From the Top: Transition Bikes

Jun 21, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
Transition Bikes



From the Top:


Transition Bikes


Words and Photos: Mike Kazimer
Kyle Young and Kevin Menard, Transition's founders, at the company's newly opened headquarters in Bellingham, Washington.


Transition Bikes have firmly established their place in the mountain bike world over the last decade, growing from humble beginnings into a respected brand producing some of the most desirable bikes on the market. The irreverent sense of humor that the company is known for hasn't diminished, but like the class clown that somehow still manages to bring home straight A's, there's more going on behind the walls of their world headquarters in Bellingham, Washington, than just beer drinking and thinking up silly acronyms.

Depending on who you ask, Transition Bikes was either established in 2001 or in 2003. It's a long-running debate between Kyle Young and Kevin Menard, the company's founders. Kevin says it was in 2001, when the idea of starting a bike company came to the surface over a game of ping-pong, while Kyle asserts that it was 2003, when the first shipment of 100 bikes arrived in the US.

In the early 2000s Kyle and Kevin were both living the corporate life, working well-paying but unfulfilling jobs at T-Mobile when the idea of starting a bike company first popped up. At the time, they were nearly finished with the creation of comparebikes.com, a side project that was intended to be a one-stop resource for riders who wanted to compare the specs and prices of any mountain bikes on the market. Building that site had involved countless hours of mind-numbing data entry, but it also entailed reviewing the geometry and product spec from every major brand, as well as actually visiting manufacturers to get the information they needed.

Gathering the information for comparebikes.com served as fuel for the idea that they might be able to begin a company of their own, and as soon as the first check came in the mail – a whopping $.02 earned from a site visitor clicking on an ad - they pulled the plug and began focusing their efforts on starting a bike company of their own.

To learn more about what it takes to start a successful company from the ground up I recently sat down with Kyle and Kevin at Transition's newly opened headquarters in Bellingham, Washington.






What were your initial goals when Transition Bikes first got off the ground?

Kevin: At the time, there weren't very many companies that were approachable. Our number one thing was to become a company that was approachable. We didn't go into it thinking, 'Hey, we're going to build a far superior mountain bike compared to what everyone else is doing.' We thought, 'Let's build a rad bike, but let's build an equally rad company that people can relate to.' One that's transparent, that people can come and hang out with and ride with. Something similar to the BMX rider-owned style, because there just wasn't much out there. That was the ethos then, and it's still the same now, although our ability to create bad-ass bikes has gotten better.

Kyle: Really, we were trying to create a culture business rather than just a product business. Ultimately we did it that way because that's what we wanted. I've seen the corporate world and that sucks – everyone hates it, there's all these little cliques in there. If we were going to do something for the rest of our lives we wanted it to be awesome, something that we had fun with. I think that fun is relatable and contagious, and people like to buy things from people that look like they're having a good time.

Kevin: We feel pretty good that the philosophy from the get-go has not changed at all. And that's where that 'rider owned' tag line comes from. It may seem cheesy, but it actually is reality to us. Every company is rider owned, but at what point do you check out a little bit and become inaccessible to the average rider? And that's what I see happening in the bike industry. As companies progress and get bigger they lose touch with that.


Transition Dirt Bag
Where it all began. The DirtBag was Transition's first model, a 48-pound freeride machine.


Was there a turning point where you realized that the company was going to succeed?

Kevin: I would say it was the Bottlerocket. The Bottlerocket made it so we could stop moonlighting and actually hire an employee. That's kind of when we went all in, 100% focused.

Kyle: The product that really put us on the map was the Bottlerocket, but I think that before that we both thought we were young enough and dumb enough to really do this. I don't think failure was ever really an option; it wasn't like 'Oh, if this doesn't work, then whatever.' It was just like one foot in front of the other, kind of blind walking. You know where you're going but you're not worried about all the distractions – it's like, my only option is to keep walking forward. And yes, things are going to happen along that path, but you just keep walking. We realized that in 2005 when we moved up here [Bellingham, WA]. That's when it really became real. We wanted to be on the trails, not an hour away from them.
Transition Bikes headquarters
The Bottlerocket is the bike that truly put Transition on the map.

Kyle: Honestly, that whole comparebikes.com thing, I kind of think part of it was stupid to one degree, but on the other hand I actually look back at the experience that it got us, and we were fully in tune with what everyone had. When you step out of the bubble and look into this thing it's really easy to see holes and where things aren't being made that you really want. Part of us just knew that that was a segment that was just being ignored, and beyond being ignored, it was a style that we really liked.


Transition Bikes headquarters
Transition recently moved their headquarters from Ferndale to Bellingham, WA, in order to be closer to the trails and the strong local riding community.
Transition Bikes headquarters
A full showroom for the public is downstairs, with glass-walled office spaces located upstairs.

Transition Bikes headquarters
A large, well stocked shop space is used to build up new, prototype, and demo bikes, and to maintain the rides of existing customers.

Transition headquarters
Water or beer? Transition even have their own signature Party in the Woods IPA that was created in conjunction with a local brewery.
Transition Bikes headquarters. Kashima coated toilet paper holders.
The world's fastest dispensing toilet paper holder.


Making the move to producing carbon bikes can be tricky, especially for smaller companies. What was the biggest challenge that accompanied the introduction of carbon bikes into the lineup?

Kevin: With the Carbon Covert the timing was about as bad as you could get. It took longer than it should have – that one was a painful pill to swallow. We'd been in talks with the bigger component and suspension companies and they were talking about 650B, but at the time we thought that there was a good delineation between 26” and 29”. It didn't go on our radar as soon as it should have.

Kyle: It was a learning experience. We learned how to read the market better, how to read the industry better, and to be a driver rather than a passenger in the product world. It taught us a lot about production planning and thinking about product life cycles. I think that the Carbon Covert wasn't what we wanted it to be, but I look at the positives, and I think it's made our product team sharper and how we analyze those projects and what we want to do. We were transitioning from a get 'er done style, and that just sharpened us, and made us go to the next level of tooling up to do more carbon.

Kevin: For the size of our company I think we're pretty progressive as far as carbon and how much we're coming out with in the future. We have good design and engineering resources now, and the product team is real focused. Before it was one carbon project at a time and it would take two years, and now we can do multiple projects at a time. Having the right manufacturing vendor is huge – it makes the process so much easier.


What's Transition's top selling model this year?

Kevin: The Patrol.

Kyle: The market's coalesced to that 160 bike – it's just the bread and butter I feel like.

Kevin: Yeah, it's the bike most consumers feel they need whether they do or not. But it is the most versatile, it's the bike you're seeing at Whistler Bike Park because someone only goes once a year so they bring their 160mm bike.

Kyle: I wish you'd asked me two years ago because I would have said the Klunker.
2016 Transition Patrol Carbon

Kevin: It [the Klunker] was our least profitable model, but we couldn't get containers quick enough.

Kevin: It is cool to see the resurgence of 29ers, because at first everyone was saying it would die when 27.5” bikes came out. We've always been big 2-9 fans ever since the Bandit 29 came out. I'm excited to see that take off.


Have you seen DH bike sales drop as enduro bikes have increased in popularity?

Kevin: Yeah, they have. I liken that to when I go to Whistler and see how many enduro bikes there are versus DH bikes right now. I think you can definitely see that trend changing. I don't know if it's going to be 50/50, but I still think we're at the upward trend of more enduro bikes being present in bike parks. We haven't reached that plateau yet.

Kyle: I don't necessarily see it as 'Oh, there's fewer downhill bikes at Whistler.' I see that there are more other bikes. I don't see it as a cannibalization – I think the market's growing. With these mid-travel bikes it becomes a palatable option, where they can do both things, and that's getting more people into bikes. I do think the market is building, and getting more people into thinking about riding and mountain biking the right way.

Kevin: Now we can sell one bike that can do anything, where five or six years ago you would have been compromising hard in one area.



Transition 2015 Xmas
Transition's employees take their holiday card photo shoots very seriously...

bigquotesOur number one thing was to become a company that was approachable. We didn't approach it thinking, 'Hey, we're going to build a far superior mountain bike compared to what everyone else is doing.' We thought, 'Let's build a rad bike, but let's build an equally rad company that people can relate to. One that's transparent, that people can come and hang out with and ride with...

That was the ethos then, and it's still the same now, although our ability to create bad-ass bikes has gotten better.
- Kevin Menard


Transition has a very low employee turnover rate - what do you attribute this to?

Kyle: Moto Mondays. I mean, Kevin and I are human, and we have the same human desires everyone has, which is kind of to screw around and do cool stuff. I don't want to die having said, “I worked really hard and made a lot of money.” We're in this for the experience. I don't view our experience as us just sitting in here and crunching numbers and selling bikes...

It's the human interaction, it's actually having the flexibility to do the things that come up that we want to do when we want to do them, regardless of what day or time it is. If we can't do that, what are we doing? I think that's why people like it here.

We're serious, we're driven – Kevin and I are very driven in terms of our work ethic, and we know what we want out of it. If you embody the same spirit that we have – work hard, play harder – if you can do that, you'll never want to leave because everyone here gets to play harder, and that's their work. Yesterday we cut out at noon to go ride motos. I don't track time against that, I don't go, “Since you did that today you need to do that tomorrow.” They're big boys and big girls around here – they get to decide what they want to do. We treat people like adults that can manage themselves rather than slaves to whatever we want.

Kevin: We have a very high work ethic, but we also have a high fun ethic. We set the bar, and these guys can see that, they know that it's okay to take off every once in a while, as long as everything gets done. Getting back to it, that's the culture. If we aren't doing those things, we aren't doing our job properly. We need to go out on company rides, we need to go out and moto and ski and do these wacky things that we do like Boss Appreciation Day, driving boats, paintball. There are other factors too – who wants to leave Bellingham? Not many people. I'm sure if this company was in Southern California we probably wouldn't retain as many people. We'd still have a rad company, but there's multiple factors involved.

Kyle: We take care of our people... Your people are your number one – I know I’m nothing without my people. Great, we started this thing on our own, but could we do it again? No. Could we keep doing it at this level without all these great people? No – I've got to have my people. They're as important as Kevin or I.

Kevin: We have a rad work environment with a flexible schedule where you can come in late, leave early, etc. Then you can go screw off with the bosses, but there's also a high expectation to be creative and get stuff done. It's kind of like the magic formula.

Kyle: We have a pretty laid back management style. We definitely don't hand hold. It's kind of like, I don't care if you don't know how to use a computer, but you better go figure it out. And you better not ask me how to figure it out. And if you can do that, awesome. We're good. The people that thrive in this environment are the people that can do that.


2016 Transition Patrol Carbon
Nothing like a mega huck to flat courtesy of Lars Sternberg to poke fun at the overuse of acronyms in the bike industry.


Do you have any specific goals for the future of Transition?

Kyle: It's a weird question because I'm super goal oriented, and Kevin would be the first to tell you that I'm always like, 'We have to have a long-range plan,” and we always yin and yang on that. I'd say I've grown to the point where really my long range plan is to provide a rad work environment where people feel rewarded for the work they do, where they feel valued and like they're part of something that they really care about. It's kind of like we're building a rad clubhouse and I care about the club house. And yeah, there's going to be goals like, 'I want this product because I'm really into this right now,” but those are always driven by that reason – why do I want it?

The world's telling us to do e-bikes, the world's telling us to do fat bikes, the world's telling us to do plus size bikes... I've had industry influencers tell me to my face, “Man, you guys aren't on this fat bike thing? You guys are fools.” And I'm like, you clearly don't understand who we are or what we care about. If we were just here to make the almighty dollar we'd be doing things very differently. But that's not the type of goal we have.

Kevin: I want us to be a relevant brand, to be someone that everyone is looking at, checking out what Transition is doing. I think that's something you need to battle to stay on top of, from your marketing to your product development, just everything about your company. We're not trying to create trends for the sake of selling products. For me, being out of tune is calling something a new standard in order to invent a category to sell more product when it's really just widening something, or something stupid like that. That's the complete opposite of what we want to be. There's a lot of stuff in this industry that deserves to be made fun of. That's kind of our thing...


Hold Up...
Based on a lot of feedback from Transition's supporters, they wanted to address your questions that concerned bearings, pivot hardware, and alignment on their newest line-up of Giddy Up bikes....

"We wanted to take a moment to respond to comments about bearings, pivot hardware, and alignment. We have not made any changes in suppliers or business partners in the past few years, but our volume has grown tremendously. Trying to stay on top of that demand and get bikes in customer's hands, we have seen some early production QC problems with assembly on the Patrol Carbon in particular. Steps have been taken to improve the process and ensure everything is correctly prepped and torqued from the factory. Of course, if anyone has issues with our products we will stand by them 100% and ensure they are taken care of.

As some people have mentioned, we have seen a small number of frames with alignment problems around rear shock mounts. Any frames out of tolerance are completely backed by our warranty and we are ready to help you ASAP. If you feel you have a problem, please contact us at warranty@transitionbikes.com and we will be sure to make it right for you. If we don't hear from you, we can't help. The percentage of frames that have been reported to have alignment problems is extremely low. Welding does introduce uneven stresses in a frame, typically a frame is aligned before heat treat and after heat treat, it is good to go. However, some cases of frames out of alignment after heat treat are always inevitable. We try our best to catch them in QC, but occasionally something will slip through and make it out to a customer. More recently we have been seeing an increase in comments about bearing quality and we are looking at new options for bearing suppliers as a result. Quality is very important to us, and we are always looking for ways to improve our products and make sure our customers are happy."
- Transition Bikes



MENTIONS: @TransitionBikeCompany




235 Comments

  • + 306
 "NO ebikes and NO fatbikes"
hallelujah praise be Transition !
  • + 12
 But..."I've had industry influencers tell me to my face"

Can I have a crack at "Industry Influencer", pretty sure a vocational guidance councilor said it was my calling way back when
  • + 34
 All manufacturers of E bikes should be boycotted, support sensible bike companies like this who show they care about the sport as much as profits.
  • - 20
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 21, 2016 at 7:30) (Below Threshold)
 "I hate this weirdo" is the best way of getting supporters. Out of a*sholes. This PR strategy just works - ask Donny Trump.
  • + 24
 @viatch dude you live in Canada, you should consider a fat bike for that 8 month winter. Dog them as you will but they get riders (like myself) more days on the trail. And no, I don't ride it when trails are dry. Also, eBikes are motorbikes and should be treated as such.
  • - 21
flag viatch (Jun 21, 2016 at 9:07) (Below Threshold)
 @ryan83: yes i do and NO i wont. i have too much self respect and decency to NEVER be caught dead or frozen riding one of those dumb clown bikes. FYI i have tried riding one for about 10 feet and it didnt make sense to me at all.
  • + 2
 I can kinda get the hate for ebike however they are just so much fun to ride plus brings out some older crowd riding bikes if they can't make the climbs. As for fat bikes up here in our igloo winters fat bikes are a drea.
  • + 12
 try a 25lb fatbike on snow! that will stop your bitching!
  • + 10
 @ryan83: So I have to build an Igloo for my fat bike too, Ryan? Where are my Reindeer going to sleep?
  • + 23
 @ryan83: ebikes are worse than motorbikes they are Mopeds! Mopeds are the opposite of cool!
  • + 39
 I don't want an ebike or a fat bike, but I don't think there's anything wrong with them. If that's a guy's thing, then fine with me. If Transition doesn't want to sell them, that's their business model. I don't have a problem with that, either. I don't have to live with their decision, they do. Unless I want a fat bike or ebike, of course, in which case I'll go to one of the many companies selling them.

I guess what I don't understand is coming down so emphatically one way or the other based on something that shouldn't affect you so much. Don't want one of these bikes? Don't buy one. If Transition doesn't want to sell them, that's OK, but it doesn't make them heroes saving the cycling world. It's just a simple philosophy.
  • + 7
 @ryan83: yeah 45min drive North and the weather climate is so different than Bellingham LOL .
  • + 6
 Everyone hates on fat bikes but mine was the best trail hardtail I've ever had. I had one for half a year and we didn't even get snow in our winter and I was riding it more than my endure bike. I say to everyone that you have to give a good one a try before you say you can hate them. For the e-bikes, keep them off the mtb specific trails. That's my opinion
  • + 3
 @CaptainSnappy: no igloo required, just leave the house and go for a ride instead of waiting all winter for the snow to melt duh
  • + 1
 @markar: Yup! I'm gonna be prepared with a mid fat steel hardtail this winter. I think the 27.5+ will be good for the mixed conditions here. Can always put the skinny wheels back on in the spring.
Now as soon as the frame arrives....
  • + 9
 @partymob: Do people ever go to races? There are plenty of old people that can still climb. It's called pushing yourself.
  • + 17
 @ryan83: I live in North Vancouver, BC, Canada. We average 15" of snowfall for the whole year. Most of which melts within a few hours of falling. We ride all year round. We also live in houses, drive automobiles and are very liberal in our political views. We treat all races, religions and sexual orientations equally. We enjoy Beer. Some enjoy Weed. And it's true, many of us like to play Hockey. We don't live in igloos and most of us don't own snowmobiles. I just thought you should know.
Your friends to the north!
  • + 3
 I just buy and ride there bikes because these guys drink beer and are fun , there bikes are so much fun to ride ~ my current ride Scout never fails to put a grin on my face ~ always finish a ride with a nice bottle of IPA

Love what you guys do , looking forward to what you have in store for the future !
  • - 1
 @Protour: well what about e bikes on moto/multi purpose trails? E bike parks are a thing too.
  • - 2
 @Adamrideshisbike: Oh yea totally, Ive seen people from all ages ripping up hills. Im talking about more the people that can't and have met people and know that have got back into trail riding or have said they have had the time of their life riding an Ebike
  • + 0
 @Protour: you are my hero
  • + 5
 @TheR: perfectly put, they don't want to make fat or E bikes...simple statement. They didn't slate that type of bike or at the same time champion it either, so the above bullsh!t debate is irrelevant. I love PB, but eff me there are some major keyboard warrior douche bags that comment on here
  • + 3
 @HardtailZero: ask Macklemore and Ryan Lewis (Downtown). :-P

But yes I also think e-bi&%* (can't even say that word) are bikes with a motor and therefore no longer a bike but a moped. So they also have to be treated judicially like a moped and are not allowed on the trails.
  • - 5
flag PsychosisTripper (Jun 22, 2016 at 6:49) (Below Threshold)
 Enduro bikes are for rich people with no skill. They are the ones who need six inches of travel on a fire road.
  • + 2
 @PsychosisTripper: yea... I heard that about DH bikes when 6" bikes were growing in power around 2010
  • + 2
 @Simon87: I just don't understand it. The mere existence of fat bikes and ebikes aren't hurting anyone. They're just one type of bike out of dozens of types of bikes you can buy -- or not buy. I don't have any use for a beach cruiser, fixie, triathlon bike, comfort bike, low-level fitness or sport bike, those tricycle bikes, a BMX freestyle bike, a recumbent bike, or even a full-on downhill mountain bike, but I'm not angry they exist. (Well, recumbents kind of piss me off. Haha!). In fact, I appreciate all bikes for their purpose, and I think some look pretty darn cool. I'm never going to ride a fixie, but some of these hipsters are riding around on works of art.

As for ebikes, I've honestly never seen a single one in a shop here in Colorado Springs -- never mind on a trail -- and people here are arguing like they're the scourge of humanity. Maybe they're big in Europe or Canada or elsewhere, but I've never seen them here on our local trails. Or maybe they're everywhere I ride, and I haven't noticed. If that's the case, how bad can they be?
  • + 2
 @TheR: The obvious analogy for the use of any tool: kid gets a knife, can kill another kid or put butter on a sandwich. Then there is this school called USA placed in a wonderful park, that is unfortunately run by a paranoid, corrupt, alcoholic principal who barely allows kids to use only wooden knives in the school canteen. But there is a group of a-holes from spoon club who are going to go to the principal and tell him if any of the kids use metal knives. They's use the argument that it got sooo dangerous, and all knives should be disallowed. Pulp eating Spoon club leader kid is a son of spokesman for NRA off course. So the knife kids instead of ganging up and beating the crap out of spoon kids, prefer to police their own club and rag on any kid who brings a metal knife.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: In response to your most recent post...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Y_7P9Ce9Uc
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes. Exactly. Something like that.
  • - 1
 @SteveDekker: I ride my reign all winter here. We get lots of snow. I have friends that ride fat on the same snow. Makes no difference fat or not fat on snow. As long as you're having fun, that's all that matters.
  • + 1
 @bholton: hahahahaha a fatbike blows away a regular bike, it eliminates the energy robbing torture, if the trail is hard packed a fatbike is even better, in deep snow that's not well packed the only option is a fatbike, I'm still doing a 50k ride anyway with an average speed similar to summer, it's a proper winter bike for riding in the worst conditions, it doesn't matter how muddy or slushy I float on top, a regular bike is a useless piece of shit on snow, and people like you that say it makes no difference are in denial about the mind blowing performance of a fatbike, and haven't tried one obviously! Only a shit for brains person would say it makes no difference. Have a nice day know nothing goof ball.
  • + 72
 One of the best ever customer experiences I have ever had was with Kevin from Transition Bikes and it involved a Bottle Rocket. The story goes like this. I gave a deposit to Atlantic Bicycles only to find out that they would go out of business 3 days later. A bank had taken over the shop at which point they told me that i had lost my deposit and that I would need to get it back from the original owners. I then decided to call Transition and explain my dilema. Without hesitation Kevin told me that my bike was packed and ready to go, but that hey had not heard back from the shop in regards to payment so it was on hold. So here is where the story gets rad as Kevin told me to just pay them the balance and that he would ship me the bike direct, we agreed that if I ever won back my deposit from the original bike shop owners that I would pay off that balance. 3 months went by and I won my deposit back so I called up Kevin and made good on our agreement. He was as stoked as I was. Moral of the story is that those guys are rad, being able to call up a company and deal directly with the owner is priceless, you will quickly find out that those guys are no different than me and you, they love to shred bikes and have come up with a very unique culture that is hard to find in any business these days. Cheers Kevin and TRANSITION
  • + 12
 hell yeah, that's a badass story. my next bike is prolly gonna be a Transition.
  • - 15
flag niksaunders (Jun 21, 2016 at 19:39) (Below Threshold)
 Lol you realize that they probably made more off you than an average customer by making you pay msrp and skimming the shop's margin... The only inconvenience to them was the change of shipping address.
  • + 6
 @niksaunders: typical negative smarta$$ forum bullsh!t, the guy was stoked with getting his bike and service given by the company owner, why try and bring down his positive experience, see sh!t like this all the time in these forums which is absolutely not nessessary
  • + 4
 Glad to be another happy Tranny owner!
  • + 3
 Another great customer experience. Just brought my carbon patrol with the shock mount alignment problem I described in a comment below to the dealer today. We got on the phone with David at Transition, explained the problem and emailed him a couple pics. He gave the go-ahead for a warranty replacement, which the dealer had in stock. We checked over the new frame and everything including the alignment was perfect. I was out the door with a new frame, a very happy camper. This is my second Transition bike and it won't be my last. These guys are doing it right.
  • + 70
 Wow kashima coated toilet paper holder,no seriously what an awesome article,I am loving my 2013 TR250 to bits....
  • + 4
 Always wished they had a longer version of that bike. I feel like I missed out on it.
  • + 3
 +1! It's still the most fun bike i've ever had!
  • + 1
 @cmkneeland: what size are you? I'm 6' strait and have a blast on size large with 50mm stem.
  • + 1
 @Muckal: in glad they didn't make the TR250 a long bike actually. It's not a race bike and a roomier cockpit would defeat the purpose of such a fun oriented park/freeride bike. I love my long yeti frame in a race or on climbs but it's just not as fun in the park.
  • + 3
 HTF technology FTW!
  • + 1
 @cuban-b: The large tr250 had a shorter reach than my Double. I'm a rangy 6'. Something in the 17inch reach range would have been perfect.
  • + 1
 @cmkneeland: it's not always just about numbers, you know Wink
  • + 36
 F%&k Fat Bikes

F$%k EBikes (unless you are disabled, in which case fill yer boots)

F%*K wheel size debates

F$%k the industry

It’s all about maximum fun on two wheels however big / wide they are ride what makes you smile and love what you do.

Love my 2016 TR500 running on 26 inch wheels

p.s any vacancies at Transition???
  • - 28
flag markar (Jun 21, 2016 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 only a loser rides a 26er,a 25lb fatbike on snow is amazing you know nothing goof!
  • + 0
 no, you had it right the first time.........
  • + 2
 @markar: so what size are your fat bike wheels then, 26"?, if so that makes you a loser as well
  • + 0
 @Garpur44: pushing, chairlift, truck, I no longer ride useless bikes, but it's ok if you do
  • - 6
flag markar (Jun 21, 2016 at 13:03) (Below Threshold)
 @mark3: if you knew anything about fatbikes the actual diameter of wheel with tire is 29" that's what matters, that's why a fatbike works, same thing with 27.5+3 also has 29" diameter wheel, 29" is the right diameter, on fatbike no need to go bigger than a 26"rim with a 4-5" tire because 29" diameter is achieved and I'll shut up now oops actually I forgot to mention, going with a bigger wheel isn't necessary because it's already enough wheel and tire and with snow floatation of a 4-5-now7" tire is the trend
  • + 3
 They are not even against e-bikes, plus or fat bikes, they are just saying that don't want to do it just because it's profitable, they want to make a bike because they feel it. So "F%&k" you, man. There's old people that want to ride bikes too and they not have the same strenght anymore like us younger ones, and others like big tires, who cares.
  • - 2
 @passwordpinkbike: why are you annoyed with me? I'm confused
  • + 1
 @markar: I also have a 160 travel bike for covering miles but for smiles it's the big bike all day
  • + 1
 Whilst some of these bikes may not be my/your taste in a bike theyre still bikes ( ok e bike is questionable! ) and people are still out riding bikes. Too me the feeling i get on my road bike is similar to what i got on my track bike and is similar to what i get on my trail bike and is similar to what i get on my xc race bike and is similar to what i get on my dh bike. SIMILAR but different. I am yet to ride a fat bike but its still a bike and im sure the feeling i will get will be similar to all my other bikes. Im happy to see anyone riding any bike period. I love cycling and bike technology. Im a Paramedic and went to an 88 year old bloke who fell off his stationery bike the other day! How cool is that!!! ( not that he fell off but the fact he was on it in the first place!!). Anyway just my thoughts.
  • + 1
 You do realize how retarded that comment was, right? (...and i have a 26er as my daily driver)
  • + 0
 @Treze: 26+5 works for a fatbike because the outer diameter is 29'' ok, otherwise 26 is to small and slow and boring more suck and yuc I love 29'' wheels or a 29'' diameter, on a DH bike 26'' is ok of course, your just rolling down a hill
  • + 3
 @markar: I wasn't being specific on the wheel size debate. I just find retarded to insult different types of mountain bikes just because one doesn't like them. The industry isn't imposing new standards to mountain bikers. They are just promoting them agressively and some people are too narrow not to believe the hype.

That's all.
  • + 1
 @markar: I know all about tyre sizes and how they work, but your fat bike has still got 26" rims, like it or not
  • + 1
 @mark3: the actual diameter of a fatbike wheel is 29 inches with a 4 inch tire that's why it doesn't suck, if a fatbike had the same diameter as a 26 inch wheel with a 2.3 tire it would be a slow pig of a bike, the actual diameter including the tire is what matters, look into for your self, you obviously don't have a clue!
  • - 2
 @Treze: I was auguring with this know nothing goof trying to explain that a fatbike wheel is 29" in diameter with a 4 inch tire, that's why a 25lb fatbike feels like a 29er and doesn't suck, the actual diameter including the tire matters duh
  • + 3
 @markar: In all honesty. I couldn't give a lesser f*ck about wheel sizes. I'm tired of this pointless argument. That's all.
  • + 1
 @markar: if your implying I am a know nothing goof, the tyre may be 29" dia but the wheel rim is still 26",end of,

your the know nothing goof so stop with the insults and enjoy your bike
  • + 25
 My favourite sentence (at the end of the interview): "For me, being out of tune is calling something a new standard in order to invent a category to sell more product when it's really just widening something, or something stupid like that."
  • + 25
 Please make a carbon Scout.. Love the alu version!
  • + 10
 Scout is just the best ever. Love it.
  • + 5
 I have heard by someone who's ridden it that there's already a Scout carbon prototype. I just hope I have the $$ to upgrade my alu scout when it comes out
  • + 5
 @underwdmtb Seconded. Thirded. Fourthed.
  • + 16
 Any chance of a new DH bike?
I had a 450 and now have a 500, but really the 500 is 90% the same as the 450 so it's starting to show its age, especially the geometry (bigger than XL please!)

I follow Tahnee's racing too - she's going great and a really good ambassador for you.
Cheers
  • + 5
 Been rumors of a new DH bike different than a 500, so we shall wait and see!
  • + 1
 @Dabomb684: where did you see this? Why wouldn't they be testing it in the WC circuit?
  • + 0
 My take on Transition is that they are not really interested in Downhill.
  • + 18
 Bike companies like this that make the bike industry refreshing and exciting. Setting trends rather than following them. Makes me glad im a mtber!! Good stuff
  • + 14
 You have all missed the focus of the article, the fact that there is a functional tap to pour pints in the new shop! This kind of motivator definitely helps when testing out the Huck To Flat technology.
  • + 14
 Why is everything in the last section and
comments bold? I'm not crazy right it is bold? @mikekazimer
  • + 9
 And the comments are bold too. Makes it read as its more important.
  • + 9
 Thank for the Suppressor Kevin and Kyle! So pumped I could upgrade to such sick 26" frame in 2015 and not have to sell all my 26" parts. Keep on keeping it real and you will always have my respect and my $$$.

Haven't noticed any bolts coming loose and my bearings lasted a year but then again I can use an allen key properly and I don't jet wash it...
  • + 6
 Concur. Got a 2016 suppressor at the end of last year, hands down the most playful bike I've owned. I'd recommend transition to anyone who likes to smile
  • + 9
 @guytherev: I hate smiling so my 2016 suppressor ownership experience has been awful.
  • + 2
 @guytherev: All their bikes are so damn fun!!!
  • + 7
 I have a Scout and am stoked with it, does everything I ask of it with no drama and is a great all rounder. I know that Transition do outsource production to Taiwan but that was going to be inevitable as the company grew, it still has a cool image and a good ethos....I do like the way they've sacked off following the fads (fatbikes & e-bikes) and are doing their own thing.
  • + 11
 Carbon Smuggler please
  • + 2
 agreed!!
  • - 4
flag someguy101 (Jun 21, 2016 at 10:08) (Below Threshold)
 Yes and boost rear end
  • + 2
 27.5x3.25 and 29x2.5 would be swell.
  • + 6
 I don't really like to post stuff BUT since I own a Transition I wanted to share my thoughts...

My bike:
2014 Transition Covert 29er, custom build. Pike 150mm fork, Fox Float CTD rear, Reynolds AM wheels, Hayes Prime Expert Brakes, 1x10 set up with Gx derailleur and Wolfstooth 32t up front, KS Lev 140mm dropper post, Race Face Atlas handlebar, Black Ops pedals, and Race Face Crank.

I know components make the bike but w/o a decent frame it doesn't matter what components are on the bike. So this was my first splurge on a bike, spent $1500 for it from someone that built it up from the frame, which for me then and even now is a lot of money. My family thought I was crazy, but I recognized how good a deal it was and I haven't looked back since.

My Transition has handled everything I've thrown at it, which at the beginning wasn't much, but this bike has inspired so much confidence in me that i'm getting plenty of air time now and even a few KOM's! It has spent some time in the shop, but that's components and as hard as I ride it's not so bad. I've taken some nasty spills too, but hey you have to push yourself to get better. I also entered my first race with this bike, which even though it's not an XC bike, I was still kicking ass. To me it's not so much about weight or geometry of the bike, but the rider and i've grown with this bike. My gf gets mad that I spend so much time with my "baby" lol.

Anyway, I could go on forever. Just wanted to say thanks to Transition for mak
  • + 10
 by riders, for riders. i have always loved their bikes
  • + 16
 Thinking my next bike is a Transistion. Love their attitude
  • - 2
 Show me a bike company not run by riders...
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes most are run by riders, but most are also run for money not for riders. That's what makes the difference here.
  • + 4
 @kootenay: Jesus... what is not run for money? Do you think engineers at Gant or Spec are not working there in order to live a life of a dude designing and testing his stuff in nature? Do you know how many people at small companies are out there designing bikes and not having time to ride, and not earning big money? Ideological bollocks. Anyone can say that, even scums like betting companies put it into their commercials: by players for players.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns:Go make a visit to Bellingham and stop by Transition. You'll see.
  • - 9
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 21, 2016 at 10:33) (Below Threshold)
 @kootenay: what will I see? I've spent an hour in Spec tent at WC at Val Di Sole. All I have seen was friendship, coolness, professionalism, absolute openness to the fans, dedication the sport but most importantly, spirit of having fun and enjoying the bike life. I'm more than sure that Transition guys are cool to hang out with but I light-heartedly pointed out beaten down slogans. They made the simple mistake of downgrading their opposition, just like Urge did the other day. It's like sht talk before box or MMA match > once you toss crap at the opponent, you are putting yourself into difficult position where it is you who needs to prove something and live up to your words.
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns: Ok.
Don't think I'll play this game, should have known better. Love your drawings, btw. This has gone over my head, think I'll change my outlook and just agree with your original comment and stick to reading and not posting.
  • - 8
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 21, 2016 at 11:32) (Below Threshold)
 @kootenay: sorry if you feel run over man. I'm having some rough time in my head.
  • + 8
 @kootenay: I'm an engineer for Specialized and live and work out of Bellingham because it's awesome, come visit and we'll go ride some sick trail!! Transition's a rad company! It's all love on the front lines. Everyone in the industry could walk out the door and make more money somewhere else. We've all chosen life over riches.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns I get the vibe you have a huge problem with transition bikes and what they're about based on all of your comments above. Please share with the class.
  • + 1
 @jefe: Thanks, that's what I was going for. I love Bellingham for both the riding and community ( riding and bike industry). Was just trying to affirm Transition is run by rider for riders, before some may words were involved. I'm just up in Squamish (same deal applies when your up this way for riding) and have spent my share of time down there, probably owe a day or two digging by now.
  • + 5
 I'm guessing WAKI's resume was denied at some point. Jeez dude. Love my Patrol, by the way. Keep it up TR.
  • + 1
 @jefe: transition is rad enough to wait for the patent to run out on the Horst link and use it . . . . . . And everyone hates Specialized ! ! !
  • + 8
 This is the sort of company you want to buy a bike from one that thinks these new standards are a load of bull **** money making schemes.
AMEN transition
  • + 4
 Happy to know these guys and call them my homies! It's always high fives and a beer on the house. I have owned 5 of their bikes and never been let down. Not only riders they rip often and put more trail building days then most self proclaimed builders. Always a good time. A business role model for the motivated.
  • + 4
 I love Transition bikes and the company philosophy and business attitude. Between my partner and I we own 5 Transition bikes: 2 Patrols, TR250, TR500 and a TransAm 29er. I wouldn't trade any of these bikes and the 206 Carbon Patrol is the best bike I've ever owned, period! Too bad I missed you guys on your recent visit to Williams Lake, sounds like you had a good time in the Puddle.
  • + 5
 I always try to support local companies, so I've owned a Dirtbag, Bottlerocket, Blindside and 2 Coverts. Would love to add a carbon Patrol to the stable someday!
  • + 3
 @TransitionBikeCompany is a fantastic success story. Kevin and Kyle have been able to develop their vision, build a great team, and produce bikes that are fun to ride. To top it off they are fantastic supporters of riding in the PacNW. I plan to always have a TBC steed in my quiver.
  • + 7
 The Scout is the new Bottle Rocket, Amazing Bike!
  • + 6
 Mike Kazimer, you should've asked about their new DH team that started this season. They seem to be on the right track.
  • + 1
 Transition is not a downhill bike company. . . . . Enduro .
  • + 1
 @MasterOfStone: purely advertising. . . . . . . .
  • + 4
 My first real bike was a 2008 Transition Bottle rocket, only 6" but riding the WC track at bromont, that thing was a beast for what it was. Awesome bikes... would love to get on another, but for now my Sight is killing it.
  • + 3
 When I started getting into the DH/freeride scene, my LBS had a sky blue Bottlerocket frame on display. I cannot express how much I wanted that frame. I haggled. I bartered. I offered myself as tribute. Nothing. I could not get the owner to hook me up (I was seriously low-balling).

I have money now, but there is no elusive sky blue Bottlerocket hanging on the wall Frown
  • + 2
 @ghettoflash: On the bright side, there is probably some equally sexy looking carbon or hydro formed frames to pick up now! Transition is a wholesome brand as far as i am concerned, you know what they have learned from each frame, they have rolled forward into the newer ones Smile
  • + 2
 @ghettoflash: I feel ya, I was that way for so long, my bottle rocket was actually the first bike I was able to walk into the store & buy. regret selling it every time I think about it
  • + 2
 @zion-i: Oh totally! I did up with a Banshee, which was another out-of-reach brand I could never afford when i was younger.

I think if I ever bought that Bottlerocket...I wouldn't be happy. I think there is a certain majesty when you're young and poor and not able to afford the "unicorn". I get nostalgic for the feeling it inspired: The image of me and my sky blue bottle rocket on the cover of some magazine; the rides and competitions I fantasized about; the wonderful feeling of suddenly becoming a "pro" on the right bike. lol! Honestly, when I think about it...it had to be out of reach or else I would have been disappointed in the reality that it could not make me a pro.

I would like to own a Transition someday. If they ever roll out a bike in the same sky blue or PBR decals, I might be so inclined.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: What an awesome first bike to buy. It's probably out there bring joy to someone else...or at least that is what I tell myself about all of things that I regret selling.
  • + 6
 About time I got myself a tranny!
  • + 1
 It's the human interaction, it's actually having the flexibility to do the things that come up that we want to do when we want to do them, regardless of what day or time it is. If we can't do that, what are we doing? I think that's why people like it here. -kyle
frick yes
  • + 1
 They need to focus more on 130/140mm front travel bikes 160mm travel bikes are over rated and make the god dam smuggler in carbon u fools. Also fix the tire clearance issue with the rear triangle on the smuggle good thing I bought it used not work $1900.
  • + 5
 Bring back the Bottlerocket!!
  • + 5
 I heard a roumer of a new bottle rocket, just before the triple came out......
  • + 3
 Love my blindside and Bottlerocket! Awesome interview, awesome company. My blindside is so much fun I can't sell it, despite seriously wanting a full DH rig...
  • + 1
 Generally i try not to be brand loyal, but i will always buy Transition. They have the right attitude, they will always make fun bikes. The Anvl products are fantastic, every part ive bought feels like it was made for me. Keep up the great work guys
  • + 1
 I met these guys at the evergreen MTB festival a couple of weeks back and spent about half hour talking to kyle about the bikes, engineering, the industry etc. He gave me beers and invited me to come to bellingham and ride with them. Such a rad group of people. Makes me even more stoked to be riding a scout.
  • + 1
 I remember back in the early 2000's I met these guys down in Seattle dirt jumping at Greenlake and they had some sketches of parts(frames,stems and hangers I think it was) they wanted to have machined,stoked to see that passion grow into what it is today
  • + 1
 I love my Carbon Covert. It's the first bike I've owned that I can actually ride anywhere and have a ton of fun on it every time. I've owned others that claimed the same thing, but the covert is so far beyond those it's crazy. Did two XC type rides on it yesterday and will be hitting up Silverstar with it next week. Keep it up boys (and girls)!
  • + 1
 should have asked them why their FS bike's bearings are shite and the bolts come loose after a couple of days of riding and the high incidence of miss-aligned frames causing shock damage. Thankfully my bike shop regreased and redid all the bolts on my suppressor
  • + 12
 @poah high incidence? I've not heard of one.
Did you maybe have a duff one? Can't think of any companies with a blemishless record.

Never ride my Scout without smiling. Great company too deal with too.
  • + 3
 @jimmyconnors: no issue with my suppressor as the shop did the above. my bro in laws patrol bolts came loose and its pretty common on the patrol/suppressor thread.
  • + 6
 Seconded.

Every pivot bolt came loose first descent (I mean literally within 150 yards) on my carbon patrol. Nothing was torqued to spec, main pivot was under half what it should have been. My shock definitely has misalignment between top and bottom mounts, only a mm or two but still once the bolts are tight that couple of mm could easily cause premature wear from the side loading on the shock, I believe this is what Poah is talking about. It's weeping oil but the shop says it's assembly lubricant and should stop soon (already 10 or so rides in I reckon it should have stopped by now).

I've inspected the bearings and there is a faintest hint of grease in there but nowhere near well packed. I'm going to strip the whole thing down, grease all bearings and torque everything up to the spec from the manual (which is finally available half way through the year!) and hope that stops the terrible clattering noise the bike currently makes over any rough stuff. (XT 11 complete drivetrain so no reason why anything should be banging around)

Don't get me wrong it's a really fun bike to ride especially pointing it downhill or off jumps, but the QA/QC during manufacturing is clearly severely lacking. It's a real shame, I've had Transitions before and they are such fun focussed bikes to own, previous ones have been second hand though so I guess all the teething bearing issues if they had any were solved, but buying this Patrol new has been a really bad experience in terms of customer satisfaction when you consider the price of the thing and will definitely make me think twice about future purchases.
  • - 6
flag Vanguard (Jun 21, 2016 at 4:22) (Below Threshold)
 @veero: They're a small company. They're committed to their employees, which means they're committed to quality. I'd rather have a guy at Bellingham forget the grease than somebody in a Taiwan plant being told they're not allowed to go to the restrooms before they've reached their target. They're dedicated to producing great bikes, more so than many others. Give them a bit of time, they'll fix it and grow.
  • + 17
 @Vanguard: shouldn't need fixed, should be done properly at first especially given the cost
  • + 9
 @Vanguard: I doesn't instill a huge amount of confidence though does it 'forgetting to grease' something, besides they're sealed bearing units, they should come with adequate grease in them already, Transition shouldn't have to grease them at all during the assembly process. Having to prize every bearing seal out, squirt in more grease and carefully put the seal back in must be more costly timewise than buying a $2 more expensive bearing which comes with enough grease in surely? From a quantity vs cost relationship, perhaps they wen't too near the cheap end of the spectrum and sacrificed a certain amount of quality on outsourced bearings. If you read the thread on PB for the Giddy Up frame type there are lots of people complaining about bearings failing after only a few months on these Patrols/Scouts etc.

So are the carbon patrols manufactured and assembled in the US or just assembled? I'm not really sure your point holds much water if ANY of it is made in Taiwan.

I'm sorry but small company or not, if I'm spending £/$1,000s on a frame alone I personally don't think it's unreasonable to expect the bolts to be done up properly to their own recommended specs and bearings to be capable of lasting a season or three. Over the years I've had loads of suspension frames and only ever changed bearings on 2 of them, generally they lasted 2-3 years with ease. As in the case of some people on the thread, the bearings have only lasted 3-4 months of non-winter use. Sure you could reasonably expect to have to check pivot bolts after what a few tens of hours of riding, literally just to check they're still tight, not have to tighten them from slack AND re-torque everything.

Also haven't they been doing suspension frames for quite a while now? Surely the concepts and design philosophies of pivot alingment and configuration don't really change much, I'd hope they had it dialled by now. I certainly never had any pivot issues on my Bottlerocket or TR250 or anything coming loose.

Look I'm not having a go at Transition, I bought the Patrol frame after hearing all the rave reviews and remembering how much fun I had on my TR250 so I've got a vested interest in getting this sorted. I just think that my frame (and anecdotally quite a few others worldwide are in a similar boat judging by the thread on here) has slipped through or wasn't subjected to rigourous enough QC which unfortunately lets down their whole image as far as I'm concerned. Only time will tell whether or not the shock will be ok due to the misalignment on the frame. I'm awaiting a response from the shop I bought it from on what they want to do about it.
  • + 11
 @Vanguard: there are so many patrols with these issues (also mine), that the missing grease and the loose bolts is more methodical than a question of forgotten. Also the misalignment of the rocker is pretty common.

Greasing and tightening bolts is no rocket science- most can do this on their own.
But: You spent 1800€ for a frame and get the feeling that it is assembled carelessly - from a company that pretends to care about their customers (satisfaction) and don't wanna "make the almighty dollar". Since the issues appear so often they seem to be the result of savings and cuts anywhere in the production chain. Just my 2 cents...
  • + 5
 @Veero I totally agree with you expecting quality work for your money. Frames aren't cheap, especially carbon frames – and we can safely assume these are produced in Taiwan and just assembled in Bellingham.

@clemsi I'd bet they don't do it on purpose (to save production $), but I think they simply have an issue that passed QC.

I like that the Transition guys live their dream, and I hope that the quality issues don't hit them too hard. Yes, by all means, they need to fix it, but I also guess that by the number of warranty frames they had to hand out, they already know it and are working on it.

Free speech, and all, but I'm not sure if it is helping much if people throw dirt at them in public.
  • + 1
 @veero:


I think I just figured out why my monarch is constantly weeping oil. I thought that was just the way it was. I will have to look into alignment issues. Anyone have any links to dIY repair threads? couldn't find it.
  • + 4
 @Vanguard: It's only dirt throwing if it's unfounded. There shouldn't be any shyness about genuine problems genuine customers are experiencing.

I love the fact they are living the dream but at the expense of customer satisfaction and QC? Not sure I'm on board with that.

The frames aren't cheap which makes it worse! I'd be equally pissed if it was an alloy I'd bought, however at £1000 less I probably would have been less annoyed.

@clemsi Couldn't agree more.
  • + 7
 @veero: I don't ride a Transition at the moment but I have a vast amount of experience working on FS bikes from nearly all big manufacturers. Giant, GT, Kona, Trek, Cannondale, etc. In Transitions defense, I have never once experienced pivot bolts greased from the factory. I just replaced every bearing in my Kona Process with Enduro bearings and there was no bolt grease. I also completely disassembled my brand new GT Fury linkage because the bike was creaking after 1 ride...again no bolt grease. I think the only reason companies grease bolts (if they are greased) is due to the anodize. That stuff can cause your bolts to seize if not careful. If you are having problems with bolts coming lose, I have had a lot of success with blue thread lock. Also helps with the seizing prevention.

Also, does Transition not use sealed bearings in their frames? How did you inspect the bearing grease? Did you physically remove the bearing seal? If you did, I suggest you just replace them now. They'll never be the same. I work a lot with bearings in general and once those seals are pulled after factory install it is usually a death sentence. Transition probably sources those bearings so they are coming pre greased...probably from NSK or NMB or something like that (mfgr label will be on the seal). Transition may have received a bad lot. Insufficient grease is a really difficult thing to catch my means of QC inspection...especially with the variety of sizes Transition is probably using. If you have to get new bearings...the Enduro ones are tits!

As for the side load on your shock...that could be a problem. I wouldn't sweat the oil weeping like your shop said. I have the EXACT same shock on my Kona. Just installed it aftermarket so it is new. It weeps oil. Give it time...it will stop. With that shock, if the side load thing is going to give you issue, it will come in the form of noticable air loss. If you constantly find yourself pumping up your shock to maintain your sag settings...that may be from the side load. On mine...I maybe have to check my shock air pressure 1 to 2 times per season.
  • + 8
 Not sure why @poah is getting negative props for calling a turd a turd. I'm a huge Transition fan and current customer but...

I'll second that Transition bearings suck - get the right person on the phone at Transition and they will tell you the same thing. I had to replace three completely seized bearings on my Smuggler within 4 months of ownership. I went ahead and replaced all with Enduro bearings.

I get it that bearing replacement under warranty is a 'slippery slope' (Transition's words) but then don't put shit bearings in your frames that will be toast in months. And yes, most of the swingarm bolts loosen on a somewhat regular basis. When I called Transition to discuss the bearing issue, I was reminded a couple of times to regularly tighten the swingarm bolts.

The truth sometimes sucks. Still a fan but a little turned off by the experience.
  • + 1
 @scbullit36:

I didn't mean grease pivot bolts (these have thread lock compound on anyway so you wouldn't grease them), I mean add grease to the sealed bearing units. It's easy to pry the rubber seal back on a sealed bearing unit without damaging the seal, especially when they're particularly cheap sealed bearings, the seal literally pops out. I'm sure you work with a lot of bearings, I do too Smile and not just on bikes. These seem quite cheap ones and the seals are not very tight at all, hence with the lack of grease people seem to be experiencing quick failures, presumably due to ingress of water/mud etc. To a degree there's not much point buying super dooper bearings for pivots since they never fully rotate, I stand by not buying SKF bearings for bikes at 3/4 times the price of INA/FAG bearings because they never last 3-4 times as long. Bearings with good seals are important and ones that actually contain grease are essential!

I'm waiting for wear marks to appear on the can before giving in on the alignment issue, I've not checked the exact air pressure actually, I did notice a couple of hefty bottom outs last ride though.

@TheFunkyMonkey:

In the UK (new) buyers are protected by legislation saying products have to be fit for purpose. If bearings die in under 4 months they weren't fit for purpose originally and the shop/distributor has to replace them.
  • + 2
 @poah: Although there's only a few people posting on this review, when I looked up a couple of build threads etc - yep. A fair few misalignment and bolt-loosening stories. Too many, really. Wonder if it's the old, People post up when they're pissed off but not when everything's going good?
Bearings are one thing, but misalignment is quite another. From my experience of quick response from Transition, I'm guessing they dealt with the issues fast.
  • + 3
 @jimmyconnors: I love my suppressor, best bike I've ever had and you'll also find the same comments in those threads too.

@TheFunkyMonkey its pinkbike, why else would I get neg props for telling the truth
  • + 2
 I'm glad these issues were brought up. Just built up a new carbon patrol frame and their QC definitely needs work. Small things like one of the water bottle holes off-center and a piece of paper somehow stuck the internal routing tube were not a big deal. But, the rear shock mounts were mis-aligned by over 5mm. Looks like they just jammed the monarch in there. It took a LOT of side load pressure to get it in. I noticed that one of the frame mount surfaces was off so I sanded it down. Now the shock alignment is off by about 1mm at the rocker. I'll see how it goes, but if there's any problems, it's going back. This is sad. When you save up for a new bike at this price, you expect top quality. My older bike, a Nomad2 carbon, had perfect shock alignment out of the box and the the pivots have been bulletproof with essentially no maintenance. I'm hoping I don't regret giving this young company a chance.
  • + 2
 the bearing's are shit, when my patrol was new and 4 rides old all of them were shut because of not having grease( no pressure washer)
as for the bolt's, just as you are assembling the bike take them out, put locktite, and bolt it up to torque, most frames, wheeles and component's like that will get loose after the first rides
  • + 3
 This is why I try not to by the first run of any bike. Little wrinkles are usually identified by early adopters and ironed out for the next generation.
  • + 2
 @scbullit36: "once those seals are pulled after factory install it is usually a death sentence". I completely disagree. If the bearing isn't fried/contaminated, there's no reason it can't be serviced and have a long life. Done it plenty of times in multiple applications.
  • + 1
 @tiagomano: my cheap ass ghost frame had no issues with bearings or bolts coming loose in three years of ownership.
  • + 1
 @tiagomano: My rear hub (transition revolution) is a great roller in fact but the quick release handle keeps getting loose after a few rides. Transition parts are good value for money but they still have their flaws though...
  • + 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: Mine was supposedly third batch, I've only had it 3 months.
  • + 1
 Somewhere around 2005 I was on my way up to Whistler from Olympia with my Yeti ASX. I broke the proprietary derailleur hanger and happened to stop by Transition when they were in Ferndale near the train tracks. Kevin hooked me up with a Yeti rep in Vancouver and saved my trip. I ran into Kevin at the 2014? Crankworx and he glowed about their move to Bellingham from Ferndale and the hopes that their business and others would help revitalize that part of town. Legit dudes. My next bike will be a Patrol.
  • + 3
 I've got 3 Transitions and husband has 2. Honestly don't see myself ever buying any other brand for trails. Best dudes to deal with, hands down.
  • + 3
 Just bought a Suppressor and have to say, easily the funnest bike I've ridden. Awesome company awesome bikes drink beer smash trails die young
  • + 1
 I had waited a long time for a company to make the perfect bike for me (the bottlerocket was close) I just wanted a trail bike that felt like a slopestyle bike, and finally...the scout! Thank you thank you Transition for being different than the other money grubbing companies.
  • + 1
 Used to own an 2007 Dirtbag that just ripped through everything. Also own a 2012 Trans-Am that is my back up bike just in case my Yeti breaks. Indestructible bikes at fair prices with a cool culture. What more can you ask for? Hell, even the swag they sell looks good.
  • + 3
 How close to the toilet is the beer tap ? More distance would indicate better quality IPA I think , love your bikes by the way
  • + 2
 It's Kulshan. It could be in the front secretary desk. Quality!
  • + 1
 Still loving my TR 450. I emailed these guys a few questions prior to purchasing and they are the ones who answered me, the owners. I love that about a company. Also when needed a geo-chip they sent them to me for free and included a ton of stickers and a Tansition coozie.
  • + 3
 Had a few Transition bikes, currently got a Patrol and TR500, the guys are always super helpful whenever you ask them stuff. Not sure I'll ever ride anything else...
  • + 0
 This is 'The Real McCoy' of all bike companies. I'm still riding my first generation bottle rocket as hard, actually harder, than the first day I got it. I am so thankful, this bike seriously thought me how to truly ride a dual suspension mtb. In fact, when I was a grom back in hs when I first got the frame, Mike Metzger was kind enough to send me an autographed poster of himself that read, "To o2a6k, thank you for being part of the Transition family". To this day, that poster hangs above my bed and it's what motivates me to ride bicycles everyday. Coming from a 23 year old Northern Cal native. Thanks guys.
  • + 1
 I have enjoyed all the transition bikes I have ridden, but I have never owned one. I wanted to get a Klunker a couple months ago, but its just too darn big! Would be nice if it was available in Two sizes.
  • + 1
 Transition is a great company. Love my 2011 bottle rocket. Picked up a 2015 Trans Am (which has taken a shit load of beating).
Got my eye on a Carbon Patrol. Quality bike that are meant to be ridden.
  • + 2
 Catalog "engineers", like Nukeproof or bikesdirect. No real innovation. Decent bikes, but now overpriced for what you get.
Perfect for Pinkbike kiddos.
  • + 0
 P.S. I do ride a TransAm. Really nice bike.
  • + 1
 Really enjoyed this interview - while i was still working at a lbs I always enjoyed dealing with them and selling their products. and even today my 09 double surprises me with how awesome it is!
  • + 1
 What is really cool is that I've called Transition and gotten Kevin on the phone a few times. Once was to order a Bank, once was to call and thank him for an absolutely shredding bike. Will buy from them again.
  • + 1
 mad respect to transition and these guys. chasin the damn dream and damn jealous i am not with them.. as i sit here..in my cube.. with my corporate job... while my bike sits at home... alone..
  • + 0
 Cost of doing business, cost of living, traffic, lack of legal trail networks that rival the riding in Bellingham... Positively @TransitionBikeCompany would be different down here. Good on you guys for building a company YOUR way in a killer area. On another note... Can we expect to see HTF ready E-Chubby bikes in the future?
  • + 1
 I love that their new space has the original DirtBag displayed next to the new Patrol--my first Transition bike and now my current one. It's been great watching these guys get to this point.
  • + 2
 Got my hands on patrol last weekend, I've been riding bikes for over 10 years and its easily the best bike I've ever ridden.
  • + 1
 where's the agree button?
  • + 1
 Much love for Transition! As someone hoping to work in the industry soon, it would be an honor to work for a company operated like Transition.
  • + 4
 Love my Covert.
  • + 1
 No fat bike + thing. Yep - don't care if they only sell cardboard cut outs of bikes after dishing that little extravagance of Lycra wearing fools
  • + 2
 I love this company! I love that they still offer a rad 26" bike. You guys are awesome! Passion over greed wins!
  • + 1
 My resume is forthcoming. I bought my first Transition because of the guys at the company first, and the bike itself second. Truly. I'm hooked, and won't buy anything else.
  • + 2
 My '11 Bottlerocket loves to get punished every day as hard as possible. It's such a fun machine!
  • + 1
 I can attest to their great customer service! Been a transition bike owner since 2009! Samsquatch has been a great help in everything I purchased.
  • + 1
 I told my wife I wanted to move to Bellingham and work for Transition. She immediately started checking real estate there. I married well!
  • + 1
 My first ever full suspension bike was a bottlerocket. Now I have a patrol. Loyalty to this brand has been a huge success for me. Their bikes are a blessing!
  • + 3
 carbon scout please
  • + 1
 Where can i pick up those custom Easton ARC 30 decals for my Carbon Patrol?!?
  • + 1
 found em, silk graphics
  • + 2
 transition needs to open a place in Brevard N.C. please!
  • + 1
 After 30 years as an aerospace engineer, I'm ready to retire and come work at Transition for beer and bikes.
  • + 2
 Love my TR 450 with 650b wheel set
  • + 2
 Where is the work with us section in your page?!
  • + 2
 Yeah, these guys are the sh*t. Probably my favourite bike company
  • + 2
 I wanna be working there!
  • + 2
 Great company. Im one of those bottlerocket fanboys too.
  • + 2
 I really miss my Bottlerocket, THAT was a bike. Sometimes I want it back
  • + 1
 Love how my scout rides and love that I'm supporting what seems to be an awesome company!
  • + 1
 To the Transition folks: Don't fool yourself - the carbon covert is awesome, and I'm still loving the 26" wheels.
  • + 2
 Talking about a 160mm bike which has actually 155mm of travel?
  • + 0
 I would ask them why they only made a yellow yellow/black alloy Patrol? I want to ride a bike that looks as good as it rides not one that makes me hungry. Share the blue!
  • + 1
 I can't afford full retail or I'd have bought a bottle Rocket, Double, TR250 over the years.
  • + 1
 @TransitionBikeCompany Any chance you guys need a plastics/composites engineer? I have been dying to get back to Bham.
  • + 1
 that Dirtbag. Still a killer. Still awesome looking.
  • + 1
 best bike I ever had!! cheers Transition!!
  • + 2
 High 5 to transition!
  • + 1
 @TransitionBikeCompany

Cheers!

from a proud owner of a Patrol and 450!
  • + 1
 If somebody wants to sell me a PBR bottle rocket, lemme know.
  • + 1
 Where were they originally based for the first couple years?
  • + 1
 New Bottlerocket please! With an xl option!
  • + 1
 ...Transition is like a family...
  • + 1
 ...Love my Transition Patrol!!!
  • + 1
 I love my Orange patrol. Just wish I can afford the carbon Patrol.
  • + 1
 love my smuggler transition4lyf
  • + 1
 Buy a banshee, zero problems will occur!
  • + 1
 Yeaaaa how bout these moto Mondays? ?? Employees only?
  • + 1
 Ebikes are glorified mopeds
  • + 1
 @transitionbikecompany hey you guys hiring?
  • + 1
 Making a trip to Bellingham in a few weeks. The stoke is way-high!
  • + 1
 you guys need a machinist ??Smile
  • + 0
 Own a Scout and a Trans AM, want a Patrol, want a TR500, willing to suck dick for either, won't swallow though lol
  • + 2
 I want to work here!
  • + 1
 What a rad crew.
  • - 3
 I love that he just dumped on southern California. That place sucks and so do the people that live there. They are all moving to Bend Oregon and just wrecking our trails with their crappy attitudes.
  • + 1
 Nice write up.
  • + 1
 Gnarly!
  • + 1
 Cute cranks. Wink
  • + 0
 That TP holder gives a whole new meaning to kASShima
  • - 3
 Wait, what the hell is wrong with SoCal?!
  • + 2
 It sucks. Don't worry though, its mostly the people.
  • + 2
 rampant materialism
  • - 1
 @MmmBones: Lashing out on SantaCruz possibly?
  • + 1
 @MmmBones: your from Portland so you get it. SoCal folks are blind to their douchness.
  • + 2
 @Treze:Not at all, Santa Cruz is in Northern California and a small coastal college town with diametrically opposed ideology compared to the Southern part of the state. Have you been to either?
  • + 1
 @MmmBones: No i haven't. Hence the question. I wish i could someday...
Thanks for clearing that out for me! Smile
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