Tech Week 2023: Smart Trainers, Casual Glasses, & Fresh Bum Cream

Oct 17, 2022 at 11:49
by Mike Levy  

The $1,199 USD Elite Justo trainer auto-calibrates and works with your mountain bike.

Elite Justo Direct Drive Trainer

There's a good chance you're here to read about some new enduro bike, watch a two-minute video full of sends, or check out all the Red Bull Rampage coverage... all of which has nothing to do with a new trainer from Italian brand Elite. But there's also a (admittedly smaller) chance that you not only know what FTP stands for but work to raise it, and maybe even own a bunch of stretchy clothing. If so, you might also be interested in knowing about Elite's $1,199 USD Justo Direct Drive Interactive Trainer.
Justo Details
• Direct drive, interactive
• Larger flywheel, Flex Feet
• Compatible with mountain bikes
• Auto calibration, dual Bluetooth, bridge connectivity
• Wired connection option
• Can be used offline, unpowered
• MSRP: $1,199 USD
• More info: www.elite-it.com

First off, while the Justo is pictured here with a road bike attached to it, it's also compatible with a 12 x 142mm thru-axle and 135mm quick-release axles, as well as 148mm and 157mm spacing with the addition of adapters that are sold separately. Like other direct drive trainers, the Justo replaces your entire rear wheel; all you need to do is install a cassette (not included) and attach your bike before smashing yourself to bits while using Zwift, Sufferfest, TrainerRoad, or whatever app you've paired it with.

You can pair the Justo with Elite's Rizer to better simulate uphill grades.
Flexible feet let the trainer rock left to right for more realism.

Elite has also added a bunch of features that set it apart from its other trainers, including two different durometers of flexible feet that allow the trainer to rock left to right while you're working for a more realistic feeling, a much smaller footprint, and a larger, 13.6lb flywheel. On the software side of things, there's a new ERG "Easy Start" feature that relaxes the resistance briefly if you're restarting pedaling while the trainer is in a high-wattage resistance setting, auto-calibration, dual-Bluetooth, bridge connectivity for heart rate and cadence sensors, and the ability to hardwire an ethernet connection for maximum reliability. If you're into online racing, that last detail should be high on your priority list.

You can also use the Justo without a computer by downloading the Elite app and setting the gradient/resistance you'd like to replicate, or even when it's not plugged into the wall and has no power.



Like big rides? Ultra Balm from Chamois Butt’r might help you.

Chamois Butt’r Ultra Balm

If you've read about Elite's new trainer, you might also want to know about this tin of Ultra Balm from Chamois Butt’r that's designed to keep chafing to a minimum during your next all-day epic. Ultra is a bit thicker than their other treatments, with the idea being that it will last and be more effective for longer, especially when faced with non-stop rain or excessive sweating from extreme heat. It's not water or petroleum-based, and the ingredients are all-natural, including oils and beeswax.
Ultra Balm Details
• Designed for long rides, harsh conditions
• All natural ingredients
• Made in the USA
• MSRP: $29.95 USD (5oz tin)
• More info: www.chamoisbuttr.com



Koo Cosmo
Koo's new Cosmo glasses combine casual looks with performance-oriented features.

Koo Cosmo Glasses

Never heard of Koo? Me neither, but the eyewear brand has been around since 2016 and offers some smart-looking MTB goggles, as well as their new Cosmo glasses that are pictured here. The casual-looking Cosmo can be worn anywhere without looking like you're on your way to the 1997 Ironman World Championships, but they still make use of Zeiss polycarbonate lenses and grippy pads at the nose bridge and temples. Polarized lenses are available with the black Cosmos, and the frame is said to be flexible enough to bend long before breaking.
Cosmo Details
• Casual style
• Zeiss polycarbonate lenses
• Polarized lenses (black frame only)
• Flexible frame
• Seven color options
• MSRP: $130 - $160 USD
• More info: www.kooworld.cc

Koo Cosmo
The Cosmo comes in seven colors and costs between $130 and $160 USD.
Koo Cosmo



Tech Week 2023 is a chance to get up to speed on the latest mountain bike components, apparel, and accessories. Click here to view all of the related content.




66 Comments

  • 72 0
 Here's a pro tip for everyone. Want casual sunglasses that don't cost $160? Goodr they're $25 with polarized lenses and work great for any activity, because they are sunglasses!
  • 6 0
 I will second this.
  • 8 0
 I’ve been really happy with sunclouds. Great lens, nice styles, good fit, $60 cdn.
  • 3 0
 DANG Shades well, only glasses I run on and off the bike
  • 4 0
 100% agree with this! Got a pair this summer and they have been great. Excellent quality, cheep, and they have cool names (Vincent’s Absinthe Night Shades are mine)
  • 6 0
 @heze: Best name they have is "Ginger's Soul" all black. So add in great sense of humor
  • 3 0
 Have a few pairs of goodrs as well as some Smith lowdowns. The difference in both frame and lens quality is very apparent--the smiths are far better. That said, I wear goodrs when I run the risk of losing my glasses.
  • 7 0
 3M protective glasses are nice when it gets dark in the forest on evening rides theses days. And you can get them for 5 bucks.
  • 2 0
 Yep, whole family wears these. Especially food for kids after skiing. At 25 bucks, you don't have to worry too much about them, plus all the fun colors for the little ones.
  • 1 0
 I've got their clear glasses for night riding and wet weather and they are awesome. They are also named "jorts for your face" which fits my style as well.
  • 5 0
 I dislike how pervasive the Pit Viper marketing strategy has become. Stop yelling at me... I just want some sunglasses.
  • 2 0
 X-Tiger sunglasses on amazon. $30 USD, with 5 replaceable lenses. Smash 'em, scratch 'em, lose them? no big deal only $30. I keep my expensive glasses in my truck, and only use cheapies on the bike.
  • 1 0
 Goodr glasses are dope! I have several pair.
  • 1 0
 I'm clumsy and not going to risk ruining expensive sunglasses while mountain biking. I picked up a cheap pair from MEC. The lenses can be swapped out. Clear and yellow tinted spare lenses were $11.
Not concerned if I scratch or smash them.
  • 1 0
 So damn comfy too. And don't move around on my face at all. These things are amazing, except the polarized lenses are wearing out..... but I also stopped putting them in their case so that's on me lol.
  • 1 0
 Knockaround sunglasses as well.
  • 17 0
 Musher's Secret Dog Paw Wax - buy the 16oz tub, it will last you years. The shit is so tenacious it will stay in your chamois for multiple washes. My balls could survive the Iditarod now.
  • 14 1
 I can’t believe it’s not BuTT’r!!
  • 9 2
 Chamois Butt'r in a tin always seems wrong to me. Surely it's better to squeeze that stuff out of a tube prior to applying it to your nether regions. I wouldn't want to share the tin with my friends.
  • 27 0
 Honestly, I wouldn't want to share the tube with my friends either...but to each their own.
  • 3 0
 I rub it onto my chamois, which should be cleaned after every ride. . . But I don’t even share my chamois buttr with my wife, she has her own.
  • 14 1
 Never double dip
  • 20 0
 @iammarkstewart: "butt to each their own"
  • 3 9
flag nateb (Oct 25, 2022 at 8:31) (Below Threshold)
 @wobblegoblin: “should be cleaned”… but we know they rarely are.
  • 16 1
 @nateb: dude what.
  • 1 0
 I've had a tin of it sit for too long and get moldy, it was vile
  • 5 0
 @Flavaine: you butter your chode the way you want to, and I'll butter my chode the way I want to.
  • 6 1
 I’ve never met anyone who uses bum cream and I ask everyone
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: I assume it’s more of a fetish than anything. Kind of like leg shaving
  • 1 0
 Nobody should double dip. Tubes are the way for hygiene
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: I have no idea how people go for >2 hours rides without it
  • 3 0
 For anyone dealing with chaffing, I highly recommend BodyGlide sticks. Goes on like a deoderant stick, it is clear and odorless. It isn't squishy and runny and awful like the butter stuff, and it works for long rides. You can also buy very small sticks that are easy to keep in a bag for ultra big days (honestly really nice to apply if you go for a swim mid-ride).
  • 3 0
 Honestly. Unless you want to race virtually. Just get the new Zwift hub. It's less rhan 1/2 this one listed and I bet most of us wouldn't notice the difference.
  • 1 0
 Just picked one of those up actually...its been great and perfect for someone who is not that interested in virtual racing but rather keeping up fitness in the winter months.
  • 5 0
 @wolftwenty1: that's how it always starts..
  • 2 0
 @2wheelzgood: lol. Its painfully boring...how anyone does it for real...looking at you @mikelevy is mind boggling.
  • 2 0
 @wolftwenty1: Erg-mode workouts help immensely. Especially ones with lots of variance or shorter intervals. Keeps it interesting and changing and you focus on the suffering and not how bored you are. Or give yourself motivation by trying to complete a certain route within a set timeframe, try to complete all the routes over time, do group rides or races (this is super motivating for me, even if I’m miles from the front group). The hardest rides are anything over 90 minutes, and low-intensity base rides that are slow and boring.
  • 1 0
 @juice-stain: Have done half a dozen or so and its not too bad when doing some of the pre-programmed workouts.
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: how's the noise? I'm highly tempted.
  • 2 0
 @ultimatist: mines silent. Nothing more than the drivetrain.
  • 2 0
 @ultimatist: Just hear the drivetrain...its pretty slick and for the price hard to beat.
  • 4 0
 Pretty much all direct drive trainers work with mountain bikes, just fyi
  • 2 1
 Actually, a huge portion of them don't work with modern 50-52 tooth cassettes because the full extension on the derailleur to wrap the largest cog winds up hitting something so you have to run a smaller cassette. I assume that's what they're referring to when they say compatible with mountain bikes.
  • 1 1
 @badbadleroybrown: When would you actually be in that gear on your 'clever' trainer?
  • 1 0
 @V7V: when you're climbing... obviously. Have you never ridden a smart trainer, they simulate inclines well into the teens, you'll use your whole cassette on a good ride. So lopping off the few gears where your derailleur is pretty annoying.
  • 1 1
 @badbadleroybrown: You don’t need to put that massive 50-52 cassette on the trainer either. A cheaper 42 or whatever works just fine, as long as the brand and speeds are the same.
  • 1 0
 @juice-stain: you do if you want to train the gears you ride and have reliable shifting.... but you don't need to match brands, not sure where you got that idea.
  • 1 0
 It might have to do with rear hub frame spacing. MTB frames these days are 148mm +. I don't think it has to do w/ cassette. The ERG will adopt to your speed/output/watt, etc., no matter what cog you're using. But not all fancy trainers can go wide enough for all mtb's. They should, tho. These days there should be all kinds of adaptors/spacers for every kind of width.
  • 1 0
 Lmfao... $30 for 5oz of Chamois Buttr? Who's actually dumb enough to be buying this shit?

Get a 12oz tin of Noxzema for $7 and it works every bit as well as the best chamois creams and better than most of them.
  • 1 1
 I just use Vaseline... same thing, isn't it?
  • 1 0
 I’m happy to show my ignorance here but, what’s chamois butter for? Are you supposed to have a splodge of it on your bum when you’re riding? Is the big pad thing not enough?
  • 3 0
 *Insert obligatory rOaDIeS aRE sOfT comment here*

Honestly not sure. I thought chamois dealt with all that, but apparently not. Though I could see how tight sweaty spandex in certain regions could be... uncomfortable
  • 3 0
 For really long days and back to back big mileage days it can be a lifesaver, especially when it's very hot or very rainy. After enough mileage even the squishiest of chamois can start wearing in the ol' but bones.

I usually don't wear padded shorts for MTB, but for road/gravel/touring the butt butter can save the day.
  • 1 0
 The big pad thing is good for 3-4 hrs.. if longer, or if multiday, then you gotta lube it up
  • 1 0
 @coffeepoop42069: so literally butter the chamois like toast then? Sounds clammy haha
  • 1 0
 Yeah it's not so much for the padding, but the rubbing after a long or very pedally day in the saddle.
  • 1 2
 I'm no corporate shill but I have an Elite Suito and quite like it. I'll be getting the Boost adapter so I can put the hardtail on it I think (less than a new XDR body for the new road bike). Full disclosure, I did get an industry deal on it but I still picked it over the Tacx or Wahoo offerings. Only niggle is you should pop for an ANT+ nubbin, seams to work much better than bluetooth.

Also, Goodr makes some pretty nifty glasses for way cheap (relatively speaking).

I've been thinking about shammy cream but so far my legs and lungs run out before my bottom does so I'm good for now.
  • 1 0
 Been using Blue Steel all season. One tube. About to run out, but $18 for a season is pretty good. www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001JK6N3I
  • 2 0
 No double dipping allowed
  • 2 0
 Bag Balm > chamois butter
  • 1 0
 Smells awful tho. Definitely works.
  • 1 2
 I always knew that chamois users are a little butthurt, but a dedicated lubricant, now thats something Wink Buying a proper saddle might be more economical and hygienic though.
  • 1 0
 Goodr has a variety of nice sunglasses for 30 bucks
  • 1 0
 Wait, virtual racing is a thing?
  • 1 0
 Smart trainers, chamois lube, and sunglasses. Stahhp, I’m overstimulated
  • 1 1
 Is this Pinkbike? With indoor trainers, butt’r and hipster glasses? Guess the paid promotions are too good to refuse.





You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2023. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.026237
Mobile Version of Website