Inside Acros

May 16, 2017
by Matt Wragg  





There are precious few companies who hand-make their hubs in-house these days. Most people can point to the likes of Hope and Chris King, who are rightly known for their commitment to high quality parts and shunning the easy path of Far-Eastern manufacturing. Yet after that the list of names tends to dwindle. There is one name that is all too-often left off those lists, at least it is outside Germany. That name is Acros.

Based just outside Stuttgart, Acros have been making hubs, bottom brackets and headsets since 1999. They adhere to the German approach of product over marketing, turning out exquisite kit without fanfare or hype. Like both Hope and Chris King, they too make everything there in-house and their focus is on making finely crafted, reliable kit that will stand the test of time - after all, what else could you possibly sell in Germany? We stopped by their headquarters and manufacturing facility to take a look inside this hidden gem of a company.



Meet Sven the engineer behind Acros hubs. This is the man who obsesses over all the little details in the chase for perfection.
Meet Sven, the engineer behind Acros' hubs. This is the man who obsesses over all the little details in the chase for perfection.

The initial 3D printing of a hub - they prototype all of the elements this way including the ratchet system.
The initial 3D printing of a hub - they prototype all of the elements this way, including the ratchet system.
3D printed samples of the ratchet sytem.
3D printed samples of the ratchet sytem.

Even at the prototype stage the level of internal detail is very close to the final product.
Even at the prototype stage, the level of internal detail is very close to the final product.

After 3D printing come the machined protoypes.
After 3D printing come the machined protoypes.

This is a concept unique to Acros. They springload the ratchets - the rider can then tune the springs to determine how loud they want their hubs to be with stronger springs to make more noise and lighter ones for a quieter ride.
Whereas DT Swiss employ two conical springs in their star-ratchet system, Acros utilizes this particular spring configuration.This means that the rider can switch the mounting for the spring with deeper and shallower pockets to increase and decrease the spring tension, and therefore the noise of the hub.

Inside Acros
Inside Acros

The hub shells are machined twice - the first takes the raw metal and cuts it down to something very close to the finished shape.
The hub shells are machined twice - the first takes the raw metal and cuts it down to something very close to the finished shape.

Inside Acros

Inside Acros

Inside Acros
Inside Acros

Inside Acros

Quality control is something they take very seriously and XXX is one of the people responsible for that. He checks every hub for tolerances - anything more than XXX out is rejected.
Quality control is something they take very seriously, it is performed at every step of production, Dietmar is one of the people responsible for that. He checks every hub for tolerances - anything more than 9 micrometers out is rejected.

The first step in the life of a hub shell - this is what emerges from the first CNC machine.
The first step in the life of a hub shell - this is what emerges from the first CNC machine.

Inside Acros

Being German Acros don t do their testing by halves. This is subjecting the wheels to XXX in salted steam to see how they will withstand the worst wet winter conditions.
Being German, Acros don't do their testing by halves. This is subjecting the wheels to up to 700 hours in salted steam to see how they will withstand the worst wet, winter conditions.

As you can see the hub itself is fine although those end caps would probably need switching.
As you can see, the hub itself is pretty much fine, the rust is all on the test rig fixture, not on the hub itself.

The ratchet. These are forged initall which gets the basic shape right they then goes to CNC for a precision finish.
The ratchet. These are forged initally, which gets the basic shape right, they then goes to CNC for a precision finish.

XXX is the master machiner here at Acros keeping a close eye on their hubs.
Andreas is the master machinist here at Acros, keeping a close eye on their hubs.

Inside Acros

Inside Acros
Inside Acros

Inside Acros

The second machining is for the fine detail and precision removing any excess material.
The second machining is for the fine detail and precision, removing any excess material.

You have to love this kind of crisp CNC detailing.
You have to love this kind of crisp CNC'd detailing.

The ratchet after the trip through a CNC machine - you can see how much sharper the edges are compared to before.
The ratchet after the trip through a CNC machine - you can see how much sharper the edges are compared to before.

Freshly machined hubs ready to be sent to the anodiser. Like almost every company Acros don t anodise their productds in-house but send them to a local supplier.
Freshly machined hubs, ready to be sent to the anodiser. Like almost every company, Acros don't anodise their products in-house, but send them to a local supplier.

The finishing touch laser-etched graphics.
The finishing touch: laser-etched graphics.

Loading the bearings is delicate work and needs to be done by hand.
Loading the bearings is delicate work and needs to be done by hand.

Acros have one advantage over every other wheelmaker out there - their parent company XXX is a bearing manufacturer. While the two companies are separate legally and Acros still have to place orders and so forth for what they need it means that they can get custom bearings designed specifically for what they need for instance they can order custom sizes something not usually possible through a conventional supplier.
Acros have one advantage over every other wheelmaker out there - their parent company, HWG, is a bearing manufacturer. While the two companies are separate legally, and Acros still have to place orders and so forth for what they need, it means that they can get custom bearings designed specifically for what they need, for instance they can order custom sizes, something not usually possible through a conventional supplier.

Acros test their wheels to the absolute limit - this custom rig can even simulate forces on the rim to see how the wheel rolls under different side loads to see how the bearings perform when things aren t aligned.
Acros test their wheels to the absolute limit - this custom rig can even simulate forces on the rim to see how the wheel rolls under different side loads to see how the bearings perform when things aren't aligned.

Each hub is built by hand. First step is to press the bearings into the hub shell using a hydraulic press.
Each hub is built by hand. First step is to press the bearings into the hub shell using a hydraulic press.

The ratchets are prepped with grease ready for mounting.
The ratchets are prepped with grease ready for mounting.

A simple but effective solution for pressing in the freehub. The freehub is mounted on a special clamp on the bench then the hub body is pressed onto it.
A simple, but effective solution for making sure an even coating of grease is applied to the hub and ratechet,.

The hub and ratchet are then pressed together.
The hub and ratchet are then pressed together.

When the freehub and ratchet are assembled a coating of grease goes on the teeth ready for the next step.
When the freehub and ratchet are assembled, a coating of grease goes on the teeth, ready for the next step.

A light smear of grease around the bearings.
A light smear of grease around the bearings.

Assembly. The axle body and freehub are all pressed together by hand.
Assembly. The axle, body and freehub are all pressed together by hand.

A quick check to make sure it all sits together properly.
A quick check to make sure it all sits together properly.

The finished product an Acros Nineteen FR hub ready to roll.
The finished product: an Acros Nineteen FR hub, ready to roll.



122 Comments

  • 79 6
 "Acros have one advantage over every other wheelmaker out there - their parent company, HWG, is a bearing manufacturer. While the two companies are separate legally, and Acros still have to place orders and so forth for what they need, it means that they can get custom bearings designed specifically for what they need, for instance they can order custom sizes, something not usually possible through a conventional supplier."

This can only be a disadvantage for the customer? Are custom sized bearings really necessary?
  • 27 2
 This is what instantly popped in my mind too.
  • 40 2
 if there made correctly its an advantage, take chris king for example, you will never have to replace the bearings. mine are going 11 years strong. Off the shelf bearing would never exceed this.
  • 23 0
 FYI, Chris King makes their own bearings for everything they sell.
  • 55 3
 @Myfianceemademedoit: you're lying, your fiancé made you type that
  • 2 1
 @Myfianceemademedoit: my point exactly
  • 3 4
 @BoneDog: there are certainly COTS bearings that are going to last a long time. You're just going to pay more for them. CK isn't leading industry with their bearings but they certainly make great ones.
  • 6 5
 @atrokz: For the bike industry, Chris King is undoubtedly leading the industry.
  • 4 7
 @BoneDog: no doubt about it, they certainly make the best bearings in the cycling industry.
  • 1 0
 Or with the ever changing standards of the bike industry it allows Acros to start real world testing.
  • 12 2
 Custom bearings are so frustrating. Why cant they spec standard size bearings so i can go into any engineering supply shop in any town and get what i need straight off the shelf?
  • 2 1
 @atrokz: Wonder what Phil Wood would have to say about this...
  • 1 0
 It s a sealed Angular Contact bearing system. I would guess that shortly Wheels Manufacturing will begin manufacturing them, if they haven't already. Easily replaced. As long as Murphy ;aw does't effect the outcome of my statement.
  • 1 1
 @sspiff: Ever wonder who makes phill wood bearings? www.ntnamericas.com/en
  • 1 0
 It certainly can be a problem. HWG and Acros are longtime players - supply should be no problem. More important - they use very decent races and balls and seals, no soft ss crap an do decent QS. Buying third party replacements is not a good idea here. My Shimano 600 hubs went 30 000km and never had to change the bearings. Setting the bar.
  • 2 0
 They state they could use custom bearings not they do use custom sizes. If you buy these good looking hubs somewhere you could expect to get bearings from the same place. Let's move on.
  • 1 1
 Happen to me 6 months ago. I had to change bearings of my Acros headset but it was impossible to find them. In the end I had to change my headset...
  • 1 0
 That sucks. Well I take back my post. @Eneite:
  • 1 0
 @shotouthoods: It was classic size bearings but with a chamfer on one side. So I order some new bearings (same size) but I only notice the chamfer once I tried to put them in...
  • 37 3
 Now I feel way better about the stock Acros Headset that came on my YT.
  • 13 2
 I had one on my morewood - it was garbage, the bearings seized up because the seals were crap. Swapped for a Chris King 3 years ago and it hasn't needed touching yet, not even tightening up.
  • 4 0
 Mine comes loose all the time =(
  • 8 0
 The headsets are useless. My integrated headset has no dust seal to protect the lower bearing. After six months it is no smooth, and now its almost a year old needs replacing. Not as good as hope or cane creek.
  • 4 0
 @discotone: I would have to agree, all of my king headsets make some creaking sounds due to the o-ring, however they are all bomb proof and have lasted for years and years always staying smooth as hell. I just recently bought a rocky mountain altitude and had no choice but going towards an integrated headset. I went with the cane creek 110 with the tradition wedge system. Now, all my bikes going forward will rock the 110 headset no questions asked.

Hubs however, Chris King if the accounts are okay, hopetech if I wanna be a little more practical.
  • 5 0
 ....acros headset is piece of shit....1month hardly use and it's gone. Changed it for cane creek 110....and couldn't be more satisfied
  • 2 0
 @artoBP: Agreed. My Cane Creek 1.5 reducer headset, 10 years, 2 bikes, never touched it, works flawlessly!
  • 2 0
 I destroyed many cane creek lower bearings in the Pacific north wet on the regular. We'll see how the acros holds up in this dust bowl
  • 4 0
 Have had to replace two of them with failing bearings after only a couple of months. Really the only weak component I have found on a YT.
  • 1 0
 @carym: Did you go through YT for warranty or get a bearing from a local shop?
  • 1 0
 @BoneDog: I've been using a CC110 for a few years on one bike. The next frame if I'll go another CC110 or Ck headset. BB likely a Hope stainless. Hubs looking towards Onyx
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't feel too confident @denomerdano , the bottom race on my Jeffsy Acros headset is unservicable after 1 winter's light use
  • 1 0
 @denomerdano YT is using an non stainless steel ACROS bearing, as all other bike brands do. I had a situation with my YT. After a friendly phone call a young lady at ACROS recommendet an after market stainless steel headset to replace my old one. since then I have no problems with the headset. She told me there are two bearing qualities: non stainless and stainless...
  • 1 0
 @ridetastefully: wouldn't need to be stainless if it was sealed better...
  • 30 0
 I absolutely love these behind-the-scenes factory tours. Awesome stuff, @mattwragg
  • 12 0
 especially when I'm pinkbiking at work an my boss walks in!
  • 28 0
 Typical, just because they make their own hubs they think that everything revolves around them.
  • 5 0
 I see what you did there Wink
  • 9 0
 You Spoke the truth.
  • 27 0
 E.W.S Machine. Enduro is taking over production duties.
  • 7 1
 haha my thoughts exactly. Enduro specific machinery. Never go full enduro.
  • 2 0
 @barzaka: ahaha I also noticed the enduro specific machine lol
  • 6 0
 Looking at a rear hub price, they are 100€ more expense than Hopes, and more than 200€ less than CK. Are they better engineered than Hopes, but not as good as Kings? I suspect the price of all three is more connected to wages in their respective countries, and differing margins.
  • 6 2
 Isn't CK based in Portland? America certainly isn't the bastion of high labor costs anymore...
  • 4 3
 Ask around about Hope's Pro2 freehub bearing longevity. Been on 3 sets in one season, common failure. Pro4s only have a slightly larger bearing.
  • 1 0
 @atrokz: replace your bearings with full complement bearings.. ones with no spacers inside but the max number of bearings they could stuff in. This lessens the force and stops the races cracking. I now use enduro max bearings, and before I would only get one month on a set of bearings in my pro 2 evo freehub. I am at 6months now. I asked about warranty to hope btw, they caimed no one else had issues.
  • 1 3
 @chrisingrassia: Yep, California transplants that probably aren't as hated by the 'Gonians as the rest of us are/would be. Localism sucks, but I get the "We grew here - you flew here" thing.
  • 2 2
 @omclive: They also pretended this wasn't an issue. it clearly is. I only run certain companies for bearings for a while now, and never Enduro full max bearings. I'm not going to get into it here as it will ruffle some feathers, but I've run those in an industrial application (lathe) and it was almost comical how short lived they were (I'm a mfg engineer, former team wrench, former T&D maker in aerospace so bearings are something I'm versed in), even under minor load. Ive also used them as a hub bearing replacement in a pinch and they didn't last long so I splurged on the SKF and it worked as long as I ran the hub. I run SKF, Timken, etc. The problem with the hope bearings is the race and ball material. They spec'd sst races and balls in place of the high carbon races they used to run. this was done because of corrosion complaints in the UK, unfortunately the SST used doesn't have the same tensile, charpy/izod impact, or shear strength and they break at the race, destroying the axle and seals and start to split the balls. I have 3 of these bearing/axle assemblies at home to review. It came down to materials being wrong for the application. I've got a nitonXL5 that we rent that I plan to use to review the material used, and planned on running a hardness check at home (I've got a mitutoyo 940-130 at home, more in the shop). ultimately, I won't buy hope hubs anymore.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: As an Oregon native... Get off my lawn!
  • 2 0
 @sspiff: I passed out on your lawn and drank from your garden hose. Then I outbid everyone on the house next door - we're neighbors!
  • 1 0
 @atrokz: Seriously you used Enduro max compliment in a lathe. And then bite on Hope for misspeccing parts, that's too funny.
  • 1 1
 @sq225917: Was in a pinch and needed to replace a bearing, had it on hand and ran it, was a low load low speed application, crazier things have been done before and whether it was a full or ran on cages makes no difference to the application (it only makes a difference where it's spec'd incorrectly: a low rotational pivot. if it rocks vs rolls, this is fine). It was comical how bad it was. This was back in about 2007. Took it out and investigated, learned really quick why they fail (what with being in metallurgy and all), which was prior to formally learning about them from a engineering capacity. They are cheap low to mid range bearings, period. Most of their flaw is from the quality of balls and the seals themselves.
  • 1 1
 @sq225917: should also note that they make more than their "Max" line of bearings Wink . They also make ABEC bearings. In industry, it's SKF, FAG, Timken, NSK, etc. SKF bearings for hubs are the best bet, imo. The design issue with the Max is twofold, the seals do not work as well as intended (washing out the poor quality grease), and the groove can catch a ball when moment load is axial, and can split a ball or damage thee groove causing more failure to balls.
  • 2 0
 @atrokz: Enduro, ok for seals, great for shock pivots and bushing tools, but shit all use for anything else.

I'm still reeling at the idea of using them in a lathe. Though i did cut 400 holes today by hand in a drill press with a 3mm carbide CNC bit..... if it looks like a hammer...... ;-)
  • 1 1
 @sq225917: drill bits are drill bits no matter the machine driving them Wink
  • 11 3
 Herman ze German! I hope I brought my point Acros.....
  • 7 7
 Hey, hey hey. Point taken buddy, no need to get Acros at me.
  • 3 0
 Honest question: are there any downsides to using more than "a light smear of grease" in moving parts? At least in pedals, I like to get enough grease in there that it's basically under positive pressure. But pedals are uniquely exposed to contamination, and I have a bad habit of exploding pedals...so maybe I'm doing it wrong.
  • 6 0
 The reason they only use a little grease on the star ratchet is because they are finicky(one reason I'm not a fan.) Because the drive forces do not move in the same direction as the tooth engagement, any extra material can cause the teeth to not fully engage. The super high engagement ones that Botranger was selling were so low tolerance for this that you couldn't even run grease, people who did ended up breaking the teeth. Recommended lube was light oil or wet chain lube. same problem happens for any contamination, so you have to keep them clean. People talk about how unreliable traditional pawl based hub engagement is, especially on cheap hubs, but the only person I've seen ever destroy a hub on a ride was on a star ratchet.

To address your initial question more directly, you can overpack any engagement mechanism to the point where the grease prevents the teeth from engaging(it's just easier on a star ratchet,) but any pure rotating area like a pedal is probably fine. Positive pressure you introduce probably doesn't last past a ride or two, though.
  • 1 0
 My Mavic hub says to use only a little bit of oil, still going strong after 4 years.
  • 1 0
 @DC1988: The argument that I would make is that the environment a hub lives in, is an environment that calls for grease over oil. You want something with bulk & stickiness, in order to displace water or dirt, & suspend any dirt that does get in. So if your engagement mechanism can't tolerate grease, it's not the right solution for the application. IMO. Only other solution is to run a good enough seal that you'll introduce more drag than a pawled system would, bringing you back to square one.

Think about any place that uses oil on a car. the parts are sealed in a case & bathed in the oil. any place that doesn't have a bath mechanism uses grease instead.
  • 6 0
 Salted Steam is the name of my new Irish Punk band
  • 2 0
 I have some Acros parts, awesome products! Thanks for the nice article, factory visits are my favourites. ;-) Btw, I'm using an Acros A-wheel carbon 29er wheelset for racing, built on Acros Nineteen XC hubs. Superlight (~1270g for the complete wheelset!), 25mm internal rim width, star ratchet and even if the rims are made from quality carbon, it is actually quite affordable, if we compare the price to the competition.
  • 1 0
 I regret buying these wheels! Hub reliability seems to be a big problem. Repeatedly coming loose. I know of other riders who have had similar problems along with the free-body not engaging. Save your money and stick with DT hubs.
  • 4 0
 Those inspection tolerances are ridiculously tight! Impressed!
  • 1 0
 A human hair is 50um, 9um tolerance is crazy. Then again, you think about putting a human hair in a bearing track, and it would screw it right up.
  • 2 0
 Neat, i kinda did think acros was an offshore brand making parts for the lowest bidder, nice to know they are essentially the german hope.
  • 1 0
 Nice but... What's wrong with a friction fit or do the ratchets really not last at least 5 years? And off the shelf cartridge bearings repacked with marine grease is just plain simpler.
  • 4 0
 Tell about a hub and not have a sound clip of it finished?
  • 1 0
 So do you have to press out the ratchet to get at ot service the bearing under it?

And what does this hub start out as? A chunk of billet sawed from bar stock or a forged hub shell?
  • 1 0
 Why would anyone want a hub with only 19 POE the angle slack must be awful. I'd have to feel damn good about those bearing seat tolerances to put up with that slack in the back when doing technical climbs.
  • 2 1
 As much as I love all that cnc maching and stuff I still go for Novatec 4in1 with STANDARD bearings. I don't see any reason to buy antyhing else to be honest.
  • 1 0
 If you like broken ratchets maybe Wink
  • 1 1
 @EnduroriderPL: that link looks like spyware click bait!
  • 3 0
 Novatec is trash. 6 months of XCish riding and the rear hub sized up on me. The problems with hubs is that once you get experience on something solid, King, I9, etc. it's REALLY hard to go back to anything else. I currently have I9's on my 29er and my fatty came with the stock Salsa hubs.... the salsas just feel like sloppy garbage in comparison. Its a money trap I tell you!!!! But a fun one Smile .
  • 1 0
 @eswebster: so change the bearings and it's brand new.
  • 3 0
 @EnduroriderPL: Solid point, but I don't want to always change out bearings because they are prone to failure. I want a hub design that just works with as minimal maintenance as possible. The I9's have been rock solid for years with literally zero maintenance until recently, just a re-grease. Also, after the I9's anything with less than 90 or so points of engagement I dont think is for me. I have just become used to the zero play/instant power transfer to the wheels that anything else seems half broken to me.
  • 2 0
 @eswebster: sorry but that's not a valid argument in this discussion. Every bearing will fail eventually no matter what producer or type. Baring that in mind I prefer cheap standard, available everywhere bearings instead of one off like for chris king.

Secondly: Novatec is really, and I mean really, easy in mainteance and service with basic cheap tools required to change bearings.

As for the "the zero play/instant power transfer" I will agree with you but still I'll stick to Novatec Smile
  • 2 0
 Novatec do different levels of bearing quality depending on the customer from what I understand. I bought a pair of novatecs with Japanese bearings, done over 1000 miles of mixed riding and they are as smooth as day 1. And yes, I ride in the wet, I live in the UK.. also own hopes, so I can appreciate quality hubs, just very impressed with my pair of hubs which cost less than a hope front!
  • 1 0
 @rchez08: I recently change bearings in by D042SB after years of maintenance free riding. I went for ultra cheap bearings which costs 2 PLN = 0,7 E for one piece so cost of entire operation was ridiculosly small Wink
  • 2 0
 They did some blurring on the computer screen to not divulge their engineering secrets. Funny ; )
  • 7 4
 9 micron tolerance? Either BS, or absurd overkill.
  • 12 1
 At least it's metric
  • 7 1
 9 microns out of specified in either direction is 18 microns which seems perfectly reasonable for a bearing seat.
  • 4 4
 German engineering, that's why they have a reputation for quality worldwide..
  • 16 6
 Ha. Typical American attitude; 'it's better than we do, so therefore it's not necessary'.
  • 4 0
 @SleepingAwake: maybe for a press-fit bearing seat (still overkill but if the machine can produce without extra effort, why not), but the caption said "...anything more than 9 micrometers out is rejected." A hot disc brake rotor will pull the hub out of tolerance at that level.
  • 2 10
flag Nictue (May 16, 2017 at 6:54) (Below Threshold)
 @danspring: U wot m8?
  • 4 0
 @danspring: So very true!
  • 5 3
 9 microns is .00035". On aluminum, this can be affected by just handling and this check must be done at a specified room temperature. While their gauge is really just a bore gauge, it should hold repeatability to about .0001" at this resolution. This is also not a position tolerance check (true position) so what @sleepingawake is stating isn't what's being checked for, but rather bore size (neither is cylindricity, concentricity, or other GD&T checks) and depth. This setup is common and utilized often in manufacturing.

So while they are stating a .00035" tolerance, this is probably +/-, which is pretty standard for bore tolerances for a press fit bearing. This is also very commonly achieved in the USA, @Danspring, where most of the more complicated things around the globe are made to even tighter tolerances than a basic hub bore. @nictue it's not overkill, this is pretty normal bearing bore size requirement. usually +/- .0005 for a bearing that is staked or swaged. If they are claiming they are hitting +/-.00015 then this isn't happening. companies often exaggerate their tolerances achieved, but rarely have the actual inspection equipment to even calibrate this check. But this being a german company, using proper gauge setups, means they are more than likely calibrating this in-process gauge.
  • 9 0
 @atrokz: you guys are hilarious. Who in engineering is still working in imperial units Big Grin
It's an article about a German company, we're talking micrometers not inches...
  • 5 4
 @SleepingAwake: trust me everything that comes across our desk gets converted to inches. So next time you land in that A350, 777, etc, know full well that I used imperial to make those metric parts lol

Also same goes for all the components for your astute class that were made in NA... haha. Whats funnier is that the Volvo RM12 got transferred to metric when it was pulled from the F404 design, then we turned it all back to imperial to make it here in Canada..... So I guess, all the cool stuff is still made in imperial even if drawn in metric Wink
  • 4 3
 @danspring: just a question, is your comment typical British arrogance? My guess is that some people are different than othesr, regardless of country. Your comments implies you are a douche, which is a trait one encounters in all countries around the world.
  • 6 0
 @atrokz: haha I thought you guys learned your lesson when crashing a Mars probe because of metric / imperial mixup Wink
When I worked in the states everything was metric tho
  • 4 1
 @atrokz: No wonder lost NASA a $125 million Mars orbiter in 1999...
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake: Yes but for the price they charge for a hub I doubt the can justify a tolerance like that. That's Three ten thousandths of an inch or .000354"
I am fully aware that you can meet that tolerance on a cnc machine because I've done it but the cost is very high to machine parts that tight.

Plus, If you intended on keeping and using that tolerance you would have a machine installing your bearings not a person doing it by hand on a bench top press with a ram that is a foot long. The slop in the seals on that thing would press that bearing out of spec.
  • 2 1
 @theteaser: yup, configuration control. It's not the units that caused the failure, but rather the failure to control both configuration (drawing and documentation, in this instance software) and process (would define the units to use for a particular program or job). No problem on the private sector, what with making satellites and all. No problem with defense industry. But those software programmers on the other hand....... lol
  • 2 0
 I think Absalon rides the Nineteen hubs:

info.acros.de/en/riders-english/remy-absalon
  • 2 0
 Love this kind of articles, and amazing photography (as always but still worth pointing out). Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Thanks Matt for going Acros the sea and bringing us this report!
  • 2 0
 This will have some bearing on my next hub purchase.
  • 2 0
 I guess you don't want any ol' run of the mill hub?
  • 1 0
 Super cool, just when you probably need a new rear hub companies are making them. I wish I was a machinist.
  • 3 1
 nice factory
  • 2 2
 If America wants to be great again just start making stuff like the Germans do.
  • 8 0
 So build it in Mexico?
  • 2 1
 over-engineered and prone to failure?
  • 4 0
 @xeren: high-end stuff you can't outsource that pays well. I wish Canada would get on board with this philosophy too instead of just slurping up shitty tar sands cutting down ever tree in site.
  • 4 0
 @JesseE: oh, i'm all for precision engineering that you can be proud of, but it you're ever talked to an auto mechanic, they'll tell you don't buy a BMW or an audi or a mercedes. lease them with a warranty, because otherwise you'll be doing things like pulling an entire engine in order to change a couple of plastic timing belt guards because the timing belt was put up against the fire wall for some stupid reason
  • 4 0
 @xeren: sounds like Sram.
  • 4 4
 I'll stick with my Hadley's with the titanium freehub. Less cost and high quality, can't be beat.
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