Reverse Components Releases the Travel & Sag Indicator 2.0

Nov 8, 2021
by ReverseComponents  

Press Release: Reverse Components


Super plush, ground-hugging and delivering unparalleled traction are some of the characteristics of a well-tuned coil shock. But many riders are never using anywhere near the full potential of their damper due to the difficulties in setting up a coil shock vs air. The Travel and Sag Indicator is a suspension tuning tool to allow you to monitor your travel use while riding and for setting your sag accurately on your coil shock, using an external shaft with an ‘O' ring to indicate the millimetres of shock stroke used while riding.

After the success of our V.1 model, with its piggy back mounted design - we received a lot of requests for an indicator that worked with non-standard/non-piggy-back shocks. The Travel & Sag Indicator 2.0 Universal Mount is now available, with a new fitment design.


The Indicator attaches at the top and bottom of the coil spring - allowing compatibility with all coil shocks, including Inline and non-standard piggy back shocks such as Cane Creek, Ohlins, Push Industries, DVO and more.


With our handy online calculators you can quickly work out the amount of sag you are using and calculate your desired sag percentage.

With this information you can more accurately determine if you have the correct setup, whether you need to adjust your damping, or should move to a heavier or lighter spring.

The V 2.0 indicator now fits closer to the spring, allowing use on more frame designs with narrow shock tunnels.

The Travel & Sag Indicator 2.0 is now available in EU online stores and will be available in the USA in-store and online from late November '21.

The V.1 version is priced at €26.90 and the V 2.0 is priced at €33.90.

For more information about the Travel and Sag Indicator and to view the rest of our product range, visit our website.




97 Comments

  • 67 4
 "the difficulties in setting up a coil shock" isn't the only difficulty having to open you wallet to purchase another spring?
  • 53 2
 The important thing is to know if you should go heavier or lighter and with most coil shocks having no guide on the shock itself, the Travel and Sag indicator makes it easier to get the initial setup right.

Sure you can use a zip tie or look at the dust marks on the shaft with a ruler to try and get a reading but this makes it very clear and easy to do with the measurements there, ready to go into the sag % calculator. Probably more importantly - it can be also kept on the bike in the setup stages to check your travel use when riding - if people aren't bottoming out their shock, they often don't know how much they're really using. So far a lot of riders have found this tool + process useful and they've ended up with a better performing coil setup in the end.

Thanks for the feedback !
  • 7 0
 @ReverseComponents: Is there a reason you don't recommend leaving the indicator on the shock long-term? Could it potentially damage the shock?
  • 20 0
 @crazyXCsquirrel: Thanks for the question. No it wasn't about potential damage to the shock. It was simply that if used continually (and not cleaned) in bad weather, the scale markings may rub off. Many customers have kept it on the bike long term no problem. Cheers !
  • 10 0
 I'm buying one. I've had issues with getting the right spring rate in the past. And with how much I'm able to ride, which is sometimes just once a week, sometimes it's taken me a couple months to finally end up with a perfect set-up. I also find with progressive suspension designs and how good the bottom out features are it's difficult to really tell if and when and how often I'm using all my travel.

I also like to use Super Alloy Racing springs for their consistency and light weight, but they have spacers that make seeing and setting sack a little more difficult.

Throw in to the mix how different one 500lb (for example) spring can be to the next (often by as much as 25lbs) and this thing will be a very useful tool.
  • 4 0
 I thought moving bottom out damper on the shaft to the top and then measure the sag is the proper way, also I doubt anyone will change spring in case sag within +- 3%
  • 10 0
 @nickmalysh: This simplifies that, while at the same time allowing you to see if, when and how often you're using full travel.

So if you use one spring and get 28% sag barely while barely ever, if at all using full travel... yet when you use a different spring rate, and get 30% sag and use full travel when you should, that's a good thing.

Thing is... the difference between the use of travel between these springs may be just a couple mm of stroke on the shaft which is something that is very difficult to tell if it's happening or not.

Also, in my experience, + or - 3% points of sag is the difference between 28% and 31% sag, which means change of probably 50lbs of spring rate, which depending on your suspension design can have big impacts on small bump, mid stroke support, use of travel and bottom out.

If I'd have to guess, based on your comment and others in this thread... there are probably quite a few people on the wrong spring rate and not getting everything out of their bike's suspension. A lot of people moving to coil these days because it's the cool thing to do, but not realizing it can be much more difficult to maximize your set-up.
  • 4 2
 @ReverseComponents: Shove the bottom out bumper up to the shock body, there's your sag indiciator.
  • 1 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: this is for use when riding too.
  • 1 0
 Not anymore!
  • 3 8
flag jaame (Nov 8, 2021 at 12:21) (Below Threshold)
 @Fix-the-Spade: or get your wife/daughter to just measure the spring from end to end across the flat surfaces. If you know how much sag you need in MM there is no need to measure the distance between the eyelets or the oil ring on the shaft. One can literally just measure the actual spring before and after sitting on the bike. This is a nice tool and all, but it solves a non-existent problem.
  • 5 0
 Seems like an awesome idea to me. It's one thing setting sag, but another thing is really knowing how much travel you use when riding. I tried setting / checking where my bumper gets to but it's up and down like a bloody yo-yo on my TTX.
With this I'll know if I really use anywhere near the full travel I've got.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: I spent last 4 years on coil suspension and never thought I'm in wrong spot in terms sag or using all or not so travel;

Just set it one time and forget, probably I was like 80% in non ideal configuration
  • 2 0
 putting the cake down so you don't have to.
  • 3 0
 There are other benefits as well. Say you decide to hit a bigger drop than normal and you think your suspension is setup decent normally. With an air spring, you just hit the drop and then look at the travel indicator and say "gosh, I just used full travel! Maybe I should adjust something!"

With a coil, depending on how hard the hit was, you might not be sure if you used full travel or not. With an indicator on, it would be immediately obvious if you used all or had 10mm left.

This works even if your drunk and can't stand upright.
  • 2 1
 @mdinger: If you're so drunk you cannot stand upright I wouldn't go out and hit drops bigger than normal, not even with this tool....
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: never tried it lol
  • 4 0
 @ak-77: What even is the point in releasing a product if it doesn't help you huck when you're drunk.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: You ready for an almost free solution? After getting frustrated trying to dial my coil in, this is what I did:

Take an elastic band. Tie a knot on one end. Wrap the elastic around the exposed part of your shock shaft using a thin screw driver (I used a wooden kabob skewer). Pull tight. The knot will help keep it from loosening. Then use a plastic tire lever, or your handy kabob skewer, to seat it at the top of shaft for sag and travel measurements. Works great. Almost free.
  • 4 0
 @ReverseComponents: I bought the v1 T&S indicator, showed that the coil I had was riding very low in its travel and that I was bottoming out on fairly mild trails. Went up 50lbs on the coil and whilst I'm still getting into the bottom out bumper its by significantly less, and the bike is riding in a much better area of its stroke in normal riding. Good product, I really like mine.
  • 4 0
 @rrolly: Still not going to show if you're using full travel though. On modern coil shocks, there's a big thick easily compressible bottom out bumper some of which is part of your travel, so the elastic could end up against that even though you're not using full travel
  • 2 1
 @Malenfant: We're stoked to hear you liked it ! I
  • 1 2
 @ReverseComponents: sorry guys. The first iteration was junk…don’t see how this one is going to be any better.
  • 2 1
 @KK11: fwiw, this is a pretty useless comment because it isn't specific enough to mean anything. Honestly it might mean you had a bad day the day you looked at the device. Or you hate black. Or you get sick when you see little o rings. Or you dyed your hair and therefore your girlfriend broke up with you and now you hate reverse. Really, anything.
  • 2 1
 @islandforlife: It'll be close enough to determine the change in 25lb spring increments. If you go down to the bumper, the elastic sits just above it. If you are using full travel including the bumper, the elastic gets wedged into the bumper.

It really is a simple solution. But if you want to go ahead and drop some coin on this product, fill yer boots.
  • 1 1
 I found that if I heard that bottoming noise off flat drops, that meant it bottomed out. I didn't need a gauge to tell me what my ears already told me at the time. Coil shocks do bottom out more than air shocks. Setting up by sag and feel are good enough for anyone. Really, if you believe you need this device to set up your shock, you really do need it and you should buy one. That said, remember there is a conversation about sustainability and this device falls badly on the wrong side of that conversation. It's a superfluous product that is no doubt manufactured at one side of the world and shipped to the other. It consumes resources and serves no real purpose. I wonder what the carbon footprint is on something like this and if they even bothered to do their triple scope impact analysis.
  • 1 0
 @mdinger: NC is worthless dinger-boy lol
  • 2 1
 @jaame: Thanks for the feedback. It is most useful for riders who are not utilising all their travel, which is really common as many riders use stock coil springs set up for an average rider weight for that frame size. The Travel and Sag Indicators are made in Germany.
  • 13 1
 I could see that being useful for measuring nut sack sag. They say you don"t want more than 20% sag in your late 40's.
  • 4 0
 Don't worry about it.. plush is new firm!
  • 12 0
 Don't worry, Rockshox will release a nut sack attendant that will automatically adjust your nut sack sag whenever someone stares at your nuts.
  • 3 0
 You may not want it, but you're gonna get it. Old man sag is real.
  • 6 0
 Nah man, "long, low, and slack" is the new hotness.
  • 3 0
 You just need to rise your brake levers up; this activates the balls cable and brings your balls back up.
@yoannbarelli did a full video about it.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YHDpunS4yQ
  • 1 0
 Larry David knows what you mean......
  • 11 0
 Been using the old piggyback one, happy with it. Nothing i keep on my shock but when dialing my setup it is sweet.
  • 8 0
 Glad to hear you've been finding it useful !
  • 16 8
 I have a coil shock. I just unscrewed the eyelet mount from the shaft and slipped a little o-ring on there. Works fine. I can reach down and push it into position just like an air shock when setting sag. There is no difference. It seems like a lighter and cheaper solution than this contraption, but what do I know.
  • 5 0
 Yeah, not sure why manufacturers don't do this already?
  • 4 3
 Exactly. Sometimes people go down the rabbit hole of coming up with a complex solution to a simple problem.
  • 4 2
 @cueTIP: last week it was reserve, this week it’s reverse. Quite poetic really.
  • 10 0
 Does your bump stop not swallow up the o-ring? Plus, it is still difficult to measure sag through a coil even with an indicator in place (I've tried by pushing up the bump-stop).
  • 7 0
 Tried that. The o ring got attached to the bottom out bumper and it didnt work. Maybe to set sag one time but not to keep on the bike.
  • 4 0
 I did something similar but used one of the millions of hair elastic laying out the house. With a hair elastic you can just wrap it around the shaft, check that your sag is in the right range, then remove it... and more importantly, put the hair elastic back in the bathroom drawer where they belong!
  • 1 0
 @deiru: I’m not the only one hahaha! (wife and two younger daughters here, never need to go all the way to the bathroom to find one)
  • 8 0
 This is a clever product, and very useful. I'll probably pick one up.

But people know you can just measure the eye-to-eye at sag and figure out your sag percentage, right? Yeah, that's pretty much impossible without another person and a ruler, but it's a lot easier than using a ruler and measuring how much your bumper has moved (through the coil).
  • 5 0
 I've thought about doing this very thing for years, measuring sag on your coil shocks is such a pain. I know you can use the bump stop, but measuring the space between the top of the bump stop and shock body is infuriating at times. I found myself cutting zip ties in 1mm increments and trying to stuff it between the slots to figure out where I was, which was annoying with the spring in the way. I just wish you could use this without having to alter the spring to remove it, seems to kindof defeat the point if you have something adding preload to the spring and requires removing the spring to use. You could measure the rotations, sure, but seems like it'd be easier to have it mount to the shock body somehow.
  • 7 0
 We have the piggyback mounted Travel & Sag Indicator which can be mounted without removal of the shock or spring, so that sounds like it could work for you. The 2.0 was made specifically for riders with inline coils or non-standard piggybacks shocks.
  • 7 2
 Honestly just throw some dust on to your coil shock stanchion, take it for a ride and see how clean/how much dust is still on ur stanchion and ur good.
  • 51 2
 If you spray them with a bit of contact adhesive first you'll find the dust sticks a bit better.
  • 3 0
 Most coil shock spring tuning is plugging in your weight in a calculator online and hoping that the spring rate presented will work with you and your bike. This sag indicator will work with the springs you already have but not the correct one you haven't bought yet.
  • 5 0
 I'd use one. Sure you can use a zip tie or dust but for 20-30 quid it seems like a neater option.
  • 17 12
 Buy Rockshox, get it for free.
  • 3 1
 You don't get it for free since the only way is to use the bumper, which is quite hard to move around and you do not get any gradients for bottomout.
However, this thing is not convenient to use, it starts squeaking when both ends misalign and/or gets a little dirt inside.
  • 5 1
 @lkubica: if it squeaks for 0.3m/s then you have 10mm sag. if it sqeaks for 20m/s this is 30mm sag and correctly set up for DH. easy
  • 1 0
 @browner: didn't think about it, so it's a feature then. cool Wink
  • 5 0
 not much of a fan selling in Canada Eh?
  • 7 0
 Thanks for the feedback. At the moment we don't have a Canadian distributor, we're working on this and hope to be able to sell in Canada soon. Some of our US based online shops might be able to ship to you once we have stock.
  • 1 0
 Not gonna say this thing is trash but it bend completely after using it one day in a bikepark with relatively smooth trails. It was installed correctly according to the manual... And the quality of the 3d printed holder wasnt good
  • 1 0
 Same here... The metal "ring/plate" bent after some rough trails. The 3D printed part will slide up and down the piggy if not tight enough or destroy the sticker on the piggy.
  • 1 0
 @Spooky-Asparagus: Hey guys, sorry to hear that, it shouldn't happen. Please give us an email on info@reverse-components.com and we'll help you out.
  • 3 2
 The problem with this is that it only gives you information on one event , not the thousands that occur on a run. You need to know how many times you achieve full travel in a whole run, not just once, for example. That’s why data acquisition systems like Motion Instruments are light years ahead in helping set up your suspension. Why spend a fortune on a bike and then just fiddle around with spring rates and clickers. Lots of folk offer the service nowadays
  • 1 0
 There's no one gonna need that precise of a sag , they buy it cause they like to fiddle with crap and say "look what I got"..
O-ring or zip tie, even a dry erase line on shaft measure what's taken up..

Good idea and there will be a crowd who buy these...that's just my personal opinion from a practical standpoint from a gadget standpoint it's pretty cool and I hope you sell a crap ton love to see business succeed and long term...
  • 1 0
 Ordered one of these last year when they were released….finally got one on May. Junk…pure junk. Great idea but it was worthless. Spring diameter will restrict your ability to measure without the telescoping rod buckling. Metal mounting rings bent and flexed.

Back to zip ties.
  • 4 0
 helpful, also a normal caliper and calculatore never lies.
  • 3 1
 Or just run a tape measure from the back of the seat to the ground, then repeat with a rider standing on the pedals. Do some basic math and there you go..
  • 2 1
 This is also the most accurate way when shock travel to wheel travel isn't a fixed value (pretty much all bikes)
  • 1 0
 Perfect I can put this right next to the stem/ handlebar alignment tool on the work bench
At least its priced pretty reasonable What about using a dry erasable marker on the shaft/stanction.(shiny thing) idk
  • 2 0
 first version worked great to compare different springs on my EXT Storia.
give it a try or die trying to feel what springrate you need Big Grin
  • 3 1
 O guess most of the coil shock riders will stay with the dust indicator already included on all them
  • 3 0
 Tiewrap or put an oring on your shaft next time youve got your hands on it
  • 5 0
 O-ring on the shaft is a cheaper alternative to viagra.
  • 3 0
 For those who don't have a friend to measure eye to eye
  • 1 0
 Yeah, so simple to mesure the sag with a friend! I would still like to have one of these to see how much travel I am using..
  • 2 0
 @ReverseComponents will this help to determine if you are bottoming out regularly?
  • 2 0
 yes
  • 1 0
 Yes, it designed to be used when setting up your bike to clearly check your travel usage while riding.
  • 1 0
 I have a v1 Reverse Travel and Sag indicator. Love the idea but really disappointed that the indicators have rubbed off badly in places after only 3 rides
  • 2 0
 interesting. I have one too, kept it on literally for 6 months straight, riding 2-3 times a week, with very minimal wear to the number indicators. the reason why I took it off was simply just because I wanted to.
  • 2 0
 Every bikeshop should have one at least. Pretty clever solution to a unrealized problem
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the positive feedback! We have a bunch of bikeshops who have these and use them with their customers for setting up their spring rate, it's especially good if they can loan coil shocks for customers for test laps test before buying - and the Travel and Sag Indicator is part of the process of getting it dialled in.
  • 2 0
 It's a good product and not a million dollars. Looks like a win win to me.
  • 2 0
 Gonna put one of these on my air shock
  • 2 0
 Look, a useful tool at a reasonable price.
  • 2 0
 Wondering if this would fit on the new Norco range....?
  • 2 0
 Tiewrap
  • 1 0
 interest in here is just as expected
  • 1 0
 does it work with my old coil marzocchi 888, too?
  • 1 0
 PLEASE replace the FAN WASHER with a working bolt locking method
  • 2 0
 Great concept!
  • 1 0
 is this similar to a measuring tape or steel rule?
  • 9 11
 First they try to kill off the Presta valve with a pointless, more expensive valve, and now they have the humble coil shock bump stop in their sights. Just stop it.
  • 18 0
 Reverse ≠ Reserve
  • 10 0
 @AlexRob: I know that. I meant THEM.
  • 4 1
 @AlexRob: reverse Reverse to write reserve, therefore Reverse^2 = Reserve.

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