WolfTooth's New EnCase Tool System: An Allen Wrench Walks Into a Bar and Says...

Nov 19, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
EnCase Tool System


Wolf Tooth's EnCase tool system is designed to be concealed inside your handlebars until needed. EnCase is intended to be a three-piece set that can be combined to suit your needs. The heart of the system is a pair of machined aluminum end-plugs attached to sleeves that can be stuffed with your own tools or spares, and slipped into your bars. The stars of the show, however, are Wolf Tooth's beautifully engineered multi-tools which fit neatly into those sleeves.

One side is a 14-function multi-wrench CNC-machined from aluminum that doubles as a screwdriver handle. Magnets backed up by O-rings secure the tool-bits in place and the indexing driver can be flipped 90 degrees for extra leverage when torquing pedals or stubborn through-axles. The other tool is a clever chain breaker with a threaded cap on the opposite end that hides a tubeless tire plug kit.

The entire EnCase system, including the end-cap sleeves and both tools, costs $119.95 USD. End-cap storage sleeves cost $34.95 USD, with the multi-wrench and chain breaker tools costing $49.95 each. Wolf Tooth Components
EnCase Tool System



EnCase Tool System


Hex Bit Wrench: $49.95

Wolf Tooth packs a lot into this multi wrench, and its design is very ergonomic. Being able to use the tool as a screwdriver makes seat-angle adjustments much easier than using an L-shaped Allen key or worse - a folding tool. When push comes to shove, you can angle the indexing driver and use foot pressure to break a pedal loose. The extra number 10 and 30 Torx keys will come in handy, as many component makers are switching over to that standard. You'll need to bring your own tire levers, though. The EnCase tool does not have enough real estate to offer that amenity.
Details:
• CNC-machined, anodized aluminum body
• Bits: 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2.5, 2mm Allen hex; T10, T25, T30 Torx; flat-head & Phillips screwdrivers; spoke key and Presta core remover
• Driver end rotates 90 degrees
• Magnets retain bits to handle and driver
• Uses standard 1/4" bits
• Sleeve sold separately

EnCase Tool System
Use as a screwdriver...

EnCase Tool System
Magnets and O-rings retain the double ended bits.
EnCase Tool System
...Or flip the driver for extra leverage.

EnCase Tool System
Spoke key and Presta valve stem tool.

On trail, the EnCase tool remains silent, shrouded by its plastic sleeve and further insulated by the tool's O-rings. I doubt that the O-rings are necessary, though, because the magnets are silly powerful. You'll need strong fingernails to pry the larger bits free. There is an extra magnet on the hilt of the tool to stash a different bit in a handy location or to retrieve a bit that may have fallen into an inaccessible frame cavity or rock crack (these things happen).

Handlebars vary, so Wolf Tooth leaves some extra length on the flap that encircles the plastic sleeve. The idea is the user can cut the flap to adjust for different inside diameters. Lines are molded into the flap to use as cutting guides. The minimum ID is about 5/8 inch (16mm). Once you get it right, the sleeve will take a little effort to remove. A relieved area on the aluminum end-cap assists that process. Some resistance is not a bad thing. The flip side might result in losing your $49.95 tool somewhere on the trail.

Pros

+ More useful tool than most folding types
+ Stows out of sight, but readily accessible.

Cons

- Pricey for a multi-tool
- Your favorite grips may not have end-caps



EnCase Tool System


Chain Tool & Tire Plug: $49.95

Two trailside tragedies I rarely suffer these days are punctured tubless tires and broken chains. Knock on wood, though, because it's "game over" in both instances - so having a plug tool and a chain breaker on board is a good idea for longer forays into the backcountry. Wolf Tooth's Chain & Tire Plug tool is pricey, but its convenient location and professional-level construction could prove worthwhile over time.
Details:
• CNC-machined, anodized aluminum body
• Sturdy stainless steel chain tool
• Chain tool requires 4mm Allen wrench
• Tire plug kit with 5 plugs
• Plug tool threads onto handle when in use
• Sleeve sold separately

EnCase Tool System
The handle hinges to provide leverage.
EnCase Tool System
Reverse side of the plug tool threads onto the handle.

Wolf Tooth's chain tool is compatible with 9 through 12-speed chains. The stainless steel head hinges to allow the handle to provide leverage and control, which is this tool's compelling feature. You'll need a separate, four-millimeter Allen wrench to actuate the tool (which is typical of multi-tool chain breakers) and a sharp knife to clip the ends of the plug. The action is smooth, and Wolf Tooth stocks replacement pins should you need one down the road.

I like the tool's more substantial plugs. Five are included in the hilt, which are about a third the thickness of automotive types. The skinny ones most kits provide usually need to be doubled up if the hole is large enough to disable liquid tubeless sealant. In most cases when I've needed a plug, one from the Wolf Tooth kit would have done the job. Of course, you'll need a bit more force to press one into the tire, so you'll appreciate that the installation end of the plug tool threads onto the handle to provide extra purchase.

Pros

+ Pro-quality and function
+ Thicker plugs are more useful

Cons

- Pricey for tool you'll rarely use



EnCase Tool System


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesWolf Tooth's take on in-handlebar tool storage is one of the better options. Those familiar with the brand will attest to the quality and beautiful finish of their products. Pricey, yes, but you'll be proud to own them. Before you shell out $119.99 for multitools, realize that your favorite grips may not have removable end plugs. You'll need those, and it wouldn't hurt to check with Wolf Tooth to ensure the tools will fit your handlebar's ID. That said, I found the multi-wrench to be much more user friendly than a folding tool and look forward to the day when I actually need to use the chain/plug side of my secret handlebar stash.RC







158 Comments

  • 209 8
 Lots of interesting options for storing tools in the nooks and crannies of the bike... the only area left to innovate now is storage options in the rider. Your friends will never try to bum a tool from you again! Ba-dum-tss
  • 90 13
 What a shitty idea. With comments like that you're making an ass of yourself.
  • 270 9
 My granddaddy used to have a multitool like this. Long story...but he hid it in the one place he knew he could hide somethin'. His ass. Five long years, he wore this multitool up his ass. Then when he died of dysentery, he gave me the multitool. I hid this uncomfortable hunk of metal up my ass for two years. Then, after seven years, I was sent home to my family. And now, little man, I give the multitool to you.
  • 24 2
 @showmethemountains Nature's pocket
  • 20 2
 @VtVolk: brilliant. one person has no clue what you're talking about.
  • 3 1
 @tobiusmaximum: oops had to edit...what i meant to say was this all sounds like a certain type of fiction to me.
  • 11 0
 The concept of mass centralization is but useless by putting weight on the top of the bike.
Better yet , you guys should review the tool that storages on the crank spindle.
I think it's an Italian company?
  • 5 3
 @VtVolk:
Underrated comment, id upvote more if i could
  • 5 2
 @VtVolk: slow clap for you today.
  • 8 4
 @VtVolk: Nice! Now re-brand this tool and call it "Pulp Friction"!
  • 4 0
 @endurocat: here they are (crank spindle multitool storage):
www.allinmultitool.com/products/all-in-multitool-v2-black
  • 4 2
 @VtVolk: Hides tire levers in prison wallet...
  • 2 2
 @powderturns: And that's to balance your handlebars out so that if you ride the White Line in Sedona, you don't have to switch out the tools to the other side of the handlebars. This should offset that tipping balance or else you'll go off the cliff!
  • 3 1
 @VtVolk: best use of a quote ever. Best movie ever.
  • 3 1
 You guys don’t shelve your energy gels?
  • 2 2
 wow, you people have very low standards for humor
  • 2 2
 @VtVolk: girlfriend of mine does a similar thing, but not in her bum.
  • 4 24
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 19, 2019 at 15:16) (Below Threshold)
 it started really well but then some bloke did his version of Walken Cameo and everyone went ape sht on who gets Tarantino better. Oooh you don’t know what we are talking about hah hah haaah. One more hah on you, you pathetic little ha-ha. Guess what, it’s 2019 - it’s not retro anymore, it’s just old. Dude on tge other hand... The Dude never gets old
  • 1 1
 @pdxjeremy: I can only picture this in 2 other places! Big Grin
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: the Dude abides...
  • 1 1
 @pdxkid: prison wallet
  • 2 2
 @endurocat: "Allinmultitool" this thing rusts after a while tho
  • 1 3
 @VtVolk: sounds like the Butch's watch story in Pulp fiction
  • 5 0
 @tritri94:

No way, man.
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: I thought it came from "Catch Me if You Can"
  • 62 3
 My $30 folding multi tool will stay in my fanny pack.
  • 29 0
 I have a mini multi tool that I carry in my pocket, like a freak against innovation.
  • 52 1
 The brits think this comment is yet another joke about hiding a multitool in your anatomy.
  • 27 2
 @kittenjuice: nah, we just think fanny packs are a joke.
  • 8 1
 @drpepperrider2: yup. Phone, keys, wallet and a multi tool. Big water bottle and I’m good for a couple hours.
  • 2 0
 @yzedf: I carry the same things but just hate having stuff in my pockets when riding. I've rolled onto my phone before and it is no bueno.
  • 2 0
 @rmclarke: I look at it as better my leg than my lower back. I feel a small tug on the harsher drops/hucks to flat and that’s it.
  • 2 0
 @yzedf: To each their own. I haven't fallen onto my lower back since I was young whereas it is relatively common to roll onto my leg/side when bailing.
  • 1 1
 @yzedf: I once hit a tree with a multi tool in my pocket. I would have been knocked around a bit, but would have been riding the next day if I didn't have anything in my pocket. But I was off the bike for 8 weeks with a massive haematoma in my quad. It turned into one the most painful injuries of my life as the blood proceeded to drain through my knee to settle down on the sole of my foot over a period of weeks. I was taking huge amounts of pain killers for longer than I've ever taken pain meds before. I can still feel the damage done to my leg 10 years later. Best not to put pointy things in your pocket.
  • 1 0
 @kram: life is a risk. Hematoma on the leg versus spinal damage. I’ve made my choice, you’ve made yours.
  • 1 0
 @yzedf: True, but you can put it in your bars or your stem and alleviate both. But as you say, the choice is yours.
  • 46 3
 Oneup puts their cylindrical tools in the steer tube, WolfTtooth puts theirs in the handlebar, I've just been putting mine in my butt
  • 60 1
 Have you tried putting your tool in someone else's butt? Save weight, make friends. Cheaper than a tandem.
  • 38 2
 Am I the last guy on earth with a hydration pack to carry water, tools, backup tube, my phone, etc?
  • 12 0
 No I have a old camelbak mule I have had since 2002 never failed me carries all my stuff well
  • 19 15
 @FatTonyNJ No lots of people are still living in 2002.
  • 10 0
 @Cspringsrider: Yes my old Mule is good for carrying stuff such as tools,food,water ,gloves,jacket,bike spares ,phone,map,money, glasses and once its on my back i generally forget all about it and get on with the ride ,Perhaps these back packs might catch on
  • 7 1
 @kittenjuice: to be fair my bike is a 2019 but I have landed on my back enough to know that my pack saved me. Also like having a pocket for my 420 stash as well. Its legal here..... But my dad still has an 03 Raleigh ram 2500 xt that he rides lol
  • 9 0
 Same here. Also, more than one bike means I would need a tool for each bike.
  • 3 0
 Nope! Came here to say this!
  • 6 0
 No- I still take my sweaty smelling backback nearely every time I ride.

You cant stuff a book, food (no bars- real food), water and a tool into a fanny pack.

And Ive got back protection- I wouldnt ride without o tbh.
  • 5 1
 Nope, I still use one routinely for MTB. Lost count of the number of times I have bailed out friends who have broken a chain or not carried enough food, not to mention the times I've been the only guy on the ride who has a rain jacket when it gets cold and wet.

Inside the hydration pack lives the Topeak Alien my (now) wife gave me on our first Christmas together, which turns 21 this year.
  • 3 0
 @rideronthestorm1: +1 more Mule lover here. I also carry a supremely efficient self-made first aid kit: I highly recommend a composite mirror for eyes and even dental floss. Never forget toilet paper!
  • 2 0
 You're just not part of the enduro fashion brigade. At least until backpacks become trendy again, which is guaranteed to happen.
  • 1 0
 nope. Evoc backpack user, here.
  • 1 0
 because your entire SWAT cellar and all of your special storage niches are filled with weed? bro, that's SO enduro.
  • 1 0
 No, EVOC FR enduro blackline backpack user here. I need place for gopro, batteries, tripod, jacket, water - so I have to carry all stuff what I need for 4-5hours ride. If you race a lot, forget the backpack and be lightweigt.
  • 26 0
 Crank brothers M-19 multi tool. $26 bucks. Not sure how you can say the multi wrench is more user friendly than a folding tool. First pry off bar end, second pry out tool, third remove o-rings and find correct tip, fourth assemble tool.
  • 12 0
 Same here. My M19 is probably 8 or 9 years old and does everything I need it to. Crank Bros may not make durable wheels... or droppers... or pedals... but their tools will last a lifetime.
  • 7 0
 I personally prefer a folding tool over something with loose bits that I can lose in the mud. I do prefer my folding tools proper big though, no need for those useless lightweight but short handles. I want to be able to operate the tool when my hands are frozen or wet and my body is shaking from the cold and exhaustion.
  • 8 1
 Totally agree. Every time I'm tempted to get a One-Up tool, etc, I still see my humble M-19 in my bag... and it's never let me down. The thing even has a little notch to remove presta valve cores! This was probably the high watermark of anything that Crank Bro's has ever made
  • 1 0
 @pnwpedal: actually their dropper is great.
  • 26 1
 Clean product line but I don't think putting any additional weight at the end of the handlebars is ever ideal.
  • 8 3
 Ha, my first thought was the weight might be nice... On motorcycles weight is placed at the end of the bars intentionaly as it acts as a steering dampener.
  • 6 2
 @michibretz: Not a steering damper. But some bikes can benefit from the added mass to dampen vibrations at certain frequencies. But the effective ones suspend the majority of mass inside the bar using a threaded bar end and reducing the diameter off the device inside the bar itself. In less words . NOT REALLY.
  • 4 1
 @michibretz: Those weights tune handlebar vibration, often in conjunction with a rubber mount acting as a damper. They don't have any real steering damper properties.
  • 3 2
 @michibretz: the weights on the bars of some motorcycles are definitely not steering dampers. That device is something completely else and not something you want on a bikeWink The weights are added on motorcycles where vibrations of certain frequencies caused by the engine negatively affect the handlebars. Otherwise your hands would be numb from vibrations and you would be quite uncomfortable very soon. But I do think that maybe having some weight in the bar ends of the bike would help with trail chatter though.
  • 4 0
 @michibretz: Those motorcycle handlebar systems are to deal with engine vibration, on rare occasion. Frankly haven't known anyone ever to use those systems after a life around motorcycles.
Bicycles have some trail vibration but it's nothing like the frequency of a single cylinder 450cc, or a 1400cc V-Twin.
  • 2 0
 @Archimonde: If you want that effect. Fasstco makes bars that pivot in a single plane to dampen chatter. I hear they are very effective, but expensive and a little heavier.
  • 2 1
 @chasejj: fair enough, it was a very simplified statement as I felt it was not necessary to go into depth of vehicle dynamics and the physics behind.

Adding weight to the end of a lever rotating about a pivot point, in this specific case a handlebar rotating around the headset, increases the momentum of inertia and therefore it does require a higher force to initiate rotation of said lever or in this case the handlebars.
This is true no mater if we are talking about forces intentionally applied to initiate steering by the person riding the bicycle or forces applied from the opposite end of the system, the front wheel as part of the assembly of handlebar, stem, fork and wheel rotating about the headset, by a rough surface the bike is moving about .
This is effect is the same as the initial effect one would experience with a hydraulic steering dampener as commonly used in performance motorcycles in the beginning of a movement.
In less word: it is.

Also if you want to talk exact physics, adding mass will not dampen vibrations, it would however reduce the amplitude of physical movement caused by vibrations as well as change the harmonic frequencies of the component. Personally I felt that this effect was not relevant to a bicycle and therefore not worth highlighting in my original post as a bicycle would commonly not experience ongoing vibrations of a specific and constant frequency like a vehicle with an internal combustion engine does unless one really really is overdue to oil the chain...
  • 2 0
 @michibretz: That's still not why motorcycles add weights and all sorts of rubber gizmos near the ends of the handlebars. They don't do it so it 'feels like a damper initially by being harder to move due to inertia', which I might add would be about the most stupid way to try and have a damper one could ever imagine.

The weights and other devices located at the ends of motorcycle handlebars simply alter the frequency of the engine vibrations to a level that feels more tolerable at the speeds the engine is commonly operated at.

Adding weight to the end of your bar isn't ideal, but probably isn't a deal killer at these relatively low weights. Personally I would have located these sweet tools in the crank spindle or somewhere else where it would no possible effect on handling.
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD: what makes that's so stupid in your opinion stupid?
  • 1 0
 @michibretz: That escalated quickly.
  • 2 0
 @michibretz: If you don't understand that attaching weight to the end of moving/ rotating parts is a poorly engineered method to attempt to gain stability, I don't know what to tell ya.
Have you considered filling your MTB wheels with Lead to gain stability yet? You should look in to it. Won't even need a slack HTA any longer!
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD:
you bust be loving your bar-spins if you consider the bars rotating parts...
  • 1 0
 @chasejj: seriously...
  • 12 0
 Still embarrassed to admit I use a small $9 Performance Bike (RIP cuz the new AMain-owned PB sucks) saddle bag which fits everything. Transfer it bike to bike to bike in seconds. Feel so out of place not having a tube strapped to the frame...
  • 4 1
 I still like my Fix-It sticks mounted under my W/B cage. Light and effective for 95% of issues that come up on a ride.
  • 9 0
 Just imagine how out of place I must feel then, still riding with a pack.
  • 6 0
 @Upduro: My pack save me a couple of weeks ago after an OTB incident. Fell down about 5m and hit a tree with my head and the stump next to it with my back. Sprained back and bruised kidney are the only injuries on the back. Would definitely have been a lot worse without the pack.

Always ride with a pack for that very reason.
  • 2 0
 Saddle bag works great on my hardtail, but unfortunately the wheel hits the bag on every 29er fs + dropper combo I've tried.
  • 4 0
 @MMOF: I had a stupid crash last year where I bruised a bunch of ribs. Not something I wanted to go through again, got an evoc 10l with a back protector this year for my birthday and its amazing. Also I can carry as much water as I want
  • 1 0
 @chasejj: I have broken and warrantied three pairs of those.. the metal bit falls right out of the orange holder every time it gets used. Useless IMO. Also doesn't have a chain breaker or a 2, 2.5 or 3...
  • 1 0
 @bluenext: I have never needed a in 35 years of MTB riding. Hopefully that remains. Most of my rides are 2-3 hrs. and my bikes are well maintained. Biggest issues have been broken spokes,flat tires, broken frame, broken der mount, 2 broken cranks and 2 failed freehubs and worn out brake pads.Most of those a re a limp back or walking, tools couldn't really fix the issue.
99% of the time I use a tool on the ride is adjustments to seats , bars , controls and derailleurs.
My FixIt sticks have not had any issues with bits coming out. Ive had them since the company started offering them.
  • 12 0
 For only €29, you can have the BARINTOOL which repair your bike with all the hex keys you need and 2 tire levers !
  • 4 1
 yeah, and don't forget the weight, only 100g for both
  • 4 1
 just discover it today, thanks @black-ghost i will probably order mine for Xmas on barintool.com
  • 2 1
 I was just waiting someone to create the tool for every rider who don't want to carry a full backpack of tools. And with this one, you have the same weight on both side of the handlebars.
  • 1 1
 I checked a long time ago and most of this tools wasn't on the bike, then came One up and the price froze me, even more when you need to tape your fork, then another one came on the bottom bracket... how about the mud !!
And this one onto your handlebars... 129 US DOLLARRRSSSS, WHAAAATTT.
so for 29 euros, it looks perfect for my stink* butts haha
  • 3 1
 tbh It also get a better fit, I got it on my bike and it haven't move a eyelash
  • 2 1
 I like to support local companies or smallI businesses when I can. I have used the BB tool now for almost a years and it keep getting stuck inside my BB with the mud It loosened and rattled in the steam tube that it makes me think my bike is making noise but it’s always the tool., so it's clever to put it on the handlebars.
just not FOR THIS PRICE, come on, be fair for my wallet haha. this Barinttol will looks flashy on my bike next to my brooosss
  • 7 0
 This seems cool but being a habitual basher-of-handlebars-into-trees and having lost many a bar end in said role, I wonder how long it would take me to hit it just right and not notice it flying out of the end of my handlebar? I suppose i could just stop riding like shit...
  • 6 0
 Point: Not a fan of adding weight at the furthest point of distance from the point of pivot on the longitudinal axis, something about physics, moment of inertia, etc. goes [here].

Counter point: weight in the bar ends could help to dampen chatter and vibration, something about dampness, and things that vibrate goes [here], please expound.

Counter counter point: Adding weight up top, instead of down low is a recipe for little in the middle but she gots a big head?

Finally, none of this is going to make me any faster, so if you like to jam bike tools in your holes have at it.
  • 6 0
 Why not use the BB axle space. It's nice and low and quite wide.
  • 4 0
 @fartymarty: the All-In Multi Tool does just that. It's not cheap though either, at $100.
  • 8 1
 Thats where the little GPS tracker needs to be...
  • 5 0
 I love to see innovative products like this. Unfortunately this idea won't work with single clamp grips, which I always go for....
  • 6 0
 getting in on that oneup cash Smile
  • 6 0
 Where is the compartment for your pre-roll?
  • 4 0
 In the helmet where your ear presses to your head.
  • 3 0
 stability factor six eggs with one sided weight on any bar. I see destroyed end caps on every bike I ride and that gives me the thought of having a tech issue and not being able to access the tools.
  • 7 1
 So much nope.
  • 9 0
 Injuries are worse if no bar end caps. I think some countries require by law.
  • 2 0
 Nevermind.
  • 1 0
 This year I had over the bar crash and cut my chest with plastic bar end, thnx god rib cage was strong enough;

1.As a Result invert in chest protectors;
2. bought the softer nicer bar end I could find
  • 3 0
 I'll take an aluminum plug that won't fail in a hard impact vs a plastic or rubber end that can crack or be punctured and let the bar through.
  • 1 0
 The article you cite talks about blunt injuries to the artery from handlebars. An aluminum bar end would change nothing about that injury.
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: a softer bar end will be more likely to get pushed through, exposing the sharp end of the bar.
  • 5 1
 Its a killer idea, and I love this kind of stuff, but damn! Expensive!
  • 4 0
 Don't need no stinking tools! My techi bud carries them. jk.
  • 6 2
 Won't work with Ergon grips.
  • 3 0
 End cap can be removed from Ergon grips. The end cap ends up recessed a bit into the grip, but still works just fine.
  • 3 1
 Adding weight at the end of the bar is not helping with balance, it makes more sense when it;s centered and lower like in the BB
  • 9 1
 I bet having one side of your fork filled with oil and one side filled with air doesn't help either, but I would also guess that you would never notice it.

That being said, inside the frame/down low is definitely the best spot I've seen for storage so far.
  • 2 0
 Equal weights out at the end of the bars vs a single larger weight centered in the steerer would actually increase stability (like a tightrope walker's balance pole, both increasing the moment of inertia) and make it slightly harder to tip the bike side to side. Bike handling sure is an interesting combination of stability and agility

But I agree that centered and low is absolutely best for this.
  • 1 1
 @keeqan: I regularly complain about single sided brakes.

I hate the feeling but likely never see dual sides.
  • 5 1
 Should also add it won't work with vibrocore bars
  • 1 0
 Don't try this on Vibracore bars. They won't work. Wolf Tooth looks better than the half-priced Granite Gear, which requires an Allen wrench to remove; the Allen wrench that's in the handlebar.
  • 4 0
 and no corkscrew? Can`t sell that in France.
  • 1 0
 A bad place to put weight IMO. A while back I changed my heavy ~120g lock on grips to lame 50g ESI foam grips. While the grips sucked, I was quite surprised at how the lighter grips quickened up my steering. Go figure.
  • 3 0
 I like to fix it the Enduro way, rocks and sticks are my go to tools Wink
  • 4 0
 Shorts with Pockets.
  • 1 2
 How would it affect bar flex? Or is there no real flex out by the hands anyway? What about weight way up and and at the farthest point out (end of handlebars)? I know it's not much weight, but that's a currently a very light weight point on the bike... and so far away from the COG + a position that gets whipped around quite quickly, I would think the weight would be exaggerated and easily felt, no?
  • 2 2
 Did you ever hang a grocery bag or a school bag full of books on your bars? Or how about the news papers...! You'll be fine w a couple Oz. Or MTBers need to hit the functional fitness gyms a bit more... Just sayin!
  • 5 0
 @TW80: Ya I did, and it caused a huge weight imbalance, made it twitchy and scary to ride until I moved it towards the centre... exactly what I was thinking... that confirms it would be horrible.
  • 1 2
 I like to support local companies when I can. I have used the EDC tool now for two years. It sucks as it ages. It loosened and rattled in the steam tube that it makes me think my bike is making noise but it’s always the tool.
Sorry OneUp. This tool looks to have One Uped u...
  • 1 0
 Huh, was thinking of going EDC this season... is that most people's experience, does it loosen over time? I do remember hearing from someone at an enduro race that they lost their tool because it flew out mid race... thought that was weird. But if that's the case, I may look elsewhere.
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: not my experience. Still as solid in the steerer as when l fitted it about 18 months ago.
  • 2 0
 @cooie: Good to hear...
  • 4 0
 Every company should earn your support regardless of location.
We're happy earn ours. Please let us know ( info@oneupcomponents.com ) more about your set up and we'll trouble shoot with you. We've not had many issues we couldn't fix pretty quick with EDC set up issues or as they get worked on the trails.

I'm only responding here regarding our product you mentioned.
Happy to help. Drop a line.
Owen @ OneUp
  • 4 0
 @islandforlife: Hi, I can confirm that is not most people's experience. Following the set up instructions and compatibility guidelines on the product page will result in a silent and secure system for the long haul.

The retention is based on an o-ring / lip-fit at the top cap and as such does require a little grease applied about as often as one would lube their chain for a nice snug interface.
These and other tips can be sourced on out site or handled first hand via our email support desk of four riders here to answer your questions. info@oneupcomponents.com

I'm only responding here regarding our product you mentioned.

Owen @ OneUp
  • 2 0
 @OneUpOwenF: Great to hear, thanks for the follow up, it's appreciated!
  • 2 0
 i wanna know more about that Cannondale!
  • 1 1
 Gotta say I like this solution better than the EDC. You don't have to do a bunch of crazy stuff to the steer tube. Plus I like to us a kedge topcap mount for my Garmin.
  • 1 0
 With the new stem you don’t need to do anything to the steerer anymore, but it’s true about taking away a Garmin mounting option or two.
  • 2 0
 Again and again, put it hollow axles
  • 2 0
 A solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 2 1
 Im not a fan of this placement at all. I nip trees all the time and my bars get beat to shit.
  • 2 1
 Stupid idea! Tools in grips, tools in frame, tools in stem. It's not bike, it's f*cking toolsroom Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I just keister my multitool like I learned in prison.
  • 1 1
 Extra weight at this position will help bar spins immensely. If that's your thing. Otherwise I'm not sure you'd feel it when turning your bars in the average sense..
  • 2 0
 Buying a light expensive bike, carbon handle bars to weigh it back up?
  • 2 0
 But the handlebars are where I store my beef jerky...
  • 1 0
 "An Allen wrench walks into a bar and says"... how can I unscrew you?
  • 1 0
 ONE UPed ONE Up big time!
  • 1 0
 If this came out before fanny packs got cool again.. I'd be all over it
  • 1 0
 Fanny packs are cool?
  • 1 0
 Great, but too expensive compared to the AllInOne Multitool...
  • 1 0
 Those suicide no-handers may become a bit more sketchy.
  • 2 0
 Stool tool
  • 1 0
 Toolcore
  • 1 1
 I just came here to comment about offset weight in the bars
  • 4 7
 Honestly it's a good concept since you aren't cutting threads in your steerer like with the OneUp EDC.
  • 3 0
 You no longer have to do this if you use their stem which has integrated preload. I have the EDC and while I mostly like it, I wasn't happy when the chain tool died the first time I used it. They rely on a 3mm allen key to wind the pin on your chain out. It's not sufficient and the screw just rounds out. I've modified mine with a 5mm bolt and it now works.
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