4
 It doesn't matter at all whether racers are paid to run 650b, or even if it's complete marketing BS (I have no opinion, never ridden one). The only thing that matters is that Ibis is a BUSINESS, and from a money making standpoint it makes no sense at all to invest in producing what is basically a dead wheel size (for now, at least).

The market is obviously not going in the 26" direction, and it's risky at best to assume that there's a significant and lasting market in people retrofitting their 5 year old bikes with $1300 wheels. On the other hand, there are TONS of brand new 29 and 27.5 bikes selling right now, and the competitive scene is increasingly dominated by the bigger wheels. For the next couple years (at least) it will be impossible for the 26" market share to grow, and it makes no sense to produce a niche product like this for a shrinking market. If they did make these in 26", they'd probably have to cover the cost of the 26" tooling using the money from the other two sizes, which would drive the cost of all the products up.

I'm not saying people should buy new bikes every couple years, or that everyone should jump on the bigger wheel bandwagon. My only mtb is a 26er and I like it, but if it was my money there's no way in hell I'd be betting on a sudden comeback of 26" right now.
  • + 2
 Normal is 1mm wider than standard 21mm ID rims… my mind is blown!
  • + 1
 The 928 is meant for xc bikes that might normally use things like notubes crests which are flexy and fragile but actual trail bike riders will go for the 941s if they have anything in a long travel 29er.
  • + 3
 I'm another person slightly perturbed that they aren't making a 26", since that's what I ride, it must be the best, right? (so goes the logic)

The cost of making another tool to create a 26" wheel would impact the costs of all the wheels to the public, since they'd probably try to recover the prices across the family. So the previously $1200 wheel set might go up to $1500.

That all being said, I think judging by the size of Ibis (and many smaller bike industry companies) they don't have a dedicated market research person who could definitively forecast how many wheels they might sell, and what the amortization schedule would look like. They aren't that sophisticated. They are simply guessing, putting their money where everybody else is, and abandoning the bike (Mojo) and riders that got them to that point.
  • - 1
 Except the mojo, the original 26er only mojo hasnt existed for many years. They keep evolving it and now we are at version five or six. Too bad whiners online haven't evolved also.
  • + 1
 I've just laced up some mavic 821s on to hope pro 2 40t hubs and couldn't be happier. 21mil ID running tubeless with non tubeless specific high roller 2s. Don't find them too narrow or have any burping or tire stability issues at low pressure,say 25psi. That's riding British downhill,fort bill etc. Can't believe how strong this wheelset is,also very light. I'll be ordering some spare rims because I honestly believe 26 have a year maybe two b4 the top company's stop making them. I'm not ready to ditch my Sunday anytime soon. Shame but that's the way things are going and we can't stop it.
  • + 1
 mikelee - what sidewall for HR 2s? 2ply, exo, 1 ply? I ride Shimano XT AM wheels with 21 internal and to be fair, I am no shredder, I have average skills and when riding in Hafjell I still managed to burp air out of Minions EXO and Highrollers 1 UST at 28-30PSI. All it takes is to load the corner after a slight slide. When you see crosses on the sidewalls, caused by tyre squirming and being folded by forces, then you know that you took the tyres almost to their edge. Last year in the same place I pumped them up to 31psi but things were getting sketchy and too loose for my likes as it was very dry - I changed to 2plies for a second day of riding, and it was a major difference in tyre stability and confidence. When it comes to light tyres like Nobby Nics, I manage to nearly take them off the rim on local trails, and we don't ride faster than 20kmh due to the nature of terrain. 821s look great sure, I love it that mavic introduced machined rims as separate, but >25mm internal width is the future. They should just make a 500g version of 625s and 729s.
  • + 0
 Waki - have you thought about running tubes at 30 or so psi? Heads will probably shake at the comment but I ran XT Trail wheels for about two years with tubes at 30 psi and only ever had one puncture. I don't exactly set the world on fire either but do weigh close to 90 kg and ride on some pretty rocky terrain. Since November I've broken three carbon rims (a generic rim but built by a reputable local wheel builder) and damaged a Stans Flow rim. Having just bought ENVE's (good timing aye, with today's announcement), in total this has cost me a small fortune and I'm apprehensive about damaging the new rims. Needing an XD driver sent me down this path but to have the time again I'd have stuck with my 1x10 and the Shimano XT wheels running tubes.
  • + 2
 @ GBeard, Derby should have the 26" available now. They are amazing wheels...These Ibis version seem to be a copy of Derby with the hookless bead, I can hear the engineers saying "Derbys are 40mm so lets go 39, nah lets go bigger & give em 41".....
  • + 0
 I'm using 2 ply but it could by the mavic rim that's maybe giving a tighter bead due to it being ust. Maybe I'm just luck or really slow lol. I'm not slow ha ha
  • + 0
 Thank you! Well said!
  • + 1
 Mikelee - yep, it's making a huge difference in sidewall stability with 2-plies. I don't think you could comfortably smash Fort Bill on Exo even on widest rims Wink
  • + 26
 finally some affordable carbon wheelsets from none other than the best customer service company in the bike biz: Ibis!

thanks Scot
  • + 23
 Thank you. We think the price is pretty compelling.
  • + 7
 it'd be a bit daft of ibis to release new wheels and not supply 26" wheels for all the thousands of 26" mojo's out there, never mind all the other different bike brand owners that may be interested in them
  • + 2
 that's a great point mark3. 26 mojo riders gave ibis the new life it deserved. howz about helping those riders float who are now tossed overboard w/26" sized life saver?
  • + 0
 I absolutely second and third these two comments. "Daft" indeed.
  • + 3
 @mark3 @fullbug @twozerosix I think you guys forgot that Ibis was the only company I saw doing this for there 26" wheeled customers. www.pinkbike.com/news/Ibis-Swingarm-Converts-Mojo-HD-to-275-inch-Wheels.html

I have worked with Ibis cycles many times and I will agree with @jaybird951. Best customer service in the biz. Stoked to try some of these wheels when they are available.
  • + 2
 Fair play cdub- honestly, they probably would but simply can't cuz they need to follow market trends. Sometimes I wish it was more like Bmx. All the riding progression on the same wheel size for 40yrs and still goin strong but hey....
  • + 0
 @scotnicol Great price combined with progression... Love it. Gonna get a set for my HDR provided the hubs aren't total shit!
  • + 3
 blasphemy. ibis and the word "sh*t" are not be seen or heard in the same sentence. you can use other brands and names but not this one. whats wrong with you?
  • + 13
 So in the UK these will retail at around the same price as in dollars so £1300, for this price i could buy 2 if not 3 sets of stans flow on pro 2 hubs with a weight penalty of around 100/150g a set.......... Am i the only person who doesn't understand whats going on here?
  • + 10
 Import taxes, that's what going on here Wink
  • - 1
 Yeah you're so right. Carbon is not the wonder material for every part. 100g weigt difference won't be noticed by everyone. These wheels are made for ultra rich weight weenies only
  • + 4
 I can definitely feel 100 grams per wheel
  • + 14
 It's not about weight as much as width. The difference is HUGE. I went from FlowEX's to Derby's and I was blown away by the difference in traction, braking, and stability. Also, a 1/2 pound in rolling weight is noticeable.
  • + 7
 remember, it's rotaional wieght too
  • + 5
 stiffness will be noticeable too
  • + 6
 Right @mestapho. AND the stiffness of a carbon rim is amazing. I haven't used these rims but I can tell you the change from Stans to a set of Rovals was one of the best upgrades I've made to my bike. $1300 for a set of carbon wheels.. no brainer.
  • + 2
 keep in mind, too that you can often get away with dropping a tire size with a big rim width increase... Tires are the heaviest single part of any wheel.
  • + 8
 For £1300 you could get two pairs of 33mm Lightbicyle DH weight rims on Hopes- I did.
  • + 9
 As a long time Ibis rider I'm not feeling the loyalty. You already have the tooled 26" frame, You should offer these rims in a 26" size too. Some of riders don't want to ride bigger wheels, that being said, It would be nice if you supported the riders that supported you and helped you become what you are today.
  • + 4
 If Ibis made business decisions based largely on rider loyalty they'd still be making steel frames rather than pioneering long travel carbon fiber frames way back in 2005. Scot Nicol's pursuit of the best performing products and materials is the dominant factor in them becoming what they are today. If you want to feel the loyalty, ride the living piss out of your Mojo, break the frame, call them up and see what happens. There is simply no better customer service in the bike industry.
  • + 2
 Then they better keep producing 26" bike and parts because I've ridden the 650B Hd and that bike is a step below the 26" version.
Producing a big wheel bike because the industry tells you to do so rather than because it's better is hardly the pursuit of the best performing products.
  • + 8
 For 26" light bicycles makes a hookless 33/26 rim so there is someone who still cares about you.
www.light-bicycle.com/New-26er-33mm-wide-enduro-MTB-all-mountain-downhill-carbon-rim-tubeless-compatible.html#.U0LI04nnYm8
  • + 2
 Needs moar wide
  • + 0
 Unfortunately their hookless 33mm rim still only comes in 27.5.
  • + 8
 i never tried a derby rim , but i have had super amazing luck with the rims from a company called NEXTIE-BIKE, they do a 35mm rim thats carbon , allow you to pick the number of spokes , spoke size -so you can use the oversized nipple from CN(atom lab torque nipples) or regular sized and even the choice of top coat of glossy or mat.
they deliver anywhere in the world.
and best is the cost : 2 rims 650b 32 holes , gloss finish, UD weave , extra material added for my fat ass , shipping with in 10 days of my order for $370- total
  • + 2
 Me too! Great so far.
  • + 2
 Can we get a review? I came across these about a year ago, but I have yet to buy them as I can't find any reviews, and I occasionally huck to flat. Being 200+ pounds I want to make sure the rims are strong.
  • + 2
 Sadly, their widest 26" wheel is only 30mm.
  • + 1
 im super bummed about that too, ive asked him about a 35mm rim, but he feels that the 26" is kind of a dead size, too bad , because many riders i think would use them for racing.
  • + 1
 I secon that. A review would be great!
  • + 1
 Also, what is the differences between weaves
  • + 1
 Get the UD weave.
  • + 11
 41mm??!! Thats pretty much fat bike territory! Props to Ibis for sticking their necks out.
  • + 0
 No...its not. But its close to trials bike territory. Fat bike rims start around 65mm and go over a hundred in some cases, Trials bikes are high 40s/low 50s usually (47mm is common). Some fat riders will run trials rims for their race wheelsets / summer wheels because the rims are usually a 100g or more lighter and they're fighting for every gram on the bikes.
  • + 12
 figure of speech mate
  • + 10
 This is great news. Um, but what about the hubs?
  • + 6
 more info is needed, on hubs, spokes, nipples, etc...warranty...
  • + 8
 You guys are right. I'll get the web page updated with more info.
  • + 3
 Yea $1299 is a great price with DT Swiss 240, CK or Hadley hubs, but with cheap Chinese hubs? Not so much.
  • + 0
 dont bash it, yet...Ibis does not bring Christmas presents on April's Fools that are turds.....at least not based on their track record to date; and we all know the retail price of Derby rims as they have been available to everyone directly from Derby himself. Buy only if you see fit and if the value justifies the price. There are other brands and more or less better or worse products in alum or carbon offered to us all by those brand manufacturers.
  • + 5
 Yeah because simply "made in china" must mean crap... guess I'll throw away my American Classic and WTB hubs then. Not to mention Notubes and Novatec.
  • + 2
 Made In China does not mean crap, but typically it means less expensive than competitors. If the hubs are in fact Novatec or AmClassic units that typically sell for $150f/$250r, does that mean the rims and spokes are $450 each?

I'd expect the larger Ibis would benefit from quantities of scale and would be able to not only beat Derby's pricing on the rims, also offer complete wheelsets (with quality Taiwanese hubs) for less anyone else could do otherwise. Even at $1000 they'd still beat every carbon wheelset producer out there except Light Bike.
  • + 2
 Well canadian dollar wholesale on these rims (at brand level) is about $200 each. Hubsets and spokes run about $150. Right there we're at $550. Usual markeup from wholesale to distributor/dealer is usually 30%, and then that new price doubles to the retail level. So ($550 + 30%) times 2 and we're $1430. Divide by 1.1 to go from CDN to USD and we get ding...$1300.
  • + 2
 ding ding. Buy Now.
  • + 8
 Combine these bad boys with some Schwalbe Dual Chamber tires!
  • + 5
 Is there any way one can put a filter rule on Pinkbike that automatically hides news containing "27.5" and "29" ? I may be interested.

Thinkin' about it....will I receive any news with filter on? Er...
  • + 5
 No man, Market demands 650b. And by market, I mean "marketing".
  • + 7
 Nice rim design and concept. Make them in 26 with a 36 tooth star ratchet hub and I'll be interested.
  • + 7
 FFS, just because there are 27.5 and 29" options out there doesn't mean it is ok to forget about 26" completely!
  • + 9
 Derby is working on a 26" x 40mm wide rim that he told me is "coming soon".
  • + 3
 Now look at the tire profile on those shwables. Look how flat it is. you wont be doing any far leaned over cornering with these rims. The idea seems stupid as years ago I played around with wide versus narrow rims and the wider rims made the tires profile so flat you couldnt corner real hard or you would go past the knobbies and get onto the side wall. So you couldnt lean the bike over in corners too much. Once you got past that point you would just wash out. Side walls dont have traction. LOL! There is a proper size rim width for every size and shape of tire. You have to find out for your self which one is the correct size. And also depends on if your using dual ply casing or not.
  • + 5
 Coming from the company that stated they were never going to leave 26 inch wheels its kinda funny they aren't making these in 26"
  • + 2
 just ordered some 35mm 27.5 after running 33mm 26 for the last few months.. Wider is definitely better but I think there might be a point when its too wide..I can run lower pressures now and have more sidewall support but the tire is just as vulnerable to sidewall slices and impacts..the problem is I cant run 32psi anymore..with the wide rims it feels like 40psi
  • + 2
 I have Derby rims built up with latest Hadley hubs for under 1k,and yes absolutely they perform as described on Derby site and this Ibis wide rim review.I mounted a Maxxis non tubeless and a WTB tubeless and both inflated easily with a hand pump,I then pulled them both off to get familiar with changing them...wow do they lock on! I'm a stone mason by trade and have pretty strong hands but had to use both hands to break the beads and was still an effort,no worries about burping for sure!
  • + 2
 I've been running 35mm wide rims (Salsa Gordos 29er and Velocity P35 650b) and the improved traction, rollover and compliance is great. Running low tire pressures is possible, but the tire will still squirm when ridden hard so I use normal pressures. I'm sold on wider rims, but 41 mms seems too far. I noticed that with some tires, the tread looked like a mohawk and the sidewall was sticking out farther than the side nobs! Not good. I believe 32-35mm OD is the sweet spot. Be careful with frame rub too on such wide rims.

The weight and price look great!
  • + 1
 I think it depends on the tire width. 2.1 tire stick to 32mm. Run a 2.35 then go to 35mm. Run 2.5-2.7 then 41mm will be just fine.
I currently run my 2.35 Schwalbe magic mary at 18psi on a Velocity 35 blunt rim with no problems (I ride rugged alpine terrain). Used to run 15psi on Schwalbe Muddy Mary 2.5 with a 42mm rim. I am, however, pretty light weight at 60kg (132lb)...
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride, I have been running Blunts on my XC bike on our smooth pine forest trails and I have huge dings and flat spots in them. They are much softer than the OEM rims from Giant that came with the bike (same terrain, no dings). I am surprised to hear you can ride in rugged alpine terrain with no problem. Mine are so bad that I received a third rim (because of a scratch) and I don't think I will bother relacing the wheel.
  • + 1
 I think that most people do not realize that wider rims are more susceptible to pinch flats and rim dinging. This is because the height of the tire decreases as the rim gets wider.
  • + 1
 Yeah I've read it. I don't agree with most of it. Ever heard of the law of diminishing returns?
  • + 1
 No
  • + 1
 Oh. Well it basically means that while a little bit of something can be good, a lot of something isn't always more good.
  • + 1
 Makes sense
  • + 1
 @iamamodel well I did just get the blunt to replace my Pacenti from last year because it is wider. I hope you're wrong seeing as the wheel wasn't cheap! Will let you know after a few months riding!
  • + 1
 It is interesting that even as the the original idea of the UST standard fades, some key design features like the UST bead seat, which the Ibis and Roval rims both appear to use while eschewing other features, are only now starting to become mandatory equipment.
  • + 1
 I would argue that the majority of the most talented and core riders hang out on Pinkbike. Again and again, the community stresses they want 26" to stay and we continue to be ignored by the bike industry. Ignoring your customer leads to giving others the opportunity to innovate. Look at One Up & Wolftooth as examples.

More innovation is right around the corner I am sure.
  • + 2
 Very exciting to see this! I wish there was a 26er option. I just moved over to the Velocity Blunt 35s (great budget option) and could not be happier. Fat rims ride better.
  • + 1
 It is coming....from Derby. .
  • + 1
 What I don't get is that rims used to be wider, Yes wide rims are better and with carbon can be light and strong too but its not revolutionary But the prices of bikes has got a bit out of hand, but must admit would like a lighter bike
  • + 1
 I have a question about air pressure- even on my wire bead dual ply DH casing minions and nevegals I have to have 35+psi to keep from pinch flatting. I use the right size tubes on sunringle ADD rims and I still pinch flat often. Would this help?
  • + 0
 Go tubeless.
  • + 1
 Get some schwalbe Dual ply DH tires on some wide rims and you won't be pinchflatting again!
  • + 1
 Cool!!! This is great news for Derby. I bought a couple of his first run rims and couldn't be happier. I built them up myself on some Hadleys and wow, these are the stiffest best performing wheels I've ever run. Way better than the big bank Enve's I used to have yet cheaper. Sure they're China made but I doubt I could hurt these with the 4mm wide rim wall profile. Still Derby gives I think a year or two warranty also.
  • + 1
 Back in this mythical time called the late 90s we had plenty of wide rims, xlite phat albert, sun doublewide etc, most people said they made the bike ride like a pig as the tyre was too square.
Does making the rim out of carbon solve that fact??
Doubt it.
  • + 2
 They addressed this, it's about the ratio of rim to tyre width, tyres are wider now.
  • + 1
 I had a double wide for about 4 weekends before it resembled the wavy crust of a pie , and yeah my tire looked almost rectangular in profile Razz
  • + 1
 I dunno like, we used 2.5 tyres back then, they havent got that much wider. Maybe for trail bikes but still
  • + 3
 A bit of info on the build would be nice. Hubs? Spokes? They look a bit like American Classic knock-offs. Will the moving parts be Ibis-quality, or farmed out?
  • + 5
 Low pressure? 30 PSI in my Minions.
  • + 1
 25 psi in mine.
  • + 2
 15-20psi on my schwalbes...
  • + 5
 This is good - all rims should be wider
  • + 3
 Would love to try extra wide rims but I'm not sure about having such a square tire profile. Too bad I won't be able to try these because they don't come in 26.
  • + 1
 I put some Velocity Blunt 35s on my 26er. The rim weight for those was a bit higher than what I was running, so far though I have been extremely impressed. If you run tires wider than about 2.2, the change is quite something. Better traction, better cornering, lower rolling resistance, and I'm finding a smoother ride as I'm able to run lower pressure. So far, I'm yet to find a downside other than the rim being a bit heavier.
  • + 3
 I call bullsh1t.
Not buying into "flat tires roll faster than tires with air in them"
  • + 7
 It depends on the terrain. On smooth ground you are correct. Add some terrain and everything changes. It's similar to having small bump compliance with suspension, it is simply faster this way.
  • - 5
flag scary1 (Apr 7, 2014 at 11:42) (Below Threshold)
 Wasted so much money in my early years racing because I flatted in my race runs because I used the recommended pressure of the day. It wasn't till I said F 'it I'll figure out how to ride looser and with more air pressure , fresh tires and proper suspension setup that i stopped ruining rims, got faster and quit worrying about what the terrain in front of me was going to do to my bike. I don't have a mechanic at the bottom of the hill to throw on brand new wheels at the end of every run.Wish i did! If all your riding is groomed, park sh1t, Then fine, follow the latest nonsense. I'm a downhill racer.I don't enduro or xc. I run into shit and jump into rock gardens...like a 200lb MAN. Keep your 15 psi and your 40 mm wide . rims it's silly and stupid
  • + 3
 I weigh 240 lbs, and I ride HARD. I've found that on my AM bike, I can drop ~ 8 PSI moving to fatter rims. I was running mid to high 30s to keep rear from rolling and pinching, I'm now running high 20s.
  • + 3
 It didnt say flat ... And yes tyres with low pressures do roll faster in off road situations , the tyre deforms to roots and rocks rather than deflecting and losing forwards momentum with upwards movements
  • + 2
 I've been on about wide rims for years now and no one took me seriously, glad to see more wide and light rim options coming out!
  • + 1
 That's all beautiful about the rims. Tell me something I don't already know. What I want to know about are the hubs and the engagement. THEY are part of the wheels as well. What's the POE? What bearings are in there?
  • - 1
 What's this nonsense about hookless being stronger? It's all about sidewall thickness. Hooked sidewalls can be thinner or thicker than hookless sidewalls. If anything, the bead hook provides lateral rigidity. I-beams and angle-bar are stronger than a flat plate.

I can't tell we the riders are gullible or if the rim makers actually believe their own nonsense.
  • + 3
 I guess motorbikes and cars have been doing it wrong. With my experience in carbon rims, they tend to crack at the bead hook. I'm running hookless now we'll see if they are stronger. The manufacturing is easier as well.
  • + 9
 Of course you're right - it's about bead wall thickness - but you're being intentionally obtuse about the strength of hookless vs hooked bead walls to come across as an authority on rim design and to play the "victim of the evils of marketing" card. It's very annoying so stop it. Most bike product developers are riders and they are genuinely trying to improve the available riding equipment and honestly believe that their products will improve your riding experience They don't have magic vacuums that will suck money out of your pocket whether you like it or not. If you don't want to buy something, don't buy it. But don't tell everyone else that it's a scam unless you have proven it with repeatable and verified lab tests and field tests.

Carbon rims begin life without bead hooks. This means that they start out with thick bead walls. To create the bead hook. the inner surface of the bead wall is milled away leaving the bead hook behind. The result is a thinner bead wall. This makes them weaker in the circumstances that would cause a pinch flat such as running straight into the square edge of a rock. Sure, they could start out with a bead wall twice as thick so that milling away material to create the bead hook resulted in a still-thick bead wall, but they don't. Remember that conventional rim profiles are based on the properties of aluminum, not carbon. The properties of carbon are just now being leveraged for rim design resulting in new rim profiles that are unfamiliar and scary to some folks.
  • + 2
 lol, I didn't say hookless designs are bad. Merely that they aren't inherently stronger. Indeed, I think hookless designs are probably superior given current tire and rim technology. The rim sidewall can be any thickness desired and a bead hook can be included in a design or not. Including a bead hook does not mean the sidewall has to be thinner.
  • + 3
 Oh great, another kind of wheel debate...Super!
  • + 1
 I go for ride now...
  • + 1
 Afford...Business...What the hell happened to mountain biking? I guess it all went corporate and simultaneously down the toilet. Ooh, wide rims...Just ride for f*ck's sake.
  • + 2
 These are the same price as a set of used Enve's. Looks like a solid "win" in my book.
  • + 1
 Loved the brief presentation vid, wheels look great.. if anything like there frames should be a winner.. way cheaper than ENVE Fat is the new black
  • - 1
 "We tested the impact strength of several major brands of carbon fiber rims and discovered that the change to hookless bead was a major advantage in impact strength."

Just admit it, making a hook rim mold is more complicated, whereas the hookless mold is easy going. A hook has great advantages such as better tire retention at low pressures etc. - but it takes more efffort to mold it. Jus look at the stupid amount of material in the rim face and tell me this makes any sense at all...
  • + 0
 better tire retention at low speeds? Trials bikes are under 10psi. You sure a tire hook is molded or does it come super thick hookless bead and then drilled out for the hook?
  • + 1
 Nice looking wheels. But have they been through a season of DH/ XC/ Enduro racing?...cough! cough! If not, they are just nice looking. Racing improves the breed.
  • + 1
 These look good. No 26? FAIL!!!

Anyone remember Planet x BMF rims? They were pretty fat I loved them even just for how they looked
  • + 0
 21mm id suits me fine thanks. I have tried wide rims but feel that 21 offers the best pinchflat resistance and makes the bike lean over so nicely.
  • + 0
 April fools! Are you serious? Wide rims? What about tire profile?
This has been done before. There is a reason it didn't stick. So lame.
  • + 1
 You can’t have too much traction - Ancient mountain bike proverb. // haha, good one!
  • + 1
 Best service company!? I waited 13 weeks for my med Ripley. I said f##k it and went out and bought a tallboy.
  • + 1
 Another copy, I was considering the NOX carbon set. Same exact concept, wider, eliminate the bead hook, etc.
  • + 1
 Didnt Alex make ultra wide rims more than a decade ago? Heavy but same idea. Old ideas resurface. There is a suprise.
  • + 1
 Curious about setting a bead on a hookless rim. Anyone else done it? Is it any worse or better?
  • + 3
 You can almost always set these with only a floor pump.
  • + 1
 Interesting, and when I look again at the cross sections I can imagine that. Once the tire bead climbs out of the valley, that wide sealing surface must make the tires seat straight too.
  • + 1
 Was excited for a second. No 26...Peace out.
  • + 6
 Derby will have 26" x 40mm soon.
  • + 2
 Gonna bump this...
  • + 3
 thanks for that info scotnicol. I for one am very happy to hear it!
  • + 1
 GreT to see carbon rims coming down in price!!
  • + 1
 At 0:34 in the video, "When the contact patch IS IS not directly..."
  • + 2
 Wide rims are the best.
  • + 1
 Stick Enduro specific in front and they'll fly out of the warehouses.
  • + 0
 My stock wheelset suits me fine, I really don't understand the need to spend 1300 bucks on a pair of wheel, i mean wtf
  • + 1
 Enve, please do not follow suit...
  • + 1
 Check the newest news article! Hahaha
  • + 1
 No 26'', you not getting any of my money.
  • - 1
 When all you little bitche$ invest your own money and start your own wheel manufacturing company, you can make all the F'n 26" wheels you want..
  • + 1
 Derby much?
  • - 1
 Errrr.... price very very high, weight average.... has everyone lost their minds?
  • + 0
 What about that silver/duck tape on the shoes of the photo? Disapoiting
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