Round Up: 30 DH World Cup Cockpit Setups Past & Present

Dec 19, 2020
by Ed Spratt  
Just like when we looked at World Cup DH tire choices every rider has their own unique setup for their race cockpit. We have looked back through our collection of bike checks from World Cup races to find some of the bar and stem combos that are being run by some of the world's top riders.




Loic Bruni:
Maribor 2020
For the double header in Maribor this year Loic Bruni was running his 31.8mm Joystick bars at 780mm wide with a 28mm rise. He paired this to an adjustable stem with options for a 45-55mm length. For this race he had it set at 55mm.



Troy Brosnan:

Troy Brosnan Canyon Sender
Maribor 2020
Troy went for 750mm Canyon G5 bars with a 45mm stem.



Marine Cabirou:

Mont Sainte Anne 2019
For the 2019 World Champs in Maribor, Marine Cabriou was running a 770mm wide Syncros bar and stem combo on her custom Game of Thrones-inspired Gambler.



Amaury Pierron:

Mont Sainte Anne 2019
Pierron went for the more unusual combination of an ENVE M9 carbon handlebar at 800mm and a 40mm Spank stem.



Charlie Harrison:

Val di Sole 2019
For Val di Sole in 2019 Charlie Harrison came set with an aluminum Descendent handlebar which had 25mm of rise and was cut to 790mm. He was also running a 50mm stem.



Nina Hoffmann:

Les Gets 2019
Nina Hoffmann chose a LevelNine handlebar with 20mm rise and a width of 770mm for the 2019 Les Gets World Cup. Nina was running a 50mm stem.



Aaron Gwin:

Maribor 2019
A 50mm Renthal stem and 790mm Renthal bars for Gwin in Maribor for the start of the 2019 season and his first race with Intense.



Danny Hart:

Maribor 2019
Shimano Pro Stealth bar at 760mm for Danny Hart for the 2019 season opener.



Magnus Manson:

Maribor 2019
Canyon G5 parts for the cockpit. Magnus runs his bars at 780mm.



Wyn Masters:

Wyn Masters
La Bresse 2018
For the wet and slippery racing in La Bresse back in 2018 Wyn Masters went for a 780mm Race Face SixC bars, with 20mm of rise.



Tracey Hannah:

Tracey Hannah
La Bresse 2018
To take on La Bresse in 2018 Tracey Hannah went for a narrow 740mm bar paired with a 50mm Stem.

Tracey Hannah Bike Check
Lenzerheide 2017
Going back to Lenzerheide in 2017 Tracey was running a slightly wider bar at 760mm although she was still running a 50mm stem.



Martin Maes:

Martin Maes
La Bresse 2018
To achieve his incredible win in La Bresse Martin Maes was running 780mm Race Face SixC bars, with 20mm of rise. Martin was running a fairly low cockpit setup, with his fork dropped down to 190mm and only one spacer under the crown.



Adam Brayton:

Vallnord 2018
In Vallnord during the 2018 season Adam Brayton was running a Hope Tech bar cut to 760mm but with the Hope lock-on grips this measurement actually comes closer to 770mm. This was combined with a 50mm Hope stem.



Bernard Kerr:

Bernard Kerr
Val di Sole 2018
A very specific 768mm wide Renthal alloy bar with a 40mm rise for Bernard Kerr in Val di Sole for the 2018 season.



Phil Atwill:

Sixpack take care of the cockpit with their Millenium bar stem and grips.
2018
For the 2018 season Phil Atwill was running a 780mm Sixpack Millenium bar with 30mm of rise. He paired this to a Sixpack Millenium 50mm stem.

Phil Atwill Bike Check
Leogang 2017
The previous season Atwill was running a Funn 785mm wide Fatboy Supreme handlebar with another 50mm stem.



Isak Leivsson:

Pole Proto
Fort William 2018
Pole Proto
Isak is running a short, 10mm stem and some extensions inserted into each end of the handlebar bring the length up to a wild 830mm.



Sam Blenkinsop:

Sam Blenkinsop 29er
Lošinj 2018
Sam Blenkinsop 29er
Sam's 25mm rise bars measure 815mm wide with grips. The Aurum's front-center can be adjusted with the bike's offset headset cup. His is set 4mm forward from neutral.



Ed Masters:

Ed Masters Pivot Bike Check
Lošinj 2018
Ed's 30mm rise Renthal Fatbars are cut down to 770mm on all of his bikes. These are combined with a 35mm clamp Integra stem from Renthal in a 50mm length. Ed is also using a +8mm reach adjust headset to dial in the size.



Greg Williamson:

Greg Williamson UNNO
Lošinj 2018
Renthal Fatbar aluminium 780mm wide, 30mm rise with a 50mm Renthal Integra stem for the rocky trails of Losinj.



Brook Macdonald:

Mondraker Summum Brook Macdonald
Lošinj 2018
Renthal bars at 30mm rise and 775 width paired to a 50mm Renthal stem for the Bulldog.



Connor Fearon:

Connor Fearon Bike Check
Lenzerheide 2017
Connor Fearon opted for a 50mm stem and a Handlebar width between 760-770mm when taking on the slopes of Lenzerheide.



Tahnée Seagrave:

Tahnee Seagrave Transition TR11
Val di Sole 2017
760mm bars with 20mm rise and a 45.5mm Pro stem for Tahnee.



Rachel Atherton:

Rachel Atherton Bike Check
Vallnord 2017
Rachel Atherton was running Pro Handlebars at 775mm and a 50mm Pro Stem for Vallnord 2017.



Marcelo Gutierrez:

Marcelo Gutierrez Bike Check
Leogang 2017
For the flat out Leogang course in 2017 Marcelo Gutierrez was running Truvativ Descendant bars at 800mm and a 50mm stem.



Alex Fayolle:

Spank Suntour Box and TrickStuff make up the front end
Fort William 2017
Spank Spike 800 Vibrocore aluminum handlebars cut down to 770mm and Spank stem for Alex Fayolle after his Lourdes 2017 win.



Myriam Nicole:

Myriam Nicole Commencal DH V4
Lourdes 2017
Spank Spike 800 Vibrocore aluminum handlebars (cut down to 745mm) and 50mm Director stem for Myriam Nicole in Lourdes



Greg Minnaar:

Greg Minnaar V10 29er
Lourdes 2017
A wide 815mm ENVE carbon bar with 28mm rise for the GOAT when he was debuting the Santa Cruz V10 29er in Lourdes.



Dean Lucas:

Intense M16 World Cup Round 1
Lourdes 2017
ENVE Minnaar handlebars cut to 788mm and an ENVE direct mount stem w/ 5mm spacer for Dean Lucas back in 2017



Remi Thirion:

Remi Thirion s Commencal v4
Lenzerheide 2015

BOS fork has a prototype valve in the left leg to keep the front end a little higher catering to Remi s aggressive riding style.
Vallnord 2015

A full Renthal cockpit for Remi at both Vallnord and Lenzerheide, he prefers the aluminium version of the bar rather than the carbon and cuts it down to 770mm. He mates that with a 50mm Integra II stem.



Emmeline Ragot:

A personal touch on Ragot s bike is this moto inspired headset steerer damper. In heavy cornering it stiffens up the steering feel of the bike. Zero offset stem for the Summum.
Val di Sole 2012
A Renthal aluminum fatbar with a custom personal touch on Ragot's bike, a moto-inspired steering damper. In heavy cornering, it stiffens up the steering feel of the bike. Zero offset stem is also fitted to the Summum





98 Comments

  • 50 1
 So in summary the pros manage to be as fast as they are on the cockpits they are given by sponsors. So when your trying to work out the best bar or stem take a long hard look at yourself and your skills.
  • 18 0
 Fully anticipated a debate about 785 vs 780 bars and then I read this. Bummer.
  • 5 1
 100%, a new bar won’t make us mortals faster. I do love my vibrocore bars for comfort though, I genuinely feel less vibration, better than my joystick carbon ones even.
  • 7 0
 Except loic, every piece of that bike is optimized and unique, low offset fork, slack af at 62 degrees, 55mm stem, offset bb to lengthen chainstays and a medium frame giving a short front center vs rear. Its quite a diff front end setup, puts lots of weight on the front contact patch from a neutral stance.
  • 1 0
 @game: where did you see he has an Offset BB? I saw his bike check during the first lock down and don’t remember it being there then.
  • 2 0
 @DH1977: he normally runs one, but he stopped when ue started running dub cranks (you can't with dub)
  • 26 1
 how many are on 31.8 vs 35mm?
  • 5 0
 This is something I’d like to know (and also how many of those companies with 35mm bars have designed them to feel the same as their 31.8mm bars?
  • 1 0
 @CustardCountry: yeah so this is what I don’t get what is the point of a 35mm diameter when they apparently feel the same as a 31.8mm they just weigh more and don’t look as sleek hardly anyone ever snaps bars anyway so I don’t see the point.
  • 1 0
 @Ooofff: bars stil go boom.
Side note Isak is running a 0° Offset stem full motod out
  • 1 0
 +1 Also want to know this
  • 2 0
 @Ooofff: they actually weigh less (generally)
  • 13 0
 Interesting how Danny and Troy run very narrow bars even compared to some female riders. They were both run wider handlebars in the past. I wondering if this is a way to compensate longer frames in order to have the same range of movement on the bike.
  • 5 0
 Both on the shorter side, their wingspan is probably less than Amaury’s!
  • 2 0
 Bruni was running narrower bars for a while too and then went back to wider bars. I'm guessing the top teams/riders do windtunnel testing and bar width probably has a big effect, which is likely why we see XC riders stick to very narrow bars, but in DH there is more of a balance between control and aero as to what is most effective in gaining seconds.
  • 3 0
 @dthomp325: Narrow bars in XC also help you wiggle through a group of other riders. You get more tree clearance and you save a few grams too.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: Plus XC riders need longer stems to drop the bar height, especially with shorter riders on 29ers, and bar width needs to compensate, but I bet aero testing plays into more decisions than you might expect.
  • 8 0
 When I (Cy) did a bunch of testing with different bar heights and widths a couple of years ago, range of movement was a big factor in width and height choice. Long, slack bikes in particular favour a lot of angle on them to get them to corner well, and Troy and Danny both get a lot of angle on their bikes when they corner. What I found was that even at 6ft 3in, really wide (800mm plus measured across the ends of the grips, so about +10-15mm on the bar itself) if the bar was a little low, I ran out of reach to get the end of the inside grip low enough when getting a lot of angle on the bike. My arm would fully extend, then over weight the inside grip and I would steer out of the corner! Can be helped with higher bars so you don't run out of arm extension when leaning the bike over, but only up to a point, and shorter guys will need lower bars naturally, and will have shorter arms, so will need narrower bars simply to be able to reach the inside grip without locking out their elbow at the insane lean angles they get to.
  • 1 0
 @cotic-bikes: That's interesting and it could explain why Rachel (Atherton) uses a relatively wide bar. Maybe she doesn't lean the bike as much as males (?) I've read an article about bar width and mtb biomechanics some time ago but It did't answer why some riders having the same height run different bar width.
www.pinkbike.com/news/handlebar-width-vs-handling-are-your-bars-too-wide.html
  • 17 1
 "Bernard runs his bars at a very specific 768mm." Surely he just cut them down wrong
  • 6 2
 Probably due to his moto connection, or he uses an axe.
  • 2 0
 Maybe the handgrips have 1mm bottom thickness and he is very finicky about the final measure Smile
I run 790 but i had to cut my handlebar at 786...
Jokes apart I would like to know if these numbers are referred to the final measure or just the handlebar itself
  • 9 0
 I Like seeing all these 45-55 stems on DH bikes.. where any modern trail bike with a sub 65degree hta almost immediately calls for a 35-40mm stem.. as if it’s not enduro enough if a stem is over 45mm.

Joking aside, what I’m saying i suppose is I’ve been liking the longer 45mm stem that I originally thought “wouldn’t be cool enough” to run on my Megatower enduro bike.. can’t knock it till you’ve truly tried it!
  • 6 0
 I've ran 60mm on Enduro bikes ever since Rat Boy did a bike check video with his V10. Not because I'm a following fan boy, it just makes sense.
  • 5 11
flag sargey2003 (Dec 19, 2020 at 0:51) (Below Threshold)
 Part of the reason for 45-50mm stems on DH bikes is to ensure the bar doesn't foul the top of the stanchions.
  • 2 0
 Went from 45mm stock to 35 and back to 50 now on my Meta. Bike feels a bit less twitchy but not harder to steer at all, if anything I found it easier. From what I can recall a lot of the pros still run a tad longer stem, Jared Graves had a pro tip Tuesday on instagram about it.
  • 3 3
 Due to the lower head angle, a longer stem can be used without compromising the attack position.
  • 2 0
 I go with comfort but I do wonder if wheel size makes a difference.
I just got rid of a 27.5” bike with a 50mm stem and 780 bars which felt good. Replaced it with a 29’er with a big wheel set, 35mm stem and 800 bars. That feels awesome and a lot more in control. I am 6’1 so a bigger guy and I feel I can muscle the bike about in the same way I can my old bike. A smaller set up may make this harder. The one thing I dont like is the 35mm clamp. The bar feels stiff but equally stiff vibe wise. Swap out the bar first.
You cant really look at a pro set up and go with that as often they are height, build, riding style, riding location, etc suited.
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: it could be the fork offset, a lot of brands are designing around a 44/42 (depending on fork brand) offset now for 29" which gives a trail measurement which results in a more stable experience in the steering department. I can't remember full ins and outs, it's proper geometry geekery, but look it up and you'll see what I mean. Plus 29ers are just more stable anyway, I'm a convert!
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: I promise it has nothing to do with the stem
  • 1 2
 I don’t want a bike without the shortest rental 31mm stem
  • 3 1
 @sargey2003: that is actually true, don't get the downvotes. A lot of pros just can't run something else
  • 1 1
 @ilovedust: 29" forks tipically have more offset, and every extra mm of offset can (and should, according to some) be accompanied by a corresponding increase in stem length. There is namely the theory that stem length should be the same as wheel offset length, but naturally bar backsweep eliminates this theorethical alignment.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: Why do they still use ~ 50 mm offset on 29" dual crowns anyway? Pretty much all 29" enduro/trail forks have 44 mm offset, yet DH world sticks to slightly longer offsets.
  • 1 0
 @Flinty: It does give more of an attack position, but yes I think a shorter offset would be better. And even 44mm, isn't it longer than what's available in 27.5" forks? That's also what I meant in my comment, 44mm is becoming pretty common for 29" enduro bikes.
  • 13 1
 Take a cock to the pits and be a dick about it.
  • 2 2
 Cracking dick patter
  • 14 10
 Just on the off chance that anyone doesn't know:

There is basically no difference between running bars with an extra 10mm of rise, and putting an extra 10mm spacer under your stem (or having a bike with a 10mm taller head tube). You can adjust the roll of the bars so you can end up with a slightly different position, but basically what I'm saying is that knowing the rise doesn't really tell you that much because you still have no idea what height the rider's hands are at relative to the BB and to the ground (both of which are important).

I just find it odd sometimes that articles quote the rise of the bars with basically no other information. I know it's awkward to actually measure the height of the bars and the bb but it's much more meaningful than just the rise.
  • 23 2
 Nah you're wrong about adding spacers under the stem doing the same increasing bar rise. Because the head tube and steerer are angled, putting spacers under the stem does not have the exact same effect as increasing bar rise. Adding spacers under the stem raises the bar height but it also shortens the reach of the bike due to the head tube being angled. Even tho the difference with just one 10mm spacer would be small it still has an unintended effect on reach.
  • 13 0
 spacers reduce the reach
  • 1 0
 snap!
  • 5 0
 @carbonsinglespeed: but really, to have full information, you need to know it all - HT length, spacers, stem lenght and height and the bars. Missing one of parameters you get up to 2cm of unknown delta in all directions
  • 1 1
 @Sirflyingv: Exactly, that's why these articles are quite meaningless – but hey, a pro is running this and that, so some of their fans will run that setup just for the sake of it.
  • 4 0
 Bar roll has all kind of effects over what’s mentioned here. You can throw your up and sweep sweep figures out right away, which can lead to things feeling very odd
  • 2 1
 Sweep sweep? Know idea wtf that is, try back sweep instead
  • 3 0
 Spacers reduce the reach but they increase the distance from the BB to the grips, which is a more determining factor regarding bike fit. Bar rise is neutral regarding reach (if you don't "mess" with the tilt, that is), but it increases the RAD (rider area distance, the aforementioned BB-grips distance) and it's also equivalent to an increase in stem length, so the attack angle becomes less aggressive. One can also increase stem lenght when adding spacers to maintain reach, but reach isn't really an important factor. You want to consider your optimal RAD. If you decrease the stem length you will want to add spacers if you want to maintain RAD. If you increase the bar rise you will need to either remove spacers or decrease stem lenght to maintain RAD. And these are all things to keep in mind, but we're not bound to anything, not to a RAD, reach, stem length, bar rise, etc. Bar backsweep also has a great influence on the riding position, as different backsweeps can be equivalent to a difference of 10mm or more in stem length. And with the higher rise bars, just tilt adjustments can also be equivalent to a 10-20mm difference in stem length.
  • 2 0
 To put it differently, let's say you add a few spacers beneath the stem. If you want to maintain the former RAD, you will need a shorter stem. If you want to maintain the reach, you will need a longer stem. If you want to maintain the steering offset (the distance between the line from one grip to another and the center of the steering axis) you will just have to get used to the greater RAD and smaller reach. Increasing the rise of the handlebar is just a different way to mess with these factors.
  • 2 0
 And I would also introduce a different topic with this, which is the psychological one. There is a strange psychological difference between riding with different setups in which the position of the hands is exactly the same. I know it because I have experienced it. I mean, maybe a higher rise bar does behave differently, maybe it does flex more, because the higher the rise the longer the bar is (or was, before it got bent) for a certain effective width. But having a smaller stem for example, might make you feel that the direction is more twitchy, than if you rode a longer stem with a bar with more backweep, that positions your hands in the exact same place. Or a bar with more rise might make you feel more confident than another with less rise that is on a longer stem with an extra spacer, and which positions your hands in the exact same place, just because of the visual element and thinking that a shorter stem and a higher rise bar gives you more of an attack position.
  • 1 0
 Higher rise bars of a given model tend to have more flex, giving a more compliant feeling over lower rise bars of the same type, so it can make a difference vs stem height even if the absolute position is the same.
  • 1 0
 I read somewhere that Sam Hill uses bb to grip position as his primary critical set up point.
  • 1 0
 IIRC when I did the math, with a 65 degree head angle that every 5mm spacer decreased reach by about 2mm. To the original point, how much rise you need is directly related to stack height and will be different on any bike.
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: if you have know idea about sweep sweep does that mean you know about sweep sweep? Get it right yourself if you want to grammar police others...
  • 1 0
 @SPKeen: nice try, I grammar policed myself, and still failed. But thanks for white-knighting for me....against me
  • 4 0
 @mb23: I know its kinda game with words and meanings but ...
raising the stem does not shorten the reach. Reach is fixed number by geometry of frame and fork.
Adding spacers can be compensated by longer stem, less of backsweep and narrower bars. those 4 numbers make a final number. Only way to change reach is by offseting fork, e.g. with angleset
  • 4 1
 So folks, do you measure bar width with grips on or off?
I measure it with grips on ( I like grips with a single clamp), measuring fron the futhest outwards point on the grips where I can still put my hand. That is because some grips have a stiffer rubber ring on the outer end.
  • 4 12
flag Neale78 (Dec 19, 2020 at 2:36) (Below Threshold)
 Bar width is bar width. Did you take a picture for Instacringe because of how 'extra' your setup is(n't) too?
  • 20 1
 I never disclose proprietary information like my bar width and tire pressure. Nice try, you almost got me.
  • 1 1
 @Neale78: well yes, but actually no
  • 6 0
 Not a particularly strong correlation between rider height and bar width there.
  • 1 0
 I was thinking that. Wonder if it's more to do with how hench the rider is? If you're strong, you can still control the bike with smaller bars, plus get faster turning and tree clearance. Lighter or less strong riders can use wider bars to help out.
  • 3 0
 So a stem is a stem is a stem (for the most part) and bars dont vary a whole h÷ll of a lot.......but not ONE mention of grip choice!? Jeeeez.
  • 4 1
 Bar height would be more interesting.
  • 1 0
 So a zero offset stem to make the steering feel quick, and then a damper to slow the steering down? Am I missing something? Could she have just run a small length stem for the dame feeling? Seems kinda like running a short offset stem with extra steps and parts....
  • 1 0
 It is probably designed to mimic an MX bike
  • 1 0
 Isn't a super short stem supposed to give deader steering?
  • 1 0
 I was surprised to see how everyone had their bars rolled. Some were really aggressively rolled forward while others like Hart had them rolled back really relaxed or Brosnan who had really flat upsweep. I've found that more than width, bar bend angles and rollback had the biggest effect at control and minimizing fatigue and aupside. Article wasn't outright super informative, but pretty intriguing. Would be nice to get the rider input on why they have it set up the way they do.
  • 5 0
 Slow news day.....
  • 1 0
 What i learned are that these downhill peeps use rather wide bars compared to the enduro bros. Rude i saw once ran 740 bars. Quite narrow.
  • 1 0
 Worldcup DH tracks are pretty wide so there are less chances of hitting a tree with your handlebar.
  • 2 0
 Bigger, heavier bikes on faster tracks. Probably looking for the most leverage they can get.
  • 1 0
 I’d like to k ow more about how much stanchion they
peek out of the upper crown clamps and if it differs for each track and plus/minus, etc..
  • 2 0
 All I learned is that all of the pros ride whatever their sponsor provides ????
  • 1 0
 This entire article is a meaningless unless you're providing measurements of stanchion/crown extension and spacers under the crown....
  • 2 0
 Nobody even noticed the old school honey steering damper?
  • 2 0
 loic bruni's bike has a janky ass headtube weld
  • 1 0
 1999 Schwinn Straight 8 with its bass boat paint... sexiest dh cockpit on earth
  • 3 0
 I had a Homegrown in Bass Boat Green... It looked amazing
  • 1 0
 So much for the flat lever trend... Most of the DH pros are running theirs quite more angled than Yoann. Wink
  • 1 0
 Interesting how low some of these guys run their front ends. Look at how much stanchion is exposed above the clamps.
  • 3 1
 Must suck for pros who have to run Code brakes
  • 1 1
 Troy Brosnans zero rise bars looks deceptively riser bar like...! Check yo' shit PB lol...
  • 1 0
 Maybe they meant upsweep. Seems weird though
  • 1 0
 Sorry “hopey” steering damper
  • 1 0
 Is there any kind of rule about how to find the good length bar?
  • 1 0
 shoulder width
  • 1 0
 The only practical advice i've heard is to go into your natural/comfortable press-up position and measure the distance between your hands (might need an extra pair of hands for that).

I suppose it makes sense as the correct positioning of your hands in a press-up optimises the use of strength and range of movement from your arms and max comfort of load-bearing through the shoulders. And it mimics riding in attack postion pretty well.

The other option i suppose is buying a cheap 800mm bar and cutting it down in 10mm increments after each test ride until you hit the sweet spot or you go past it and it now feels too narrow. Then get a nice set of bars in your preferred width (or cut them to your preferred width).
  • 1 0
 I imagine it's for balancing the front and rear feel of the bike.
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who was just looking at the grips?
  • 1 0
 You did not include backsweep and upsweep? Wtf
  • 1 0
 anyone else notice troy Brosnan's bike is running a black-box shifter?
  • 3 3
 My GF says it itsnt about the width, but its all about the diameter...
  • 3 1
 She's very kind.
  • 11 1
 She told me the opposite.
  • 1 2
 Same as her mom..
  • 2 2
 If they let free to choose, half of them would pick an OneUp bar...

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.015117
Mobile Version of Website