Review: Cannondale Lefty Ocho Fork

May 23, 2018
by Mike Levy  
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I've blabbered on and on many times about how there's a lack of 'out there' products in the mountain bike world these days; you know, something that makes you go ''Holy shit balls'' when you see it. But then Cannondale comes up with this thing. The Ocho is a single-sided, single-crown fork that's supposed to be both lightweight and relatively torsionally stiff. Now we're talkin'. In case you missed it, last week I wrote approximately a bajillion words about how and why the Ocho came to life, and I'll rehash some of that below. Or, if you're bored with the details and just want to know how it performs, you can scroll down to the bottom.

The fork has 100mm of travel - no more and no less - and it's aimed squarely at cross-country riding and racing, so don't use it for your down-country antics. There are versions to work with 29'' and 27.5'' wheels, too, with the carbon model of the former coming in at 1,515g / 3.34lb on my scale with an uncut steerer and the lockout attached. The less expensive aluminum fork is said to weigh 220g / 0.48lb more, so it's still not exactly a boat anchor.
Lefty Ocho Details

• Intended use: cross-country
• Travel: 100mm
• Wheel size: 27.5'' or 29''
• Carbon (tested) or aluminum chassis
• Air-sprung w/ volume adjustment via tokens
• New Chamber damper
• External low-speed compression, low-speed rebound adj.
• Remote lockout
• Lefty-specific hub
• Carbon fiber fork guard
• Easily removable brake mount
• Weight: Carbon - 1,515g / 3.34lb (actual, 29''); Alloy - 1,735g / 3.82lb (claimed)
• Only available as OE on Cannondale bikes for model year 2019
www.cannondale.com

The Ocho is air-sprung, of course, and there's a new damper inside that should be miles ahead of anything Cannondale's come up with in the past. And being a Lefty, it requires the same proprietary hub as their previous Lefty offerings, although there are a few different companies making them these days.


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If this looks wrong, I don't want to be right. The 100mm-travel Ocho might be the most divisive product since... the last Lefty, but I'm a fan of its unique appearance.


Oh, one more thing: You actually can't buy an Ocho. I'm serious. It'll be available on its own in the future, but if you want one now, you'll need to pick up one of Cannondale's new F-Si bikes to get it. So why bother reviewing this strange looking fork (strut?) if you can't even go out and buy it? Because just look at it - if this isn't 'out there,' I dunno what is.





Single-Sided, Single-Crown Chassis

I bet I know what you're thinking: How the hell can a single-sided, single-crown design be in the same ballpark as a traditional, two-sided fork when it comes to torsional rigidity? I'm much closer (but still years away) to paying all my parking tickets than I am to being an engineer, but it all comes back to Cannondale not using round stanchion tubes that require bushings and depend on the fork arch and axle for steering precision. You know, like how nearly every other fork on the market does it.


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The one-piece, carbon fiber steerer tube, crown, and upper leg look massive compared to the spindly build of two-sided cross-country forks.


Instead, the Ocho's three-sided stanchion and roller bearing system, along with using the right materials in the right place for the right design, make the Lefty possible. I haven't seen the alloy version in person, but the carbon fork's upper assembly is quite the thing. It looks burly, with a relatively massive structure at the crown and leg junction that leaves the top of other cross-country forks seeming more than a bit tiny in comparison. But, with one side to work with, I imagine that it has to be that substantial.

The tapered axle, which is the same shape as it was when the Lefty was first introduced (any Lefty wheel will fit the Ocho), is roughly comparable in size to the spindle stub axles used on older Volkswagen Beetles. So yeah, it's more than sturdy enough for your cross-country racing ass.

It also features an all-new stanchion and lower tube design that Steve Extance, Chief Engineer for Suspension at Cannondale, says is the lightest that Cannondale has ever come up with. And if you were to strip the Ocho down, you'd find that the stanchion is three-sided rather than four-sided like on all previous Lefty forks. That means that it uses three strips of roller bearings rather than four, of course, and they're now manufactured as a single, flat piece before being rolled up and clipped together to fit inside the fork.
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The Ocho's stanchion tube is three-sided rather than four-sided like all previous Leftys have used.

Why the switch to a three-sided stanchion after eighteen years of four-sided tubes? Three strips of roller bearings weigh less than four strips, and there's said to be less friction in the system for the same reason. Also, Cannondale says that it allows the stanchion to self-center, which make for more consistent action from fork to fork; a four-sided tube might have two facing sides that have tighter tolerances than the others.


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An old-style bearing strip is pictured on the right (it's the black one), and the new three-sided, one-piece strips are shown on the left.


There's another nearly-hidden detail that's sure to raise some eyebrows: The Ocho has what I'd call a sorta-quick-release brake mount. The SQR (be upset with me for that acronym, not Cannondale) lets you remove the caliper by turning a single, captured 5mm Hex bolt 180-degrees. Doing so rotates a cam that grabs or releases a small steel post, while two cone-shaped extensions should provide perfect alignment every time you re-install the mount.


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The sorta-quick-release brake mount is released from the fork by turning that one 5mm hex bolt 180-degrees. It's a neat, proven setup that's been used for years in other applications, so don't panic.


If that sounds scary to you, here are two points to keep in mind: First, just so long as you're not rolling backward down a hill, braking forces want to push the mount onto the fork when you slow down. Second, Magura's hydraulic rim brakes have used a very similar system since the beginning of time (full credit to Instagram user @the_gobshites for reminding me of that), so while I know that the SQR brake mount might sound like a crazy idea, you shouldn't be shaking your head because it's actually an old one that's very proven.

It's also way slicker than the previous Lefty's slotted brake mount that required you to back out two bolts in order to slide the piece up and off the lower tube. Why would you need to get the wheel off easily if your fork is single-sided? After all, you can fix flat without having to take the wheel off... But those who have to put their bike inside of their car, or on a rack that requires the front wheel to be removed, will be thankful for the Ocho's easy to use brake mount.


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You shouldn't ever let a hose rub the wrong way, and the Ocho's well thought out guides prevents that from happening.


But wait, there's more. Sorting out the cable routing on any fork that's not normal - and the Ocho certainly ain't normal - must be quite the task because pretty much every oddball fork on the market makes a mess of it. But not the Ocho. First, there's the slotted cable guide on the upper tube that's split to wrap around the hose before being locked into its home on the leg. Below that is a stiff shroud that clips onto the hose and is just the right length to slot into the upper guide while also resting in a groove at the top of the fork guard.

The fancy looking carbon fiber guard itself is the last component of the system, with a small clamp on the backside that grips the hose firmly. It's all very moto-esque.



Inside the Ocho

If the outside of the Ocho is wild, the inside is anything but. It's probably selling the smart people who designed the Ocho's Chamber damper a bit short to say that the internals aren't that exciting, but I only mean that in the most complimentary of ways. You see, Cannondale couldn't mess this fork up in the slightest - it needs to work as well, or better, than a Fox 32 Step-Cast or a RockShox SID World Cup - so they designed and manufactured a relatively straightforward closed damper with adjustable low-speed rebound and compression. Nothing unproven design-wise here, thank you very much.


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Are cutaways the gratuitous nudity of mountain bike nerd-dom? Here's what the inside of the Ocho's Chamber damper looks like.


This makes all the sense in the world, of course, but having to cram both the air spring and the Chamber damper into a single fork leg wasn't an easy task. ''We made every millimeter count,'' Bob Slaw, Suspension Design Engineer, told me. ''Some of the ways we got around the space constraint is that we minimized the height of everything in the damper circuit and, separately, everything in the air spring circuit.''

Both RockShox and Fox use bladders in most of their high-end fork dampers, but the Ocho employs an internal floating piston due to, you guessed it, space constraints. And even then the IFP saw an incredible amount of scrutiny to get its stack height as low as possible but also have it be as sturdy as possible.


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The production IFP (left), and the production compression piston (far right).


Externally, you won't find any sort of three-position compression lever to toggle back and forth, but rather a remote lockout up on the handlebar and a low-speed clicker at the top of the fork. There's a low-speed rebound dial at the bottom of the leg, too, which is where you'll also spot the air valve to set the spring rate. It's a self-adjusting system that automatically charges the negative spring as well, so setup should be easy peasy.


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It might be missing a fork leg, but it still has all the knobs. Low-speed compression is tuned at the top of the leg, while low-speed rebound is at the bottom of the leg.









I've had the Ocho on the front of Santa Cruz's 100mm-travel Blur for the last few months, and it's seen all sorts of terrain in that time, along with plenty of other riders looking at my bike like it's the first time they've seen a single-sided, single-crown fork. Okay, it's a first for me, too, but I couldn't care less what a product looks like (the Redalp bike being my one caveat) just so long as it works well, and you won't know there's only one fork leg if you never look down, right? You're supposed to have your eyes up and be looking down the trail anyway. Jokes aside, if the performance and reliability are there, I couldn't care less how many legs my fork has.

Is the single-sided, single-crown chassis stiff enough?

First thing first: Just how torsionally stiff is the Ocho on the trail? I've had plenty of time on older dual-crown Lefty forks, so I was already well aware of how precise they can be, but the Ocho ditches one crown and one side of its stanchion tube, so I wasn't entirely sure what to expect.

Conveniently, I've logged a ton of time on both a 32 Step-Cast and a SID World Cup, and while I wouldn't try to convince anyone over 170lb that either fork is going to come across as being rock solid, neither feel noodly to me relative to their intentions. No, they're not close to a Pike, 36, or even a 34, but that's also not the goal.
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The unholy union you're looking at turned out to be an ideal - and very fun - pairing.

At around 165lb, and with not a lot of qualms about pointing the Blur down some of Squamish's rowdier lines, I'd say that the Ocho is as torsionally rigid as a 32 or a SID. Maybe even smidge better, actually, but with so many variables (different wheels, tires, and completely different bikes) it's hard to be sure. But one thing I am 100-percent sure of is that the Ocho is as precise feeling as a cross-country fork needs to be, with not a single moment over the last few months of testing where the chassis didn't feel stiff enough.


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100mm is always going to be 100mm but, compared to other cross-country forks, the Ocho excels in those rough, awkward situations.


Are roller bearings better than bushings?

I'd say the answer to that question is 'yes,' but only in the right package. Despite having relatively little amounts of travel, cross-country forks still need to be supple and active. I might even argue that, because there's less stroke available, it's even more important for them to be slippery and smooth than it is for a bigger fork. And the Ocho is all of that, but the roller bearing system does have a different, slower feel to it when you're just pushing down on the handlebar while not moving, AKA the useless parking lot test. It's on the trail where the Ocho - actually, all Lefty forks - really shine, with the one-sided slider feeling extremely active under you.

I know that part of Cannondale's spiel is how the fork's roller bearings don't bind like bushings during braking or similar heavy loads, but let's be honest here and ask who the hell out there has noticed their fork binding? That word, while accurate, seems a bit harsh to describe the result of forces being applied to a traditional fork - no bushing-based design on the market today has ever had me thinking that it's binding at any point. But the Lefty Ocho is really, REALLY not binding.


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Don't tell the fun police, but cross-country doesn't have to be about suffering and spandex all the time. Just most of the time.


I wouldn't go so far as to say that it makes a normal fork chassis feel sticky at any point, but it's definitely doing something different under you, something better. You know those times when you're going through some janky-ass corner and everything feels wrong, and then you hit a rock or root and you realize that everything was fine before but now it actually is all going wrong? Yeah, those are the moments when the Ocho is noticeably better, more than likely because the stanchion can still roll in and out of the upper tube freely while a bushing design would be, er, not bind-y but let's go with less free.

That action, along with an air spring that feels pretty linear to me, gives the Ocho some unique performance traits. Compared to a SID or 32, I found that it was more important to get my spring rate spot-on with the Ocho, and the higher pressures required by the fork's large air chamber means that it takes a bit of tinkering to nail it.

Due to the fact that there's no shortage of steep chutes and rock faces in Squamish, I also needed some volume reduction via the tokens that go on over the shaft; the job is simple, only calling for you to release the air pressure and undo the cap at the bottom of the leg.
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The lockout locks the fork out (surprise!), but I only used that lever during my paved commute to the mountain.


How does the Chamber damper compare?

The Ocho is neat, but it'd all be for nothing if the fork's damper was a letdown. Good thing it isn't. The Chamber is every bit as good as Fox's FIT4 or RockShox's Charger system, and it'll be interesting if it eventually ends up in a longer stroke package. There are eight clicks of low-speed compression, twenty-two of low-speed rebound, and both dials have nicely defined detents. I ended up with the LSC dialed four clicks out from closed, and the red LSR knob turned out by only three clicks; I do prefer slightly slower rebound speeds than most other riders, but my settings have me thinking that I'd like a bit more range on the slow end of things. Either way, the stroke felt controlled, composed, and all the other suspension-y adjectives.


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The Ocho's chassis passed my bar hump skid test with flying colors.


Because cross-country types sometimes like to keep their suspension from moving for some reason, I know that Cannondale pretty much has to include a handlebar-mounted remote lockout with the Ocho. And that's both expected and fine, but I'd try to swallow a cat litter box-flavored Clif Bar whole if it meant that, in some perverse world, I could delete the remote.

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately?), we don't live in such a world, and the remote has to stay attached to the Ocho. Hopefully that changes when the new Lefty becomes available on its own.


What about the little things?

The Ocho's removable brake mount is a slick system that's been trouble-free for me; there will be absolutely zero drag after you re-install the mount just so long as there was zero drag before you took it off. There's not a lot of room between a disc brake's pads and rotor, but the mount's two cones that interface with the bottom of the leg clearly work as intended. I was a bit curious about how robust the whole thing would be in use, and especially how it'd hold up to some ham-fisted-ness, but it feels solid and has brushed off all my ham fisting so far. It's also never come loose, either, and it's always a plus when your brake stuff doesn't rattle loose.
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Thanks to some clever cable management, the other thing that doesn't rattle at all is the front brake line. Sure, it's going to take an extra 45-seconds to set up compared to the single hose guide that a boring fork uses, but there are few things more irritating than a hose rubbing the wrong spot or rattling. None of that with the Ocho, though.


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The single-crown design lets the Ocho fit any modern cross-country bike, whereas the old dual-crown Lefty was a PIA on that front.


Performance-wise, I've got nothing to moan about. Compatibility-wise, I have pretty much nothing to moan about. The fork goes on essentially any bike, unlike its predecessor, but you do have to use a Lefty hub, of course. That'll put some riders off, but it's just how it's gotta be. Besides, if you're not okay with having to use a proprietary hub, I suspect you probably won't be okay with a single-sided, single-crown fork, either. But if you are into the Ocho's design, you'll likely look past the hub thing.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesIf the Ocho were a song, it'd probably be something by Beck, or maybe that Björk woman from Iceland, because it's weird as hell but it's also pretty good. Weirdness aside, you probably want to know if ''pretty good'' means that it's better than a SID or a 32, right? Well, I think it is. The damper and air spring are both top-notch, the chassis is as stiff (or maybe a touch stiffer) than other weight-conscious forks and, most notably, the action in those awkward, clutch situations really is better.

Also, I'll happily admit that I like how different it looks. At this level, most products don't leave you with much to ask for, at least as far performance and reliability go. So just as long as that's the case, which it is with the Ocho, I'm all for using something unique and interesting. There will always be those who don't trust the Lefty, the large majority of them having never even tried one, and no amount of good performance will convince them otherwise. I'll also happily admit how that fact just makes me like the Ocho even more.
Mike Levy





242 Comments

  • + 286
 I still find it amazing that there’s a big company like Cannondale that is so dedicated to making things their own instead of following a cookie cutter method. This fork, like previous lefties, represents truly amazing engineering. Good on ya, Cannondale! I’m all for it.
  • + 17
 Exactly. When we live in a perverse world where exceptional, ground-breaking technology will never see widespread success because it looks TOO groundbreaking to be believed, Cannondale's health is pretty miraculous. That said, even this Lefty evangelist's faith faltered a tad when I saw this thing. Traditional single crown forks always looked pretty iffy to me, let alone a strut. Glad to hear the Ocho really does deliver on its promises. Now, if only I knew what "Ocho" referred to... is this the eighth Lefty model already?
  • + 4
 You said it joalst! I am a proud Lefty and Cannondale owner and will continue to be such. BTW, anyone know what size tire will fit in there?
  • + 84
 I'd rather they go truly outside the box and use 3 stanchions
  • + 2
 Pitbull called it calle ocho.
  • + 11
 Half the fork, half the price?
  • - 33
flag WAKIdesigns (May 23, 2018 at 3:30) (Below Threshold)
 @Christopop: you wouldn't say it about fat tissue when hunting on Tinder...
@joalst - yes I agree. It's great some companies do it and that some people buy it. We all own them a great deal of grtitude. Now saying this first part is like feeling great about yourself in a crowded train for thinking: oh this soldier over there has defended my country, fought for my freedom, I should stand up and give him my place. Tell him how much his sacrifice means to me. And then you never do it... you're just happy you thought of it. Same with me here: genuinely amazing fork, congrats yeah... won't buy it...
  • + 1
 joalst, couldn't have said it better. I admit, i think sometimes cannondale have shot themselves in the leg with this uniqueness. But the fact that they keep up with this approach nonetheless, is amazing.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: No, because fat would be considered a “bad”. A commodity that the consumer doesn’t like. So your point is not valid. And obviously, I was joking.
Like consumer electronics, the more tech and features stuffed into a smaller package, the more the effort and money is put into the whole development process, assuming no performance is compromised.
  • - 9
flag WAKIdesigns (May 23, 2018 at 4:13) (Below Threshold)
 @Christopop: I did pick up your joke, hence i was joking too. I am glad we got this meticulously explained otherwise some people may get an impression that Swedes and Danes don't understand each other very well...
  • + 6
 @Christopop: Devide it by 1/2 Wink
  • + 31
 can you buy two ocho's and pair them up to have a 'regular' fork, and if so, does that mean you'll have 200mm of travel?

Asking for a friend
  • + 15
 @WAKIdesigns: You’re whalecum Smile
  • - 14
flag WAKIdesigns (May 23, 2018 at 4:44) (Below Threshold)
 @Christopop: spattered all over myself hahahhaha
  • + 9
 Hell yea now I can throw barspins with a lefty.
  • - 13
flag WAKIdesigns (May 23, 2018 at 5:38) (Below Threshold)
 @Daniel8schrick: which way?
  • + 3
 This is a cool product, but I also wish they could have spent some of those engineering dollars updating their frames to more modern geo so they'd have a good platform to put it on. Hopefully that's coming soon. 29er Scalpel/Habit with Lefty and geo like SB100?
  • - 2
 Nice looking pogo stick you got there broby!
  • + 0
 @chyu: Haha!! Smile
  • + 4
 @richierocket: if you dish your wheel to the right you could put anything you want on it
  • + 5
 @dthomp325:
How is the Scalpel and F-Si not a good platform for this fork? It was specifically designed for these bikes.

Maybe they can release a burly 120mm option in the future but to be honest, the new crop of “down country” bikes don’t suit most riders in the World Cup circuit. While they do pedal very well for how well they descend, they give up the all out speed of a race-bred XC bike.

Where I do think the “down country” bikes will shine is on rougher epics or multi-day races like BC Bike Race. An SB100 would be awesome!
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns:
I’m not saying that we all owe them gratitude. My statement simply reflects my personal thought of Cannondale as a company.

To your comparison, not giving the soldier my seat assumes that I’m not in the market for a Cannondale in the future. Why assume that I’m posturing or acting narcissistic? That is quite a pessimistic view of my statement.
  • - 6
flag dthomp325 (May 23, 2018 at 9:44) (Below Threshold)
 @joalst: How is the Scalpel and F-Si not a good platform for this fork?

Because there is no way I'm spending my money on a bike with that type of geometry? The review itself even tested it on a Santa Cruz Blur, which has much longer reach, steeper seat tube, and slacker head angle than the F-Si or Scalpel.
  • + 5
 @dthomp325:
Then don’t buy it.
All I’m saying is that you’re claiming that Cannondale’s own fork does not suit the bike they designed it around.

I personally like the geo of the new F-Si for XC racing. It looks like quick bike.
  • + 2
 Most upbeat post ever.
  • + 2
 @dthomp325: Ive heard the bad habit (27.5+) is a pretty fun bike with some 29s thrown on to it.
  • - 1
 @joalst: All I'm claiming is I wish they'd invest in updating their geometry to something more modern so I can buy their bikes.
  • - 3
 @Christopop: half the fork, double the price Smile
  • - 5
flag wakiisapuddinghead (May 23, 2018 at 14:08) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: such an objectionable character you are. How can you be so negative towards real innovation when it has been thoroughly presented as such.
Let's race. And if you loose you are never allowed to write another post on any mtb website. What say you big mouth?
  • + 3
 @Keit: ah, so you read my comment as being negative towards Cannondale. It’s absolutely not your fault like assuming bad intentions, no. It’s how terrible my English is because I do think it is a fantastic product, I wrote it in a bad way, I suck at communication. I’m sorry.
  • + 3
 Its always worth going in the comment sections to read Waki's downvoted comments!
  • + 0
 @Christopop: I assume half the fork double the price...
  • + 2
 @Daniel8schrick: yes but no footjams. Maybe one up will make an add on brace.
  • + 2
 @LukasN89: Dividing something by 1/2 is the same thing as multiplying it by 2...
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I quote: "Same with me here: genuinely amazing fork, congrats yeah... won't buy it..."..... You were saying.
  • + 6
 @Keit: and how is that anything AGAINST this fork? So one cannot be infatuated by something and at the same time not even try to own it? For instance there was an April Fools article adressing this particular human behavior where a bike component maker made something that Pinkbike users said they desire and nobody bought it. Would you like only straight forward comments? Press 1 would you like to consult a philosopher? Press 2
  • - 5
flag wakiisapuddinghead (May 24, 2018 at 3:07) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: it was just another spiteful opinionated hypocritical waki comment again, and this is where I would post your personal note to me again. Last time, lets race and if you loose you must forever keep silent. Or am I right and you are just all mouth and nothing else?
  • + 7
 @Keit: yes my opinion is that this is a great fork and would support anyone considering it, but I have my personal reasons why not to buy it myself. Aaand I thought I’m not the only one acting tha way. Outrageous!!!
  • + 6
 Oh for Fork sake !!
  • - 4
flag wakiisapuddinghead (May 24, 2018 at 9:08) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: let's race....Ach you're just piss and wind
  • + 4
 @Keit: fine, when are you coming?
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns:

you seem to be the target of unhealthy obsession. I find it odd that just because you don't always post the consensus opinion you're chastised for it. Your opinions are like the Lefty, some love them, most hate them but they are not without merit. I don't always agree with you but I like different perspectives to challenge my own way of thinking and doing things. Reading everyone say the same thing is boring and comes across as a massive circle jerk.

If you do actually race, I suggest borrowing a Cannondale with an Ocho. It would make the win that much more satisfying and funny. Then post the video on PB and strut around as obnoxiously as you can as only you can. Keep on doing your thing because in a world of Sessions you are a Jekyll
  • + 1
 @TrevZ: Brilliant.
  • + 0
 @indydave124: no his pro doping remarks drew a line. Not his attitude which is at bett questionable. This was a few months back. Just to be clear. And he would have won then when I challenged back then. So just to be clear where this challenge came from and no he chickened back then also.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: you said once:Oct 19, 2017 at 3:41
WAKIdesigns says:

I like you, we are very similar, however just like me you fall short with your assumptions as soon as you elaborate them further. Data shortage. I just wanted to prove to you that you cannot hurt me more than I can hurt myself. Race me? Uneducated? Trumpian? Coward? Honestly? Do people actually get intimidated when you speak to them this way or you just haven't tried it in real life? You talk like a 16 year old looking for a fight. Do you know how many "discussions" like that I have had? What the hell do you think you're doing here? Trying to outsmart a fool in his own game? You can try to get on your high horse all you want. Many many tried, I am just typing sht online, I don't give a flying f*ck what people like you think of me, I am just entertaining myself. Maybe because I got more friends than enemies by putting a stick into an anthill... journos, engineers from bike companies, sales reps, mechanics and racers on WCup race. and I will care about you?

You took a wrong turn man.

Oh and no hard feelings... honestly, you're just another pissed off dude. I can understand that. Make this a better day for yourself and ignore me.
  • + 3
 @Keit feel better now? Don’t think so. But that’s just an assumption
  • + 3
 @Keit: His personal opinion that does not hurt anyone drew a line? I guess if you want everyone to think and act the same then different perspectives are very inflammatory. As I already stated, I don't always agree with him but he does provide a different POV that ignites the forums and creates debate in many ways. If you let differing opinions cause you hurt then that says more about you then it does about him. As my Grandfather used to say " offense is never given it is taken".

As far as the race goes, I think it would be entertaining!
  • + 117
 Still waiting on the downhill version to balance out my demo
  • + 16
 Just chuck a regular Ocho on. It'll be fine. Honest.
  • + 11
 @bigtim: But then I wont be able to whip anymore with such a balanced bike
  • + 3
 i was hoping for a dirt jump version to shave rotational weight when throwing the b's
  • + 5
 Stumpjumper could use it but Orbea Rallon would need a righty.
  • + 7
 @vid1998: Just run it backwards. Negative fork offset could be the next big thing.
  • + 1
 ah ah ah!!!
  • + 2
 @kram1055: I just saw a problem if a Rallon would have a balancing righty (or a different name). The brakes would now be unbalanced...
  • + 1
 @kram1055: Right!
  • + 52
 This review is a bit one-sided.... I'll let myself out.
  • + 9
 I agree, something isn't right.
  • + 23
 Please don't look me in the eyes while doing a bar hump!
  • + 5
 What has been seen cannot be unseen....
  • + 22
 You heard it here folks @mikelevy liked it so much he’s changing his name to Mike Lefty
  • + 4
 I feel like it'd be a step too far, but who knows.
  • + 6
 "He's going to be all right"
"Wow, I don't know if I'd react that well to someone that lost their left hand"
"YOU SAID HE WAS GOING TO BE ALRIGHT"

"Yeah, he lost his left hand, so he's going to be... all right"

Arrested Development at it's best.
  • + 1
 @Waldon83: Best show.
  • + 14
 Holy crap. I read up until the part about the Redalp, realized I didn't know what that was, and took a break and Googled it. I quickly remembered why people say to not Google unfamiliar terms. I found and read the old PB article, as well as the subsequent comments. I have just now recovered from laughing myself to tears. That thing looked like a couple of 90's bikes (Klein Mantra and B1/BeOne) had a child with an E-bike! lol lol lol Wow. Thanks for that @mikelevy... Made my day.
  • + 1
 Edit: I meant to throw the Super 8 in the mix too. Forgot about that.
  • + 11
 I don’t get the hate. I like it and if it works as well or better than the big players then great!
  • + 32
 Welcome to Pinkbike, you must be new here?
  • + 17
 hurr why companies are not innovating anything and copying each others designs

lefty? what a retarded idea durr

pinkbike in a nutshell
  • + 1
 The lefty misses one massively important aspect of humans - we really like symmetry. It's been proven in many ways, we're attracted to symmetrical design, heck even people with symmetrical features are considerable more attractive across cultures and geographies.
  • + 2
 @robwhynot: Yes, this is why asymmetric drive trains and brakes never really caught on.
  • + 8
 Cannondale had their ups and downs, and i'm sure their unique approach has much to do with it. I hope this one turns out to be a success story, because engineering wise- it's sexy as f~~k.
Their "System Integration" thing mostly felt like annoying marketing jargon for a while, but i admit - when i was looking for an XC 29er and got on a Scalpel, it hit me. The bike felt so much more solid and harmonic than all other high end bikes i tested. The Scalpel felt like one solid organic machine, while the other rigs in comparison felt like a group of quality parts. It's very rare to achieve such "harmony" when building up a bike from the frame up alone. (Although in the end, i bought an AnthemX. Smile
  • + 11
 Hey look Titanium cranks
  • + 1
 It's always funny how you can see future product reviews in other product reviews.
  • + 9
 if only there was a 160mm lefty... tbh id have a lefty on all my bikes if i could, even my dh bike. theyre beautiful.
  • + 5
 pair it with Specialized Demo...
  • + 5
 www.cannondale-parts.de/Lefty-Carbon-SuperMax-275/en - not signle crown but there you go
  • + 3
 @Karve: i shoulda said "160mm lefty ocho". i know those exist but i was under the impression those old supermaxs arent available new anymore. i heard that old leftys only fit cannondales. i dont know how thats possible but in some video i watched they said the ocho is the first that can be fitted to any bike. is that true?
  • + 2
 @CarrotCorn: you can buy steerer adaptors to run them in any frame even 1 1/8th i had a superman fitted to my stanton was amazing
  • + 1
 @Karve: The 160 Supermax wasn't stiff enough for it's any harder riding. You'll see in reviews of the previous Jekyll that the fork was holding it back. And the damper wasn't as good as ones from Fox or RS. This seems to have a much better damper as the old ones. I wonder up to what travel could they make it stiff enough for it's purpose, is it 140, 160, 180 (probably not but who knows)?
  • + 6
 @vid1998:
Trail Version with 120 and 130mm.
42mm offset
Would be nice.

For Downcountry as Pinkbike calls it.
  • + 1
 @vid1998: I thought the 160mm was plenty stiff, stiffer than my old 160mm 29er pike, but the damper was garbage. Made the lefty feel like an XC fork with too much travel and horrible brake dive. If they resurrected it with the 3 sided stanchion, modern offset, and a new damper it could be killer.
  • + 8
 Take it from a Lefty user and fan, this new "quick release" brake mount is a godsend. With the old style, removing the front wheel is a PITA.
  • + 3
 I can see the appeal but I never removed the front wheel unless the Lefty or Scalpel was being serviced. But with this quick release I will probably find reasons to remove the wheel more often just so can play with the SQR
  • + 3
 It was a PIA, wasn't it? This new mount setup is so damn slick, though. Will make life easier for those who have to stuff their bike in the back of a small car.
  • + 6
 @mikelevy: granted I haven’t ridden a new SID or 32 Step Cast, but a few years back, the stiffness difference was even more significant as a 195-200lb rider (back in my svelte race weight). The Lefty, as well as the Scalpel, was the only XC fork/ strut that didn’t feel like it was going to explode after screaming in pain when I hit the front brake when I got my setup in 2013 to tackle some endurance races. Do you feel like that could still be the case today or has the SID and Fox offerings actually gotten that much better?
I’m definitely spoiled by a FOX 36 for stiffness now on my daily driver Ripmo, but the Lefty still doesn’t scare me when I get on that bike. In fact, I’m still pleasantly surprised by how it tracks and its small bump compliance.
  • + 4
 I'm sure the current XC fork offerings are torsionally stiffer than they were a handful of years ago, but I doubt very much that a 200lb+ rider of decent skill would be okay with how a SID or 32 chassis feels. But as you said, the Lefty 2.0 is far, far stiffer than any other XC fork.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: it wasn’t even just torsional stiffness on forks like the older SID, when I hit the brakes, I could watch and sometimes hear the stanchions flex backward. In contrast, I can do stoppies on the Lefty without worry. I just need that remote lockout for any climbs while standing because it has no mid stroke support.

Of course, now, I couldn’t probably buy a C-dale race bike without carbon rims as they stock Crest rims. Mine came with Arches. I’d fold those Crest rims like a paper airplane.
This industry can be tough for fit 200lbers. The Lefty was the only XC front option when I was last looking in that market, maybe a Step Cast 34 fills a little of that void. God bless Enduro for making durable, pedal-able, trail bikes that don’t weigh a ton. If parts can handle Richie Rude Hulck smashes, maybe they will work for me for a few seasons.
  • + 6
 A single 45mm tube under bending and torsion is heaps stiffer than 2x 32mm tubes And the roller bearing action is super smooth. I own a lefty and also conventional forks. Lefty tech is justified
  • + 4
 For sure, I agree 100-percent. But LOOK AT IT, IT CAN'T BE SAFE!!1!!!. Ugh.
  • + 7
 I was trying to think of a good opunning line, but all I had left didn't seem quite right. Never mind...
  • + 5
 Nicely written, Levy. Loud and clear on that binding-like thing, and the awkward moment when you realize things were actually fine before, even though they felt awkward at the time.
  • + 0
 I feel sorry for the hub
  • + 11
 @madmon: How bad do you feel for the wheels on your car?
  • - 2
 @hllclmbr: i don't use cars and if I did the axle would be BALANCED, Give up the battle the fork sux eggs
  • + 4
 @madmon: My eyes are rolled so far back in my head right now Smile The fork work, and it works very well. And it's strong, torsionally rigid, and just as safe as anything else. I will be borrowing your "sux eggs" line for something, though.
  • + 1
 Agreed @phile99 - this article and that paragraph especially make you appreciate @mikelevy 's solid ability to put into words the inchoate, squirrelly, muddy awkward wrestling match that is sometimes mountain biking.

(Yes, phrasing here chosen with the indelible "bar hump skid" photo in mind)
  • + 2
 I don't care how good it performs (if it does). I just don't like the look. Period.
It is like good looking and functional wife or functional but not so good looking, err... ugly, wife.
I prefer the former.

Big props for Cannondale for Innovating, though.
  • + 4
 WAIT A MINUTE.... My 2013 alloy XLR 29 90mm weighs in at 1455 grams and the new carbon Ocho comes in at 1515 grams??? what is going on
  • + 2
 They had to add more carbon because one mounting point is less stiff than two? People are fickle and more likely to buy the better looking product than the more functional one? Lefty got a boob job with 50cc of saline? I am not sure but something is grinding my gears too.
  • + 2
 Hmmm, sounds like someone has made an XC fork worth buying. Haven't bothered to bolt anything with less than a 35mm stanchion to my bike since my last few experiences with as SID and a 32, both flexy as all hell in the name of weight reduction. Hopefully this is a kick in the pants to the big boys that XC forks need be more beef than pasta, weight weenies be damned.
  • + 0
 ... I wouldn't do it, even for racing. My experience with xc equipment is not great. I like my SID wc, but the fork is still a fair bit less stiff than I'd like for blasting my tight trails. It is loads stiffer than an old Marzocchi Corsa, and maybe %80 percent the stiffness of my Argyle, but it is not as solid through root balls as I would like. And you are used to 35mm forks. That said, mike also suggests not to put the Ocho on your "downcountry" bike- I suspect Cannondale my have something better for the rest of us later. Break the bank every once in a while, but don't pick up a fork that may break under your regular use. Heck, there are quite a few broken xc frames from WC racing- it doesn't really matter how much lighter it is if you can't finish the season on it.
  • + 3
 Yup, the 32 and SID certainly aren't stiff by many people's standards, and that's okay because both are designed for a certain style of riding, just like a 36 or BoXXer is. But you'll be bummed if you're looking for the kind of rigidity from your XC fork that comes with 35mm stanchions... it's not there with the Ocho. It's stiffer than its competition, though.
  • + 2
 Has anyone ever made a single sided swinger on a Mtb like they do with motorbikes - ie Ducati Panigale, Honda VFR? This seems like easier ground to cover than a single sided fork.
  • + 3
 Drivetrain and brakes on one side? Motorcycle has more room. Only one cog, wider rims
  • + 2
 Look up the Millyard Racing DH bike from a few years back... Single sided swingarm with a gearbox!!
  • + 1
 The Millyard bike was one, but there have been a few over the years... mostly pig-in-the-window prototypes made to look at, not buy.
  • + 1
 Back in 1991, I was in Germany on a school trip, I can’t remember if it was while in Munich or Frankfurt that trip, but I saw and rode in a park a early production model of a bike that was similar having a Lefty and then a right side only rear end. It was fully rigid, but to my eyes it was super cool. The biggest advantage touted by the person from the company was that you could change a flat without taking a wheel off. Which back then, was something we worried about every ride. I never saw a production of that bike back in the states, and I unfortunately can’t remember the name of the company.
  • + 3
 I love reminding people that don’t trust lefty’s that their car wheels are attached the same way. Makes me happy even though I’ve never ridden one.
  • + 1
 Can someone explain to me what a Lefty has over any other standard fork? To go through all that trouble to make it.

The only thing I can grasp is weight, if that's even that marginally better.

Couldn't you just through roller bearings and 3-sided stanchions onto a regular fork and it become instantly superb to a lefty?

Also I feel like bearings in a lefty hub would have a far less life to it then a regular hub.
  • + 3
 I believe a roller bearing setup on both sides of a normal fork would be prohibitively heavy
  • + 1
 I believe it's what the lefty doesn't have...
  • - 1
 yessir, I tend to agree...
So they continue with the Lefty...well...for the millionth time I have to ask...is it because somehow one leg has a superior performance to 2, or just because it's novel and it works for what it is?
Does it's performance make it better than a standard fork, because until that happens it's still a novelty and something that's just different for the sake of being different (not that it's a bad thing, but i don't think it deserves all the ooohs and ahhhhs)
  • + 3
 @preach: exactly, like where can a lefty succeed where a reg fork can’t.

I’m not against it, I think it looks cool to be honest, but still after reading multiple articles I still don’t see where the pay off is for all that work.
  • + 1
 @coadymacmillan: yessir, though the Lefty Fanboys can't take the heat ;-)
  • + 7
 don't be lazy, go read the article. All will be revealed. Its like getting a diploma
  • + 1
 @golefty: I read the article(s)
  • + 1
 Weight isn't the reason. It's light, sure, but it's within a handful of grams of other expensive XC forks. It' all explained in the article Smile
  • + 1
 @mikelevy Any word from Cannondale about jumps and drops limits? All XC forks are supposed to be in ASTM CONDITION 3 which says it should stand 61cm drops... but I have stretched these limits with confidence on my Lefty 2.0 and I still have my bones without Ti plates and screws.
Would love to know what is the real-world limit in a destructive test.
  • + 1
 Why are so many testing photos from these recent articles on the fork done on a Santa Cruz bike? Presumably Cannondale controlled the marketing process here. Why wouldn't they make sure all these release photos of the fork were on a 2019 model year Cannondale bike, especially since the fork is only available as OE on Cannondale 2019 bikes. I don't get it.
  • + 1
 They’ve not been be good at marketing for some time now...
  • + 6
 My guess is to show it can be put on other bikes because it is now a standardized tapered steerer.
  • + 1
 @blamacken: Couldn't Cannondale have solved this much more easily by releasing a Lefty with a moving bolt on upper crown and integrated stem?

And keep the upper part of the tube less than 80mm above the lower crown race so any handlebar could be slammed on any frame.

???
  • + 6
 I have the Blur test bike kicking around still and really enjoy riding it. It's also an XC race bike, so it suits the Ocho well. There's also a set of titanium Cane Creek cranks on it for testing, an e13 seat post, and some other bits. And to be honest, I didn't want to test the fork on a mega-light carbon hardtail that I couldn't push as hard as the Blur. I don't like my ankles and back be rattled apart, either. Cannondale was receptive of me putting the Ocho on a different bike, no doubt because it highlights the new fork's compatibility. Cannondale controlled nothing beyond sending me a fork to review, and being game to let us film their engineers on camera as well.
  • + 1
 @R-trailking-S: That was the difference between the lefty's pre 2013 and lefty 2.0 . The upper crown on 2.0 and supermax are much lower and you can use stems below 70mm length. Total pain in the A for pre 2013 bikes
  • + 1
 @blamacken: I get that, but there would be no frame compatibility problems if the upper crown was bolted instead of bonded to the strut. The extra complication of slamming everything into a space below the head tube was completely unnecessary.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: when does the Blur review drop?
  • + 1
 As an owner of a Slate, good to see that Cannondale are finally seeing the light in making non-proprietary parts and that they're finally stepping up their dampers. Maybe now someone will actually be able to use a normal stem instead of having to look for a proprietary stem. I'd love to have this fork on my Slate, since a reduced travel version of the Ocho makes a lot of sense for that bike.
  • + 1
 I assume that this fork will be aimed at serious XC riders, the performance in WC XCO cannot be denied, so it does raise the question of price ? If competing with Fox factory 32 and SID, and the small crop of other race forks, is this fork likely to be in their price range ? or are we to be greeted with 'the price' of being different ?
  • - 2
 When it comes to performance you'd be surprised about serious XC riders just like you would with serious Downhillers. Many of them are clueless but strong, skilled and extremely adaptable. I rode with one of fastest XC dudes in Poland once, he rode on a locked out fork for most of the time, including chunky descents... for most XC riders a 2008 Sid without a damper would do. Just air spring set hard as fk. For crying out loud: these people race without dropper posts, a sport where these things are as useful, if not more useful, than in Enduro... they just keep repeating some weird mantras while using hip drive for handling a bicycle is an undeniable fact, and it is greatly limited by running high saddle. So just like RS-1, this thing is... different. It's just hard for companies to reinvent such simple thing like 100-120 mm fork. Is it a bad thing? Hell no, I'm happy these things exist. Diversity is good.
  • + 1
 Good question. There's no word on MSRP yet, but I imagine that'll it'd have to be in the same ballpark as a SID WC or a 32 Step-Cast. I'd be more interested in the alloy Ocho's MSRP.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think Cannondale settled with a locking button for the removable brake mount.
static.bikehub.co.za/uploads/monthly_05_2018/ccs-62657-0-13428900-1526626862.jpg
  • + 3
 Awesome review. Never seen Bjork used to describe suspension before.....Bjork Fork....hmmmm I like it.
  • + 1
 Thanks! I feel like it was an apt description haha
  • + 1
 Say it in the Swedish Chef voice and unlock the full fun factor. maybe @WAKIdesigns can send you an audio recording.
  • + 1
 Bjork is from Iceland fyyy faaaan!
  • + 0
 "You know those times when you're going through some janky-ass corner and everything feels wrong, and then you hit a rock or root and you realize that everything was fine before but now it actually is all going wrong?"

Um what? No. Can't say I know that feeling. Care to explain?
  • + 1
 Awkward situations where the fork or bike is loaded up, especially on technical, steep trails. Maybe it's just me haha
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: fret not Mike, I know exactly what you are saying. Rode a mate’s Fox 32 with floppy bushes the other day & first corner was like “why is this thing rigid?”. Then out of the corner & rigid no more. Fork bind is a real thing. Mate doesn’t notice it though...
  • + 3
 Levy, your like the 2.0 version of Mike Ferrentino which I think is fantastic.
  • + 4
 Dude, I am not worthy of being in the same sentence as Ferrentino. His Grimy Handshake columns were unreal, and the one about his dog, Lena Toast, still gives me goosebumps. I'd love to see him back making words.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: he's the #1 reason I continued to have a subscription the Bike mag. well that that and Shit Bike challenges
  • + 2
 Can someone explain the phenomenon of material binding in this context? I think I grasp the rough idea, but I can't find a good definition online
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: This is the message C'dale should always present. Showing their reasons for pursuing Lefty presents a much more powerful message than telling people "trust us, it's better". When they simply tell folk "it's better", some people invalidate it as opinion, or only equal in reasoning to their armchair engineering.
  • + 1
 @DirtBagTim: so it's problems associated with chassis flex?
  • + 1
 @nhp890: Basically, the sliding parts (bushings) which are used in non-lefty forks become less slippery when the fork is loaded in any direction other than the direction of suspension travel. These non-axial loads are generated by braking and steering. If the bushings stop being slippery, the fork stops doing it's job. In Lefty's, needle bearings are used instead of plain bushings, needle bearings don't get sticky when they're loaded non-axially, so the suspension can move freely when subjected to braking and twisting. If this makes, sense, try watching the linked video again at 1'20".
  • + 1
 @DirtBagTim: makes sense, thank you
  • + 4
 Levy makes me reconsider the idea of full sleeve tattoos
  • + 5
 Just don't get it done in prison like I did and you'll be fine.
  • + 4
 Bold move, Cannondale. Let's see if it pays off
  • + 1
 Hey Levy: cut off the remote with wire cutter?

You’re welcome. Now go soak a clif bar in a used litter box and chug. You’ll be a youtube star.

I have no idea what I’m talking about.
  • + 1
 I think it's not the lefty concept itself what makes the lefty so great but it's the technology that's inside. Image a standard fork with needle bearings. Could be pretty awesome
  • + 5
 And heavy. Cannondale tried it before and ditched the concept.
  • + 1
 @fiatpolski:
Well a RS Sid is lighter. Maybe it would be heavier but not by far. And it wouldn't need to be serviced that often
  • - 2
 @emptybox: then two rear brakes and two cranksets and two rear mechs.
  • + 2
 You can do roller bearings in just one leg and maybe get the weight more competitive with a traditional fork. You would want to do it inverted tho- like the lefty is. Inverted forks allegedly also don't bind when there is torsional stress on them, and the roller bearings would keep it from being flexy. The xfusion Revel does this but with keyways, and supposedly you'll actually be able to buy one this year.
  • + 2
 why aren't more forks made with square-in-square and roller bushing designs?
  • + 1
 Patents.
  • + 3
 It looks like he is running the Cane Creek ti cranks
  • + 3
 For XC and you tested the fork on squamish rock slabs?
  • + 1
 I tested the fork on all sorts of terrain, including plenty of rock slabs. They're probably the least technical bits of Squamish's difficult trails.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: to be fair it's difficult to rate BC trails. Is Rupert an XC trail?
A Squamish local will probably say yes.
The rest of the world may have a different opinion.
Is it a trail fork or strictly an XC fork?
  • + 1
 @Sshredder: Good point. Rupert and LoA (which is awesome) are pretty XC-ish in my mind, and especially for Squamish, but certainly not the rest of the world.

It's definitely an XC fork, not a trail fork, but I want to be able to ride everything from LoA to Larvicide on my XC bike. That said, I wouldn't judge the Ocho's performance on a trail like Larvicide or Rigs - it wouldn't really be fair. But having used a 32 and SID on both of those and others, it does provide some good perspective and comparisons.

But yeah, tamer trails (for Squamish) were the focus given the product's intentions. Plenty of great slab fun on a lot of those, too!
  • + 2
 I would love to take the Santa Cruz pictured with the lefty out for a day and form an opinion from there.
  • + 1
 You could if you were in Squamish Smile
  • + 3
 140 mm 29 er version please.
  • + 1
 Fuck, same here. This thing in a 120 - 130mm package would be killer, I think. We'll see what happens.
  • + 1
 Fuck, same here. This thing in a 120 - 130mm package would be killer, I think. We'll see what happens.
  • + 3
 when is the new scalpel coming?
  • + 2
 once Shimano announces new 12 sped XTR on 3/25.
  • + 4
 Ah yes, barspins!
  • + 1
 I am buying one. Too bad new bikes are not available until July and Cannondale is making us believe this is already in the market...bad marketing strategy!
  • + 1
 this looks amazing on the santacruz frame =p

now, ill keep my 34/36 forks, but if i was made of money i do like the look of that iteration of the lefty
  • + 1
 Gotta respect people sticking to a different path and making it good. Where can I find video of people shredding on this fork?
  • + 2
 Thanks Cannondale, but prob just gonn stick with my Bothy.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy any thoughts how it compares to lefty 2.0 in terms of performance and stiffness?
  • + 2
 This fork has always left me wanting more...
  • + 1
 They had a successful Enduro racer as some point, but still can't sell their bikes! Why? You're looking at it!
  • + 1
 "I'm not an ambi-forker. Its a problem I've had since I was a baby, i can't have a right stanchion"
  • + 1
 ah, I freekin love cannondale, as a designer and furniture maker I appreciate the madness of this.
  • + 2
 No comments on 55mm offset?
  • + 1
 Whoops, I forgot. So that offset is made to work with their own bikes, but I'd bet that the aftermarket Ocho will be available in different offsets. Maybe. Possibly.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: It would be nice if you guys do a review focusing on this matter.
Mondraker speced their Foxy 29er with 44mm offset fork in spite of retaining a, now conservative, 66° HA, which seems at odds with the whole super-slack HA + reduced offset "winning formula".
And now Cannondale go the opposite way, with a slacker than normal, for XC bike, head angle and increasing an offset.

So why not do a proper article on the matter? Does one work for one type of bike and the other for a different one? Does it even matter?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy:Time for an update then. With some real world feedback. Smile
  • - 2
 Senior mechanical engineer, once-upon-a-time bike designer, and composites expert here. If you're trying to save weight, do a better job with your FEA and make the two sided fork better. There's just no way you can make an axle supported on one end as good as an axle supported on both ends. Torsion and moments, y'all. The Lefty idea is simply stupid. It always has been and always will be.
  • + 0
 I'm not a senior mechanical engineer, once-upon-a-time bike designer, or a composites expert, but the gist I get from Cannondale is that, unlike other XC forks, it's not about weight. It's relatively light, sure, but I think they'd tell you the real reason is the rigidity... and it is more rigid than other XC forks. Also, there's no doubt in my mind that being different to be different is a big factor, too.
  • + 1
 This is going to be great with my new 28.9999mm Super Duper BubbaRubDub crankset and $300 Wool Riding Chaps!
  • + 1
 The reviewer didnt mention how ridiculous he looked on the trail for having a lefty fork. It's kind of important.
  • + 3
 Why is that important? I usually look like an idiot anyway.
  • + 2
 I'll wait for the 1st lefty barspin and tail whip.
  • + 2
 I ate shit a few days ago and the fork spun around mid-crash... does that count?
  • + 2
 Fascinating how Lefty has evolved over time Wink
  • + 1
 It took them that long to understand contact geometry and the benefit of triangulation?
  • + 1
 This is the first lefty I actually want one over my two-legged forks.
  • + 1
 How does it compare with the 2.0 in regards to ride quality?
  • + 1
 Mtb should be like this fork. Weird innovative and awesome.
  • + 1
 Agreed. Consumers can't be expected to put up with weird shit that breaks and sucks, but I want more weird shit that works well.
  • + 1
 Makes me want to get a scalpel just for this fork.
  • + 1
 Where's the ebike version?
  • + 6
 Ugh, hopefully never.
  • + 1
 What’s so unholy about it
  • + 1
 Quick release brake mount?
  • + 7
 Yes, because you need to take the caliper off to remove a wheel. So it is basically part of a quick release wheel mount.
  • + 1
 He spent an hour going on about how safe that is and it is more or less bullet proof and not to be worried about it. . . .
Oh wait, did I just get trolled?
  • + 1
 extends dropper post for climb - then stands up... xoxo
  • + 1
 Noobs climb with their seat slammed, standing or not.
  • - 3
 Seriously, Mike, it would be interesting for you to go out on one of these and you have a friend lock out the fork without telling you. You would probably never notice. Or better yet, I could sneak into your house and replace the dampeners with very small donuts and you might notice. How many times have you left the lock out on by accident and noticed it at the bottom. A solid rider like you can ride anything on almost anything, and, provided you are given enough donuts you will have a great day,
  • + 4
 Disagree. I routinely lock the back of the Blur out by accident (probably because I'm a clumsy MF'er) and realize it within about 17ft of descending. And that goes ten-fold for the fork. But you are right about the donuts - if I have enough, they'll make any day great Smile

Ugh, I hate lockouts and cheater switches, especially on a bike with so little travel. But I also know they need to be the bike because XC racers think they need them.
  • + 0
 I can only assume the people that are okay with these are asymmetric themselves. Check your symmetry.
  • + 1
 damper internals look money.
  • + 1
 those comments are better left unsaid....right
  • - 3
 the CRack n Fail employees are down voting for their jobs.
  • + 1
 800 bucks
  • + 0
 Scrolled directly to the comments...
  • - 2
 So, a reba is lighter than the alloy lefty and a sid lighter than the carbon? It certainly looks cool but it seems ditching 50% of a fork doesn't save any weight.
  • + 4
 You weren't listening then. Roller. Bearings.
  • + 0
 @Hockerz: But my takeaway was that the RBs don't actually make a perceptible improvement with "binding" being a marketing myth. I know he gives a bit of a flowery statement that it sometimes feels better, but I'm going to chalk that up to confirmation bias. Would be cool to do some sort of a blind test. Like make duel stanchion versions where one is just a dummy, Boots to coverup up the shape. Then have a regular design to mix into the group. I bet it could be done. Wanna bet the results are like the wine tasting results from that big study a few years ago? People don't even know a red from a white when it comes down to it? ;-)
  • + 1
 @Chuckolicious: I don't think they can handle the truth eh Smile
  • + 1
 ??? 29er SID is 1,537g claimed on srams website, this is 1,515g actual weight WITH lockout cable, hose, and lever.
  • + 1
 Weight isn't the end-game with the Ocho.
  • + 1
 @Chuckolicious: @Chuckolicious: This has been done... not blind, mind you, but in a way that eliminated confirmation bias. There was a video floating around (check youtube) where they have a lefty and a traditional 2-legged fork mounted horizontally in a clamp. The end of both forks is weighted to create a lateral force and they are cycled through their travel. The lefty cycles smoothly and "binding" is clearly visible in the traditional fork as it seems to jerk through it's travel when cycled. How this translates into real world experiences is perhaps questionable, but as somebody who has ridden both a current lefty hybrid and a Pike... the lefty does track and maintain composure better in hard rough corners and also seems to have better small bump compliance in every situation. All that being said, I'd still say the Pike is a better performer overall and, so far, worth the weight penalty versus a carbon Lefty (IMHO). Oh, and the video I'm referring to is years old so I admit doesn't offer a terribly convincing argument versus the current gen of high end traditional forks. Would be great to see the test repeated.
  • + 1
 @headshok2002: Good to know! But yea, I'm a big empirical science nerd and pedant, so I'd need a blind test to be won over. I can actually accept the seeming basic fact that RBs should have less friction in most circumstances than a bushing, but for this application, end user experience is the final arbiter. IMHO, of course!
  • + 1
 As stiff as a 32..
  • + 3
 Stiffer, for sure. But you say it like it's a bad thing. Horses for courses; most serious cross-country racers don't need anything with more torsional rigidity than these forks, and they wouldn't go any faster if they were more rigid, either. Is a 32 stiff? Nope, not relative to a 34 or 36, and that's just fine. If you need that rigidity, then there's a fork for you.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: hey Mike, I agree, I was just stating something that sounded funny to me (there's always one in your post, in a good way) like saying wetter than water. I totally understand that those who use such fork is because it's the right tool for the job
  • - 1
 Lefty + 2019 Specialized Stumpy to balance the figure!
  • + 1
 if only there wasn't those things like cogs and chains and derailleurs dangling on one side of the bike...
  • - 2
 "ham fisting"
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