Litespeed Release Pinhoti III Titanium Trail Bike - Pond Beaver 2021

Apr 16, 2021
by Daniel Sapp  

Litespeed have released their updated titanium hardtail, the Pinhoti III. The new version has more of an emphasis on general trail riding, with contemporary geometry and a tubeset that delivers a plush and functional ride, according to design engineer Brad DeVaney. Of course, it's still a hardtail, so plush might not be the most accurate adjective...

The bike is ideal for a variety of riders, according to Litespeed - from endurance riders to bikepackers. The bike has a 67.5-degree head tube angle with a 130mm fork and it is able to use either 29" or 27.5" wheels, on sizes small through extra large. There's now tire clearance for up to 29 x 2.6" or 27.5" x 3.0" rubber, and it can accept up to a 140mm fork. There's additionally an extra small size built around 27.5" wheels. Bikes are also available with custom geometry.




The Pinhoti III has a full 3AL/2.5V titanium frame which is shaped via cold working in Litespeed's Chattanooga, TN factory. There is a CNC-machined titanium chainstay yoke, asymmetric and dropped drive-side chainstays, and integrated dropper cable routing. There's a PF30 BB shell with the option of a T47 threaded bottom bracket as an upgrade.

Bikes can be configured with a variety of build options, with pricing starting at $4,745 USD for a Shimano SLX build. All bikes can be configured and ordered online at Litespeed's site or through Litespeed retailers.

For more information, visit litespeed.com







Pond Beaver 2021





92 Comments

  • 62 4
 I love geo charts with a mix of freedom units and Metric. . .
  • 13 4
 you would love the UK then
  • 15 5
 Bike geometry tables are all in mm in the UK @adrennan:
  • 15 1
 @mtb-scotland: Ok now do the weights of riders in kg, pounds, and stone
  • 7 3
 @mtb-scotland: more referencing their general mixing of units compared to other countries.
  • 7 0
 There's loads of mixing in cycling, tyre widths are my favourite, changing from imperial to metric half way through the measurement.
  • 10 0
 @commental: Love a 30mm wide internal width for your 2.6 WT tyres? 148mm axles for your 27.5" wheel?

It's nuts.
  • 2 0
 @adrennan: you are correct. Brits use imperial and metric interchangeable.
  • 8 0
 I used to put up road works signs with how many hundreds of yards / miles the cones started but we had to measure the sign positions in km / metres.
  • 21 5
 I weigh just under 13 stone - How much would that be in dick pounds?
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: Land of Whitworth tools Smile
  • 1 1
 Not just the bike industry, but I do love to see metric inches......35.6" for example.

It's kinda like having an affair, telling your wife about it and her saying " Fair enough, I've put on the pounds lately anyway, go for it"
  • 5 1
 @enis:
A metric inch is 25mm, what you have is a decimalised inch, you can't confuse us Brits that easily
  • 2 0
 Glad it's not just me. Geo chart made me cringe. Stack and reach are always metric. Always.
  • 5 0
 Lengths in baguettes, diameters in camemberts, volumes in glasses of wine pleaaaase!!! Wink
  • 1 0
 I absolutely dispair at the lack of radians for angles. Curse those Babalonians.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Only if I can pay in pounds, shillings, and pence.
  • 1 1
 @woofer2609: I paid in Schillings for a Matchbox toy car on a trip to Austria... even Fabio Wibmer can't remember that...
  • 1 0
 Vote @danstonQ: for world El Presidente!
  • 14 0
 I didn’t realize Litespeed was still around, last time I heard their name was when a real meth of a guy was bragging to me about his super lite titanium bike he had that he could lift with his pinky....I wonder where it came from????
  • 15 0
 The Lynskey family started Litespeed, ended up moving to Chattanooga, and sold the company in the late 90s. Litespeed's new owners kept operating there and the Lynskey descendants started a Titanium competitor under the family name a few years later. So now there are two Ti-proficient, US bike manufacturers in southeast Tennessee!
  • 5 0
 That's awesome litespeed is still in business. I remember wanting one of their frames back in the 90s.
  • 6 0
 Are they any good? They used to have a ton of ads in mba magazine back in the day
  • 3 0
 Probably memories his from his pre meth days. A fair number of meth heads started as well off professionals that used it to keep up with work.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: Had a Litespeed road bike a long time ago and their reputation in the 90s to late 2000s (when I stopped riding road) was really good. Based on these gorgeous pictures, I would say the quality still looks top notch.
  • 1 1
 yes some perfected bikes are considered knock offs, one off miracles. Not Lightspeed their bikes are all lust worthy. Masters of Ti.
  • 3 0
 @madmon: The welds on their frames look impossibly perfect.
  • 1 0
 @madmon: I seem to recall RC being a big fan of theirs too
  • 6 0
 @RayDolor: Moots has entered the chat
  • 18 6
 I know these legacy companies are going for a different crowd, but why call the geo on a bike "contemporary", with reach numbers from 2014, a steep head angle and a long, slack seat tube? This looks like an interesting bike packing bike, or even a xc race type bike for someone not at all concerned about weight. To call it a trail bike with contemporary geometry though is pretty strange, unless you haven't paid attention to bike geo for most of a decade.
  • 28 12
 Because Low, Slack, Steep, Long geo is for going up, then down. A large percent of people's rides are up,down,up, down and those people want contemporary not fad geo.
  • 3 2
 Reach is too short, agreed. but seat tube is not really that slack ... stupid long, but not that slack ... A full suspension rig will sag 30-40mm-or more on a climb slackening your 76 seat angle to 74. This is right in line since the seat angle will not sag. For the same reason 67 degree head angle is REALLY steep.
  • 5 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I get that, I use to live in an area that maxed out with only about 1400 vertical on a given hill, and I have ridden many areas in my 30 years of riding that had a lot less. To call quite old geo contemporary is strange though. You could name it for what it is for, but to name it a trail bike with contemporary geo is just not true. In the hardtail trail bike category that means 63° head angles and another inch of reach at least, maybe 2" on the XL.

Given all that, as a tall, heavy, oldish guy that could care less about crazy tech trails or jumps bigger than a few feet tall, I could never go back to old geo. The modern geo bikes are the first time I feel like I fit on a mountain bike the way I should. Went from a first gen optic, to a Honzo, to a RSD Wildcat and now I'm on XXL hightower with 520mm reach and the bike is plenty playfully and fun on nearly any trail. The only thing you need to watch out for is not getting enough weight on the front tire if you are feeling lazy and rip into a corner that is flat or transitions to uphill through the corner. I wish that it had longer chainstays and pedaled better, so I will probably get rid of it, but I wouldn't change the geo at all. I get not wanting super step seat tubes, but that is the only part of modern geo that seems incompatible with more flatish rolling terrain, you can always downsize if you think wheelbases are too long on modern bikes. People like me could never upsize and now, finally I don't wish that I could.
  • 2 1
 @SDBrian: As a tall guy I always see the bent seat tubes and am pretty sure that my seat will be right around the rear axle when it is at full height. It might have a pretty steep virtual seat angle, but looks well below 70 in actual angle, which is really the number that matters for us tall folk. Especially with having the same sorta middle of the road length chain stays(I would like another 10 mm for sure) for all sizes, I'm pretty sure keeping the front wheel down on a climb would be a challenge for me.
  • 8 11
 Calling it "contemporary" speaks better to fancy crowd. You won't find word "modern" on beard oil or yeast package. It's like the best way to sell poor people some cheap ass HT that takes a big fork, is to call it "aggressive". Same same, makes you feel edgy and part of something important.
  • 5 3
 @justwaki: LOL thinking contemporary is some fancy word.
  • 5 1
 Maybe we just need a new term 'East Coast' Geo.
  • 5 1
 @SDBrian: actually, the seat tube is very slack, 74⁰ is the effective angle, the actual angles is more like 67⁰ - same as the head tube. It just has a huge setback.

And 67⁰ HT is really quite steep on a HT, which will get even more steep in riding position. Nothing contemporary about that. Also, longer, slacker bikes don't climb worse at all. They actually do better in steep climbs...
  • 6 1
 I own a nice enduro bike with a 64° head angle, but for my hardtail to use in flat and hilly area, i wouldn't want to ride anything slacker than this litespeed.
On flatter terrain a slack headangle requires a lot of weighting of the front wheel, while steeper seattube angles exhaust you because you have keep pushing your ass back on the saddle.
Bikes like the kona honzo esd might be fun in whistler, but not around here...
  • 1 0
 @insertfunusername: Cascade link gives better pedaling over chaff, and longer chainstays--which help with frontweighting
  • 2 4
 67.5 is pretty slack for a hardtail
  • 1 0
 @two-one: What geo requires more effort to weight the front wheel, is a long front center length with a short rear center length. Having a slack head angle could make that imbalance happen, but is not the driving geometry feature to make that characteristic happen.
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: If it needs a label then I guess that would work, or Nebraska geo perhaps. Cannondale used to make a few models that would sport funny geo like taller BB's and more mud clearance as the "Beast of the East".
  • 2 0
 @justwaki: you’re right, these tits who downvoted obviously don’t know what’s happening in the modern world.
  • 2 0
 QUESTIONS:

Can a leaf springy rear triangle be made out of Ti? If so, why not do that every time assume you can mostly preserve lateral stiffness?

How bout a 64/65° head tube?

No more questions, either I’m high or this geo chart is blowing my mind, units are reversed
  • 4 0
 Look up ibis silk ti and funk la ruta for a couple examples But also, yes, you're high
  • 4 0
 I rode the Pinhotis this past weekend. Fun trails. That is all for now.
  • 2 0
 Such great trails! Been a bit since I've ridden them, but I want to go back and ride them again.
  • 1 0
 @neologisticzand: Make a trip. And stay at Mulberry Gap and let them sort out a cabin, meals and shuttles. Easy!
  • 2 0
 @AndrewFleming: That's how I rode their last time! The crew at Mulberry Gap is phenomenal! The only reason I've not made another trip is aI moved and now live significantly further away
  • 1 0
 @neologisticzand: Awesome. There’s a few new trail networks within an hour drive from Mulberry now too.
  • 4 1
 Oooo, and upgrade to threaded BB is available? For only $250? How delightfully generous of them.
  • 1 0
 Wow, I literally said out loud the other day, "what happened to Litespeed"?
Loved my Ocoee back in the day. Drove it into a parking garage once. Held together but had a neat little kink in the top tube
  • 4 2
 @hardtailparty this looks right up your ally, i would love to see a review on this one day!
  • 4 0
 looks like a lynsky
  • 3 0
 That subtle curve in the top tube is really gettin' me.
  • 1 0
 Is it bending UP? Eek
  • 2 0
 Looks like it was taken with an Instagram filter.
  • 3 1
 I didn't know they were out of Chattanooga. Very cool.
  • 2 1
 Custom geometry and threaded BB available, made in the USA. What else can people find to complain about?
  • 2 0
 An artwork Ti Surly Karate Monkey is what I’m looking at here.
  • 1 0
 An emphasis on being more general purpose... An emphasis on not emphasizing anything. Interesting choice of words.
  • 2 0
 Pf30 with a T47 upgrade? Pass
  • 1 0
 I just call everything "Space aged".
It sounds contemporary, but applies to anything built after 1961.
  • 3 1
 Not pretty but sexy af
  • 2 1
 If I was going to buy a hardtail it would likely be this. Whooa!
  • 1 0
 Didnt they have an "aggressive" ti hardtail a few years back?
  • 3 2
 So much lovely detail on something so fuck ugly
  • 1 0
 Cool! Who doesn't love a titanium frame
  • 1 0
 67 head angle? On a trail hardtail . Angleset required then
  • 1 0
 The geo chart says they basically made a Santa Cruz Chameleon out of Ti.
  • 1 0
 Would not want to ride on the Pinhoti trails.
  • 1 0
 Engineering meets art.
  • 1 0
 A pressfit BB?
  • 1 0
 Looks like they offer a T47 option too.
  • 1 0
 Beautiful up close
  • 1 4
 It's a beautiful bike! But why are fork length and optimized travel specified in mm when everything else is in inches? Metric units really, really suck, and are difficult to convert and understand. Please stop using metric!
  • 1 0
 Moots...nuff said
  • 1 1
 Tire clearance and geometry is spot-on for the Southeast.
  • 2 3
 Zaskar called, they want their frame back...
  • 1 0
 But... The bike doesn't have the triple triangle
  • 4 0
 @makripper: TRIPLE TRIANGLE
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