Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO - Reviewed

Oct 14, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO 2014

Niner’s R.I.P 9 RDO is the carbon-framed version of its do-everything trailbike. Niner only makes 29-inch-wheel mountain bikes, and the company is perfectly happy with having the R.I.P RDO, or any bike it makes, compared to those of any wheel-size in their respective categories. On paper, with 125-millimeters of rear-wheel travel and its standard-issue, 130-millimeter-stroke fork, the R.I.P 9 RDO appears to be a warmed up cross-country bike, but its ride is comparable to a 140-millimeter-travel trailbike with conventional-size wheels. Niner backs up this premise with a notably all-mountain component spec which revolves around a SRAM XX1 one-by-eleven drivetrain that powers wide, American Classic wheels shod with large Schwalbe Nobby Nic tires. A RockShox Reverb dropper post and ISCG-05 chainguide mounts further underscore the bike’s purpose, and if one needs any more reminders, the R.I.P 9 RDO’s 800-millimeter carbon handlebar and 50-millimeter alloy stem should be enough. Niner offers the carbon RDO in small, medium, large and X-large sizes. Our test bike, built with Niner’s Five-Star SRAM kit and upgraded with the Fox 34 TALAS 140 fork, retails for $6899 USD. Niner also offers a Five-Star Shimano XTR build for $7399 and a ‘more affordable’ $5499 Three-Star version based upon Shimano XT components. Colors options are Rally Blue (our test model) and Licorice Black.


(From top) Niner uses large-diameter aluminum axles at each of
the suspension's main pivot locations. Splined nuts fit Shimano
cassette tools. An aluminum bash guard protects the lower link.
The upper link's pivot location prevents using an internally routed
dropper post cable. Note how close the 2.35-inch tire is to the
swingarm's reinforcing arch. The shift cables are routed through
Niner's cast-aluminum head badge. The plastic housing retainer
pulled out and caused a rattle.



R.I.P 9 RDO Highlights:

• Purpose: All-mountain/trailbike
• Carbon fiber frame and swingarm
• Carbon rocker links with oversized aluminum axles
• 125mm travel, CVA (Constantly Varying Arc) dual-link rear suspension,
• Shock: Custom-tuned Fox Float CTD, Kashima
• Fork: Fox 34 TALAS, 140mm stroke (RockShox Revelation 130mm is standard)
• Removable ISCG-05 chainguide mounts – frame is offset to clear DH guide mechs.
• 142/12mm ‘Maxle’ rear through-axle
• Frame clearance for tires up to 2.4 inches
• Accepts tapered-steerer forks with travel from 120 to 140-millimeters
• Weight: 12.24 KG (26.9 pounds) as tested
• MSRP: $6499 USD(with RockShox Revelation fork), $2899 (frame and shock)




R.I.P 9 RDO Construction

Niner builds the R.I.P 9 RDO chassis in Vietnam – which doesn’t surprise us, because Niner is a forward-thinking company that rarely follows the beaten path. Niner president Chris Sugai says that they opted to avoid the well-worn road to China’s composite factories when they had the opportunity to work with a new, state-of-the-art factory in Vietnam. The partnership gave them more control over its manufacturing process and the cooperative atmosphere there allowed Niner to open an independent quality control and testing facility there to further oversee their frame production. Sugai says the move took a measure of time to sort out, but the results were better than hoped for. Vietnam has been pressing for a share of the high-tech manufacturing market and, like Niner’s factory, new startup factories are investing in the latest machinery, revising their molding and adopting more effective manufacturing techniques which take advantage of lessons learned through China’s efforts to dominate the carbon fiber market. Witnessed by the quality of construction and the finish of Niner’s R.I.P 9 RDO, we expect to see more elite-level brands shift production to this rapidly developing nation.

Testing: Testing protocols are strict at Niner. The frames must pass both US and European standards, and are also put through rigorous stress and destruction testing at an independent laboratory in the US. In addition, Niner employs a staff of test ambassadors who thoroughly thrash the bikes in the real world. To eliminate the temptation of a premature product release, Niner long abandoned the traditional ‘model year’ marketing system. Without the pressure to have a ‘new and improved’ lineup every spring, Niner can release one bike at a time – and get the job done right.

Frame design: Fitting a frame between a pair of oversized wheels without growing the wheelbase to some outlandish proportion is tough to do when the design calls for five inches of rear-wheel travel. Niner’s CVA rear suspension allows for a surprisingly short 17.7-inch chainstay length because the lower rocker link swings beneath the bottom bracket shell. The same design aspect provides more room for big tires and, in the case of Shimano builds, clearance for a front derailleur. Stand-over height is minimized with a deep bend in the top tube, and while
our medium frame measured only 29.8 inches at the top tube’s lowest point, the steeply rising frame member is a potential nut crusher.

Clearing the rear wheel at full compression required Niner to trace the R.I.P 9 RDO’s seat tube around the arc of the tire – an exercise that results in a laid-back seat angle that effectively extends the bike’s top tube as the saddle is extended upwards. The theoretical seat tube angle is stated at 72.5 or 73.5 degrees, depending upon fork length, but those numbers will steepen or become slacker as the saddle height changes.

Cable routing of the R.I.P 9 RDO frame is both functional and fashionable, with most cables and hoses externally routed on a multitude of well-placed guide bosses that are bonded to the carbon chassis. The shift cables are routed internally, however, which cleans up the bike’s appearance somewhat, but seems to be more of a fashion statement, as the two cable housings, (or in the case of our SRAM XX1-equipped bike, one housing), conspicuously enter the frame through Niner’s cast-aluminum head badge. The rear derailleur housing pops out about a third of the length of the down tube, while the cable for the front mech exits between the bottom bracket and the suspension’s lower link where a plastic guide directs it to the proper angle.

Large aluminum axles at the suspension’s three most important pivot placements are retained by splined nuts which are designed to fit a Shimano Cassette tool. The rockers are carbon fiber and the lower one is protected by an aluminum bash plate. Because the lower and its bash guard extend below the circumference of the 32-tooth chainring, they also protect the very expensive sprocket from harm.

By Pacific Northwest standards, the Niner’s 69.5 degree head angle may seem too steep, but dedicated fork offsets for 29-inch wheels have relegated super-slack head angles for big-wheel bikes into the arena of fashion, as the naturally slower steering action of big wheels and the extended front center of a 29er chassis automatically create the necessary elements that super slack head angles imbue to small-wheel bikes. The R.I.P 9 RDO feels surprisingly well balanced when pressed hard in technical terrain.

Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO Geometry
Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO 2014 Geometry

Standout Components

Considering that the R.I.P 9 RDO weighs in under 27 pounds and is pegged as a capable AM/trailbike, most experienced riders will look for the ‘cheats.’ Where did Niner compromise reliability to cut weight? The answer is a little bit everywhere on the bike. We were skeptical about the R.I.P 9 RDO’s American Classic All Mountain 29 wheelset, which turned out to be up to the task. Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.35-inch tires are as lightweight as a monster tire can get and still feature sidewall protection. SRAM’s XX1 ensemble is a weight saver as well, as is Niner’s RDO carbon handlebar. The message is that Niner achieves a surprisingly low weight for its showcase trailbike by carefully choosing the lighter side of capable on every component selection, rather than exposing a potential weakness by opting for one or three foolishly lightweight parts to achieve the same goal. View Niner's complete XX1 spec here.



Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO 2014
  Niner's R.I.P. 9 RDO feels at home at the bike park - and doubles as an efficient XC/trailbike during the week.


Testing the R.I.P 9 RDO took place over nearly three months, while a small group of riders put the Niner through the wringer on everything from cross-country epics to jump sessions at the local DH trails. Two reviewers were DH racers who train on long-travel trailbikes – neither of whom had any time on a 29er, which proved to be key in assessing the R.I.P 9 RDO’s performance in comparison with popular 26 and 27.5-inch AM/trailbikes. Those who want the short version can rest knowing that Niner’s R.I.P 9 RDO comes awfully close to the fabled ‘one bike.’

Dialing in the bike: The medium size felt a bit long for our two, five-foot, nine-inch riders, but after a month of testing, nobody wanted to change it. I measure two inches shorter, but the raked-back seat tube effectively shortens the bike’s reach when the saddle is dropped, so with that and by pushing the saddle a centimeter forward on the RockShox Reverb seatpost, I also found a good fit. Even the best steering 29ers require a lot of input at the handlebar for low-speed corners, so as fashionably wide as its 800-millimeter carbon RDO bar is, we found it necessary to cut it down to 760 to speed up the steering response.


Harold Preston launches the R.I.P. 9 RDO out of a rock garden at
Mammoth Mountain. Preston was Pinkbike's Primary test rider
for our Niner review.

Suspension setup was remarkably insensitive. Which meant all we had to do was pressurized the fork and shock to achieve something close to 25-percent sag, dial in the rebound and go ride. Niner’s CVA rear suspension does not act to eliminate suspension movement while pedaling, but it does a great job of erasing any sense that the suspension has a negative effect on pedaling. The R.I.P 9 RDO’s fork and shock were both equipped with Fox’s CTD pedaling platform option, and most of us used the middle ‘Trail’ option on occasion to boost climbing performance, by rarely if ever, used the nearly locked out ‘Climb’ mode. It was not necessary. Interesting to note that both fork and shock felt balanced fore and aft, with no tendency to blow through the mid-stroke like Fox’s early CTD suspension did.

Pedaling and Acceleration: Pedaling was a bit draggy at low speed, but once the pace was quickened, the R.I.P. 9 RDO felt very efficient in all pedaling modes. Beyond the first three pedal strokes from a near dead stop, acceleration feels crisp and its big wheels make is easy to maintain momentum over almost any surface. This, and the fact that the R.I.P. 9 RDO is a light weight bike, ease the task of extended climbing – much to the dismay of the local cross-country Strava boys who were pushed off their podium spots by PB’s DH riders throughout the review period.

Technical Climbing: Plenty of traction is afforded by Schwalbe’s larger-than-life 2.35-inch Nobby Nic tires, the short-for-29er 17.7-inch chainstays and the effects of the big-wheels, so topping a technical climb is solely up to the rider. That said, the high handlebar position and ergonomics of the R.I.P. 9 RDO can get in the way when attacking abrupt climbs, like Moab’s many flat-to-vertical step-ups, or in the case of PB’s Southern California test trails, a surprise boulder roll-up. In those cases, the front of the bike gets in your face in a hurry. We found that anticipating step-ups by jumping out of the saddle and exaggerating our body position well forward was the savior move.

TALAS or not to TALAS: Niner chose to outfit our review bike with Fox’s adjustable-stroke 2014 TALAS fork. We liked it. The 34-millimeter stanchions feel stiff and its damping was well balanced throughout the performance envelope. We used all three of the CTD settings, with the adjustable compression feature of ‘Trail’ mode set in either the number one or number two positions. The RDO could be ridden in the open mode for the duration of a ride without feeling mushy under power or under-damped when descending through the boulders. The travel adjustment, however, was rarely utilized.

We experimented with the shorter travel position, which reduces the stroke by 30-millimeters and steepens the frame’s geometry by a degree, and while the option creates a slightly more efficient feel when climbing or riding on the flats, collectively, we opted to ride the R.I.P. 9 RDO for the duration of the test with the fork at its full, 140 millimeter stroke. Our advice for riders who want a little steeper, XC feel would be to order the R.I.P. 9 RDO with the 130 or 120-millimeter fork option and ‘run what you brung.’

CTD as intended: While it is probably too late for Fox to salvage CTD’s reputation, its 2014 suspension finally performs as promised. Niner’s CVA rear suspension eliminates most reasons for locking out the shock to firm up pedaling, so we only used ‘Climb’ mode for stints on pavement. ‘Trail’ mode, however, was quite useful, as it offers three choices for low-speed compression to tune the ride and pedal firmness. The benefit for using the Trail option with the Niner was that it caused the bike’s tail end to ride a little higher and freshened up the feel at the pedals when climbing, or when powering out of the saddle in any situation. Climbing irregular or loose sections, though, was always better with the suspension left wide open. We also used the Trail setting to add additional firmness to the suspension for mid-ride jump sessions. Fox finally got the high-speed damping fixed for CTD’s ‘Descend’ option. We could open the suspension up for DH runs and the bike would track beautifully. The R.I.P. 9 RDO has a balanced feel and retains its ride height when pressed hard.

Niner-RIP-9

bigquotes Like all big-wheel bikes, the R.I.P. 9 RDO needs to be leaned further than a 26-inch bike in nearly all cornering situations to scribe a similar arc around a corner.

Cornering: With a nod to Fox’s 29er-specific fork offset, Niner’s carbon AM/trailbike feels lighter and better balanced at the handlebar than some of the most touted 26-inch-wheel all-mountain bikes available today. The normally heavy and slow low-speed steering that we have come to expect from 29ers is not in the R.I.P. 9 RDO’s repertoire. It can deftly reverse direction in ridiculously small space, and it can be trusted to follow a tight line when threading around boulders and trees. At speed, the Niner drifts both tires evenly, scrubbing off speed in a very controlled manner. Its tail end can be pushed out when asked, but the chassis prefers to hold a line even in situations where traction is sketchy. Like all big-wheel bikes, the R.I.P. 9 RDO needs to be leaned further than a 26-inch bike in nearly all cornering situations to scribe a similar arc around a corner. In a berm-turn situation, however, where the effective lean angle is almost zero, there is no sense that the R.I.P. 9 RDO is a 29er.

Technical riding: The R.I.P. 9 RDO’s tallish front end, and its big front wheel and tire, make for an invincible descender in situations that would challenge everything but a big bike. The R.I.P. 9 RDO will roll improbable drops and rarely will drop into a hole that it can’t bounce out of. Its steeper-than-fashionable, 69.5-degree head angle does not erode from its descending skills and it may be a plus, because the RDO retains much of its steering qualities when it is pointed downwards, which can be a bacon saver when one’s initial line choice proves to be a fail.

Slow Motion: Playing at Ted Williams

Views: 15,274    Faves: 16    Comments: 2



The mid-travel Niner coasted over rock gardens and bomb holes with confident ease that suggested that it had more suspension travel than its physical numbers. Large-volume tires and big wheels seemed to work miracles most everywhere on the trails, but we found its limitations when we skied the R.I.P. 9 RDO over some 35-foot jumps. Jumping the R.I.P. 9 RDO became a pastime because it flies straight and lands gracefully – but we did bottom the suspension landing the big stuff. There is no fudging the fact that the R.I.P. 9 RDO has only 125 millimeters of rear-wheel travel when there is more sky than dirt under the bike.

Braking in technical situations was predictable and its Avid/SRAM X0 Trail brakes were strong stoppers. That said; we noticed that the R.I.P. 9 RDO’s tail end would skip under braking – an effect that was most common at higher speeds and while descending DH tracks where chatter-bumps are typical at corner entries. We pinned those effects to the Niner’s chassis design, as we have ridden 2014 Fox suspension on different bikes that have remained significantly quieter down the same trails.

Niner R.I.P. 9 RDO 2014 Components
  (From left) Fox tuned the RDO's shock to work in harmony with the CVA suspension. Niner specs a flat bar to keep the stack height of the bike as low as possible. Post-mount caliper bosses on the RDO's swingarm sport Avid X0 four-piston Trail calipers


Component Report

RDO Carbon Chassis: Good: Lightweight, laterally rigid under power and pedals efficiently. Its CVA suspension performs at the top of the AM/trailbike class. Bad: Some lateral flex in the rear end when pressed hard through rocks and deep ruts. Internal cable routing plugs came loose and rattled.

American Classic AM 29 wheels: Good: AC's wheels are lightweight, they stayed true, and the wide rims accelerate well and support the tires well. American Classic’s tubeless system never burped throughout the review. Bad: while AC’s innovative six-pawl freehub is bomb-proof, its ratchet points engage at 15-degree increments, which bothered some test riders.

Avid X0 Trail Brakes: Good: Very good modulation at high and low speeds and we never rode into a situation where we needed more stopping power. Both wheels remained drag free throughout the review period. Bad: Avid’s deep-section lever blades could be better shaped, as balancing the engagement point and lever reach for two-finger braking often caused the lever blade to contact the ring finger. The solution was to run the lever way inboard or deal with an engagement point that was adjusted farther out than optimal.

SRAM XX1: Good: You have XX1. Bad: You don’t have XX1. Niner spec’ed a 32-tooth chainring for the R.I.P. 9 RDO, which is fine for the most capable riders, but a 30-tooth chainring would have made this already good technical climber into an awesome one. The 29-inch wheels, boosted by Schwalbe’s high-volume tires, cover a lot of ground in one revolution, so the slightly smaller chainring would not steal much from the Niner’s top speed, while adding a useful bailout gear for tough climbs.

Niner-RIP-9
  Preston wrings out the RDO on the loose pumice soil of Mammoth Mountain. The carbon version of the R.I.P. 9 was very stable at speed.

Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesNiner's R.I.P. 9 RDO convinced two talented DH riders to shop for 29ers, but its magic is hidden in more places than its wheel diameter. Niner's elegant looking carbon trailbike may owe its balanced feel and capable handling to the fact that its designers did not overreach when they penned the RDO. Its moderate rear suspension travel allows for short chainstays and a stiffer linkage. Its carbon chassis follows Niner's proven lines and it uses suspension geometry that was time-tested by the RDO's aluminum predecessor. Perhaps the R.I.P. 9 RDO feels 'just right' because it is the ripened fruit of a long evolutionary cycle. Incremental improvements, like slightly modified frame numbers, proper fork offset and custom tuned suspension don't make headlines, but add them to a cross-country-weight carbon chassis and then wrap it in components just lightweight enough to fulfill the role of an all-mountain bike, and the resulting package makes the R.I.P. 9 RDO breaking news - especially for riders who want to dominate all of the mountain on one bike. -RC

Niner Bikes


194 Comments

  • + 110
 Hey everyone! lets all hate on 29er's and act like we are big bad free riders. While in reality, we don't ride anything like the way we talk. - your average PB poster.
  • + 6
 Lol! That's a good one.
  • - 45
flag vernonjeff (Oct 14, 2013 at 13:44) (Below Threshold)
 you can always tell the people who dont ride like they talk.. they ride 29ers.
  • + 16
 Most PB riders ride DH or freeride, according to their polls, but not every mountain biker out there is on PB and or taking their polls. If I was fortunate enough to be around DH riding, I would have a 26" and love it but I live in an area that is almost all singletrack and XC and nothing rides better than a 29er for those types of trails. Pedaling up hill can be a bitch and 29ers make it so much more easy on us XC guys... Come on guys, stop the hate and enjoy your riding style.
  • - 15
flag finnrambo (Oct 14, 2013 at 20:30) (Below Threshold)
 eh I'd give that bike a chance but I still don't understand the point of long travel 29ers, I'd peg 29ers as bikes made for xc racing and then 650b for this new trail crap (it's worse than "enduro") rather get the new altitude rally edition than this for one reason: it has an exact racing use, this doesn't
  • + 11
 Just have an open mind and ride it!
  • + 2
 Lets just dont give a fk about what we dont want to give a fk. And ride what we got or can afford. Life is simple somehow.
  • - 5
flag jackharvey99 (Oct 15, 2013 at 12:00) (Below Threshold)
 either way 29ers are pretty suckish
  • + 2
 no 29ers have a use, they currently make great xc bikes, if that transitions to great am/dh bikes in the future then fine, I'm not a fan of long travel 29 currently but you can't say they suck when they're clearly evolving quickly
  • + 2
 Allot of people who bag on 29ers have not even spent a significant time on one and never gave it a chance. I'm not saying it's for everyone but it is a great wheel size for xc-aggressive trial riding for allot of riding styles. But if I'm personally going up to the chairlifts or some shuttle runs with my buddies there is no question that I'm gunna grab for my 26 inch free ride bike. But if I'm going for a long epic (epic being over 30 miles) ride with my buddies I'm grabbing my 29er. As far as 27.5 I'm not to sure about that one yet, I've rode a few but I can't say I have a for sure decision yet.
  • + 0
 ^ Thank you! That's exactly right.
  • + 44
 C'mon, Red Bull Rampage has only just finished and Kelly McGarry and Cam Zink have blown all our minds and here you are back to reviewing 29rs so soon!? Don't you think its a little inappropriate? Its just too soon!
  • + 11
 The vast majority of riders on pb are DH/FR crowd. It makes absolutely no sense that they now, basically only review 29er and 650b trail bikes and parts. And god forbid I can't remember the last time they reviewed a 4X or DJ bike. Not happy with the way this website is going at all.
  • + 89
 Not true there are alot of enduro riders and hella hella XC guys.... There are more XC riders world wide then any other mountain discipline
  • + 2
 Haha, I think they owed Niner Bikes better timing for this release since they let PB borrow one.
  • + 50
 I'm pretty sure a poll recently showed most of us fall between trail and FR, which really means we ride trail on FR bikes and hit the park a couple times a year. It is kind of like how that jump you did looked so huge until you watched the video. . .

I know a few guys who hit way bigger stuff than myself (the A line at Highland) on 5" travel bikes. Would they prefer a DH rig on that? Heck yeah, but the 5" trail slayer is what they have because at home on the 4-5' drops and the 10' gaps don't justify a bike that pedals like a fat sow, and frankly 5 inches get the job done.

I don't know about all you guys, but I am doing some serious soul searching about whether I should get the Norco sight or range. 5 or 6 inches takes care of most of my FR needs while allowing me to get to the top of the hill with enough time to shoot down and then up again, and to have fun while climbing.
Bikes with 7+ inches of travel are just not on the menu anymore since they cater to people who have season passes or live in the mountains (a tiny group really).
So as far as I can tell PB is reviewing what most of us ride.

That said: Come on PB, what about 4x and dj bikes!? Do they all ride the same? Why don't we see reviews for them?
  • + 7
 I can tell you that over the past year I have been riding a 6" bike for pretty much everything I used to only ride my DH bike on. The little bike got the job done but I wasn't as fast, it wasnt as fun, and I always felt sketchy when pushing "deep" like you can on a dh bike. It was more of a , "wow I survived anouther run!" rather then a "wow that was the best I've rode all year". I am building my DH bike back up. Its more work getting up but I can say I have tried each side exclusively and just have more fun on a big bike.
  • + 11
 This bike actually looks fun. at first, I thought it had to much travel to do xc, but not enough for it to be a capable all-mountain bike. But I have ridden ted williams a lot, and I thought it was only possible to do it on a 8" travel bike. I also very much like 29ers. I know a lot of people don't, but I really like how they can roll over a lot of stuff, compared to a 26 or 650b.
  • - 10
flag The-mnt-life365 (Oct 14, 2013 at 6:40) (Below Threshold)
 Well 650b rolls over pretty much the same stuff just as easy its only a little bit different then the 29..... Shred have u ever ridden a 27.5? Cause i have and i love it, because it rolls practically the same as a 29r but corners pretty much the same as a 26... I wish niner would change their name and test making a 27.5 because they make amazing capable 29rs... But I feel they would make legendary 26ers or 27.5s if they even just made the frame set.... Or if they made their carbon rigid forks for a 26 or 27.5 that would be sick.... Idk i just kinda dumped everything on my mind out into this comment...
  • + 18
 The majority of people who COMMENT and TAKE polls might be DH/FR or other gravity disciplines... but in reality only a small percentage of members ever post at all. I am constantly (benefit of being a mod) seeing automatic alerts about first posts which are coming from members who have been here a number of years. Just a few mins ago in one of the rampage blogs was a guy who's been here 4 years who only now commented for the first time. So you really can't speak to who the majority on PB are other than they're people who don't bother to ever comment on blogs and everything that makes the front page news is considered a blog post from its writer.

But speaking of polls related to DH and 29ers... there's one about future 29" DH bike development, and while 4527 think they'll NEVER happen and 26" will always dominate DH (ignoring 650B's rise completely), 3733 think they will be developed but not displace 26 and 650B ones, 254 think they will be developed and replace other sizes, and 589 are undecided. So... in that poll, the majority didn't pick the 26" only option in the poll and that's probably because they either own/ride 29ers already, or are open to riding them in the future.
  • + 0
 The-mnt-life365, I have never actually gotten on a 27.5, but I was looking at Giant's "charts" on why they use 27.5, and it looked interesting.
  • - 5
flag giveitall14 (Oct 14, 2013 at 7:34) (Below Threshold)
 Dj and 4x bikes may not be reviewed because what is the difference between them now a couple mm of bb drop and a cm of chain stay length other than that they are all the same, some might be lighter due to different tubing diameters but its not like anything mindblowingly different has happened with dj bikes in the last few years with the exception of dj specific suspension designs, which have been reviewed if memory serves me right
  • + 18
 I love all the " I hate everything that's not downhill or dirt jump haters ". Kind of reminds me of old bmx vs skater rivalry. Lastly, it is pinkBIKE! Not pink26bike" or pinkdowhillbike.
  • + 2
 I rock a yeti 575 with a van 36 up front. I don't hit crazy stuff but thats me, i have total faith in the bike. All the stuff i do hit i can hit just fine on my hardtail maybe not as fast or as smoothly but the travel is there to be nice and fun, and save my ankles. Yes the rear end could be a little less progressive but thats what you have push for. As far as the new wheel sizes if i were to have the $ to walk into a shop and buy a new bike i'd seriously consider a sumpy fsr evo 29er, or a trance X the bigger wheels in that travel sounds like a blast...
  • - 3
 Ya i got u shred!! And im sorry I didn't mean to like call u out but I'd rather it be me than someone else that woulda torn u out,
  • - 2
 And Rosen thts so true its sad that that's what this had turned into!
  • - 5
flag Saidrick (Oct 14, 2013 at 8:33) (Below Threshold)
 Deeights math is the wrong. The majority did pick 26" over 29".

It's only when COMBINE ALL the other options and then compare them to the one option, that your math sort of works.
  • + 4
 As an aside, I don't have anything against other wheel sizes. My only complaint is with the industry picking sizes for us.
  • + 15
 Saidrick, quit using tea-party math...
  • + 6
 .....RIDE
  • + 1
 When you need to use all three other choices to beat the first choice, it seems like a majority to me. Sure it may be only a plurality. But who uses the word majority when there are more than two options?
  • + 2
 Look at it like this:
The poll asked (in a fuzzy sort of way) if the people wanted 26 only or 26 plus other stuff, and the majority said 26+, though a huge number did say 26 only.
  • - 4
flag vernonjeff (Oct 14, 2013 at 13:28) (Below Threshold)
 I was out today. not a 29er in sight. I was out last weekend... not a 29er in sight... I have no idea who is riding these things. I ride mostly dh but do AM also and there is never a 29er in sight. The only people i know who have them are new riders and they dont seem to keep them for very long. the 29er thing is garbage but thanks for trying so hard to have it accepted. PB reviews also seem to go to the people who advertise with them. this makes it biased and worthless. my opinion. agree or not but i ride a lot and this is what i am seeing. and yes i have ridden 29ers... the bike took over and was hard to make last minute changes. sucks in the air and turning almost killed me a couple of times.
  • - 1
 Your sampling method sucks. Also locally the majority of new trail bikes are big wheels. Even the DH racers use them as trail bikes.
  • - 2
 just checked out movies for your monday... not a 29er in sight. dude i trail build when im not riding and this might be what you have been told but its not true.... 29er is a specialty off shoot it is not the main attraction. they are trying desperately to make it stick. the main trail bikes are not 29ers... im not sure where you shopping but they are speciality order here mostly with the odd one thrown into the mix.
  • + 1
 watched the redbull rampage yesterday... not a 29er in sight... not alot of sharp corners and lots of rock.. i thought thats where they shined?
  • + 1
 Can't say I have ever seen a 29er or 650b out on the trail ever either, perhaps all the dentists keep theirs inside all year so they don't get dirty.
  • + 5
 Vernon that is ALL they sell here... Big bike can't be bought here... Like as in bike shops won't even special order them, dirt jumpers included its only AM XC, BMX, CX, Cruisers, or Road that is all the shops here sell no matter where in the state i go no big bikes, or DJs.... And your 110% wrong 29ers are all that i see I am one of the last guys to still ride and race 26in..... And 650b is also taking the racing pits by storm I've seen 20 in the past week..... I haven't seen a downhill bike in person ever...... And I've been looking so dont tell me that 29ers aren't sticking.... THEY ARE WAYYY PAST STICKING on and becoming a new thing THEY ARE THE THING NOW.... And that's coming from someone who doesn't like 29ers....
  • + 2
 I didnt see a 29er at rampage either.. Wanna know why.... Cause the rims would have buckled but i saw a 27.5.... In fact i belive that there have been 27.5 bikes at rampage for 2 years now......
  • + 5
 That one gave me a good chuckle, heh.
  • + 3
 About the tea party math, that is. Smile
  • + 4
 the bb650s arent much different. you can get to 27.5 with rubber. people get so bent out of shape with this issue... who cares mnt just ride your Georgia hills and enjoy. i will never own a 29er so so what... i probably will never have a friend who comes out with a 29er.. so what...
  • + 2
 well we know who won't ever be your friend then...
  • + 1
 just frapping to bike porn. just lost interest because they threw a 29er in... it was like they threw a russian worker woman with a moustache into the mix.. difficulty level was impossible.

ah.. hi deeeight.. just winding up the locals today.. hows your day going? (although im serious... 29ers are the shits)
  • + 1
 Damn when are they gonna review a dj or.slopestyle bike all they do is trail bikes
  • - 2
 But this bike is sweet. Also, the market is shifting towards Enduro, so the majority of bikes that are hyped up for release are Long travel trailbikes.
  • + 1
 You have to admit though, if any DH/FR rider were to ever jump on a 29er, there's a good chance that either the RIP 9 or the WFO 9 would be their choice. I'm gonna say the same thing I've always said regarding wheel size- every wheel size has its advantages. Ideally, I would ride 29 for XC, 275 for Enduro, and 27.5 for DH race, and 26 for FR and DJ. But this is one of the most aggressively set up 29ers there is out there. Just sayin.
  • + 0
 hey deeeight i mean im most likely never going to own a 29er either but i race Enduro and XC so i felt i was ultimately responsible for standing up for my race mates and opponents that do ride 29ers..... and i didn't say this earlier but this RIP is actually really atheistically attractive!
  • - 5
flag cavehawk (Oct 14, 2013 at 17:01) (Below Threshold)
 29ers are super cool... just kidding they are super gay...
  • + 4
 @cavehawk
Hey...but they're faster than you...

(I see what you did there)
  • + 1
 Saidrick- you and logic aren't exactly friends are ya?
  • - 2
 My logic is cogent. But keep going with your ad hominem...
  • + 2
 27.5's are the way of the future, every wheel size has their pro's and cons, If i had the room and extra cash, i would be rocking a 650b DH bike, 650b AM bike and a 29er pedaly bike. I'm a believer of the big wheels, 26ers are so 2011 Razz bring the hate!
  • + 4
 Hahaha! When I saw this article surrounded by Red Bull Rampage posts, I opened it just to read the comments. I was not disappointed. Haha, Yes!
  • + 3
 side get bent with your way to the future. my local bike shop says this every time a new product comes out. the next year it is something else. for us guys who have been doing this a while we have seen this exact same 29er debate come and go. now its well they are better than they used to be... well what isnt? i love how most of the arguments here are the same buzz words that are being parroted in the magazines and half of you dont have even one picture of a 29er on you profile.. im starting to think this whole thing is just a massive troll.

two: too much fun huh?
  • + 2
 I didn't see any 29er's at the rampage either, or at the fifa world cup, which makes sense since you don't pound nails with a screw driver. Gotta have the right tool for the job.
  • + 1
 Tale idk y but your comment made me laugh so hard!
  • + 2
 Oh ya to anyone saying that the majority of people on here are downhillers and that there are WAYY more DHers than Just XC and AM riders on here........ Check out this MASSIVE poll take on here....

www.pinkbike.com/poll/222-what-style-of-fork-will-your-.html


EAT SHIT!
  • + 1
 yep. That's the poll I was talking about
  • + 1
 Yeah bang bang, e-high five....... time to take a test in ap human
  • + 33
 ITS A BIKE REVIEW, WHO CARES WHAT SIZE WHEELS IT HAS.... It lives or dies on its merits rather than size of hoops.
  • - 15
flag madmon (Oct 14, 2013 at 10:41) (Below Threshold)
 i guess you are missing the point.
  • + 16
 No madmon, I don't want to be a dick, but I think you are.
  • - 18
flag madmon (Oct 14, 2013 at 13:22) (Below Threshold)
 yupp yer a dick
  • + 6
 I can't believe the butthurt in the comments on these reviews. I honestly don't know why I even take the time to scroll down any further than the review itself.
  • + 1
 I couldn't agree more.
  • + 21
 I Imagine this bike will still get slated in the comments just because it's a 29er, regardless of how it performs... Also, glad to see that have sorted CTD, still prefer the RLC system but at least they're usable!
  • + 0
 eh, bigger fan of the dh style damping, RLC isn't enduro enough for me Big Grin
  • + 20
 Although not a 29er fan, these longer travel versions look pretty fun. They have come a long way in my opinion. This is a nice looking bike!
  • + 0
 Yea, that one looks really great!
  • + 8
 WAKI WHERE ARE YOUR DESTRUCTIVE AND DERROGITORY COMMENTS!?
  • + 3
 Under things I don't like so much that I have to tell everyone
  • + 1
 ... Well played my friend...well played.
  • - 1
 Uhm what?
  • + 0
 I was saying that your comment was funny...
  • + 1
 waki why did you move?
  • + 1
 deported?
  • + 2
 Yupp, banished. Wanted to find a coubtrt called "internet" but it wasn't there
  • + 10
 Having ridden that bike a lot over the past four months I have to say it's the real deal. Take off the talas and put a pike on the front and your in business.
  • + 6
 My experience with NN tyres is that they are too light to be proper AM tyres and fail when the going gets rough. If the tyres were found to be good I have to wonder how hard the bike was actually pushed as a proper AM ride....
  • + 0
 Nobby Nics are great tires, we rode several DH / AM trails whilst testing. I noticed when they are close to being replaced they'll let you know by handing out flatsWink
  • + 1
 Which version were the NNs? My Reign came with Evo's and they were weak Burped off the rims and a rock ripped a knob off leading to a flat and dinged rim. I wasnt going warp speed either...
  • + 1
 Hey there headshot
Nobby Nic TL-R K tire, 29 x 2.35" PaceStar, S-Skin
  • + 1
 I wish more bikes would come with super gravity casing, maxxis ardents were the first time I ever sent a rock through a tire.... although that could've been a defective tire
  • + 5
 I love reading all these reviews regardless of wheel size. Mountain bikes are always awesome and I really appreciate the vicarious experience that Pinkbike provides me. I will probably never get to ride any of these bikes OR ride like any of the testers. But they are all fascinating and consuming. The comments, less so. Keep it up Pinkbike.
  • + 6
 Actually, this Niner has comparatively LONG chain stays when you look at other offerings, Kona Satori, Kona Process, Specialized, etc, etc. they do look great though Smile
  • + 1
 I ride a Kona Honzo with 16.5" chain stays. Which rips. But I saw this bike at interbike and it looks legit.
  • + 4
 long stays? I hear aaron gwin coming
  • + 1
 BH has the 16.75 stays. Only bike on list right now... Down here after bills and shiz though.
  • + 3
 I rode Ted Williams (where the video was taken) this September and ran into that rider his first day on the RIP. He had just come back from the World Championships in South Africa racing Junior. His first time riding a 29er and he was absolutely STOKED on the ride, mostly raved about the increased traction.
  • + 2
 Rational person: "They make a variety of bikes with different components, tire sizes and frame geometry. Wow, amazing to have the opportunity to try different options and choose what really works for you".

Irrational person: "Are you MAD???!!!! That which pleases me should be pleasurable for all. More 'options' is nonsensical and an unnecessary pursuit of things that I'm not interested in."

Rational person: "My GAWD, you have convinced me! I also realize the idea that Apple and Samsung's rivalry pushing innovation and choice is an absurd waste of energy as well. Oh how I long for sameness, uniformity, rigidness, and minimal imagination."

Irrational person: "Join me my friend, I'm on my way to North Korea where your conformist enlightenment will be complete........".
  • + 2
 Though not often mentioned on this page, I'd just like to mention some of the awful writing included in the article.

"Niner only makes 29-inch-wheel mountain bikes, and the company is perfectly happy the R.I.P RDO, or any bike it makes compared to those of any wheel-size in their respective categories." Happy what? To compare perhaps?

"I two inches shorter, but the raked-back seat tube effectively shortens the bike’s reach when the saddle is dropped, so with that and by pushing the saddle a centimeter forward on the RockShox Reverb seatpost, I also found a good fit." I two inches shorter, you Jane.
  • + 4
 Yeah often the editing on pb is quite shoddy. It does rustle my jimmies a bit to see a professional journalistic organization not have anyone proofread stuff
  • + 1
 I've noticed it more the past few weeks with a lot of stuff being turned around very quicly/ around big events but i'm usually half alseep when i read PB in the AM before/between classes
  • + 1
 you could always go back to mbaction.com if the quality isn't up to par here...
  • + 3
 I'm with you guys 100% on this one, very shoddy at best !!!...I two inches shorter, you Jane, haha
  • + 6
 I re-read my stories three or more times before and after posting, but I am presently wrestling with Windows 8. It's pretty much a nightmare. Those must have happened during my final editing. Bad keystrokes on the features near the space bar often return the cursor into some unknown place in the text, which leads to phantom edits or deletions that are unseen in the edit window. Thanks for the catches. RC
  • + 1
 Hamncheese, that did make me laugh quite a bit xD
  • + 6
 To the credit of the PB editors who cover events: They walk the venue shooting and taking down stories all day, and then rush back to process photos, type and layout their posts until well after midnight. Shower and repeat. Add crappy internet speeds and drunk room-mates and you may be able to understand how a few typos can get through. Covering events is a great gig, but it's not always fun.
  • + 2
 We forgive you RichardCunningham. Nah not really. I'm still jealous as sh*t that you get to ride top-o-the-line bikes when I have to correct Spanish kids shoddy pronunciation of the words ship and sheep.
  • - 1
 Dude, this was a review of a bike that you probably had for months, not something like rampage where you go, shoot hundreds of photos, decide which 20 photos are the best, put them together with text in a format that looks good, and upload it on shitty internet in the space of five hours. There shouldn't really be excuses for shoddy editing in reviews that you probably knew the deadline for well in advance. I'm not trying to be a dick, but if you're being payed to do something, do it well.
  • + 5
 I am humbled before you, master mnorris122. Please tell me how I should f-off
  • + 2
 ^^^Hahahaha!!
  • + 1
 @richardcunningham...my parents' laptop gives me the same problem all the time. i'll be typing and i barely glaze the mousepad and the cursor goes crazy. may i suggest a macbook hahaha?
  • + 6
 Viet Nam - for when China's carbon construction costs get too high.
  • + 5
 Next step: Sudan and Ethiopia
  • + 2
 Yeah its a good thing though, it means the workers over in china are being payed more. The when the wage in Vietnam rises too much, they move on to the next country and so on.
  • + 0
 Yes! Free trade in action. Everyone benefits
  • - 1
 Hoolydooly: Not sure if serious... you do realize we live on a finite planet so we can start paying our fellow countrymen the right money and bring the industry back, what would boost the economy. (though some moron probably already use a counter argument that Earth is a sphere and sphere cannot be finite). Since when a new form of slavery is better than the old one? If you want a lecture on outsourcing I will be delighted to share it...
  • + 6
 I am half Vietnamese, and I happen to think that the Vietnamese people are also children of God, and a job to them is the same value as a job to any one else. I see no reason why an American or Canadian is any more deserving of the ability to feed their families than any one else.
  • + 2
 There is only one thing we learn from history and that is thar no one ever learns from history. In the history we can find many examples (South America in particular) where a dispersed population living a hard life in countrysides of post colonial countries, has been lured to live in cities to work in factories. They changed feeding their families by themselves, by growing food, to feed their families by earning money and exchanging them for food (irony nr1). When wages rise the ordering party or money providers, move out to a cheaper country to lower production cost. That leaves a mass of people in the cities who are now left with no means to feed their families, and after a generation, they have no way to go back to country side.

The end of this free market chain is Africa, which is what it is today, because it is in highest interest of us Westeners to be so. Civil wars and atrocities in Kongo for Rare earth metals, are only the top of an iceberg. The only right way to "heal" the world is to minimize consumption and produce more localy.
  • + 1
 I was not trying to get to political or historic. It just reminded me of way back when almost all mountain bikes were steel...mid to late '80s, and often in MBA, it was mentioned when a frame was 'made in Japan' vs. 'made in Taiwan', with the inference that the former was of higher quality. Over time, it as Taiwan was producing some really nice frames, it swung to 'made in China', with Taiwan being inferred as the higher quality workmanship. Basically, companies would move production as they found cheaper alternatives.
  • - 1
 Off course they move. I'm not saying it to boost my ego, I'm not holier than thou but this global rotation happens because the terryfyingly large brainless part of consumers always wants cheaper products without recognizing consequences of such thinking. Our needs are unsustainable, that rotation just makes more people wanting more stuff they don't need. I am not trying to say THEY should not do it, I am saying we should stop, or we have to face the consequences and we are not allowed to say a single word. Meat production ruining the environment is a great example. When Asians will get same aperite for Steaks and burgers as we have, we'll get seriously screwed. Bicycles count in as anything else.
  • + 2
 WAKI, this simply isn't true. It isn't. I have a degree in Economics. Look at South Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. In 1960, they had economies that were no different than the rest of Asia. Now they have standards of living higher than nearly all of the West. Vietnam has had double diget GDP growth every year since the Doi Moi economic reformation in 1984.

Where has there not been economic growth in the last 30 years? Those parts of South America that are not open to free trade. The parts of Africa that are not open to free trade. North Korea (not open to free trade).

There is some fantasy out there that before Europeans started marching around the globe the world lived in some Avatar tree-hugger Nirvana where there was no disease, war, or famine.
  • - 1
 Yes living standard of living of an average bloke able to grow food to feed his own family is definitely lower than of an umployed bloke in Europe. By Western standards. I don'tknow what you mean by standard of living, off course everyone wants our attractive fairy tale. I respect Milton Friedman, he was a brilliant man, many of his ideas are universal for all philosophies. I don't like his practical solutions..,
  • + 2
 I gave it a thought and your sentence about everyone benefiting from freemarket economy (as most people understand it) makes me doubt the quality of your degree in economics, especially if you took your education in US. It's like going to Russia in 70s and learning how awesome Communism was.
  • + 2
 Really? Lets make a list of some of the most economically free countries in the world:
1. Hong Kong
2.Singapore
3.Australia
4.New Zealand
5. Switzerland

Now lets make a list of the bottom 5 most economically free:
5.Eritrea
4.Venezuela
3.Zimbabwe
2.Cuba
1. North Korea

If, given the choice, where would you live?
  • + 1
 I know that question, Milton is strong within you indeed Smile sorry for being unnecessarily personal in previous posts.

I'd choose New Zealand if I was forced to chose from your list, unless I'd get really rich cuz then I'd go for Cuba, let's not screw this area. Free market itself is not a problem, just as religion, or any other invention of a man. It's how you use it. All I can tell you now is to cite Milton: "a biggest threat to freedom is concentration of power in single hands" - well.., after the Berlin Wall went down things got out of balance isn't it? Milton did not say: in single hands unless it is us Smile

I could discuss it for hours, but, I have to learn letting go. We can PM each other eventually
  • + 1
 waki you sound like a douche when you call him milton. don't do it. i got my degree in economics in the US, so screw off. getting a degree in economics in the US doesn't mean you become some capitalism loving free marketeer. it's the same as getting an economics degree in any country with advanced post-secondary education. you probably don't have an economics degree anyways, so explaining this to you is useless.
  • + 1
 Hey, cool down! Waki and I are just both passionate about things! We are having a good discussion! I happen to be honored so say I am channeling Milton Friedman
  • + 1
 you should be honored. sorry for seeming pissed guys, but it is insulting to have the value of my degree questioned because it was obtained in the us. i don't think one can claim a degree is superior/inferior based only on the country it's from.
  • + 2
 Dear Pinkbike, You can end the wheel size debate, just review the ever popular 69er setup, sit back and enjoy the interweb hug fest to follow. P.S. make sure its a mid level build with something for every fanboy to get happy about -Thanks!
  • + 2
 I hate these reviews, I just want a review on a 2001 kona stab with a white brothers fork with a mrp chain guide and bombshell wheels, screw evolution and change! 26 for life!
  • + 3
 a shoot out between a bike from back then and no with some top end but 'era' correct componets and then maybe build up the old frame with the latest and greatest and compare it to todays latest and greatest and try and keep MFG's all the same, ie the old stab vs the new carbon operator... I'd love to see that...
  • + 1
 It's a good bike by the looks of it. But when are people gonna start calling companies out on all using the same linkage design?

Put as many curves in the linkages as you like, but giant, niner, turner (DW licensed), pivot (DW licensed) and nasty catalogue frames are all the same layout. Then just spec your longish reach, short headtube and low bb height and run obligatory short stays and a slack head angle- you got a snappy trail bike.

It would be good to see something different being added to the recipe.

Good to see niner are doing it right with large/stiff linkage bearings though- are you listening Santa Cruz?!

Another note; What did you measure 35 feet with? Fisherman's ruler?
  • + 3
 No, I used the Sacred North Van big-drop measuring tape. I returned it in the cedar box it arrived in. RC
  • + 1
 This kind of sounds like the sort of BS claim that Mountain Bike Action is famous for publishing to me: "but dedicated fork offsets for 29-inch wheels have relegated super-slack head angles for big-wheel bikes into the arena of fashion, as the naturally slower steering action of big wheels and the extended front center of a 29er chassis automatically create the necessary elements that super slack head angles imbue to small-wheel bikes."

I thought the whole point of dedicated fork offsets was to allow slacker head angles and the associated benefits without floppy steering? Actually, didn't I read that on Pinkbike too? Yes.. www.pinkbike.com/news/To-The-Point-Rake-and-Trail.html

Hardly seems like fashion either when (arguably I'm sure) the hottest and best reviewed 29er today has a 67.5 degree head angle: www.pinkbike.com/news/First-Look-Specialized-S---Works-Enduro-29-S-E.html

No offense to the RIP 9 RDO, I've ridden one and it is a very capable and impressive bike that handles gnarly rock gardens better than most.

/rant
  • + 1
 HA! We found some limitations when hitting 35ft jumps!!I doubt that was the bikes intended purpose but im pretty impressed watching the vid.Personally i couldnt care less bout wheel size, my 26 wheeled wildcard is plenty fun and good enuf as a do it all for me!
  • + 2
 I wish that I could be a test rider for all kinds of new bikes, with different geometry, wheel sizes, and suspension set ups... More reviews please. It's time to plan a 2014 bike purchase.
  • + 1
 How come there wasn't more on the built in bash guard? That looked like one of the best features in the frame design, and was barley mentioned in the article. Does it work well? Will it still be effective even under compression? I want to know more!
  • + 12
 Was barley mentioned in the article? What about hops?
Barley does work well under compression if the yeast is active enough, I'm told; but the brewing is not my thing so. . .
  • + 3
 HAHA! ^^^^
Seriously, the bash guard is a pretty sweet deal if you ride a single-ring crankset. The CVA suspension's lower rocker link drops pretty well beneath the BB, so the bash protects the link, but also acts as a bash for the chainring - and because the rocker is more or less, centered on the bike, you don''t get knocked off line dragging over logs.
  • + 2
 I wonder what is the "build-in bash guard" replacement price. I bet BBG bash guards cost 10x less. And you don't nick a swingarm or bearing everytime you hit a rock hard.

Crash protection should be cheap and non structural, otherwise it's a bad idea.
  • + 1
 I have been riding this bike for about 6 months now and it truly does do it all. I am a bit on the short side at 5,8. I put a Lev dropper on it and it did improve my rides a lot. But this is still a big bike on east coast aggressive single tracks. I ride the bike on rail trails, technical single track and some light dh. The bike does well at all of it.

I have raised the rear shock pressure alot. I am at 20 ish % sag and still use the full rear shock on technical decents. The bike gets a little soft on the landings of some of the larger table tops but sails extremely well.

My only hold back from saying this bike is the best ever is the height and size. I was between sizes and went with the medium over the small. I am not sure that was the best choice but with short legs and a long torso it seemed like it at the time. Now as I swtich back and forth between DJ dh and this bike I would like to be able to get a little further back to pump the tech stuff better.

Over all after 6 months of riding it on all types of terrain I can say it does do everything I need well. Light, fast and well built.
  • + 0
 I rode this bike at the Dirt Demo at Interbike. I'm always pleasantly surprised by Niner. Look, if you're rolling a DH rig 90% of the time, you won't be pleased with any bike that fits in this category, and you'll hate 29ers. But I am a firm believer that 29ers have their place. I own a hardtail 29er and it's great for after work XC shreds. I wouldn't consider a 29er long travel because it generally makes no sense, yet when I rode this bike at the Dirt Demo, I forgot I was on a 29er. It's whippier than some 26ers I've ridden, and I felt confident on drops, through rock gardens, and around corners.

You get a bit of the classic 29er under-steering, but I also felt pretty comfortable laying it down in corners. I'm not saying I'd run out and buy one today, but it's a pretty damn good bike.
  • + 0
 Im a 80% DH guy and love my 29er's. Just got the 29er remedy, put XX1 on it and it rips everything. I've been super surprised by how well it pedals and it destroys stuff on the down like my DH. I have a 26" Remedy also, and that's a much more playful bike...but I like the climb up and destroy the down that the Remedy 29er gives me. Ill be more fit for next years DH race season due to my 29er.
  • + 1
 I'm tempted to go through this thread and repost everything 'blaaargghhh XYZ wheel size, with the word bike' to highlight how BORING this discussion is now.
  • + 2
 Holy seat angle. Looks like your weight would be a long way back for seated climbing.
  • + 3
 Seat angle changes with saddle height?? Hows that work then?
  • + 3
 The upper section of the Niner's seat tube is angled dramatically towards the rear of the bike. When the seatpost is raised or lowered, the saddle tracks back and forth a significant distance, altering the 'effective' seat tube angle. If the seat tube was straight, or aligned radially to the bottom bracket, like most frames are designed, the 'effective' seat tube angle would not change when the post was raised or lowered. RC
  • + 1
 Thanks for that explanation after reading it and drawing some lines to connect the dots it makes a lot more sense Smile
  • + 1
 My frame has the same design, and quite frankly it's not very good.
It's ok for a big enduro bike (where you drop the saddle on/off and it even gives you better clearance), but not on a trail bike as you get too much front pedaling position when you drop even a little bit.
  • + 2
 So, you need a fork with a different offset to make up for poor frame design? Seems like a great idea.
  • + 3
 I can't wait to see how this bike stacks up against the Enduro 29!
  • + 1
 The WFO is what the Enduro would compete against.
  • + 1
 What about to the new carbon Ellsworth Epiphany XC 275? I haven't seen any reviews yet but seems like a good comp, no?
  • + 3
 how bout some fat bike reviews?
  • + 1
 17.7"(450mm) cs for a 29er is short? I doubt that. This bike is not gonna feel a bit "draggy" the acceleration will just plain suck.
  • + 0
 Yeah right genius LOL!
  • + 1
 The last two 29er full suspension bikes i owned both had shorter stays than that. One had more travel than this, too.
  • + 1
 Does anyone know if any design changes to the frame were made from 2013 / 2014? Cheers in advance.
  • + 2
 Gary Fisher got robbed. Lol.
  • + 1
 Regardless of wheel size. I just never liked the placement of the linkage under the bottom bracket..looks like trouble.
  • + 0
 Most of the people who bag on 29ers have never even tried one for real... and I'll admit, I stand accused. But just don't forget that ol' Gwinny won Sea Otter on one!
  • + 1
 Let's not be snobs. We all like BIKES. Whatever wheel size rocks your bike it's should be just fine. Peace.
  • + 1
 This is a decent design but niner has terrible customer tech support and shock pivots get loose quickly.
  • + 2
 Blue bikes roll better over stuff .
  • + 0
 Great review. I like it when we have a combo of description, technical info, and a vid showing what the bike can handle. Nice work PB.
  • + 1
 Sounds similar to my Tallboy LTc. And anything that rides like that is good in my book.
  • + 1
 Ifit's in Senna yellow, then bless you for being such an advocate for aetheticaly looking bike, and things looking so good are making this world a better place.
  • + 1
 Mine is the matte carbon and orange one... I prefer that to the yellow. Though I reallllly like the yellow also.
  • + 1
 The TB ltc is a much better bike in all aspects.
  • + 1
 I'm 5'9 and looks are everything. 29ers makes my style look goofy. I rather be slow and look good.
  • + 1
 Wow, awsome bike! And only for $6499?!! What a bargain!!
  • + 1
 Too much butthurt in one thread
  • + 1
 Prob would never buy one, but good looking none the less
  • + 1
 No need to identify the paver capital of the world as the test area.
  • + 1
 how can a draggy feel at low speed, be crisp in acceleration?
  • + 0
 (^^^) From or near a dead stop, the first three or four pedal strokes feel a bit draggy, most probably due to the fat tires and big wheels. After that, the RDO accelerates and feels lively and efficient. Once it gets past jogging speed, it comes alive. I am not sure how science could explain that, but every test rider made similar comments - and the list of KOMs that they racked up during the review period supports their opinions. I came off almost a year of testing 26 and 27.5 inch models and was pleasantly surprised with the speed and agility of the bike in an XC/trail situation.
  • + 0
 Two weeks ago I bought a RIP 9 RDO. I ride nearly everyday.
  • + 1
 ...well you're a lucky sod, aren't you?.....
  • + 1
 Goggles? Really>?
  • + 6
 Do not resist....as sport glasses grew larger and larger, the jump to goggles seemed like a short hop.... Join us.... Goggles are the new sport eye-wear.
  • - 1
 One day I will have a Niner....
  • - 1
 One day I will have 9 Niners...
  • - 1
 One day I will have 99 Niners...
  • - 1
 One day I will have 999 Niners...
  • - 1
 One day I will have 9999 Niners
  • - 1
 One day I will have 99999 Niners...
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.101441
Mobile Version of Website