Easton's 35-millimeter Handlebar Standard for DH: 800mm Havoc Handlebar and Matching Stem

Apr 19, 2012
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Easton gave Pinkbike a sneak peek at its 800-millimeter-wide ‘Havoc 35’ oversized handlebar system a while back and we were impressed. Previously, Easton offered a conventional 31.8 millimeter bar in a 750-millimeter width, but when pressed to widen it to 800, its design team was not satisfied with testing results. The Havoc 35 system is based around a bar with a 35-millimeter center section – a step up from the present 31.8 mm standard in strength and stiffness – and it includes a selection of matching CNC-machined stems. Havoc 35 bars are offered in black, silver, orange and green anodized, and natural carbon. All have ample length in the grip area to stack up all the necessary controls – even if the user chooses to lop off a few centimeters from each end. Havoc 35 aluminum bars weigh 300 grams and cost $90 USD. Havoc 35 Carbon bars weigh 220 grams and cost $160. Easton says that Havoc 35 components will begin arriving at your LBS around May.

Easton Havoc 35mm diameter 800mm width handlebars
  Havoc 35 Aluminum Specs

-Material: EA90 aluminum
-Weight: 300g
-Width: 800mm
-Bend: 9 degrees
-Upsweep: 5 degrees
-Rise: 20mm
-Clamp Diameter: 35mm
-Price: $90 USD

Easton Havoc 35mm diameter 800mm width handlebars

Easton Havoc 35mm diameter 800mm width handlebars

Easton Havoc 35mm diameter 800mm width handlebars

A Balanced Big Bar

Havoc 35 bars are available in carbon or aluminum and were created after intensive testing in the laboratory showed without a doubt, that expanding the bar’s center section to 35 mm would make it stronger and stiffer than any modification of a conventional 31.8 mm bar could produce. To ensure a balance between stiffness and comfort, Easton worked closely with Sam Blenkinsop, Cameron Cole and Nico Vouilloz on Lapierre’s International team, and with Kona freerider Graham Agassiz. The collaboration dictated the Havoc 35 handlebar’s complicated internal and external tapers which occur across the transition between the oversized center section and the grip area. In short, Havoc 35 isn’t an old-school DH bar with a larger center section – it’s a ground-up design.

Standard 35mm bore stem - 50mm length
  Havoc 35 Stem Specs

-Material: CNC-machined EA90 aluminum
-Weight: 190g
-Length: 50mm
-Rise: zero degrees
-Steerer: 1 1/8 inch
-Colors: Black, Orange anodize
-Clamp Diameter: 35mm
-Price: $100 USD


CNC machining keeps the Havoc 35 stem lightweight

Havoc 35 Stems

Havoc 35’s oversized bar dictates that the stems meet the new standards as well. After all, any added stiffness in the bar must be translated to the fork through a stem designed to handle the additional stress. Havoc stems are available in a 190-gram zero-rise, 50mm-length standard stem, or in a dedicated direct-mount version that fits Fox or RockShox DH forks. The 110-gram direct-mount Havoc stem is offset to grip the handlebar with a wider stance – a design element claimed to increase lateral stiffness. Two bolt positions offer either a 45mm or 50mm extension and the direct-mount option drops the centerline of the handlebar 5mm. Both stems are CNC-machined from Easton’s ‘EA90’ aluminum alloy and anodized either black or orange to match Easton’s elite-level DH components. Both stems are priced at $100 USD.

Easton 35mm bore direct mount stem
  Havoc Bolt-on Stem

-Material: CNC EA90 aluminum
-Weight: 110g
-Length: 2-positions - 45 or 50mm
-Rise: Negative 5mm
-Bolt pattern: Fox 40 / RS Boxxer
-Colors: Black, Orange anodize
-Clamp diameter: 35mm
-Price: $100 USD


Easton 35mm bore direct mount stem.

Bolt-on stems adjust from 45 to 50mm


Where the 35mm Handlebar Came From

With the definition of wide handlebars expanding from the mid 700s to 800 millimeters and beyond, downhill riders are challenging the physical limitations of both materials and the designs of existing bars and stems. Easton ran into this wall as the same trend swept through motocross racing. Easton’s answer was to increase the diameter of the center, clamping area of the handlebar to an unheard-of-at-the-time, 35 millimeters. The MX world balked at first, but three years later, Easton’s oversized bars have been widely adopted among the sport’s elite racers as well as its rank-and-file riders. Now, Easton hopes elite Downhillers will accept the logic of its oversized handlebar system for the same reasons.

Why the 35mm Standard Makes Sense

Easton’s reasons for bringing the 35-millimeter handlebar standard to DH cycling may be more compelling. MX handlebar makers probably would have been forced to adopt the oversize standard had the cross-braced bar not been accepted fashion. The cross-brace in effect, was a triangulated reinforcement that took some of the stress from the bar’s center section. Without a cross-brace, there are only three ways to make a handlebar stronger and stiffer: make it thicker, make it from a stronger material, or make it larger in diameter.

35-S plate
  Paired up on Sam Blankensop's Lapierre, Easton's havoc 35 bar and direct-mount stem look sharp. Indicators on the offset bar clamps line up with printed graduations on the bars to assist setup.


The first two options can make only marginal improvements and at a substantial weight penalty. The larger-diameter option is the only one that makes engineering sense because, as the diameter of a structure increases, its stiffness grows exponentially. For this reason, simply jumping from 31.8 to 35 millimeters earns Easton a 21-percent increase in stiffness – and Easton further capitalizes on the larger format’s mechanical advantage by reducing material in key areas. Easton claims its 35-series bars weigh 10-percent less than comparable 31.8 mm bars across the board. In fact, at a full 800 mm wide, the carbon fiber Havoc 35 is the lightest DH bar on the market at only 220 grams.

bar

Easton's carbon fiber havoc 35 bar is said to be the lightest DH handlebar made - and it is a full 800 millimeters wide.

Havoc 35 Carbon Handlebar Specs

-Material: EC90 carbon
-Weight: 210g
-Width: 800mm
-Bend: 9 degree
-Upsweep: 5 degree
-Rise: 20mm
-Clamp Diameter: 35mm


Why Believe Easton?

Easton’s history of intensive product testing and meticulous quality control protocol is the high-bar of the cycling industry. It is a poorly-kept secret that event the best bike companies test their components against Easton’s products to establish base-line standards. Easton’s tapered and manipulated aluminum literally reinvented the mountain bike industry, breaking strength-to-weight barriers with its fork tubes, frame tubes, fork steerers and handlebars. Later, when Easton moved on to produce carbon fiber handlebars, its rigorous engineering and testing standards earned widespread trust from hard core riders who had learned from previous experience that carbon was the color of death. There will always be jerks selling shiny turds to trusting fools, but for the most part, Easton raised manufacturing standards so high that even an average handlebar from a no-name maker is pretty darn good.

Is My 31.8 mm, 800mm-Wide Handlebar Unsafe?

If it was made by a trustworthy manufacturer, your handlebar is probably safe and sound. Basic engineering, however, dictates that smaller diameter bars made from similar materials will be less rigid and possibly, less strong. If you like your present bar and stem combination, then you have nothing to worry about. If you are looking for a bit more from your bar and stem, then Easton’s ’35 series offers far more potential.

Will Havoc 35 Bars Be More Crashworthy?

No way to say for sure, although if Easton’s published numbers are correct, the new Havoc 35 bars should hold up correspondingly better in a crash. Easton (and most other bar makers) states that its bars test strong enough to be pushed right through the bones and flesh of a human without damage (well, to the bar, at least). The worst-case scenario is when you send your bike flipping down the trail on its own. In such events, the impact can do damage that the rider is unaware of. Easton has an in-house inspection and replacement program and encourages its customers to routinely inspect every part on the bike, including its handlebars, for warning signs like bends, cracks or deep abrasions.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesHavoc 35 bars and stems look stunning on the bike and offer performance enhancements unavailable from the 31.6 mm standard. Easton is a sharp company with a staff who is well connected to racing and riding at the highest levels, so we trust that their claims for the performance of the Havoc 35 system are equally well grounded in science as they are on the dirt. Easton is well aware of the river of tears which will be shed when the gravity crowd hears that yet another industry standard is being implemented. That said, when a company like Easton moves forward with a breakthrough product like Havoc 35, it almost always signals the beginning of the end of the old standard. If 800-millimeter bars are here to stay, then Easton has made the right call. - RC



Must Read This Week

220 Comments

  • + 426
 I'm way behind the current standards, I still need to change my 9 spd to a 10 spd, my 26" to a 29" or 27.5", my 1" 1/8" to 1.5", alum. to carbon, threaded BB to press fit, and finally my 31.8 to 35mm. I don't understand how am I still enjoying ridng my dinosaur with all these "new standards"
  • + 69
 Just try buying a decent 25.4 bar these days...
  • + 11
 in theory it will be massively stiff, especially with width of the stem clamps, so no doubt they'll plug the "enhanced steering precision" etc. will be interesting to hear how they ride.
  • + 64
 quote of the day rick! I think thats how most of us feel!
  • + 6
 HAHAHA...im still riding a 22mm bar on my motocrossbike!!! and its only 03, its not THAT old!!
  • + 21
 Dont forget the 150mm hub spacing is now going 157mm on session 9.9s!
  • - 69
flag northernstyle (Apr 19, 2012 at 9:43) (Below Threshold)
 Oh my god, bunch of girls crying about a new standard. If you don't want to buy it, guess what ?? You don't have to . There is however a market of Easton fans that are in need of a bar that is wider than their current 750mm bars. Instead of just slapping more material on the ends of the bars, they went back and thickened up the center for those riders that are beasts! I for one am stoked.
  • + 2
 fun thread. so, the havoc carbon is lighter, cheaper, and perhaps stiffer than the 800 Enve DH, which is the current reigning world champ in handlebars. I think its been dethroned. Quite a feat from Easton. There's no question these big bars will go big.
  • + 13
 northernstyle, the issue is that although there may still be alternatives, new standards invariably reduce the array of options available to any one particular rider. I'm still running SRAM 9spd, but with 10spd trickling down from the top, if I want to replace my mech, I have fewer options open to me if I don't want to replace my cassette, chain ring, and chain at the same time. To some extent new standards do mean people on aging technology lose out if they don't buy in.
  • - 14
flag jaybird951 (Apr 19, 2012 at 10:04) (Below Threshold)
 rickyretardo is wayoff....just ride a downhill fixie...youll be fine...ricky!
  • + 12
 Just think 35mm bars on a fox 40 ultimate stiffness
  • + 37
 ULTIMATE GIRTH
  • + 7
 yeah, we could all use some more girth!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 8
 Well, you won't go and buy new mobile phone becouse newly invented camera has 2 mpx more than your old one, but you definately will, when it becomes common on the market. Just give it some time. Everything new is tested on pro's, so if it is available for some money for everyone, you don't have to go and buy it this evening. Technology is wine (or girl). mature is better.
  • - 12
flag zmcycle Plus (Apr 19, 2012 at 12:26) (Below Threshold)
 To all retailers: Dont invest! Hopeffully it will die!
  • + 10
 Rolas... obviously you don't know much about North America... people buy the newest phones and such as soon as they come out.. i.e. Huge lines outside of Apple stores.
  • + 46
 If you ask me, im not stoked, rather shocked that company's are allowed to sell a bent aluminium pipe for 90 USD.
  • + 1
 rickyretardo, put the 1 1/4" stem clamp/steerer tube forks on your list (OverDrive 2), which was re-introduced by Giant on some of their top line bikes.
Isn't that just great! - so many varieties, I do not know where to start changing Wink
  • + 9
 but i already look like an albatross and cant fit through tight trees and doorways :/
  • + 5
 @deakmaster
i know some people who struggle with those obstacles without a bike lol never mind the 800mm bent pipe!
  • + 2
 The easiest way to say this is...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=48rz8udZBmQ
  • + 3
 No. Thicker as in greater wall thickness. Same diameter but stronger and, of course, heavier.
  • + 2
 Ricky, you seriously just made my day... Can't stop giggling!
  • + 13
 In theory, Communism works!
  • - 1
 lol, seriously?
  • + 2
 I'm just glad I now have enough space to zip-tie my memory foam pillow to the bar, now with enough width for the pillow, as well as enough surface contact for the zip-ties not to loosen on the bars, allowing me to sleep my way through the trail. No, this is cool... I was actually thinking about this yesterday... wait... patent infringement! bigger is better because I say so! Just the clamp diameter though.... I'll stick to 29". I tried 31.5" before, but now I have two 29" bars, both with the same rise, but different colors for different moods. Could someone make some really, really wide BB, cranks or pedals? I wanna go Harley... gnarly Harley...
  • + 3
 Am I the only one who thinks this is a good idea? I understand some standards are stupid but I think bigger bars will make a difference and be more confidence inspiring.
  • + 5
 haha yeah nickf, i like the harley idea, easton needs to kick us down some 2000mm 300g carbon ape hangers
  • + 5
 Wow 335 positive props thats the biggest number I have ever seen on PB. New standard association got owned.
  • + 6
 So your cockpit isn't stiff enough? Watch porn.......
  • + 0
 on the subject of the bars, its not how big it is, its how u use it.
  • + 1
 Seems rather useless, but I can already see alot of people wanting them because "they're wide"
  • + 2
 yeah, yeah....watch more porn, Lisa Ann has some nice curves!
  • + 0
 lisa ann does have nice curves. the man speaks the truth!
  • + 1
 Or they could have moved the bend further from the center to lessen the leverage on the bars. Nice, another new "standard".
  • - 1
 What a stupid useless waste of time. Another dopey company trying to re-invent the mtb, trying to kill it more like. Really expected better from Easton too. Tossers.
  • + 4
 but in their opinion the 31.8mm clamp is too flimsey for bars 800mm and wider, especially important for their carbon offerings. that's not being a tosser, that's called engineering.
  • + 1
 I can see where they're coming from, but when was the last time you washed out on a corner and thought 'if my bars didn't flex then, I'd have ridden it out'?
  • + 2
 It's not about flex, it's about breaking them.
  • + 2
 It's not about flex and not about strength - Unless you have arms of a mountain gorilla 800mm and above is supporting/creating a stupid demand. Like with most of such products it's for the demands of a real racer. Those real" racers are spending way more time wondering what's wrong with their bike rather than skills and fitness - racers are busy training and racing not giving a sht about their handlebar width
  • + 1
 I meant diameter
  • + 1
 When was the last time you snapped a bar? Point is except for heavy people with gorilla arms, it's pointless. I way in at 17 stone 6 pounds, and have never bent/snapped a bar (sure they're pretty narrow and heavy but awell). Anyway I only comment to be funny, I don't really care what bars pros are running, they only ride for the componies who pay them more anyway :p
  • + 54
 I think they need to stop making so many random sized parts, I spend enough $ buying 1 part little lone having to buy another part to make that part fit and with old forks like mine it only makes more problems with getting a stem that fits or isnt custom made for the fork Confused
  • + 19
 makes sense but i dont think its really needed.
  • - 4
flag Protour (Apr 19, 2012 at 8:26) (Below Threshold)
 I think a new DH standard for the wide bars everyone is using makes sense, and I'm glad they went really big instead of just slightly increasing it. It will be a noticeable improvement. Once people see how burly they look in person they will want some. The orange color is stunning. I also like that they do the 9 degree bend, feels stable.
  • + 6
 its funny how no one complains about consumer electronic advancements. bring the new iphones on with increased memory capacity and processor speed, i need my 4G. but who needs bike component advancements? it doesnt make anyone faster, or a better rider, right? just ask any of the pro racers out there and they'd all rather be riding the old school sh*t......
  • + 10
 You forget that some of us are 6'5" 240lbs and want these "new standards". Unfortunately there is no right answer that works for everybody...
  • + 43
 I can't wait for 40mm. I mean, it's only a matter of time before we all realize how much lighter and stiffer it is than 35mm.
  • + 2
 Amen Mitchelf..... people might not complain about electronic advancements themselves, but I do hear complaints that you spend $500 on the latest and greatest, then 6 months later it's outdated.... time for more money in Apple's pocket. Job security for those companies.
  • + 13
 the problem with these new standards is this though, say i buy a new bike next year and it has all these new standards on it, then all of a sudden the massive pile of spare parts i have in the garage becomes redundant....then every time i damage something, i have to go buy brand new parts even though i have perfectly goo parts that just dont fit. yea, i know i can sell them to whoever, but il get piss-all for them and loose out in the long term.
  • + 12
 schwimble , I think that is partly their game plan
  • + 4
 no matter how wide the bar they're trying to produce, i still cut down to 760mm ... i don't wanna hold the bar like crucifixion nor like spongebob
  • + 37
 I've got one of the 31.8 mil bad boys and never had problems with it ... dont judge me, but i really cant see the advantage of a 35mm bar ... IMO 31.8 mm bars are stiff enough for every condition (the shiny orange is P.I.M.P ;] )
  • + 9
 Yeah, I understand that the bigger riders out there might appreciate the new standard but I weight 145lbs, additional bar stiffness will most likely go unnoticed here. 31.8mm is probably plenty enough for me and a lot of other riders...
  • + 5
 I am with you on this one. Stiffness is a totally relative concept. I weight 95 kg without riding gear and I own an Atlas, 785 and I've landed pretty hard on it. People say they feel widebars bend, and I really wonder how can the do that while riding downhill (where you are all over the place, hitting rocks and pulling/pushing the bar each second), for me that is just talk. Besides, a slightly wider stem would make for a way stiffer handlebar without the need of increasing the size and adding one more size standard to the market.
  • + 26
 For all those complaining about a 'new standard', you do realise that you don't HAVE to buy Easton stuff, don't you?

I don't see a problem with this at all, but I'd be amazed if any other companies starts to produce 35mm stuff. It'll be fine as 'that weird Easton size', a novelty for people who fancy specing their bike slightly differently. Nothing wrong with that at all.

It's funny to see a paragraph titled 'Why Believe Easton?'. They're actually one of very few MTB companies who I do believe. If it was Da Bomb producing this stuff, I'd be first to call 'bullsh*t', but when Easton start talking, it's usually worth listening.
  • + 2
 right on brit!
  • + 2
 These nay sayers, they would be happy with 6" travel dh bikes with rim brakes and 7 speed. Come on every company (reputable wants their stuf to bee the best. If you don't go forwardyou are going backwards. Thats what racing dose, advances products, lighter stronger. Just my opinion.
  • + 2
 Weak analogy sir. So the difference between rim and disc brakes is the same as an extra 3 mm of bar width? Doubt it.
  • + 0
 Improvements are improvements, and companies should always seek ways to make parts stronger, stiffer, and lighter. Let the market decide if the benifits are worthy of a new standard or not. Remember when they made 24" DH tires? It didn't catch on and now they are gone (Arrow might have a few). But this standards will stay, and other manufacturer's will make 35mm bars and stems if they are smart. It's a justifiable standard since XC bikes run 31.8, 35 mm will be the new freeride/DH standard.
  • + 1
 What I ment was that things mostly change little by little for the better.
  • + 1
 Agreed, its nothing to do with comparing rim to disc its just the evolution of bikes in general. Everything evolves for a reason.
  • + 3
 in all honesty, a strong 7 speed DH orientated system would be heaven. 10 speed saint is such a marketing piss take
  • + 1
 When I race, I usually leave it in one gear so 7 would be nice, but I just use whatever comes stock on my bike. Not sure if it will have 9 or 10 when I get it but that's where it will stay.

I don't understand why people are getting riled up by this new standard. If they don't want it, don't buy it. I like it because for a guy like me (6'5") it would make the wider bars that I need feel stiffer.
  • + 1
 Brit you are on the money. Easton makes an excellent product and always well thought out. If they thought widening out thier current Havoc bars was a good idea they would have........Personally I don't take issue with "new standards".....I am pro tech progression and like new ideas coming down the pipeline. '
  • + 1
 The nicest parts on my bike are my easton bar and stem. They just produce such quality. Have you ever looked inside their carbon bars and compared it to other brands? It's just so clean. Question: can you cut down a carbon bar?
  • + 0
 Sure, use same technique as with seat post.
  • + 22
 1. The only reason Easton introduced the 35mm bars was to cut their tooling cost in half because they were already using 35mm on MX parts. On an MX bike that weighs hundreds of pounds the increased diameter is stiffer and makes a huge differrence. On a 50 lb bike not really! Only psychologically!!

2. The 35mm Havoc stem has already failed on another sites bike review, it bent and became unusable after a hard crash.

3. In countries that have actual standards, like the European union, all bars must be tested and meet the same standard. That means that a 25.4mm bar, 31.8mm bar and 35mm bar all have to meet or exceed the same requirements for strength.

4. When you are flying down the trail and look at that fat bar and think "wow, this is so big and strong and stiffer than my old 25.4 bar", in your minds eye it is and that is the only real difference! Reputable stem makers are not going to start cranking out 35mm stuff anytime soo. If Easton jumps of a bridge, why should anyone else? This is not an industry standard, it is an Easton standard.

I know... I'm a dick! Razz
  • + 1
 You aren't a dick, you just weren't convincing to me. 1. Easton already makes 31.8 bars so it doesn't necessarily cut costs in half. It might not cut any costs, I doubt you work there, you don't know. Your just trying to impress us with your crossover MX knowledge. Only slightly impressed. 2. That doesn't mean the standards is bad, it just means the stem was made too light. 3. But they don't test for stiffness, do they. You might like riding a noodle but I prefer a stiff bike laterally. 4. Physiological is psychological, and if you think it makes you faster it probably does. Especially when the product has the testing numbers from the lab to back it up. Other manufacturers will be cranking out 35mm bars and stems if they are smart, and you will probably own a set yourself within a few years after it becomes the norm.
  • + 5
 ROFL! No, I really am a dick. And I'm not trying to convince anyone of anything.

1. You must be very easily impressed as I have absolutely no knowledge of MX other than a little google + common sense. Down the road in a couple years when they only have to make 35mm for all MTN and ROAD and MX their production costs will be reduced significantly. I am a manufacturer and I know a great deal more about production than most people.

2. I never said the standard is bad. Its simply unneccessary and completely unwarranted. And yes, if the stem was beefier the whole system would be stiffer. A chain is only as strong as its weekest link. It doesn't matter how strong or stiff the bar is if the stem its mounted on is feeble!

3. Yes, they do test for stiffness. So do we! This 35mm "standard" is not new, its been on road bikes already for a couple years. We developed a stem and handlebar in 35mm months ago. We've tested it, alongside the Easton bar and the difference in stiffness compared to our existing 808 bars is so small it is considered NEGLEGIBLE. Keep in mind that all the bars regardless of the diameter at the clamp have to taper down to the same 22.2mm section for controls and grips to mount. Where Easton has really nailed it on the head is by making the clamp area of the bar wider, this alone will make the intereface with the bike drastically stiffer, without having to increase diameter at all.

4. Physiological is psychological? I think I'm a sith lord, does that mean I am? Yeah, I probably will own a set myself, well... I do, they are under my desk! I've got lots of test numbers too. Unless you are an engineer they are meaningless to you. And if the industry actually adopts this "standard" and it goes in "fashion" we will be more than happy to jump off the bridge too, but not first, since it is unwarranted.

Clearly I am a dick! What does that make you?
  • + 3
 Blackspire, I have to say, I don't agree with your statement regarding bar stiffness. There is most definately differences in stiffness from one bar to another and is something that can be perceivable. Strength not the same as stiffness. Have you ridden an XC bike hard enough to feel the bar flex? Now I know most DH bars are very stiff so maybe the difference is minimal, but to say a 25.4 bar is just as stiff is simply inaccurate.
  • + 3
 I NEVER said a 25.4 bar was as stiff! And obviously some bars are stiffer than others, no doubt you are correct about that. But we aren't talking about ultralight XC parts here. I have ridden XC bikes hard enough to feel flex in the bars, stem, fork, frame, cranks and wheels. But that was the 90's Smile
  • + 3
 True. Smile By the way Aaron I have been a fan of your company's products for a long time, Used to run the bash-rings on my bikes in the late 90's early 2000's, actually have one of your DH chain-rings on the front of my trail bike right now.
  • + 1
 Blackspire, You clearly are a dick... But who isn't... Good points though...
  • + 1
 I actually don't doubt that you'd feel the increase in stiffness. Moving from a 25.4mm to a 31.8mm bar on my all mountain bike was a huge improvement. The entire front end of the bikes have been getting stiffer and it all helps so much: larger diameter bars, through axles, oversize head tubes, etc. And on a downhill bike where your weight is biased over the front end and your constantly trying to just pop your front wheel momentarily in a hole here and there down a rooty, rocky line over and over, stiffness at the front of the bike makes those line adjustments more immediate. I love my fox 40 for that reason.
  • - 2
 Especially at the highest levels of the sport, where the athletes have strength and handling skills that are at a completely different level. This is just one more thing that will create a better bike. Blackspire, I own and like one of your stainless rings, but you are wrong about your initial assertion that Easton ONLY did this to cut production costs. They did it to create a stronger, lighter, stiffer, and therefore superior product so the fastest racers in the world can go even faster. It may not be for everyone but it is justifiable since the difference will be noticeable for some. You will never be a sith lord, but products like this can give riders advantages in more ways than one, so quit being so presumptuous about Easton's motives, drop the lame I'm a dick routine, start thinking progressively and from a racers point of view, and go out there and get some new tools for the shop.
  • + 2
 Bar stiffness will have zero affect overall speed surely ? if anything your hands will fatigue faster thus making you slower
  • - 2
 Depends upon the strength and the ability of the rider. Like I said theses aren't for everyone, and I bet 31.8 will stick around for xc or those who can't handle the stiffness, but it absolutely will make some riders faster because of the increased responsiveness.
  • + 3
 The beauty of carbon is that while it's stiff under bending loads, it also has this nice ability to dampen vibration. So you can have a stiff bar, but it doesn't necessarily translate to more fatigue. I would say that torsional flex at the front of the bike is more of a culprit when it comes to fatigue, as you are exerting energy steering your bike that isn't all converted into work where the tire meets the ground.
  • + 2
 Good point
  • + 18
 f*ck it, more standards! When are they going to stop calling them standards? There's so damn many of them now that you could hardly call any of them standards... from axles to stems... gahh....
  • + 16
 More stiffness..... good. New 'Industry Standard'....pain in the arse
  • + 14
 Good to kno... because last time my bars went through my torso they never felt straight again.
  • + 13
 If they sold the bar + stem as a package for $100, I'd try it. But a $200 entry price for new bars (because you also need a new stem) is ridiculous.
  • + 2
 This would be the smart way to win people over, and get your new tech established.
  • + 2
 Simple, don't buy it.
  • + 1
 Anyone else curious how a single all-in-one handlebar-stem combo would perform?
  • + 2
 are the bars still available in carbon? and a one piece would be stiff I had a set on my track bike and they just didnt flex at all, thing is you want to adjust you bars as well
  • + 10
 I can already see it now. 900mm bars with a new 40mm standard. For those of you who are 8 feet tall and weigh 300 pounds riding XXL DH bikes with 29" wheels with 180mm hubs, 13" of travel, 180mm BB, 15 gear cassette automatic shifter, 3.5" tires, etc...
  • + 11
 Wow so many typos. Bit embarrassing for something that will be read by thousands of people. Pinkbike need to sort their editing, it's amateur.
  • - 6
flag frijolemoreno (Apr 19, 2012 at 10:06) (Below Threshold)
 Just saying RC is anything but amateur. Typing 31.6 instead of 31.8 once is a forgivable mistake, I think, since 31.6 is a number that we use for seat post diameters. Honestly RC is amazing at every part of his job, including writing.
  • + 2
 I didn't even see that mistake! Didn't even read the whole thing, just skimmed it and came across about 4 mistakes, so I'm sure there are many more... But doesn't matter was only a quick rant!
  • + 8
 Just more marketing. Once everyone that rides has a handle bar that lasts FOREVER then the next best thing must be made or all companies die out! People thought the ps3 and xbox 360 were as good as it gets....WRONG......they already had the 4th gen playstation made.....they just have to release the tech slowly or make no money. Biking is the same!
  • + 1
 No one can make the best first try, once you use something for a while you think of a way to make it better, lighter, stronger, cheaper. It's called progression. And every one of us is an individual, what works fo Joe dosen't work for Bill.
  • + 7
 believe it or not my enve carbon DH bars were actually too stiff my hands fatigued faster and my wrist were sore after long lift days. switched back to aluminum atlas bars and problem solved. stiffness is not always performance.
  • + 6
 weird. I would have thought the carbon would be smoother and would dampen the vibration better. Also, consider a larger diameter grip - they really help with fatigue and cramping.
  • + 1
 Don't quote me on this but carbon might dampen vibration and give better handling due to the increased leverage that comes with stiffness but I guess alu bars being less stiff could absorb more shocks by giving them less leverage when they bend on impact. One thing I know for sure though is that bigger grip diameter translates into faster hand fatigue actually. Powerlifters train with increased bar diameter to work on their grip strength. The bigger the grip, the more your hands will struggle holding the same weight.
  • + 1
 I've had the opposite impression. Maybe it's their sweep or something that made your hands fatigue? My personal view is that the angles of the bar play as big of a role in bar performance as anything else but it's all personal preference at that point.
  • + 8
 '' Easton is well aware of the river of tears which will be shed when the gravity crowd hears that yet another industry standard is being implemented.'' Absolutely true...
  • + 5
 I'm confused as to why they'd put so much effort into an amazing, light, carbon bar, and then release it with the ONLY STEM AVAILABLE for it being a 190g boat anchor.

I'm all for the boat-anchor being tough and the right thing on non-direct-mount DH/FR bikes, but what about folks who want to run wide, light bars on AM bikes?

And every time someone complains about a new standard I think to myself and remember how shitty bikes were 14 years ago when I started riding.
  • - 2
 You obviously missed the great big picture of the direct mount stem, weighing in at 110g....
  • + 12
 Ah yes, for all those AM bikes with dual crown forks...
  • + 4
 Easton did some wierd extra oversized motocross bars+clamps too. I can honestly say I have never seen any at the races, but definately seen them in many store close out sales. Total BS. For one, who actually rides/needs a 800mm bar anyway, 760 is plenty and who will buy parts that can only be used together? Say you don't get on with the bar then your screwed...new bar and stem wasted.

Common easton, so something new (not reinventing things that are great as they are!)
  • + 8
 kids in Africa don't have any handlebars at all!
  • + 4
 Ha...Easton's oversized OS bars were hardly adapted by anyone in MX! I can't think of one Pro rider or team that uses them in 2012 and I always see the bars and mounts on sale at shops. I'm pretty sure they give the bar mounts away with the bars now too!
  • + 4
 Is it possible for pinkbike.com to stay objective and stop putting new products on a pedestal ?? I mean cmon those things arn't even out yet; It feels like this article was made up to grow some hype or something; More of a marketing strategy than a real article if you ask me.. Plus stop b!tching about standards; I call it OPTIONS. It's not like every 31.8 mm bar is going to be obsolete and weak just because some larger ones came out...
  • + 2
 I'm with you on this. They make it sound like it's the best thing ever since sliced bread but I highly doubt this is a game changer for the vast majority of the riders out there. I really like that they show us the new stuff even if it is stuff I wouldn't buy but some more objectivity would be nice.
  • + 3
 This is a great development for e-riders who buy or build bikes simply to take pictures of them for posting on the internet. "Looks badazz! I'm badazz! Look at my bar!"

99.9% of riders don't need this stiffer bar. Guarantee that nobody posting on Pinkbike needs it. MTBs are not motos and surely are not motos ridden by the best moto racers on the planet. MTB riders are not the same as the best moto racers on the planet.

Complete fail. A new standard to sell new stuff... not to improve what's existing and weak.

Fail.
  • + 3
 makes sense for the DH and FR markets

when you really look into who Easton are, and their engineering achievements over many decades, you'd realise they don't introduce new products for "fashion" but based on solid engineering
  • + 2
 show me the data...
  • + 5
 If not for fashion, then why such cool colors? I don't know much but I'm gonna take a stab at how I see things. Let's face it, most of us who ride DH aren't pro and will never be. We're mostly just average riders just out to have some fun. Most of us would buy a product for the "bling" and not that of performance. We're not going to watch a pro rider flying down a hill and say "Those bars perform so sick!" We're gonna say "Those bars look so sick!" That's just how it is. Most of us would rather have something that looks pimp and performs okay than something that outperforms everything and is ugly. For instance, those Crank Bros Opium wheelset... thousands of bad reviews but I still want a set!
  • + 7
 One more standard to the list. It looks nice though!
  • + 2
 Ya, im just not sure if i want a bars thats going to go right through my bones and flesh if i crash the wrong way :/
  • + 3
 "Easton (and most other bar makers) states that its bars test strong enough to be pushed right through the bones and flesh of a human without damage " Danhillracer, you've got it right. I've Taken the bars to the sternum, and been damn glad the bars bent and didn't penetrate. Maybe I wouldn't be here to tell the tale if I was running super stiff bars. I buy light bars now for that reason. THere is no blinkety blankety blank blank way in the world I'd buy these. Down with Excessive new "standards"
  • + 8
 Nice advertorial.
  • + 3
 load of bollox. marketing hype trying to bleed yet more money out of us. iv had my 31mm for 2 years crashed loads there still perfect before that i ran some azonic 25mm for 5 years no problem with them either. have all us bikers got a certain tattoo on our foreheads. whats next a beefier dust cap 4 DH only!
  • + 4
 Wait those dust caps won't make me go faster?
  • + 4
 Can't wait for the 40mm stem and 900mm bars and the 28.2 wheels ! You guys at pinkbike think that everybody has cash laying around to spend on useless trends.
  • + 1
 That's an odd wheel size. Then again, wouldn't surprise me much if a company came out with wheels that size for all the 29er haters who want a 29er but don't want to be labeled as a 29er rider because for some reason... they're gay. So 28.2" will have to do!
  • + 1
 It's called 650b. Look for it in DH bikes next year...
  • + 3
 650b is 27.5" and not 28.2". Right smack dab in between 26" and 29". Best of both worlds so they say. I don't know... I still have to learn how to ride my 26ers properly before I consider bigger wheels. I'm so shitty, I might just go back down to 24". Haha!
  • + 1
 Those numbers i posted where jokes ! As for the whole new standard ,motocross bikes do great with smaller diameters!
  • + 2
 I tell you which standard will never change. People on pinkbike douching on something new simply for the sake of bitching about something.

How DARE Easton design a handlebar and stem combo that is stronger, stiffer, AND lighter than any other system available!!

Those greedy industry bastards!! Why won't they stop thinking outside the box and advancing technology??
  • + 2
 I guess now they'll have to widen the bolt pattern and redesign the top fork crowns.. otherwise we're connecting big, wide stanchions to a big, wide stem and bars through a relatively narrow interface at the crown... why not push the bolt pattern out as much as possible and elimate any flexing through the crown.. transfer the loads more directly from the stanchions into the stem and bar... it's all just 1/2 steps i guess so they'll have something else to release in a couple of season.
  • + 2
 Im not complaining about the new standard but does the average rider really need a stiffer handle bar? Of course blinki and those top level pros are pushing there stuff way harder then any of us. But stiffness isnt always a good thing. A little flex in your bike can keep the average rider a little more stable. Talk to people who ride the dorado... they love the flex of that fork because it keeps there wheel tracking instead of skipping across the dirt.
  • + 4
 oh yey! another 'standard' just what we need! manufactures want to take a break from the happy gas and look up the word standard
  • + 2
 I'm not gonna bother. I going to go with the 2015 standard of 40mm clamp on a 1M bar. That will be sweet when I get hung up on the narrow tree lined trails I ride. I envision going full speed only to come to a sudden stop and be hurrled into the air!
  • + 2
 Deda Elementi brought this to the road a couple seasons ago:

www.trentacinque.net

The theory is sound, but it isn't exactly setting the industry on fire, either. Don't worry about a new "standard." For now, it's a couple manufacturers making a niche product that stands on its own. Maybe it'll gain traction down the road, but it'll probably take a while.
  • + 1
 Smart. everyone's been going wide (including myself) on the bars and the current stems were getting a little unsafe if you will; with all the added forces that going from an industry standard of roughly 28 inches to 30. I hate the fact that I now have to purchase a new stem and bars along with switching 9 to 1-spd on the dh bike. But who are we to judge progress. doesn't mean we have to get rid of what we have now, if it ain't broke dont fix it? if u break it upgrade it! Smile I'm stoked to have the added safety, security, and stiffness up front. Great job easton on raising the bar!
  • + 1
 I like this... We're going wider and wider, may as well maintain the same stiffness at the same weight. I agree that 800mm is quite wide, but it finally gives riders the ability to cut down bars to their desired length... Im on board.
  • + 1
 I like the new bend with a flatter section in the middle. Looks way cooler in my eyes. That being said you could just increase the stem to bar clamp to increase stiffness. I personally don't need a 35mm diameter bar but hey maybe heavier folks might notice the difference.
  • + 1
 With the bars getting thicker and wider, why are the direct mount stems getting smaller and smaller? The new Easton one has a wide clamping area but there is almost nothing there. Many new direct mount stems that come out seem to have less and less material. That thing is so thin and now only two bolts clamping the bars. I'm sure Easton knows what they are doing but it's almost shocking how minimal some DM stems are getting.
  • + 1
 Liking the colors. I think people will decide if this becomes a standard with their purchasing dollars. Let companies release and make whatever they want. In the end, you decide by choosing to buy it or not. There aren't many new bike trinkets I'd consider, but something as crucial as bars I definitely would.
  • + 1
 I am sick and tired of hearing people complaining about the standards changes..... if it weren't for these changes the bikes we are currently riding on today would not be possible. Anything that Easton does is fine with me since they most likely know more about Bars,Posts etc than most of you.Must i need remind you of Giants tapered steertubes? look at any highend single crown fork. I rest my case
  • + 1
 They're saying mid-may delivery, but I'm not even seeing any part numbers from the suppliers yet. I'll be curious to see when these actually start showing up in Canada! looks promising, I've always loved Easton bars, and this is finally something I can see being put to good use on my bike!
  • + 2
 Is anyone even breaking the 31.8's? I've landed pretty nose heavy and haven't even bent a bar. A quality 31.8 bar (Raceface, Loaded, Chromag) is all you need, 35 is overkill in my opinion.
  • + 1
 I could see this being good for DH. It is cool to see how different aspects of the sport move in different directions. There was a time when a DH bike and and xc bike had some interchangeable parts. Heck there was a time when the DH bike was just an xc bike with a busted chain.
  • + 3
 Haters gonna hate.

It's not a 'new standard'. Its just a 35mm bar/stem combo. Quit the bitching and get on with it - No one is making you convert.
  • + 1
 I agree bunkey, it's not a new standard, just another size, if it was a new standard then all the new bike manufacturers would be planning on making their new bikes according to this 'standard' then trying to make us ditch all our old shite... and they aint This bar size is just there if you want it or indeed need it
  • + 1
 You don't have to buy it if you don't want to but its good that were trying to change things for the better not just leaving them the same as they are. We constantly need to be improving the way we make things and use them. And like I said If you don't feel you need it don't buy it.
  • + 2
 You can make your bars as stiff as hell same with your forks but your front wheel will still be flexing all over the place. That needs sorting before we get a new standard in bar sizes:
  • + 1
 I think the immediate "OH NO NOT ANOTHER STANDARD!?!? Frown " people may be overlooking the fact that right now this appears to be a product aimed at the high-end racing community. It may (and likely will) gain popularity (because racers use it... it will) but by no means does it make or attempt to make 31.8 irrelevant.

By the sounds of it, and logic would dictate they aren't lying - they are saying that they can make a lighter bar using a 35mm diameter than they can (to their standards) at 31.8mm. It simply is a way to make wide-ass handlebars lighter than they would be at 31.8mm and retain (or increase) stiffness. If you don't want to shell out the cash or support the size change, then by all means stay with your 31.8mm bars as you probably don't care about the reduced weight anyways.

Nowhere does it say that Easton is replacing all bars with this new size in an attempt to drive the industry into a new standard - so stop crying. They are simply offering a lighter (and claimed stronger) alternative for the people demanding wider bars without weight penalty.
  • + 4
 High end racing community doesn't buy those, they get it for free as they are usualy sponored. But Waldo Smelly Paddy will definitely look for something stiffer than current offerings while he brakes in burms, you know, to carry more speed out of the corner when pushing on the exit.
  • + 1
 As a bigger dude riding the Shore I like a lot of DH stuff on my AM bike. But even after all these years we only have one direct-mount stem over 55mm and barely more bars with 28mm+ rise. I like this 35mm idea but it will be at least 5 years before there is a single option for outliers like me.
  • + 2
 This isn't that new tho. Recently Deda released the M35 bar and stem combo, which was a set of road drops and stem with a 35mm clamping zone. I'm surprised it took this long for it to make it's way into mtn
  • + 2
 A lot of technologies trickle down from Road racing. But that makes sense because that's where all the money is.
  • + 1
 I know, I'm just surprised it took this long, it's been ike 6 months since the Deda came out
  • + 0
 F-U-G-L-Y - find out what it means to me... Is it just me or those direct mount stems are getting thinner and thinner, and soon we might find someone doing something like ZIP ties around bars, screwed into forks upper crown by 4 bolts.

This "stem" in green will be like Borats swimming suit
  • + 1
 using the carbon handlebar in combo with the stem is a 320g in total. Thats the exact weight of my FUNN fatboy bar. So using this new standard would make my bike lighter with a weight of the stem? thats not bad....
  • + 0
 The 35mm clamp i think makes total sense and would be a real nice inprovement over a 31.8 stiffness wise but untill all the major companies decide to make a 35mm option for their bars and stems, this is just a useless inovation for easton and a hassel for the rest of us. Just like giants new steerer... Seriously guys we have enough "standards"
  • + 1
 If one company does something, does that really make it an "industry standard"..? by definition, no...

regardless if it is a welcome innovation, it's no industry standard at this point...
  • + 1
 A standard should involve at least the majority of manufacturers for that particular part. When Chris King, Truvativ, and Race Face got together to create the ISIS crank in the 90s we were all for it because we new it would become the new norm.
  • + 1
 Your own reference diminishes your point. ISIS sucked(creaks, bearing failure) and now it's almost gone, despite the all the collaboration of manufacturers. The individual companies should have worked on developing an external BB system instead, things would have progressed sooner.
  • + 0
 Although many new standards seem like a hassle with little benefit, this standard makes perfect sense. Wider bars require a larger diameter clamping area to achieve the same stiffness. Simple. Good on Easton for addressing this issue
  • + 3
 What's next? Cafe racer style handlebars for bikes.
Why not clamp directly to your fork tubes?
  • + 4
 Need that stem in normal 31.8, I'd be all over that.
  • + 0
 U can buy them in normal size.
  • + 1
 Its not the same as that one though...
  • + 1
 I know i think about 750mm with stem should be enoughSmile
  • + 0
 That wasn't my point... I want them to release a stem like the above one for 31.8
  • + 3
 I am with the majority on this one, Not another so called "industry standard".
  • + 0
 To be honest, this looks amazing in theory, but from a practical consumer's standpoint i need more options than JUST 20mm.....i knew they would blow it and not make different heights available....hopefully it catches on and they do in the real near future because some people need bars that are higher or lower...i like the idea though....
  • + 2
 If only the quality control extended to their hubs. How hard is it really to do quality control on handlebars and stems?
  • + 1
 I can't wait for the 39mm and 880mm bars Hypertractionthingamajic. Comes in Blue Hawai, purple, brown and silver scratchnsniff finish
  • + 1
 Looks wonderful. Now let me get on my bike, and enjoy my bike with 31.8mm bars, im sure they will be in fashion again some time soon.
  • + 3
 My Suzuki run's a 7/8th's handlebar and a 1 in steerer.
  • + 1
 Yes I want a realy stiff hbar so my hands can go numb at the end of a long ride! Oh and I have to buy the matching stem because my stem won't work........brilliant!
  • + 1
 If you don't like it, you could always, you know... not buy it. 31.8mm isn't going anywhere so it's a moot point. It just means more options and that's a good thing.
  • - 1
 Slightly off topic but anyone remember american bbs on bmxes??? N now theyres mtb, spanish and euro bb!!!!! Wtf was wrong with usa bb??? Isis is the same and external bbs why put more material on the spindle (length) so easier to bend?? Try bending a 1ft long copper tube and then try bend a 1inch one basic engineering!! Isis kept all the gubbins compact and inboard, i weigh 20stone and 6"4 never had a prob with ma rf isis 3 years and still rocking!!!!!!!!!
  • + 2
 Someday they will be making hydroformed bars with fancy shapes just like modern aluminum frames.
  • + 1
 looking good but 800mm.. jesus.. I think I'm good with 750mm. That's about at my max for my height. Good stuff though Easton @_@.
  • + 1
 i´ve bught a 820mm bonetrage carbon bar with 31.8. so i throw it in the dumb along with my hope corwn/stenm combo and go buy a new easton
  • + 4
 TAKE MY MONEY PLEASE!!!
  • + 3
 I don't think it's standard when only one company is producing them.
  • + 2
 I think this is hella unnecessary.
  • + 2
 Who ever buys the bars....you may neeed a bigger shed door.
  • + 2
 I'm out, just can't find enough justification for those new standard.
  • + 1
 dude why the fudge...................... sooo gay im fine with my damn 31.8s
  • + 2
 "hmmm lets add 3.2 mm to the bar so people think its better!"
  • + 1
 Better throw away your wide easton bars. Does not look like they are save to use...
  • + 1
 Another 'standard'! At this rate well be needing scaffolding tubes for handlebars!!!
  • + 2
 Fucking industry with their new stamdard. Fuck them.
  • + 0
 I love my Havoc Carbon fiber (750mm) on my enduro bike... Thank you Easton for making the 800mm version happen for my DH bike!!!
  • + 1
 I'm just gonna duck tape a shovel to my stem seems about the same cheaper alternative
  • + 2
 Bring on the new-standard haters!
  • + 1
 Kind of like racefce atlas...
  • + 1
 But carbon!!! :O
  • + 1
 Hmmm. thats a biggin
  • + 1
 "Standard" made by one company
  • + 1
 new age new standard new cash
  • + 1
 Wow 362 comments. Yes I am a horrible typer, but a good rider ;-)
  • + 1
 i will stick with my havoc carbons thanks
  • + 1
 MMMMMMMM... that stem(direct mount) is pure beauty.
  • + 2
 More standards.....
  • + 0
 its not so bad, you just need a stem to be converted and its actually a significantly better design than whats out right now
  • + 1
 There is no point of carbon bars for DH. People need flexible bars!
  • + 1
 What makes you think these bars are inflexible?
  • + 1
 carbon
  • + 2
 not "flex" but the carbon bars do absorb stutter bump/hi speed vibration better than alu
  • + 1
 I am not saying you are wrong but from what I have red this is not true. Maybe I am not right Smile If properly made carbon is also stronger but if it brakes it will just snap, this is also a reason I won't buy these.. alloy might snap too but there is a large chance it will just bend and I will remain alive haha Smile
Cheers dude!
  • + 3
 I prefer aluminum too, but carbon cant be stereotyped as flexy or stiff. It depends upon how it is manipulated, manufacturers can make it do whatever they want.
  • + 1
 I'm really digging the wideclamp design, very moto
  • + 1
 Don't even think i'd be able to reach the grips Big Grin
  • + 0
 pretty sure i have seen a bar stem from , i think funn components that is 34.9mm bar bore /stem bore
  • + 1
 Yay new standards!!! Facepalm
  • + 1
 Some new standards are useless but I'm liking this one!
  • + 1
 ....sense?
  • + 1
 I have kohna handle bars
  • - 1
 Some day riders in Whistler they need a cut lots of trees because those wide handlebars change the world and fasion
  • + 2
 Congratulations, most poorly written post of the day! Just barely got it.
  • + 4
 Maybe you can respond in Polish ? nah I didnt think so..
  • + 1
 that stem is beautiful.
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