Merida Big Trail - Review

Dec 6, 2016
by David Arthur  




Merida is a brand that probably conjures up images of aggressively slammed race hardtails, and cross-country is an arena the huge Taiwanese company has enjoyed a lot of success in over the years. But with its new Big Trail, a 27.5 Plus aluminum hardtail with modern geometry, it has set its sights squarely on the trailbike market and the sort of people that ride for fun and giggles rather than results and medals.


27.5 Plus bikes are the latest craze in this rapidly moving industry, and without wanting to get into the pros and cons, it’s probably fair to say there’s a good argument to be made for their use on a hardtail; the extra cushioning effect of the larger volume tires hopefully contributing to a smoother ride, and a ramping up of the fun factor.

We’ve seen some very progressive hardtails in recent years that mimic the long, low and slack geometry of the latest full-suspension trail and enduro bikes, and Merida has followed this blueprint; the Big Trail is equipped with a 130mm-travel Pike fork providing a 67.5-degree head angle, and it's well appointed with a short stem and wide handlebar. It sounds like a recipe for a bike designed for shredding trails and putting a massive smile on your face.


Merida Big Trail Details:

• Intended use: trail / enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5 Plus
• Frame material: aluminium
• Fork: RockShox Pike, 130mm
• Head angle: 67.5-degree
• SRAM X0/X1 11-speed drivetrain
• RockShox Reverb dropper
• Boost hub spacing
• Weight: 28lb (med, w/o pedals)
• MSRP: £2,600
• Contact: Merida Bikes @MeridaBikes


Merida Big Trail
Merida Big Trail
The Big Trail marks a new, fun loving direction for Merida.


Frame Design

Merida hasn’t just squeezed some 2.8'' tires into an existing cross-country hardtail frame, but rather designed a completely new model from the ground up, one that is targeted at the trail rider with modern geometry taking all its cues from the latest trail full-suspension bikes. Compared to a conventional hardtail race bike, the Big Trail has a longer reach, slacker head angle, short stem and massive standover. And a dropper post. Let’s be clear, this is not a bike for racing as with most previous Merida hardtails; it’s designed for extracting as much fun out of your local trails as you can rather than trying to induce lactic acid and clinch a KOM on Strava. Fun and smiles are where the Big Trail are at.

Merida has built a smart looking frame, and the chunky tires give it a cartoonish, but purposeful presence. The massively sloping top tube is reminiscent of the DMR Trailstar I tested for Pinkbike last year and is intended to provide very generous standover clearance. The front triangle features Merida's Smart Entry internal cable routing, with the solitary gear cable, rear brake, and dropper post hose all routed inside the frame. The gear cable and brake hose then pop out at the bottom of the down tube where a small plastic bracket keeps them in place. Both are then externally routed to their final destination. This approach does open up the potential for mud contamination, but I’ve had no problems.


Merida Big Trail
The Big Trail's oddly shaped chainstay yoke provides the necessary tire, mud, and chain ring clearance.


A compact rear triangle is welded to the front end, and there’s a BB92 bottom bracket with optional ISCG 05 mounts and asymmetric chainstays to provide the necessary tire clearance. They've also specially shaped the drive-side chainstay where it meets the bottom bracket to provide maximum tire and mud clearance and to ensure adequate stiffness. Each of the three models in the Big Trail range is 1x-specific, so there’s no concession for a front derailleur. Out back is a Boost 148 axle that is matched up front by a Pike Boost fork.


Geometry

Geometry is longer, slacker and lower than many typical hardtails. The Big Trail runs a 130mm-travel fork that produces a 67.5-degree head angle. Chainstays are short at 427.5mm (the same across all four sizes), with the wheelbase measuring 1,146mm on the medium pictured here - it's 1,194mm on the extra-large. The top tube is 616mm, the reach is 425mm, and it sports a 646mm stack. They've also spec'd a 35mm diameter handlebar that's 760mm wide and a matching stem.

Merida Big Trail








Descending and Handling

Merida is probably best known amongst cross-country aficionados, but with the short stem, wide handlebar, long reach and slack angles of the new Big Trail, the company has managed to shift its huge shadow firmly into the trail riding category. I came away highly impressed after riding the bike over all sorts of trails, local and not-so-local, longer cross-country rides with loads of climbing, racing enduro, and hitting up my local descents. It's clear that 27.5 Plus as a concept is here to stay, and whether you like it or not, I found the tire size ideally suited to this bike and its trail riding focus. It amps up the fun factor massively and gives you a bit of extra cushioning without dampening the ride. The geometry and the tires come together really well to provide a bike that is good fun, really agile and playful, and it goes where you might not dare take a conventional hardtail.

The Big Trail definitely has a favorite sort of terrain, though. It’s certainly not best on really fast and open trails with a lot of rocks and steps; even though the bigger volume tires do provide extra cushioning, the aluminum frame is extremely stiff and sends a lot of feedback through the pedals. Instead, I found it more at home on smoother trails in the woods, where loamy singletrack and flowing berms are the order of the day. On these sort of trails, it does everything you want with a high level of nimbleness and chuckability. With the short stem and wide handlebar, you can throw it into corners and let the big tires hook up and slingshot you through the turn, leaving a cloud of dust in your wake.


Merida Big Trail


The big tires do contribute massively to the feeling of extra confidence. Being able to simply bang over stuff and not worry about line choice so much is a real blast, and the bigger volume definitely removes quite a lot of the harshness that is often felt on a hardtail. The Maxxis Rekon+ tires at both ends provide decent grip in dry to moist conditions, and it's only in the very boggiest slop that they can start to come unstuck. You've got to experiment with the pressures to prevent the bounce that can occur at the rear wheel if over inflated, and you definitely want to convert to tubeless to get the most out of the them.

The 130mm-travel from the Pike might not sound like a lot but it's well matched to the frame, and the high level of chassis stiffness prevents a wayward front-end on steeper drops. Plus, it's easy to tune the fork to suit your body weight and riding style, with the recommended settings giving a good setup out of the box.
bigquotesMerida is probably best known amongst cross-country aficionados, but with the short stem, wide handlebar, long reach and slack angles of the new Big Trail, the company has managed to shift its huge shadow firmly into the trail riding category.

Merida Big Trail


Climbing

It climbs well, too. You might look at the big rubber and expect it to be slow, but it is, in fact, a decently rapid ascender, making light work of long and smooth climbs and able to scamper up steeper technical gradients. It's no race rocket, that's for sure, but the weight and stiff frame give it a very agile and responsive ride when hammering the pedals. The Rekon+ tires are fast-rolling and the Big Trail barrels along at a decent pace, while the 28lb weight keeps it going on the steeper gradients.

My first outing on the Big Trail was at the inaugural DMR Bikes Ex Enduro, a three-day event on Exmoor in the South West of England. With all stages ridden blind, the Merida provided all the stability and agility I could have asked from the bike, and while I did miss the safety net of full-suspension at times, the Big Trail gradually won me over with its playful character shining through. The bigger tires roll impressively quickly and there's loads of traction available in a wide range of conditions, with only the very muddiest of climbs presenting concerns. You really need to experiment with tire pressure, especially at the rear, as slightly too high and the bike can bounce and judder over rocks and roots on climbs. The Big Trail provides a roomy cockpit, so it’s comfortable on the climbs and good on the descents, and the wide handlebar and short stem provide excellent control through switchback climbs.

The wide-range 10-42 SRAM X1 cassette and 30-tooth chain ring provide all the low-end gears you need for scaling steeper climbs, but I did spin out on faster descents very easily. The plus-sized tires do offer good traction on the loose and it scampers up technical climbs well, but there are occasions when you really do have to work your weight balance to keep the rear tire from spinning out. Long climbs over an irregular surface can be jarring on your lower back as the back wheel judders and jolts, even with low pressures.


Merida Big Trail



Component Check

• Maxxis Rekon+ 27.5 x 2.8'' tires: I’ve ridden quite a few Plus tires in the last year but this was my first ride on the Maxxis Rekon, and it’s a smart choice to spec the rear tire on the front as well. It’s a really good combination for dealing with mixed terrain, coping pretty well in the wet but brilliant in the dry, and the tall shoulder knobs really hook up well in the corners and they roll reasonably quickly.

• Merida Expert 35 760mm handlebar and 35mm stem: It’s not often that own-brand kit gets us that excited but Merida’s aluminium handlebar and stem, using the larger 35mm diameter, proved a really good fit for the bike. The short stem keeps the handling agile and lets you really control the bigger tires, but I’d probably change to a 780mm handlebar if I was buying this bike for just a bit more leverage.

Merida Big Trail
Merida Big Trail

• Prologo Nago Evo X15 seat: Everyone's underside is different, but this saddle has no place on a trail bike. I found it extremely uncomfortable, and it’s just too narrow and firm and pounded my undercarriage into a mush after just a couple of hours on the first ride.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesHardtails aren't for everyone but in giving it a modern geometry and 27.5 Plus makeover, the Merida Big Trail is a huge amount of fun and will make you reassess your opinion of hardtails. I'd recommend giving the Big Trail a closer look if you're in the market for a new trail hardtail. -David Arthur


Visit the feature gallery for high resolution and additional images


Thanks to 417 Project for letting us use its awesome trails to test and photograph the bike.


About the Reviewer David Arthur is a freelance mountain biker writer based in the UK. Stats: Age: 34 • Height: 5'11:” • Weight: 154lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None



Must Read This Week

119 Comments

  • + 106
 Mountain bikes are expensive. I get this. But over two and half grand for an aluminium hardtail seems nuts. You could literally buy two aluminium Jeffsy's atm for the price of this bike, direct sale or not that just doesn't make sense.
  • + 7
 the cheapest model strarts with 1265GBP that's ok
  • + 9
 When you look at the zero AM or TR for a fun hardtail not much more makes sense! It's half the price minus the dropper.
  • + 18
 My first thought also, that seems like a lot of coin for nothing special (Diamondback Mason is pretty similar for $1k less). It's not like Meridia is a premium brand that can command a price for their name.
  • - 33
flag sentenced2life (Dec 6, 2016 at 4:24) (Below Threshold)
 Why does everyone always compare to the big direct buy companies for fuck sake. Value for money bla bla bla boring as fuck
  • + 27
 @sentenced2life: Paul, is that you?
  • + 1
 @psychodad: ah yeah that's considerably more reasonable I guess.
  • + 5
 Or dartmoor primal from like 750 quid for basic build (from uk store), if we want to compare similar bikes
  • + 9
 How to get top comment on a pinkbike bike review -
[Insert name of bike being reviewed] is such bad value for money, I could get a YT for much less!!'.
  • + 5
 @Jack-McLovin: The truth speaks volumes.
  • + 8
 2.5K$ and you get EX1501 - PIKE- Sram X01 - Sram Guide Brake - Sorckshox Reverb ; i think that explains it all.. Smile
  • + 1
 @Danpyo: 3.3K$ at today's exchange rate.
  • + 4
 Then go ahead and buy two YT Jeffseys.
  • + 2
 @TheR: it would be nice to be able to afford one Jeffsy
  • + 1
 @Jack-McLovin: I had a look beforehand, thought someone else surely would have said something. Saw my chance and struck; voila, top comment!
  • + 1
 @Jack-McLovin: Is not about just getting the top comment, its about point out the issue that all these bike companies are producing great (but similar) products for the same price. Where is the innovation? The price of a bike is the biggest barrier to entry for the sport imo, and the consumers want better value
  • + 0
 @transition-demolition:
Yes, but comparing YT to a brand that isn't competing in the direct sales market is an invalid comparison.
  • + 46
 I love the direction fun hardtails are going. Unless you race XC there's no reason to put up with the twitchy handling and limited descending capabilities of a traditional, steep HTs. The evolution of the modern trailbike has lead to very capable geometry, resulting to bikes that can cope with any climb, but allow you to go downhill with stability and confidence. Still not convinced plus tyres are for me, but the geometry recipe seems to work for all wheel sizes.

I can't help but laugh though when a hardtail is reviewed and the tester mentions "increased pedal feedback", "suited to smoother terrain" etc. It sounds like they've not ridden a hardtail for a decade and are genuinely surprised that the ride is bumpy. It's exactly this trail feedback through the legs that I love riding hardtails for. A suspension fork keeps me riding in control and rubber side down, but the rigid back end gives you an "on the edge" feeling. That's where the fun comes from!

On the other hand they have to make clear that plus tyres are not enough to make a rigid back end ride like a mercedes-benz.

Anyway, glad to see more bikes like this becoming availiable, I hope they become mainstream and spread across all price ranges so beginners are able to steer clear of 70 degree head angles for their first mtb.
  • + 5
 Just bought a dropper post for my Cove Hummer XC ti. The hardcore hardtail OG.
  • + 4
 I have a 2012 ragley marley frame sitting in my storage for when I want to go back there. Fun hardtails have been around forever
  • + 4
 @Lagr1980: Ragley forever! Troof is still going strong! That weird puke green they did... 26" and still does the job!
  • + 5
 @togood2die: My 2017 Blue pig is the NUTS
  • + 30
 AMERIDA!
  • + 18
 F*ck yeah!
  • + 42
 making bicycling great again.
  • + 20
 MeRideA hard tail? Forgeta bout it.
  • + 21
 £2,700 for a mass produced catalogue alu framed bike. Hilarious.

A Shand Hoolie (steel) or Oykel (carbon) is £2,250

A Production Privee Shan GT is £2,365

Ridiculous pricing
  • + 15
 A Curtis Bikes frame hand built in the UK with custom geo and reynolds steel will cost just over £1000, leaving £1500 for components. Would be such a better option that this Merida
  • + 11
 This is basically Merida's version of the Specialized Fuse 6Fattie (which also has the oddly shaped chainstay yoke, although theirs is split with an empty center void to let mud flow thru). Merida of course owns 49% of Specialized and does most all of their frame manufacturing for them.

www.bikemag.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/BIKP-160300-BTST-07.jpg

www.bikemag.com/gear/review-specialized-fuse-expert-6fattie/#B7fZRujQZkHV0EUl.97
  • + 14
 Always room for a good HT n the fleet.
  • + 2
 But it's good to have a FS for a backup bike too.
  • + 6
 f*ck me top comment is going on about a YT bike again... Jesus...

Anyways, bikes a little expensive but man its nice look at. Looking at that side view and thinking a horizontal mounted swing link rear suspension put on this thing would be very sexy as well.

The need for aggressive hardtails is actually on the upswing at bike shops and some companies are getting on this and some are being slow about it. They are a great way to get young kids and teens into the sport and on a bike that can handle anything... but they need to be cost effective so it's worth putting kids on them.

You want brand loyalty from the time they are kids to when they are adults? Than build affordable bikes that parents can justify buying and are going to last. If the kid falls in love with the bike he is more than likely to stick with same company because it's what they know.
  • + 3
 The price of hardtails are approaching what fullies used to cost,Fuck Me. No actually, Fuck you.
  • + 1
 you hit the nail on the head, man
  • + 6
 Not a big fan of going plus on a Hardtail...
Biggest issue on a Hardtail: flat rear tires
Biggest issue of plus tires: lots of flats
So probably bit of a missmatch.
Im riding a Hardtail only ATM. (riding a lot in the alps)
Better go for a Steel frame for the damping and a Dh rear Tire for the strenght.
  • + 1
 tubeless with sealant, my only flats come from when the sealant dries out, which for me Vee Rubber Trax Fattys on WTB i45 Scraper rims, came after FIVE months of riding.
  • + 2
 Although I have no experience on a plus HT, I know where you're coming from... just replaced a rear rim that was beaten to death. If you like lower pressures (they make a world of difference on a hardtail) you need beefy rear tyres. Running tubeless stops flats/snakebites most of the time but the rear still takes a lot of beating. At the pressures plus tyres are meant to be ran, "bottom outs" will likely occur often.
  • + 2
 @justwan-naride:

Actually bottom outs should never happen if you run pressures appropriate to your weight, tire width, and trail conditions. If you're bottoming and denting the rim, you're too low. With a 3.2 inch tire footprint, and 210 pounds rider weight, i've run 10-11psi front and 12-13psi back all summer and fall on rocky and rooted trails every ride. Never dented my rims once.
  • + 4
 @deeeight: Like I said, no actual ride time on plus tyres, just "guesstimating" based on riding 2.2-2.4 tyres with low psi. No problems when I'm smooth and riding actively, but sometimes at the end of a ride I'm tired and my coordination is poor... that's when my rear wheel usually meets the sharp edge of a square rock and the rim gets dented. Not often but it can happen.

Glad that plus works for you, looking forward to try a plus HT myself when I get the chance.
  • + 4
 Plus tires aren't too great on a hardtail. Low pressures = bottoming cuz of all the air volume, higher pressures are bouncy. There's a magic pressure where it's only kinda bouncy and you only bottom occasionally...

Probably works ok for some, but not for me.
  • + 1
 I think the majority of flats is due to the limited choice of good plus sized tyres at the moment. The Radivist did a review of the Surly Dirt Wizard 27.5x3 and reckon it's about the best you can get and really brings out the potential of plus bikes. If I were to get a plus bike, that is what I would be running.
  • + 7
 "extra cushioning without dampening" So it softens the trail but doesn't make it wet? Good to know.
  • + 1
 @pcmxa: Come on, man! In a world where even native English speaking people can't differentiate between there, they're and their, and too, to and two, you don't really expect someone to know the difference in damping and dampening, do you?

But while we're dreaming, I'd love a bike that could dampen the dust under my tires right into loam.
  • + 2
 @kingsx: what about disc breaks? Or the first time I road my new bike?

Smile
  • + 1
 @kingsx: Yeah, around here (New Mexico) dampening would actually be a pretty cool feature.
  • + 8
 what the actual fuck at the price
  • + 3
 Reverb/pike/x01/DT wheelset... it's a great build.
  • + 3
 The review started with -"Fun and smiles are where the Big Trail are at."

And ended with- "Long climbs over an irregular surface can be jarring on your lower back as the back wheel judders and jolts, even with low pressures."
  • + 2
 So? They're not mutually exclusive.
  • + 3
 Just got my first hardtail in years after her a handful of full squish bikes. I have the Specialized Fuse Expert Carbon and could not be happier. I've sent 15-20ft doubles and tables, 7' drops, glarly, rooty PNW roots and love it.
  • + 3
 Oh boy... I am praying for the day when hardtail designers from overseas will learn the difference between static and actual (sagged) head-angle. Take a look at a Last Fast Forward, this is how you should design a modern hardtail for trails and such. Heck, even a 2012 On One 456evo had a head angle of 65,7°!
  • + 3
 For the uninitiated like myself, would there be much of a difference in ride and geometry if you swapped out the 27,5 + wheels for 29ers? From what I've read very briefly, there's not much of a difference in size between the two?
  • + 4
 BB would be slightly higher, but otherwise no difference.
  • + 2
 No I think 29er and plus have same outer diameter, you won't have the cushioning though!
  • + 2
 Except more air volume and better grip .
  • + 4
 Even with 3.0 tires a 27+ has a smaller outer diameter than a 29er and you notice it in the handling, and the lower bb is felt too. These tires are 2.8 which are usually smaller when made by Maxxis, so the handling could feel quite different.
  • + 1
 I got a 27,5+ hardtail, and I have bought a set of 29" wheels for it. Geometry is the same, but the "plus" makes the difference. I use my 29" wheels for fast fire road riding, and on the trails the 27.5+ with its grip and smoothing and for trail riding.
  • + 2
 Depends on the tire and rim models. Some "plus" tires are smaller in diameter, some are larger. It really comes down to specific comparisons. Also wider rims flatten out the tread profile (for more width on the ground) at the expense of overall diameter / tallest point of the tire. The same tire on three different width rims could give three different inflated widths and diameters. Surly has a tire specs chart for their models on their website that includes these numbers if you want to go read specifics.

WTB's Trailblazer 2.8 tires in particular though are NOT really plus tread widths. The 2.8 is the casing width (the actual tread width is only 2.35), when inflated on a i45 rim. They're meant for converting existing 29er frame/forks to a 27.5/650B plus setup. The widest part of the tire being the casing sidewalls, are at a point further from the bridge point between the fork legs / chain & seat stays than the tread area. The actual overall diameter of the tires is about 28.5 inches. I tried them on a set of narrower rims on my Salsa Spearfish and Reba fork and it cleared fine, but it dropped the BB height and pedal clearances more than I would have liked. Its more air volume yes, but not actually more traction beyond what you get from running a bit lower pressure. For real plus riding fun, you want more tread width.
  • + 1
 @deeeight: That's interesting, and good to know. A semi plus of sorts.
  • + 7
 Chromag FTW!
  • + 3
 Interrupted seat tube, limited chain ring size that can be installed, slow and sluggish....sounds like a fat bike! BTW, there no such thing as progressive hardtail, there's only progressive in full suspension bikes!
  • + 6
 Honzo ST>>> stiff, less chatter and fun without butt bashing...
  • + 5
 but I like the butt bashing....
  • + 5
 i bet for some mysterious reason, this bike rides alot like the specialized fuse.....
  • + 1
 'mysterious'
  • + 2
 I dig it , I love the bike reviews, but how is it that every bike is awesome?I believe that most bikes can be good with proper setup etc. You just don't gt enough of the real world quirks that all bikes have ,even the best bikes have quirks
  • + 1
 'Thanks to 417 Project for letting us use its awesome trails to test and photograph the bike'
Interesting use of their trails- there's so many features on their trails, yet the photos are on the tames parts.
There's lots of doubles, table tops, rock gardens and drops. It looks like you've picked the easiest lines from the Blue & Red.
Would have loved to see better use of the trails for the photos to make them a bit more dynamic. These photos don't do anyone justice; rider, trails or bike. I think they could have been taken anywhere (with a view).
  • + 1
 To be fair descent in the fifth photo was pretty scary to me when I was up there earlier this year, although it was also wet when I rode it. The photo doesn't do that section justice. I will agree that the best features weren't used though, although I did break my toe trying to go round a berm on the blue too fast so the whole thing could be argued as dangerous! ;-)
  • + 5
 I wonder if it climbs like a full-suspension bike?
  • + 5
 Now that looks like a bike that can fit in everywhere!
  • + 5
 Does any company still make a 26" steel hardtail for trail riding anymore?
  • + 3
 Cotic do.
  • + 3
 Surly Instigator.
  • + 1
 chromag, on-one (i think)
  • + 3
 @captballjack: 'gator FTW. 26+ is where it's at.
  • + 2
 On the pics it looks slacker than 67.5. Guess that is just my imagination. Not a bad looking bike, but agree on the high price point.
  • + 3
 I Googled the conversation and discovered this bike is $3295.89 US dollar. Thats freaking absurd!!
  • + 0
 Will be the happiest person when the is plus size stuff goes back to where it came from. Can we please just bring back normal 29 and 27.5 inch tires. Real riders that don't have snow for 8 months could care less about this plus size movement. Don't understand why they are so great. Never seen one if front of me on a ride so that's telling me all I need to know. For all the slow non skilled riders eat away at the + and never develop real skills. Please someone prove me wrong!
  • + 4
 "Modern geometry" with a 67.5 head angle?
  • + 3
 Very long reach. Makes for a long front-center that still steers quickly.
  • + 2
 My Cotic Soul 26 with géométry of 2003 a 67.7 ! Smile Smile Smile
  • + 1
 Genesis tarn 20 is what I'm thinking, steel and way better value. Are plus size tires a good thing or not though ? Tire pressure is crucial I hear and side walls damage easier.
  • + 1
 Steel would feel nicer, for sure. I'm not a fan of plus tyres. The traction is excellent and so is the elimination of trail chatter. The compromise is weight and sidewall stiffness which makes for vague handling when you really push the tyres hard. When railing berms you find yourself drifting up the berm. If you add a few psi to stop that happening then you lose bump absorption. Compromises, compromises, like every choice in mtb.
  • + 1
 i can tell you that the genesis tarn is the shit, just ditch the 3.0 tyre up front for a 2.8 and you will not look back
  • + 1
 @doe222: That's what I was hoping to hear, thanks. The 2017 bike has 2.8 front and rear as stock.
I've heard mixed reviews of plus tires but the Tarn ticks my boxes.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: It's a fine line from the sound of it but tyres will improve quickly like everything else bike related, and it looks like fun. I've wanted a steel hardtail since the Kona cindercone of 1991 !
  • + 1
 Had Merida Matts TFS trail few years ago. That was an amazing bike that time! ( in 200Cool So Merida is not that new in this sector
  • + 1
 Hardtails are fun....riding style changes a bit because you have to stand up to pedal more to use your body and knees for suspension ....little spendy though.
  • + 1
 Stanton Sherpa 29 running a 2.6 tyre is fantastic. Yes cost as much as a fullsus but just so much much and can be used for a massive range of conditions. Love it.
  • + 2
 Nice hardtail and very pleased it doesn't look anything like an Arbr Saker Big Grin
  • + 3
 Progressive geometry? 67.5 degree head angle! Me thinks not!
  • + 3
 If it was steel, it would be cheaper and more fun
  • + 2
 I love my HT, not sure why all the hate.
  • + 3
 I wantz one
  • + 1
 For all of you guys who are looking for agresive Hardtails with ok price i suggest that you check Ghost Askel al 8.
  • + 1
 Reminds me of the old Haro with the bent top tube. I really like this whip!
  • + 2
 If 30 teeth is too small, try 31!
  • + 1
 I ve seen that weird chainstay joke in real. Just here to say it's really not a elegant solution (awful).
  • + 1
 What is brand Merida? China style?
  • + 1
 Nice, but I'm sticking with my Chromag Samurai 65, baby!
  • + 1
 28lbs, that's pretty heavy isn't it.....
  • + 1
 Looks like a Bridgestone.
  • + 0
 Dammit. I am old. Anchor was the parent company of Bridgestone. Totally out clevered myself.
  • + 2
 Clean
  • + 2
 10/10 would ride
  • + 0
 Is it just me or this looks so similar to the DMR trailstar from couple of years back ?!
  • + 2
 That's what the author thought too.
  • + 2
 Hard ????????
  • + 1
 26+ will be better.
  • + 1
 Over 28lbs!? No thanks.
  • - 1
 Too expensive for very little. Good luck with the seat tube! Those stays will bang it out of shape for sure.
  • + 1
 Spécialized Ruze !
  • - 1
 Big SCHLURRRRRRP!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.087013
Mobile Version of Website