Adam Billinghurst's One Million Foot Trek Session 9.9 - Bike Check

Nov 27, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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Adam Billinghurst and his Trek Session 9.9 that he put 1 000 000ft of descending on in 57 days. Photo by Amy McDermid

How many vertical feet do you think you put in on your downhill bike in a year? Twenty thousand? Two hundred thousand? Maybe a million if you shuttle a lot? Whistler local Adam Billinghurst took the term ''park rat'' to new heights this summer when he managed to throw down one million feet of descending in just fifty seven days aboard his Trek Session 9.9. Let us break that down for you: If he was doing the same vertical every day - which wasn't possible due to the upper Garbonzo zone opening later in the summer - he would have had to descend 17,543 feet every single day for fifty seven days. So if your mountain offered 3,000 feet of elevation drop, you would end up having to do nearly six runs every day for fifty seven straight days. There's a good chance that your local hill down the road isn't Whistler, though, and anyone who has spent time in the WBP knows just how rough and beat the trails can be, even early in the season. Billinghurst's one million foot goal, which he reached while on his favourite section of No Joke, took an equal mix of measured riding and macho bravado to accomplish without any major injuries and in the time frame he aimed to do it in. The other part of the equation is equipment, with any major failures adding up to lost saddle time in a best case scenario, or injuries at worst. And speaking of equipment, his lofty goal also proved to be an ideal opportunity for RockShox to put their new prototype BoXXer internals to the test, with the amount of riding that Billinghurst planned to do also acting as a form of extremely accelerated testing.

bigquotesAs the park opens up higher and higher it gets easier to post bigger numbers, and if you could ride from the peak from day one it would take less time. For the first month, you can only get just over 1,100 feet per lap, however, the more you ride the better the chance you have of getting hurt. I feel like it's a game of survival.
Billinghurst's Session 9.9:

• Production Session 9.9 frame
• Rear wheel travel: 210mm
• Frame material: carbon front triangle,   aluminum chain stays
• Fork: RockShox BoXXer with   prototype internals
• Shock: Production RockShox Vivid   R2C
• SRAM 10 speed drivetrain
• Truvativ X0 DH carbon cranks
• Avid Code brakes
• Bontrager wheels
• Bontrager G2, G4, and G5 tires w/   tubes


Parts replaced:

• Seven tubes
• Eight sets of tires (one set per week)
• Four sets of sintered Avid Code brake   pads
• Three sets of grips
• Two SRAM X0 rear derailleurs
• One Truvativ X0 crank arm
• One Bontrager rear rim
• One Bontrager freehub body





Adam Billinghurst s Trek Session 9.9 that did one million vertical feet of descending in the Whistler Bike Park over just 57 days. Photo by Amy McDermid
  The BoXXer on Adam's Session was fitted with prototype internals - note the different compression and rebound dials at the top and bottom of the right side fork leg.

Suspension: The accelerated long term testing laid down by Billinghurst over those fifty seven days takes on special meaning when talking about the suspension bolted to the front of his bike, which was a very non-production BoXXer fork that has been fitted with a special prototype damper. RockShox wouldn't admit to anything when questioned about what exactly is going on inside Adam's fork, but it doesn't take a genius to figure out that it is likely a long-stroke version of the Charger damper that is used in the new Pike, especially given that we've seen precisely that employed by both racers who are under the BlackBox umbrella and a few lucky freeriders at the Red Bull Rampage. It's certainly well within reason to assume that RockShox saw an opportunity to put the new damper, which is expected to reach production for 2015, to the test by having Adam put one million feet on it in just fifty seven days in the Whistler Bike Park, a theory that is backed up by inspecting the fork's single compression and rebound dials that appear to be identical to those at each end of the Pike.

The opposite leg of the fork held a coil spring for the large majority of the fifty seven days, with Billinghurst preferring the small bump sensitivity that it affords over an air spring, especially when taking into account hand fatigue during long days in the bike park. Preventative maintenance is key for a project like this, but he still put in two hundred and fifty runs before having the fork or shock looked at, and Billinghurst told us that even then it was more to take a look at how the fork's prototype damper was faring than to perform any serious repair work.
bigquotesI play with my suspension quite a bit, and only having a single compression dial at the top of the prototype BoXXer makes that easy. My hands hurt quite a bit while I was doing this, so I'd often turn my compression all the way off for the first couple laps of the day to make it as soft as possible until my hands warmed up.
The RockShox Vivid R2C on the back of Billinghurst's Session began life with a completely stock "medium-medium" rebound and compression tune, but it wasn't long before it was fitted with custom valving to suit his unique needs. This was done by Shawn Cruickshanks, a SRAM tech who runs Fluid Function, a local suspension service center, who explained that Billinghurst ''liked the small bump sensitivity but wanted a little more support when he hit things hard,'' which required a bit stiffer of a tune. ''Adam charges and could ordinarily run a heavier tune, but because he was doing this marathon, I didn’t want to over-tune and cause any unnecessary fatigue,'' he went on to say. There was also the need to keep Billinghurst rolling day in and day out regardless of any maintenance that needed to be performed, which is why he had two Vivid R2C shocks done up with matching tunes, thereby allowing him to swap the shock out without any down time that would have prolonged his effort.

Adam Billinghurst s Trek Session 9.9 that did one million vertical feet of descending in the Whistler Bike Park over just 57 days. Photo by Amy McDermid
  One million feet and two derailleurs and a crank arm later.

Drivetrain: What does one million feet of descending do to a drivetrain? While Billinghurst obviously spent more time coasting on his downhill bike than a rider putting in less vertical but earning their turns would have, that much downhilling in the Whistler Bike Park puts its own unique demands on components. Derailleurs are especially vulnerable in such settings, with stumps and rocks seemingly able to reach out to tag them regardless of how much room you think you might have. The latter was responsible for taking out one short cage X0 unit on the back of Adam's bike, while a second was retired when a hard bottoming moment extended the derailleur's cage past the point of no return, although blame for this could likely be put down to a chain that was short a few links. Fifty seven days of early season riding also required a few gear cable changes to keep the bike's shifting on point, but anyone who has spent a good amount of time in B.C. knows all about that sort of thing.

Did you spot the mis-matched Truvativ X0 crank arms on Billinghurst's bike? ''One of my pedals came loose in the crank without me realizing it, and then I over jumped a gap and landed to flat really hard,'' he explained. Those two factors conspired to pull the threads out of the crank's aluminum insert, which obviously meant that the arm had to be replaced. His bike was equipped with a 36 tooth 'ring from start to finish, and he told us that he had no derailments or issues with the Truvativ X0 chain guide.

Adam Billinghurst s Trek Session 9.9 that did one million vertical feet of descending in the Whistler Bike Park over just 57 days. Photo by Amy McDermid
  How many flat tires would you expect to get during a million feet of descending? Adam had just seven in total.

Wheels and Tires: Being the rear wheel on a downhill bike wouldn't be a good life, but that gets multiplied ten-fold when you're the rear wheel on Billinghurst's one million foot project bike. Not surprisingly, he needed to replace the rear rim once, along with a having both ends trued a few times during the effort, but that much is to be expected given the amount of descending that he squeezed into such a short time span. A more unexpected failure occurred when his freehub gave out partway through the undertaking, requiring a swap for Billinghurst to continue on.
bigquotesWhen I test new product I always like to go back and ride the old product after a few weeks to give me more perspective on the differences and improvements.
You might be surprised to hear that he set up his bike with tubes rather than a possibly more reliable tubeless system, but going that route begins to make more sense when you learn that he changed out to new rubber at the beginning of every week. That adds up to eight sets of tires in total, and running tubes meant that swapping out tires wasn't as time consuming and messy as it could have been if he had gone with sealant. What about flat tires? Adam only suffered seven flats in total, an astonishingly low figure that converts to just a single flat every 142,857 feet of descending, although he does admit that he runs more air pressure than many riders his size - 32 PSI out back and 31 PSI up front, with cross-country and mid-weight tubes. Installing new tires every week likely also played a role in keeping him up and running, with his bike using a mix of Bontrager's G4 and new G5 tires, as well as the insanely fast rolling G2 option for the chainless A-Line race.

Adam Billinghurst s Trek Session 9.9 that did one million vertical feet of descending in the Whistler Bike Park over just 57 days. Photo by Amy McDermid
  Big numbers meant that the bike was fitted with large rotors and sintered pads front and back.

Brakes and Cockpit: Billinghurst used the same set of Avid's four piston Code brakes throughout the endeavor, although new fluid was run through them a few times between day one and day fifty seven to keep their power and consistency at peak levels, an important part of the bike's maintenance considering the high speeds and big moves that Adam is known for. Brake pads should certainly be considered a consumable for the average rider, and with Billinghurst riding faster and more often than the weekend warrior or even the dedicated park rat it's not surprise to learn that he burned through four sets of sintered brake pads - we would have likely guessed a higher number - and one rear rotor that was damaged on a rock early on. He reported no issues with hoses or broken levers despite a number of good sized crashes.

Adam Billinghurst s Trek Session 9.9 that did one million vertical feet of descending in the Whistler Bike Park over just 57 days. Photo by Amy McDermid
  A view that Billinghurst saw a lot of over those fifty seven days.

The bike's cockpit is all about long term reliability over saving weight, with no carbon fiber to be found up front. A Truvativ Boobar that has had 10mm removed from each side to measure in at 760mm is held in place with a 50mm Holzfeller direct mount stem, and a lack of spacers makes up for having his BoXXer's stanchions at near full extension in the fork's crowns. A trustworthy GPS unit was an absolute must for the effort, something that could be a bit of a challenge when you consider the abuse that his bike was put through over those fifty seven days, so Billinghurst ended up running a Garmin Edge 500 as his main computer and a Suunto Ambit as a backup.
bigquotesI broke the million foot mark on the best section of No Joke, just below the Creekside gondola and above the containers, but I rode in fear that entire last day while just trying to stay rubber side down. We celebrated with some beers at the GLC after, and then I took a week off the bike after I was done.


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188 Comments

  • + 193
 wow avid brakes that lasted that long!!!!!!
  • + 16
 I would like to know how many times they were bled and the forks/shock serviced. Prob just the standard 100 hours, but it would be interesting to know.

Edit two hundred and fifty runs but it could have been longer
  • + 7
 And the front rotor survived a million descend! Surprised.
  • + 72
 Pinkbike for some obscure reason seams never to really cover Shimano parts in their write ups. Would love a bit of shimano love here and there.
  • + 185
 probably gonna get mega negged for this but... if you look after your avid brakes i.e. bleed them regularly, service caliper internals of levers and calipers when they need it they will last ages. Just seems everybody wants brakes you can strap to your bike and forget about. HELLO they're brakes, one of the most if not THE most important safety features of your bike LOOK AFTER THEM and they will look after you!!
  • + 53
 Why would you get mega nagged? Probably one of the most relevant comments on pink bike this week.
  • + 5
 Yeah, I have a set of elixirs, came standard on my trek. They only -sort of- work. No power, and sometimes the lever will just come back to the bar. Took them back to the shop, and the shop says theyre fine. thats what they're supposed to be like..... So I'm now back to using the set of hopes I've had for 4 years and never even had to bleed.
  • + 3
 hey barn, i know some people like them but ime experience they arent up to the abuse, In the Alps last year the Sram tech fixing my mates codes said the same thing, after daily bleeds he lent him a pair of deores! for the rest of the week, I like the idea of a mega-negga though!
  • + 90
 @ the-barn: "Just seems everybody wants brakes you can strap to your bike and forget about."
You just described Shimano brakes.
  • + 2
 I am not saying you cant just set/bleed and forget, but we all will be guilty of leaving it one more day. Its nice to know how long you can leave it and go for a ride instead.
  • + 9
 I've had a set of Juicy 7s they were fantastic, had to bleed them every few months, but then i stuck on some Goodridge braided hoses and never had to bleed them again, lots of power and feel. Because of how good the Juicys were i bought some Elixr CRs, first thing i did was put on Goodridge braided hoses and some superstar kevlar pads, huge amounts of stopping power and haven't needed to bleed my brakes since fitting them. That said Avid's factory bleeds are terrible, but the-barn is right, if you want anything, not just the brakes to last on your bike you need to look after it and service it regulary
  • + 11
 Yeah I don't have an issue with bleeding but bleeding Avid's is a bitch. Shimano brakes use mineral oil and do not require frequent bleeds. When you do bleed them it's easy. I agree with proper service but I do prefer to not have to bleed all the time.
  • + 5
 I just want to see some brakes that use dot 5 (not 5.1). I guess they don't because the fluid absorbs air instead of water, making it had to get the right feel, but when you do get it you have a noncorrosive hydrophobic fluid that can handle higher temps than that hydrophilic stuff. All be benefits of shimano with no drawbacks!
A few years ago I put it in some avid juicy 5's. No bleeds, no rebuilds, fluid is still purple when I checked it last summer. People said I was crazy for risking ruining the brakes, but it paid off.
  • + 2
 Honestly I think the best part about mineral oil is that it's harmless. Even if you manage to get it all over the place you just wipe it off. It's one thing to dribble DOT fluid on the brake caliper of a car, but I don't want it causing aesthetic damage to my bike. And it smells. F*** DOT fluid for bikes.
  • + 0
 They don't use it because of feel. You think Avid's are spongy now ?
  • + 1
 A touch spongy, but still very predictable. I want to try it on a more gravity built bike since the bike i did it on is an xc rig and doesn't put as much strain on its brakes. Maybe I'll switch them out to my enduro rig next summer and go to the park.
  • + 3
 Hammm cant really blame them for this one though, its out of pinkbikes control that Billinghurst is the guy to ride 1million vert, and just so happens to be sponsored by sram
  • + 1
 It's my understanding that you can not carefully bleed them and get them to feel right. The fluid is slightly compressible because air is "dissolved" in the fluid, because bicycle brakes are so small I think they would be very sensitive to this. DOT 5 is not used for motorcycle racing or even recommended for sporting motorcycles.
  • + 1
 That makes sense, but we will see.
  • + 4
 114 bleeds
  • + 1
 Where's the strava deets, bro?!
  • + 4
 He does have a Strava.
  • - 5
flag Martinezorlando (Nov 27, 2013 at 11:41) (Below Threshold)
 its cool for him,but its not that big of feet,many rider's have done more on way harder tera forma so no prof,so any bike wood be wreck by that much use.
  • - 4
flag corywilliam (Nov 27, 2013 at 12:04) (Below Threshold)
 how many tires did he go through?
  • + 1
 It says in the article one set a week.
  • - 5
flag hairy1976 (Nov 27, 2013 at 14:48) (Below Threshold)
 Read the article before asking stupid question corywilliam, but what bike did he do it on thats whet i wanna know :-(
  • + 3
 Not sure ... but it reminds me of a bike Ive seen before...
  • + 1
 Man, I died. Please revive the most irritating meme on Pinkbike.
  • + 2
 Why is everyone lipping sram? They're amazing
  • - 1
 Their crank interface is not that good. give me shimano pinchbolts anytime. otherwise, yeah I like them too.
  • + 0
 taletotale, it's DOT 5.1 or DOT 4. It's not DOT 5, as that's used by the military.
  • + 1
 "Read the article before asking stupid question corywilliam, but what bike did he do it on thats whet i wanna know :-(" .....shaking my head
  • + 1
 Dot 5 is for sale at your local autoparts store. Not 5.1. 5.1 is hydrophilic and therefore corrosive. DOT 5 is not corrosive. I know what i'm talking about.
  • + 1
 I guess I'm lazy and a poor mechanic. I want everything on my bike to be set and forget. But then I run super thick tubes with sealant at max psi so I get no flats ever. I seem to be in the minority. Why have a metal insert in the crank and make it out of aluminium? I love my steel inserts on my current cranks have lost several cranks to stripped threads.
  • + 6
 You guys are bleeding this Avid thing dry. Badum boom...
  • + 1
 choppertank3e - you should get a full UST tire/rim and put the heavy duty tubes w/ sealant in them. Just to be 100% sure... Wink
  • + 1
 they make solid rubber tubes. . .
  • + 1
 That trek must be so scratched and worn..anyone know how many times he crashed?
  • + 1
 The Barn I have Code 5's on my bike, havent bled them in a year and a half and they are the best feeling brakes I have ever ridden. IMO better modulation than shimano, and DOT fluid works better in the cold than Mineral Oil. See no reason to make the switch.
  • + 36
 lucky dude if he rides in Europe (not UK) he would have to make a million meters, just because he chose the target: 1.000.000 .....
  • + 10
 Man that ride still looks better than my new bike after 40-50 shuttles or so and months of regular riding.
  • + 39
 People on Craigslist be like: Trek session 9.9 for sale. Selling due to lack of use...
  • + 10
 bichudumatu - I think you mean that he would've had to ride 1,000,000 meters because the country he rode it in uses the metric system. If that's the case, Canada uses the metric system.
  • + 25
 Did you really just say: lucky him he didn't have to ride his bike three times as much?
Having to ride a down million meters sounds like the kind of problem I want to have.
  • + 6
 In grade school we use metric, but most people still use imperial for everything else. In construction everything is done in imperial except when it is a job paid for by the government and all the plans are done in metric. When you buy materials from a lumber yard everything is in imperial although you could ask for it in metric and most people wouldn't know what you are talking about.
  • + 1
 I went to my lbs a couple weeks ago for some headset spacers. I asked for 3/8" and the guy behind the counter thought I was speaking a different language.
  • + 1
 puddings right its fucking annoying.
  • + 1
 Building materials - 360 Million Americans versus the metric demands of 36 million Candians - what do you think they are going to produce at the factory? But I agree it is annoying.
  • + 4
 360 million americans vs how many other people in the world?
  • - 1
 But canada and the usa share a lot of lumber.
  • + 3
 Lol! Sounds just like the UK! Everyone is taught the metric system, and it makes total sense, but we still insist on using imperial too!
You drive 3 miles, but you run 5km! (maybe because it sounds more impressive!)
Not sure anyone under 50 could tell you how many yards there are in a mile...??!!
And just to confuse things further US Gallons are different to Imperial UK Gallons...whatever a Gallon is?!
  • + 4
 My jalopy get 5 rods to the hog's head, and that's the way I likes it!
  • + 35
 Bike for sale: Trek Session, used only two months, new crank and tires. Call Adam for details.
  • + 30
 I got 1,5 million in 111 days ahahaha. My bike is for sale too...
  • + 3
 I always wondered how much you descended in WBP
  • + 2
 I have done over 1000 laps. Apparently the record from all times in Whistler
  • + 2
 Did any parts of your Bike brake?if Yes,which
  • + 21
 running the math on that one, the distance covered on the chairlift alone would have been around 1100km!!!! (given he was on lapping Fitzimmons and Garbonzo) so trail distance would be at least double if not triple.

a^2 +b^2 = c^2

a=3.8km (distance as the crow flys from base to top of garbonzo)
b=1.1km (Elevation change, actually 1.097km or 3600')
c=Length of Chairlift

√(3.8^2 + 1.1^2)=c=1,111.1
  • + 18
 darn. im not good on math.
  • + 39
 Look out, Pythagorus at large
  • + 5
 i showed my math teacher this and made me props it
  • + 0
 isnt c 3.95Km
  • - 1
 Isn't he only concerned with the vertical component though? The distance the chairlift moves horizontally shouldn't be included in the measurement of vertical feet travelled...
  • - 1
 i dont know, but if its 3.956Km and each run is twice that length 3.956x2x57 thats 450Km, I wonder what his gps says. he could hit the half a million Km mark, that is insane. so is 1,000,000 feet of descent
  • + 2
 He's using the simple Pythagorean theorem, which deals with the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle (c), and a and b represent the side lengths of said triangle. So imagine the mountain as a triangle, with the "as the crow flies" distance of the trail as one side and the elevation difference as another side.
  • + 5
 Too complicated for me. I just can ell you I got lucky enough to ride over 1000 laps, 111 days and about 1,5 millions vertical feet drop. I spent about 100m in the air every lap so almost 1km the air every day... and that was fuckin awesome !
  • + 1
 wow.
  • + 4
 ahahahahahaha i love this a bunch of grade 9s telling every one whats up
  • + 4
 Oh. My. God.
So, not only are we supposed to believe that a triangle can have a hypotenuse about three hundred times longer that both catheti together, also, the square root of ~4*4+1*1 (=15) is 1111.1. And even if we were so generous as to assume he was confusing commas and decimal points in both these examples, the math would still be off by a factor of ~3.14159 in both cases. So he probably devided by Pi at some point, which probably made sense at the time.

Then there is the genious explaining that the rider covered 1 million feet vertical (~300 km) has by now probably ridden 500000 km, or in other words: traveled around the world twelve and a half times. Or, to use terminology more relevant to the cyclist, 2136 times the distance from Whistler to steed cycles in North Vancouver - and back. Which, at an average speed of maybe 30 kph, took him the entirety of 16600 hours, or just under 23 months.

I think we have found ourselves two strong canididates for the Nobel mathematics price, if there was such a thing. And I would like to recommend myself for the Pulitzer Price, as recognition for my extended journalistic effort in uncovering the wrongness of someone on the internet. Because arguing on the internet is a win-win situation.
  • + 20
 Mark Weir climbed 1,000,000 feet in one year. Never got the praise he should have for that feat. This guy's accomplishment is insignificant in comparision
  • - 1
 This guys no Mark Weir. Just a lift rat. Probably doesn't have a chain.
  • - 7
flag tetonlarry (Nov 27, 2013 at 10:23) (Below Threshold)
 Apples to Oranges. Climbing 1,000,000 feet in one year sounds absolutely terrible. Descending 1,000,000 feet at Whistler sounds amazing. Why would anyone climb that much when lifts and trucks exist? How does Mark Weir's accomplishment make Adam Billinghurst's accomplishment insignificant. They are two very different goals. The amount of risk involved to do what Adam did is so much higher than what Mark did.
  • + 8
 " The amount of risk involved to do what Adam did is so much higher than what Mark did"

How so? What goes up comes down. Weir can descend like a beast. Plus descending those million feet all tired and fatigued is the definition of sketchy.
  • + 3
 Lets see Mark Weir climb a million feet in 57 days. Then I'll be impressed.
  • + 0
 The amount of physical strain on the muscles to climb 1,000,000 in a year is greater than that to descend in 57. As in physics, it is easier to down than up. Throw a ball up and the physical strain is harder on your arm. When it comes down, there is less strain (in this case there was no strain, but in Adam Billinghurst's case, there was the jumps, drops, etc.)
  • + 12
 Lucky dude that his body is strong enough to be able to ride for 57 days in a row. My back starts to seriously ache after the 2nd day of riding. And I'm in a really fit condition (9% bodyfat, work out every single day, only eat healthy, and use my fixed gear to commute for anything that's within 20km). It's just my spine that is very weak due to some old injuries and is unable to heal back well ever again. Most people around me would probably also not be able to do this physically.

The second thing that he's so lucky about, is that he can ride is bike every single day for almost 2 months and to be able to live.
It seems like he didn't have time to work and make money in that period?

I'm wondering how much fun he had overall doing this.
Most of the time this is the most awesome idea you can think of.
But when it's raining, you're having a shit day, or you don't feel well or like riding all day again, it must have some moments that you ride without actually enjoying it:
when you don't ride because you want to, but because you have to.


All in all, I have mad respect for the guy for doing this!! Beer
It's a great achievement!!
  • + 10
 In one of his vid segments he states how anyone can have his life, they just have to have no job and ride all summer. Doing the maths on it makes you realise its a load of rubbish unless you work like mad all winter to pay for food or accomodation and then the expense of a dh bike. so anyone can have his life if they can earn enough to live all year in 8 months and have sponsorship for bikes and gear for the other 4 months. So its a bit misleading
  • + 2
 Seems like the kind of scheme trek would pay for for the publicity. I volunteer for the next one!
  • + 1
 Very possible to do. Just have to have the right career. I am in the office an average of 2 days per week so ride 5-6 days per week all summer and can afford the trick ride. Other buddies are doing the same.
  • + 3
 It's called Northern Alberta. LOTS of whistler bike dirt bags do it. Big $$$ in the nastiest weather (-40C and driving wind and snow) all winter to be a bike bum all summer. Can make 10K a month in the right job.
  • + 1
 True, over $5000 take home every 12 days when I left.
  • + 1
 couple buddies have kids up north one made $140K 1st yr , the other is taking home $6700 a month clear
  • + 1
 What jobs do they have that they earn that much money? My best bet with my job is to go to Shanghai or Tokyo and earn about 10.000 to 20.000 USD in 2 months. But here in Europe and the USA I can hardly make as much as a kid flipping burgers and I have much higher costs to be able to work
  • + 2
 What the hell do these people do to earn that much cash?
its hardly easily done if it involves landing a job with those salaries every winter.
i think the only way to make that cash here is by selling death to kids
  • + 1
 They are talking about Canadian Dollars, which is only worth about half of what GBP is worth, but those are still really high numbers they are making there with what seems to be non-serious jobs they only do in the winter, instead of job whereworking full-time all year long is required to make a career with it?
  • + 1
 jobs that risk your life: ice road trucking, oil fields, fishing vessels, underwater welding, all pay very well.
  • + 1
 What job do you have that you can ride that much? I'd like to look into that!
  • + 1
 one works on the rigs in Alberta and the other works for Cummings up in Fort Mack
  • + 13
 "I only ride park."
  • + 2
 "I am faster than you!"
  • + 7
 Something stinks here! Easton havoc rim at 2:06 in the video! Did trek pay him to claim he did it on bontragers or did he swap out wheels for a day or what?
  • + 3
 To those in charge of preaching BS to the masses, this needs an answer...
  • + 4
 Great article Pinkbike. Are you planning on going more in depth on this subject. For instance, did he pull the bike apart and look at the pivot bearings. How are the hubs, headset and BB running? Was he using the power washers at the base to wash his bike? Is he replacing tires once a week because they are completely worn, or just because he gets free tires? 16 tires in 57 days would be ridiculously expensive. What was his average mph? Seems to me like there is a lot of data that could be analyzed that was not discussed in this article. How did the fork and shock fare?

What are we not being told? I find it hard to believe that he didn't have more issues than what was discussed here. One rim? no way. This is Whistler and Adam is a hardcore shredder. If he broke a frame, they would never tell us. Same with components. According to this article, nothing failed except for parts that are expected to fail occasionally.
  • + 1
 BIllinghurst: www.strava.com/athletes/159540

A-line - 5th fastest: 38.1 lmph average. www.strava.com/segments/688689

Adam is a great guy, very humble and a dedicated, skilled and fast rider. Props to him for seeing the opportunity to do it (recorded) first and get sponsored to do so.
  • + 3
 @tetonlarry

Of course they aren't going to post that information. This is a Trek and SRAM marketing "article" or advertisement, nothing more.
  • + 1
 @amrskipro: Adam is 5th fastest on Strava, but his average speed is 23.7 MPH which is 38.1 KPH. 38.1 MPH average speed on A-line is so impossible. There is no way you could hit all of the jumps going that fast and not die.
  • + 2
 i like how people are saying their avids were good after they put new hoses and pads in after a bleed once they bought them, just buy shimano and forget about them and just change the pads every time they get low, avid stuff is poo
  • + 2
 Hey, that's awesome! I really tried to make the point on the original article that talked about his million feet that there needed to be follow-up on the bike and the parts. Someone obviously agreed with me, and so they did it. Great! Good information all around!
  • + 1
 Thats a crazy goal. Its like going to Hawaii and try to ride a millions of waves... its amazing to see a goal like that being broke. Here in Brazil we dobt have bike park with lifts so its impossible to think about it. What will be his next goal?
  • + 0
 If you go to Hawaii between Dec and February you'll be lucky to get 1 wave let alone a million.
  • + 1
 I'm seriously wondering if this wasn't a branding scheme with Trek, Sram, Rock Shox, Truvativ and Avid. Hahahaha, I mean it's perfect- we're going to do an article on how our components and bike can tolerate 1 million vertical and have few scuffs a long the way. It's smart but seems pretty in your face.
  • + 2
 He is sponsored by them so I don't think there's any reason to think otherwise. That's how videos get made and people get free shit.
  • + 1
 Of course that is what this is!
  • + 1
 I road 56 days in whistler bike park in 2011. Averaged about 7 to 9 runs a day, from garbo, on a giant glory wth a fox 40, Juicy 7 brakes, and 3C maxxis minions. I didn't have a vert feet goal, I was there to complete my guide training and instructor course and ride as much as possible. I had similar experiences with my parts and suspension, brake pads, tires, fox 40 service every 2 weeks, etc. Well done Adam. I'll see you up there next summer.
  • + 1
 I did in 2005 and 2006 around this amount of vertical per year in the French Alps and 2 weeks in Whistler. I had a 888 at the time and a Fox DH5.
I had no problem with the fork nor the rear shock.
I killed around 7 or 8 rear tyres and around 8 brake pads just for the rear. I had Hope Ti6 brakes and I didn't have to bleed them once during the season.
No problems with my Mavic 321 (at the time).
I killed 7 rear derailleurs in the season not on rocks or anything just problem with the spring and other parts in the deailleurs. But they were cheap like Shimano 105 or Deore.
I had maybe one or 2 flat with maxxis double ply and big DH maxxis tubes in it.
  • + 1
 That was awesome. Every bad scenario was played out in front of him....... On your right! That goes to show that the Sony cam captures sound quite well. Million feet of vert. with a few flats and a few broken parts. The Man is riding smooth!
  • + 1
 Nice, I am amateur 42 years old living in Colorado high country so season is short about 3 month I have every year about 1 200 000 to 1 600 000 Vertical feet ...have nice day :-)
  • + 1
 i work 2 jobs, have rode my bike for 9 of the 12 days of the local bike park being open sneaking runs in when i can between jobs and have clocked up 43920ft and the whole mountain opens tomorrow
  • + 1
 Who cares about forks,settings,brakes or any of that boring shit. The dude did a million foot decent, riding his bike every day that's what matters! Fair play to you dude. Wish it was me.
  • + 1
 Awesome article. It would be great to see more articles like this that take an in depth look at a particular riders bike and individual set up to compliment the more broad reviews of new bike models. Great job on this PB.
  • + 3
 I'll die a happy man if I ever reach 1 million vertical feet in my lifetime. Especially now that I'm living in Houston :/
  • + 4
 What a truly gnarly bloke! 57 days non-stop. Duck me.
  • + 3
 He used Easton Havoc wheels, at least at the front, not Bontrager`s . Pause the video at 2:04.
  • + 2
 feel like im doing things wrong... i killed two rear rims in only 52 days riding in whistler. even with almost daily spoke tensioning.
  • + 2
 To be fair you probably really killed 5 or 6 seeing that you didn't swap them out until they were rectangular!!!!!
  • + 2
 2 rims in 52 days at Whistler is really good.
  • + 3
 You send me to Whistler and I'll do two million.
  • + 1
 That's a lot of riding . I would imagine hitting the trail that many times he would have been top 3 in times . I would have choosen the same bike to do it. Mercian made baby
  • - 1
 "and he told us that he had no derailments or issues with the Truvativ X0 chain guide" HA! I'm calling BS on that, just look at the reviews of that guide on CRC to see the amount of people who broke theirs. My brother broke his within 10 rides just riding the Shropshire hills and I'm just waiting for mine to fall apart.
  • + 1
 I'm curios about how many pivot bolts he went through in the seat stays and if he ever replaces any of his bearings in the rocker arm.
  • + 3
 Surprisingly little brakepads used!
  • + 2
 the name is very miss leading...
  • + 2
 am I gay, or do sessions look kinda funny with boxxers?
  • + 55
 both
  • + 4
 GatorLikesToRomp : Well I think the Trek's well and truly out, but I'd stay in the closet until you've decided pal.
  • + 2
 Although I believe mine does not look that bad almost every bike with a Fox 40 looks kind of more agressive...

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10365262
  • + 4
 The boxxer looks like a toy compared to the 40. Not saying anything about performance, I can't comment. Just looks.
  • + 1
 Might not believe it but the 40 gives you an extra portion of confidence when you aim at a rockgarden. Bought the bike with an old 40 but sold it because of the weight (I already owned a WC). I like both.
  • + 1
 How does that bike look so new after 1 million vert at Whistler!? That place hammerd bikes.
  • + 1
 No one seems to even care what Adam did... Nice work man!! Looks like it was a rewarding experience in the end.
  • + 2
 I think he left some out there...
  • + 2
 Bontrager rim and freehub body replaced...Not even surprised.
  • + 1
 I would have liked to have heard how long the grips on his handle bars lasted
  • + 3
 Looks like a Trek.
  • - 2
 wasn´t sure if I should write it Smile give that man a medal!!
  • + 3
 this is a sick bike
  • + 1
 Im man enough to admit I've never bled my 810's haha. They still feel awesome.
  • + 1
 This is the most inspiring movie in the last decade. A true mountain riders vid.
  • + 0
 Sounds like a publicity stunt to address sram's poor reputation for reliability.
  • + 2
 me gusta
  • + 1
 Sound like work instead riding a bike for fun. No thanks
  • + 1
 I want to know what kind of onboard unit you used to record data?
  • + 1
 I bet i can do it in less time.
  • + 1
 I bet he knows those trails better than the back of his hand.
  • + 1
 if he still has hands after the 1 billion braking bumps he would have gone over…
  • + 1
 Georgious looking bike and such an accomplishment! Way to go man!
  • + 1
 Awesome brother!!! How are the proto boxxer internals feeling?
  • + 0
 Kijiji: 2 Month old Trek DH bike for sale. Slightly used. Well maintained...
  • + 1
 No broken chainstays on a Trek, I find that hard to believe....
  • + 1
 I wouldn't want to buy that used bike!
  • + 2
 Big props dude
  • + 1
 Respect man... what kind of seat is that you ran and how did it hold up?
  • + 4
 I dont think adam's doing much sitting down in the bike park
  • + 1
 Ha!
  • + 1
 Chromag Trailmaster LTD
  • + 0
 Who cares...The IMPORTANT QUESTIONS are what angle the seat was set at?...and how extended was the post?

*rolleyes*
  • + 1
 I care.... I hate buying shitty seats, and there are a lot of shitty seats out there. I figure if this one has had a few crashes and a million feet it might be worth picking up.
  • + 2
 I think reddirtrides sarcasm meter is broken...
  • - 1
 I got the sarcasm, I just didn't get the point of it.
  • + 1
 Everyone quit their job and go do this!
  • + 1
 Just one X0 Crankarm was lost?

...Surprising
  • + 1
 very suspicious...i bet they forgot to put in a number
  • + 3
 Similar rig running Shimano=0 crank and mech failures, and likely no reason to bleed the brakes. Smile
  • + 4
 also note the easton havoc front wheel in 2:06.
  • - 1
 DARKSTAR63 No bleeding yor saints? mmm i think you are a bit wrong. With the manteinance of shimano the 1.000.000 foot would have taken 3 years
  • + 1
 I have to admit I have not yet bled my 810's, couple years of DH races on them Smile
  • + 3
 My 810s need a bleed very often; intead my elixirs 1 remain untouched

Maybe its just luck Razz
  • + 1
 Anyone know what saddle he was using?
  • + 1
 someone said a cromag trailmaster ltd..
  • + 1
 Cheers dude
  • + 1
 I didn't realize you can run a xo short cage derailuer with a chain guide?
  • + 1
 Well done fella. Next year attempt this same challenge at fort William.
  • + 1
 What a guy!
  • + 1
 The boner cam.....epic.
  • - 3
 If you ride your bike with out a seat....you might be gay.
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