Push, White Industries, Silca - Interbike 2016

Sep 22, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
Interbike 2016


Interbike 2016

Push Industries

Push Industries' Elevensix coil-sprung shock caused a stir when it was released in 2015, in part due to its industrial / futuristic appearance, and also for its performance out on the trail. Not content to rest on their laurels, Push recently updated the Elevensix with a new coating on the body and shaft, a revised piston valve shape, and a larger reservoir body.

Interbike 2016
The larger ports can be seen on the piston valve on the right.
Interbike 2016
Increasing the oil reservoir size makes it even more unlikely that any performance changes will occur on long, non-stop runs.

The new coating, called Micro-XD, is only produced in the United States, and is said to be slipperier and stronger than what was used previously.

The new piston valve shape has an greater port volume, which allows for increased high speed rebound. This should allow the shock to maintain the plush, ground hugging feel that it's known for, while also feeling a little more lively as it goes deeper into its stroke.

An 11.6% increase in reservoir volume seems like more than a coincidence, but Darren Murphy, the owner of Push, swore that ending up with that number was purely by chance. The decision to increase the reservoir size came about when Push realized just how many of their customers were bolting the shock onto their all-mountain bikes and heading to the bike park, where the heat generated by those long runs can affect a shock's performance.

The new features will be standard on all new Elevensix shocks, and for the lucky individuals that already own an Elevensix, Push will be offering them as an upgrade at a to-be-determined price.


Interbike 2016
Push are now offering tools for bike shops or home mechanics, including these 7000 series aluminum sockets.
Interbike 2016
They also have a new fork seal press, a fitting complement to their line of seal kits.



Interbike 2016


White Industries

White Industries may be better known for their square taper cranksets (yes, those do still exist), and smooth rolling hubs, but it was the new 12-speed compatible MR30 cranks that were getting all the attention. The cranks spin on a splined 30mm spindle, and use a narrow-wide chainring that's .005" narrower than an 11-speed chainring to allow it to work with SRAM's Eagle chain. There will be Boost and non-Boost versions of the rings, with prices ranging from $75-95 USD; the cranks and spindle are $300. The final weight is expected to be between 700-800 grams.


Interbike 2016

Silca

Silca's new T-Ratchet and Ti-Torque kit was a runaway hit when the company debuted it on Kickstarter, receiving 1200% of their funding goal. The tool can be used as a mini-ratchet (10 bits are included), and with the addition of the Ti-Torque attachment it turns into a torque indicator that reads between 2-8Nm. That indicator relies on a what Silca call a "ti torsion beam", a titanium rod that holds the bit, and then twists the same amount each time the tool is used in order to produce a torque reading. This isn't a 'click-type' tool - you do need to keep an eye on the tool's markings to see when the proper torque is reached, but the simplicity of the design means that it should produce accurate readings for years and years.

Once the Kickstarter orders are filled, the T-Ratchet is expected to be available in January for $98 USD.

Interbike 2016
Silca also debuted their Seat Roll Premio ($49), which uses a BOA closure to attach it underneath a seat.
Interbike 2016
It's aimed at the road crowd, but it did look like a mountain bike tube might be able to squeeze into one of the tool roll's three pockets.

103 Comments

  • + 81
 Trying to envision how much .05" is has this American looking forward to the advent of not just metric shocks, but metric goddamn everything.
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  • + 73
 Trump will make US metric
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  • + 49
 A credit card is about. 03" thick. #machinistlife
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  • + 9
 It's not much - .005" = .127mm. The old rings may have worked, but White Industries didn't want to risk having the chain getting hung up.
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  • + 37
 @WAKIdesigns: i wish. I don't understand the masochists here who don't want to divide and multiply by 10 all day.
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  • + 13
 I think he meant .005". The thin teeth of modern chain rings are about .075". Taking off .05" would leave them so thin you could bend them over with your fingers.
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  • + 2
 @leverfingers: I was wondering about that. My chainring is kind of concave, maybe they mean changing that concavity to bring the chainline out rather than changing the width of the actual teeth?
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  • + 4
 It kills me that we still teach most of our engineers everything in standard units.... and honestly, now that everyone is programmable, the switch to more metric would be so easy. We are kinda wallowing in between. Everyone just mixes and matches, just look at the US bike industry and their product descriptions.
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  • + 11
 @Tmackstab: business card: .010"
zig zag: .0015"
standard paper from 2000 on: .0040-.0045
older paper standard: .005"

Yup, machinist life indeed.
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  • + 33
 @trialsracer: What's even worse is living in Canada, having everything that you own in metric, but you go to a hardware store and they don't sell metric bolts, metric drill bits, metric hole saws, metric anything.
Drives me insane.
America needs to get their act together and anything that isn't metric needs to die off.
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  • + 3
 @laynehip: I took Architectural Technologies and you're expected to instantly convert everything in your head back and forth (metric/imperial), whereas the Australians visiting us had metric everything. I was so jealous.
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  • + 1
 I've heard conflicting reports - but much like most previous drivetrain upgrades, won't your average 11 speed chainring work just fine with Eagle ? What are people reporting ? Or is everyone who has bought Eagle stepping up to the new chainrings ? and since they're trying to sell you cranks too do you have to purchase the cranks to put on the new ring ? I think I saw OneUp saying their chainrings are compatible with Eagle chains already.
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  • + 25
 @WAKIdesigns: and make Mexico pay for it!
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  • + 2
 @laynehip: Amen ! I am a Mech eng. student and EVERY goddamn class as been going between metric and imperial. From my 3 yrs in college for my technologist degree to my almost compete bachelor in university... Metric is life, but shock sizes had nothing wrong to be honest.
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  • + 3
 @Kramz:

Welder here. Same goes. We need to know both inside and out.
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  • + 4
 @Brakesnotincluded: Get used to it. I've been a mechanical engineer for 15 years and jump between metric and imperial daily. Just part of the job....
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  • + 3
 @NolanD: Damn I was thinking I would look for a Mech Eng job in CA when I graduate but I can't convert sh*t without google/ a calculator. Looks like I'll have to find a country with awesome riding that uses Metric
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  • + 0
 @atrokz: really? .0015? must've good stuff that day!
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  • + 4
 @laynehip: I feel you man. I'm an engineer and reaaaally push forward to use metric. It results with 25,4mm tubing and angry providers saying ''no we don't have that. Order you M10 stuff in Europe or get 3/8'' instead''
It hurts even more when you find out a project is half metric and half imperial...
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  • + 3
 I'm well suited for conversions
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  • - 6
 @laynehip: Metric makes total sense and it's what I know and living in the US it drives me crazy.

But. There is an argument amongst some that since imperial measurement was based off human body parts (a foot is the length of a man's foot, an inch is based off a man's thumb joint, a yard a forearm etc) that architecture and design using imperial measurements is more aesthetically appealing...
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  • + 7
 may as well jump on celsius too... get rid of them 'freedom degrees'.
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  • + 0
 Math class will help with either conversion
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  • + 2
 Its not as bad as the US here but its still mixed up. Miles and yards on road signs and countdown markers yet did you realise those blue mile marker signs or the white posts on motorways or duel carriageways were in kilometers. Irrelevent fact over.
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  • + 2
 Teachers in grade school told us we would be fully converted to the metric system by the year 2000. That was 1976.
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  • + 1
 @shotouthoods: Hahaha I think embitterment about this great generational lie explains around %90 of how curmudgeonly my dad is.
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  • - 1
 The funny thing about this forum is nothing has been said from construction workers. By far the better system for larger measurements spans is imperial. Imagine measuring out 609.7mm every time you set a roof joist in a home. Metric is the magic for tight engineering or you are going to the 1000th (0.001")
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  • + 2
 When in construction are you ever gonna mesure a fraction of a mm? It's pretty much the limit of human hability. After that you need precision tools and they all work with unit conversion... (it applies both ways, you won't mesure 1/32'' with your eyes...)
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  • + 2
 @FireBallDHR: @FireBallDHR: Because saying x.x meters is so much worse than saying x.x feet....riiiiight.

Usually, construction workers have minimal education...it has nothing to do with ease, but everything to do with being stubborn to learning metric, despite it being a far simpler way of measuring. Metric is used in most every other country for a reason...it makes sense, you slap on or take off zeros, it's great for measuring distances too. Here....tell me which makes more sense for larger measurements and is easier to convert in your head:

5280 feet = 1 mile
1000 meters = 1 kilometer

or if you think smaller scale cause that's too extreme an example

12 inches = 1 foot
1000 mm = 1 meter

Now please...tell me which one is logical and which one is arbitrary numerical conversion nonsense?
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  • + 2
 @rupintart: I think this one sums it up :p (no hate for the american neibourgh, I just laugh very hard when looking at the pic )

i.imgur.com/OqNDHko.jpg
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  • + 1
 @rupintart: Look man: I am not stepping into this conversation as a global representative on behalf of the entirety of the imperial system as a superior unit of measurement. Obviously you feel strongly that metric is better. That's fine. I get that. All Im saying is that certain units of measurement have their time and place. Inches and feet are useful in building. Other countries will agree that a measuring tape in feet is easier to read. Also, in reference to the different measurements, Farenheit is a more detailed describer of atmospheric temperature. Now as to why the units of conversion are all over the place I have no idea. It is as if the originator of the design literally did say F*ck you to everyone when they created the system. The conversions are a headache and the simplicity of the metric system is far beyond that of the imperial. I can say one thing that if you feel so strongly about metric, yet you live in a predominantly imperial country, Why not leave? Don't take out your frustrations through rants on the internet: Take action.
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  • + 1
 @FireBallDHR: How do you know I don't do all my calculations, daily work, and measurements in metric? How do you know that I haven't already taught my kids to be more intimate and familiar with metric? That's a lot of assumptions there....but yes, I have taken action and the aforementioned has been done. So uh, who's not taking action now???? Leaving a country based on a numerical system is extremely irrational and frankly pretty retarded....

If the only stance imperial measurement has is that it's universally agreed that it's easier to read a tape measure...well that speaks more about people that design tape measures than the system itself. Inches and feet are used in building in countries that use imperial. Look at any UK building supply/supplier and they still use mm and m and ml and L for measurements of plywood, cinderblocks, brick, wood, fiberglass sheets, epoxy, mortar, staining, etc...

I agree these conversion are shit...and there's so many damn units because everybody and their brother in academia wants to live in infamy and have a unit of measurement named after them or be associated with it in hopes it becomes the new standard.....

Become an engineer, people who are intimately familiar and comfortable with conversions who see the merits of EVERY numerical system....then tell me if you still feel the same about the imperial system. Oops, I might have taken too much action there.....going through college and all....
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  • + 1
 @FireBallDHR: farenheit is a better system how ? The universaIIy accepted reference point is that of water, aka the tripIe point: 0.01 CeIsius or 273.16 KeIvin. CeIsius is simpIy easier to use and is more representative of what surrounds us. Even the KeIvin scaIe makes more sense, Farenheit is simpIy Iost in the sea with it's water/ice/saIt and bIood temperature reference points...
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  • + 3
 speakin of temps... will this still be goin when it's freezing cold outside?
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  • + 3
 @fullbug: probably, arguing is a way of Iife for engineers !

I shouId know, my mom and my dad are eng., pIus I am a few courses away from graduating...
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  • + 1
 @Brakesnotincluded: iz all good and congrats! have family that are engineers and chemists. cannot consume enough alcohol to black out of those discussions! haha
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  • + 14
 The constant revisions in damping technology is ridiculous. As if they don't understand fluid mechanics. It's a way to just constantly re introduce the same tired technology to people over and over and keep making money making the same stuff. Just like with hub standards, wheels probably going back to 26" because reasons... its ridiculous.
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  • + 5
 Have to say there is some truth in that comment.
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  • + 1
 As a student of mechanical engineering I agree 100% with this statement. The mechanics inside the dampening systems are not terribly complicated. Their is no reason that they should not have been able to build a dampener capable of performing in the desired manner. It's ridiculous. Same goes for about everything in the bike world. Just cycling (pun intended) old ideas to sell to people who have to have the newest thing.
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  • + 1
 I agree that most of the time its just marketing gimmick.
New standards = more $$$

That being said, I worked for a well known (publicly traded) shock absorber company for 9 years, and I can safely say "its not that simple".
Meeting some of the damping force characteristics without introducing electronics and keeping it all mechanical is still pretty hard. Do you want a linear? digressive? progressive? do you want the valves to open at a certain frequency? Making it even worse is that fact that people have different taste.
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  • + 1
 @Razarath: Very true. Adding the human element to anything makes everything so much more difficult.
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  • + 4
 That BOA bag -yes! It looks like a perfect candidate to utilize the dead space behind the seat tube and BB junction on my Knolly.
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  • + 5
 Micro-XD = DLC isn't it? If the coating is PVD and on aluminum, chances are it's a DLC family of coatings.
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  • + 114
 I have no clue what you are talking about. But you managed to use enough acronyms that i believe you.
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  • + 6
 @adrennan: DLC is diamond-like-carbon. Frequently used on suspension in Moto. It was what rockshox originally used when their blackbox racers were first seen on black stanctions back in 2009. Rockshox deemed the material to be too expensive for mass production.
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  • + 6
 @diegosk: Basically yes. There are different types of DLC. It's mainly used in the tooling industry on aluminum cutters or on aluminum forming dies since the friction coefficient is similar to teflon and there won't be weld issues like aluminum cutting with a TiAlN or TiN cutter. It's also about as hard as a diamond and is microns thick. There is sputter, and cathodic arc disposition, the latter being better imo (having used and tested all types in tool and die industry and on my blades-see my profile pics for examples). It's also used in medical equipment and in racing on cams valves etc. It's not a high heat coating like TiAlN so it can be applied to soft substraits that can't handle heat, like aluminum or brass, which is why it works on items like the valves. For steel, it's better to go with a higher temp PVD or a multi layer PVD. Been using this stuff and in concert with places like Sputtek engineering on these coatings for about 12 years now, I actually recommended DLC to Darren a while back and was ignored, but it looks like hes found a similar solution.
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  • + 2
 DLC as in the same as on KML Chains?
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  • + 1
 Had the identical thought, that it's small media shot peened, then a standard DLC... dunno, would still think so considering what they're advertising is improved sticktion and durability (though surface hardness is the ultimate giveaway there)
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  • + 3
 @atrokz: Send me one of those knives!! Please and thank you.
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  • + 1
 @tehllama: Yes. I use a mixed media prior to DLC, as DLC will have the same surface finish going in as coming out. I use a mix of glass bead and alu oxide fine grit. Gives me 32Ra and a great look.

@mikealive Place and order and I will! Wink
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  • + 3
 @atrokz: Place an order where?
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  • + 2
 @gonecoastal: "DLC as in the same as on KMC Chains?"
FTFY
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  • + 4
 Have any of you seen anyone at the bike park running an Elevensix?
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  • + 9
 I was in mammoth last weekend and saw a bunch of them, yes. I talked to a couple people with them and they absolutely loved them.
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  • + 8
 I personally run one on my bike at the bike park. If you go to trestle like half the bikes have one.
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  • + 2
 I know one that just got a kingdom ti frame with one and was uplifting last weekend, so yea..
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  • + 6
 I have seen several at Winter Park and Steamboat bike parks here in Colorado.
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  • + 6
 Lots of them in the CO bike parks.
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  • + 5
 sure have. last season too.
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  • - 1
 over £900 here in the UK for one, so not worth it
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  • + 11
 Wow that sarcastic question really backfired a little there.
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  • + 1
 I would like to know the average price they payed
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  • + 2
 @donpinpon29: I am sure most got the 'bro deal'. Bike shop employees or 'I know a guy' discounts.
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  • + 2
 @poah: Maybe, but people pay that for forks all day long. Same amount of valving, adjustments but much smaller for a rear shock.
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  • + 4
 @bman33: I did not get a bro deal. But I do believe in supporting local businesses that make an innovative and top notch product.
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  • + 1
 @adrennan: Agree, my comment wasn't meant to dig on Push. I live in Denver and have had a few of my forks done by them. Love to have an 11/6 on my Bronson. See what Santa Claus brings me. Ha!! I do have two or three friends who work at shops and pro dealed them though
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  • + 1
 @adrennan:
Im just curious about the actual difference between msrp and the price that normal joes like me pay for some bike items. Im all in for small companies that produce top quality products in-house. back in the day I bought grafton, nuke-proof, etc...I wish I could support push, zerode, dvo and a couple other the way they deserve, hope to help them by spreading the word at least
I think 11-6 is a great product
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  • + 2
 @mgolder: not sarcastic at all. I run an 11-6 on both my HDR and Nomad, just curious if actual DH and bikepark'ers are using the 11-6 there
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  • + 1
 @bman33: I wouldn't pay £900 for a fork either
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  • + 2
 @poah: right on. However, thousands of have and do. To each his own
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  • + 0
 @bman33: really thousands have paid over £900 for fork.
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  • + 1
 @poah: not sure about Scotland. However, every other bike I see on the trail here in Colorado whether on DH or trail/XC is equipped with high -end forks. I think we get your point.. you never pay expensive forks or shocks. Just because you dont, doesn't mean the same for others.
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  • + 1
 @bman33: I'll
Happily pay for something if it's worth it. Only time you are going to pay £900 for a fork is if you buy a fox at rrp, my pike was under £500 so why spend another £400 for something that doesn't offer £400 of performance gain.
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  • + 3
 Every time I see a Push shock I have chills. Such a beautiful object!
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  • + 3
 Imagine when you get to look at your own beautiful bike with one mounted on it. And the moment that follows when you realize you really can't blame your equipment anymore for you pussying out on that one sick rock garden.
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  • + 4
 Wow, great job Push!
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  • + 2
 Mountain bike tube still exist?

Seriously though, it's nice to see ideas like the torque tool and boa seat bag.
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  • + 2
 Faster HSR on my 11-6. That is exactly what I want. Thanks Push. You'll be getting mine in the mail this off season!
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  • + 1
 Does Push still service old Maz. 888 forks? I need to get a new cartridge for mine as it's diving really bad lately
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  • + 1
 That 12 speed eagle cassette is ridiculously ginormus.
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  • + 1
 I was hoping that it would be called Sixshima or something...
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  • + 1
 Those seal presses are exactly the same as the ones Unior do.
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  • + 1
 I was looking for a seal press for Fox's stupid flangeless seals, which are apparently a PITA to push in straight compared to the old ones, and after getting close to spending $45 + shipping for one of the few seal press makers in the US that has the guide that slides down into the lowers (unlike the fox ones), I stumbled on the Unior ones - even with shipping from europe, they're half the price.

I wish Unior was bigger in the USA.
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  • + 2
 Gatorade bottle top usually fits pretty nicely, as an alternative.
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  • + 1
 @Canadmos: but the top doesn't have a guide that fits in the lowers. the guides make some of the more stubborn seals much easier to seat properly
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  • + 2
 @xeren: Their tools are superb quality, absolutely brilliant, I have quite a few of their tools. The new fox wiper seals are a mare to get in compared to the old ones, you have to line them up and with the wiper press hit it with a hammer sharply to get them started, should go in fine then. Be careful not to go past the top of the lower with them though, they are easy to lift back up though.
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  • + 1
 @zer0c00l44: thanks for the tips! i'm hoping these flangeless seals are worth all the trouble!
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  • + 1
 those cranks, bow chicka wow wow
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  • + 1
 Cosmic delboy...c o s m i c
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  • + 0
 Silca ripped off FIXT tools with their tool design.
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  • - 3
 I'd be pretty pi$$ed if i spent all that money on an 11/6, only to find it over-heats on a couple of runs down a bike park...
Wander if that would happen with a DHX2...?
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  • + 7
 From reading the blurb in this article, it sounds like the multi-run bike park application of the shock was slightly outside what Push was expecting for its users. Remember, this isn't a full on DH coil.

Kudos to Push for paying attention to consumers and actually evolving the product in a positive way. It even sounds like they're going to make some of these improvements available to people with older versions of the shock. Backwards compatibility in the bike industry! What a novel concept Smile
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  • + 4
 I ride one at trestle and it does great. it performs so much better than the cc dbair it replaced that even if it is experiencing over heating, I sure don't notice. They also have a great policy on upgrade which is a great selling point for them.
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  • + 2
 @CHawk68462: not sure its exactly a News Flash that people would use Nomads in the Bike Park is it? Why else would u buy a coil if not to get rowdy? To pedel uphill xc? I guess they were expecting users to buy another Shock in additon to this $1k one for the Park. *Or* they just got it wrong.
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  • + 2
 @Mojo348: kind of have to agree...seems like a misstep to me.
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  • + 2
 Just to clear the air and provide some input from someone who has use an 11/6 in whistler bike park for 2 years now...the shock works perfectly! Best purchase ever for my nomad. It works so well I sold my DH bike. It's probably the best suspension product made in years. And if I want to go pedal, I can flip the switch and put it into my climbing setting. It's seriously unreal. And if you buy a new bike, they'll reconfigure it to fit and service it just for the price of a service. Kind of a no brainier. People talk about the cost, but you literally have the best product and you can keep using it from bike to bike.
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  • + 1
 @theedon: might I ask what shock you were running previously on the nomad? I wouldn't say I'm thrilled with my CCDB Air, but it certainly shits all over the stock debonair.
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  • + 2
 @nvranka: yes I have a debonair. One of my best riding buddies is was also running a ccdbcs on his nomad. It's better than the debonair but not even close to the 11/6. It just tracks so well. It makes the bike come alive.
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  • - 3
 Is it just me or will that seat bag fall off first time you hit a bump?
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  • + 3
 It's just you. Tight BOA laces in my experience don't move or loosen unless they need to replaced (and I've never had one "pop out"), but BOA replaces for free, for the life of the product. I'd be more concerned about the laces potentially marking cutting into the rails over long period of time (maybe?).
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  • + 2
 @padrefan1982: Do they? I've seen several fail, and every time we had to order a new part. I never got the impression that there was any support.
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  • + 1
 @MeDuh: All I know is I've only run shoes with BOAs for going on 5 years now. When latching dials start to wear out, I go on to their site and go through the instructions for warranty parts, and get all brand new parts in a few days, completely free. As much as we complain about companies not supporting their products, BOA's won me over with support for life.

***I realized after my first post that I have completely broken a cable once, contrary to my first post. I used them as an experiment do see how long they'd last. They worked for a good two weeks for near daily use as they continued to fray, so had I warrantied them immediately, I never had an issue. And on a saddle bag, it should see far less wear and tear***
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