First Ride: The New Focus SAM is a 170mm Lightweight

Sep 17, 2018
by Ralf Hauser  


The brand that was started by bike legend Mike Kluge in 1992 is celebrating its 25th anniversary. A lot has happened with the company since the early beginnings. The company has been in a transitional phase for the last two years, pushing out stand-alone designs, adding renowned riders like Geoff Gulevich, Olly Wilkins, and young gun Axel Weinmann to its roster, and will soon be moving to new headquarters in Stuttgart west in Germany, to be closer to good riding spots, among other benefits.

The new Focus SAM has mainly been developed by lead engineer Fabian Scholz, with serious input from Geoff and Olly. Having seen how Fabian and the rest of the team can rip on a bike puts confidence in the know-how and dedication behind the latest addition to Focus' lineup.

Focus SAM 9.9 Details

• Intended use: enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 170 mm
• Carbon frame
• 64.8° head angle
• 428 mm chainstays
• Frame weight (w/o shock): 2.337 g (M)
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: S-L
• Price: €5,999
• Color: black/red
• Weight: 13.5 kg (w/o pedals)
www.focus-bikes.com



Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue

Frame Details

With 170 mm of travel, and building on their F.O.L.D. (Focus Optimized Linkage Design) kinematics, which is combining a multi-link shock actuation with a single pivot design, the new SAM is built for the rough. That doesn't mean that it's overweight, with the frame weighing 400 grams less than the previous design, coming in at a very low weight - for this class of bike - of 2.3 kg without shock for a size M.

According to Focus, F.O.L.D. is about traction and control, weight and acceleration. A one-piece rear triangle with no bearings close to the rear axle creates a stiff system that transfers power to the ground quickly, while the main link, guide link and shock create a low center of gravity and are sitting close together. Focus also concentrated on balancing the overall feel of the frame - they can control the stiffness of the guide link to make it a bit more forgiving, giving the rear triangle a bit of intended flex for better guidance and traction over obstacles, especially in off-camber riding situations. The leverage curve is regressive during its first phase of travel, and progressive during the second phase, past 55 mm of travel.

Made from carbon fiber, the 9.9 is the top-of-the-line model with carbon front and rear (a 9.8 version is combining a carbon front triangle with an aluminum rear), and is built from 411 separate carbon sheets with a dedicated carbon layup for each frame size.



Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue
The cobra-style top tube is adding more stiffness to the head tube area.
Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue
It also makes room for clean cable routing.

Focus SAM
Nice detail: the chainstay protector wraps all the way up to the seat stay.
Focus SAM
Stiff, yet light. The one-piece rear triangle holds tires up to 27.5" x 2.5".

Focus SAM
A rock guard covers the lowest part of the single pivot's front triangle.
Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue
It's a clean looking bike, with the line of the top tube running parallel to the seat stays.


Geometry

Focus' intent in regards to geometry was to build a fun machine with 27.5" wheels that speaks to a wide range of riders out there. They weren't trying to create the longest bikes on the market, so while the reach has grown from the previous model, don't expect to find any extreme measurements here. With only three sizes to choose from, sizing up is going to be difficult for taller rides.

The head angle has been slackened just a touch below the magical 65-degrees mark to 64.8 degrees. The 75-degree seat angle is measured at the saddle at its highest seatpost extension, compared to the usual measurement of a horizontal line from the middle of the head tube to the center of the seatpost at that level. So in regular terms of measurement, the seat angle would be even steeper. Super-short 428 mm chainstays add to the SAM's playful character.

The seat tube was shortened on all frame sizes to make room for longer dropper posts, while still maintaining room for a water bottle. Plus, the seat tube insertion is long enough to slam down a 125 mm travel RockShox Reverb on a size S frame, and a 150 mm version on the size M and above, all the way to its collar - great for people with shorter legs.


Focus SAM 9.9.
Focus SAM 9.8.

Specifications

Two models of the new SAM will be available, going for €5.999 for the 9.9 and €3.999 for the 9.8 version. The 9.9. comes with a RockShox Lyrik RC2 fork, Super Deluxe RCT shock, SRAM GX Eagle shifter and derailleur plus Race Face Turbine wheels. The 9.8 is equipped with a Fox 36 Float Rhythm fork, DPX2 rear shock and DT Swiss E1900 wheels.




The SAM doesen't take long to accustomed to, although it did feel smaller than what I'm used to riding. Studying the geometry specs, it might come down to the super-short chainstays that also shorten the wheelbase, compared to a bike with the same reach and front end spec but longer stays. Of course, each numbers are all over the board today, so comparing one company's size to another is somewhat difficult. Naturally, those short chainstays also provide the SAM with an extra helping of nimbleness that you wouldn't expect from a bike with a 64.8-degree head angle. and flicking the bike into and out of corners was a blast.

Our test trails were littered with small-to-medium-sized drops and every jump possible from mellow doubles to sizeable gap jumps, so the suspension was mainly confronted with dealing with hard hits and landings, rather than the successive hits you'd encounter in a rock-garden, with the exception of a few short root segments and braking bumps interspersed here and there. With limited time in real rugged terrain, I'd rather not come to a conclusion too prematurely, but it's safe to say that the 170 mm of travel take a considerable amount of guesswork out of your line choice. Up to a certain speed and/or level of hit, the rear end was gobbling up obstacles in a plush manner, but running the SAM with the recommended sag of 30 percent had me bottoming out in hard g-outs and over jumps constantly.

I stiffened the rear end to 25 percent sag, which did affect small bump sensitivity a bit and still had me use up most or all of the travel on every run, but not to the point where I’d force the suspension to bottom out harshly (except for when I came up too short or overshot landings, which I seemed to excel on that day). With more time, I'd most likely add volume spacers to the rear shock for added progression and peace of mind that the suspension could handle the big stuff without complaints. That way I'd be able to reduce air pressure down to 30% sag to regain that small bump sensitivity


Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue


Our early production models that we were sitting on were equipped with 55 mm long stems, compared to the 45mm ones that should have come with the bikes. While it seems funny that we'd consider 55mm stems as too long these days, I'm certain that the shorter version is going to be a better match for the SAM's overall handling. The 780mm wide BBB handlebar also had an odd bend that kept distracting me, and I wasn't a fan of the outer flange of the Race Face Grippler grips either, but those gripes are a matter of personal preference, and could easily be fixed. On the topic of components, the Guide RSC brakes seemed a little out of place on a bike like this - Codes would be a much better choice. Running a Maxxis High Roller II up front and Minion DHF in the rear is a rather uncommon configuration - swapping those around would make a little more sense.

All of that didn't change the fact that the Focus SAM was easy to handle and very predictable, even at higher speeds, and it excelled at getting airborne. Balanced and easy to lay sideways in the air, it didn't matter if the takeoff was flat or more shaped like a regular dirt jump - handling was simply confidence-inspiring, even when facing tricky landings.

Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue

Typical of a single-pivot bike compared to designs that decouple the rear axle from the suspension/braking movement, the rear end did stiffen up slightly under hard braking, although it was comparatively less noticeable than on a lot of other single pivot designs I've ridden in the past. I really can't say anything of value regarding the climbing capabilities of the Focus SAM, as we spent most of the day testing with shuttle runs, and my uphill experience was limited to some short ascents to the entry of the trails at the trail park and short stints at the Audi Nines quarry location. The little feedback I can give is that it looked like the bike wasn't really susceptible to pedal-bob and that the seating position allowed for an efficient pedaling motion.

My SAM 9.9 in size S had a weight of 13.5 kg (29.8 lb) with tubes (no pedals), which is pretty good these days for an enduro bike, especially considering that there were no fancy carbon components, except for the Truvativ Descendant Carbon cranks, to push down the weight. So if you chose to do so, the weight could most likely be dropped below 13 kg with some upgrades.

Focus wanted to build a fun machine to ride and I'd say, after spending an intense day on it, they succeeded. I wouldn't have been able to whip the SAM around over jumps, lay it over low in tight turns and point it down a pretty steep chute in a quarry if I hadn't felt as comfortable as I did, and that was without having had much time to get to know the bike at all. With more rugged trails still to be conquered on the SAM in order to get the full picture of its suspension qualities, I'm still contemplating if I'd rather spend more time on a larger frame size or stick with the playful geometry setup of the SAM I was riding on. No matter what, there's much to like about this bike.

Focus SAM Photo Christoph Laue






147 Comments

  • + 124
 No linkage compression video, no interest
  • + 23
 Well it's a single pivot, so you probably wouldn't have been blown away.
  • - 28
flag bishopsmike (Sep 17, 2018 at 5:16) (Below Threshold)
 So does the 9.8 version also use a flex-stay at the rear, but in aluminum? Scary...
  • + 8
 @IluvRIDING: It had a linkage for the shock so it would still be interesting
  • - 7
flag endurocat (Sep 17, 2018 at 5:31) (Below Threshold)
 @bishopsmike: The rear end is carbon in all models
  • + 21
 @bishopsmike: This bike doesn’t use flex stay, it’s a single pivot solid rear triangle. There’s no way you can make flex stays on a closed triangle...

Also, only Kona makes aluminum flex stay; and they break all the time.
  • + 6
 @bishopsmike: It's not actually a flex-stay bike. The rear end is a solid triangle from the looks of it and if you look closely at the upper linkage, you can see a little swinger piece that would allow for the slight vertical movement caused by the single pivot motion.

Not that's there's anything wrong with a CF flex-stay design (love my Decree).
  • + 1
 those are best ! cant tell a lot from that.
  • + 4
 @endurocat: The 9.9 is carbon/carbon the 8.9 is carbon/aluminum
  • + 1
 @Focus-Bikes: Thanks. I just saw your photo album and it has a picture of the aluminum rear end. Any chance that you guys will make a full aluminum bike?
  • - 2
 @big-red: can't tell if this is a serious comment or not....
  • + 4
 @Loche: Specialized also using alu flex stays on their Epic Comp. As well as Scott Spark. As well as Cannondale Scalpel))
  • + 3
 @big-red: Here you can find a more detailed look at our F.O.L.D. :
www.focus-bikes.com/fold
  • + 1
 @bishopsmike: I think you should look at the rear triangle again bud no flex stay to be seen only a solid rear triangle.
  • - 2
 Dammit I replied to the wrong comment... Should have waited to actually be awake.... One sec let me fix this...
  • + 1
 @Loche: this where my firat comment belonged... Lets try this again... Here we go.

can't tell if this is a serious comment or not....
  • + 1
 @Toutacoup: You're right, but these are all XC bikes. The Kona HeiHei Trail is a bigger bike at 140mm with alu flex stays...
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: Not sure which part of my comment sounded like a joke?
  • + 1
 @Loche: Only Kona? Off the top of my head I can think of Marin and other FELT models which use flex stays.. I'm sure there's others.
  • + 1
 @gnarnaimo: I believe Felt only use carbon flex stays, at least nowadays. Not aware of Marin using flex stays. But yeah I agree, my initial comment was restricting...
  • + 3
 @Loche: my son broke two kona's.....
  • + 1
 @gnarnaimo: Trail bikes? Giant Stance. Cannondale Habit. Pretty sure the Stance's are notorious for cracking.
  • + 1
 Nice looking bike but wish there was a real blacked out version without the huge FOCUS logo
  • + 1
 @Focus-Bikes: And what is the REAL difference between F.O.L.D. and BlackMarket's Hammer Link? I can see no difference.
  • + 1
 @Loche: Ah missed that obvious bit. Thanks!
  • + 1
 @big-red: Love my Decree too. And the flex stays have given me no trouble
  • + 1
 @Loche: We use flex stays as well in our Paralane, Raven and Raven²: www.focus-bikes.com/int/cia
  • + 1
 @Loche: The Giant Stance has alloy flex stays too, but they don’t break as much as the Konas
  • + 36
 No complaints that it's not a 29er was nice.
  • + 8
 Agreed. This is the first 27.5 review I've read in years that didnt mention 29ers.

And its refreshing to see a shorter reviewer. It seems like mos treviewera are in the 5'10-6'2 range (which makes sense, since most men fall in that height). But i, for one, am glad to see what other short riders thibk about bikes.

With an inseam of 28", i cant even straddle a 29er.
  • + 1
 @sixstringsteve: so all those ladies in WCXC can't straddle their bikes?

I, for one, would love to see the bike with 29" wheels in 130mm format. The new FOLD design is really aesthetically pleasing.
  • + 10
 @PHeller: i cant speak for them, but my legs aren't long enough to even straddle a 29" wheel. (Just the wheel, not a bike)

Ita just a matter of perspective. Imagine having wheels on your bike taller than your inseam. I'm not anti 29er, but i also admit that the relationship between a rider's size and the size of their bike is very important.
  • + 4
 @PHeller: they also have unexpected bails less than me (another hobbit) and also apart from pompom, aren't all the top girls on 27.5?!
  • + 2
 @sixstringsteve: But when you're on the bike you're 330mm+ higher than standing on the ground...

I get it though. 29" are very stable due to the BB drop so they're a bit of a pain to throw around for guys and girls with less mass/leverage.
  • + 1
 I’m around abouts 29” inseam and love a 29er but I agree with what @jclnv says. I can ride em fine on most trails but if it gets wild and/ or I need or want to manoeuvre the bike my smaller mass and leverage over the thing becomes evident. I found it hard to wrestle the bike back under control at times and obviously difficult to make shapes in the air but taller riders don’t seem to struggle as much. I think a smaller rider can still rip and appreciate the positives of a 29er but may feel the negatives more than taller riders is all. Having said that I don’t fully support the idea that 29ers are for taller riders and vice versa. A strong and aggressive short rider could still make very good use of one, I’m just a little too slight and ride conservatively I think. The other thing is I barely ever scrubbed my ass on the tyre. And I like manuals.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: who said anything about women's WCXC racers? OP stated that they struggle to straddle a 29r. Didn't state a gender of any type at all. Take it easy bud.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: You could go for the FOCUS Jam, 140mm trailbike with the F.O.L.D. system either aluminum or carbon/aluminum
  • + 0
 I thought it was at first. Stopped reading when I found out.
  • + 2
 @VwHarman: My point was, there are plenty of Women's WCXC riders who are shorter than the OP and get on with 29ers just fine.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: Thats like saying xc racers dont need more than 100mm of travel, so neither should I. This isnt an xc bike review.

"Getting on" with an xc 29er isnt my goal. If i were racing xc and my goal was fastest xc time, i would get a 29er and be fine and give up on manualling. Bunny hopping, and playing around on tge trail. But thats not my riding goal.

If im going to be buying a new bike, im going to want to do more than "get on" with it.

Id like to see these small xc girls on 29ers manual them, or comfortably hit drops, gap jumps, bunny hop, and slash corners.

Imagine someone 6'4 riding a bike with a 33.5" tire. Imagine what the chainstay length would need to be. Imagine how much body english it would take to get their butt behind the rear axle. Imagine how much effort it would be to manual, bunny hop, or slash corners. No doubt it would be awesome for xc, but would you really want to ride that as your main bike?

The point is, 29ers are great, but when you have short legs and short arms, the bigger wheel size isnt always a benefit. If you can barely get your butt past the rear axle, it wont ride very well.

The fact that most bikes have the same chainstay length is insane to me. Someone with a 36" inseam has the same distance to their rear axle as someone with a 26" inseam. We have a long way to go to make bikes fit people better, and a proper fitting bike makes all the difference in the world. Props to companies like norco who understand this.
  • + 14
 Say! I like the Focus Sam! I do! I like it, Sam-I-am! And I would ride it in a boat! And I would ride it with a goat... And I will ride it in the rain. And in the dark. And on a train. And in a car. And in a tree. They are so good so good you see! So I will ride it in a box. And I will ride it with a fox. And I will ride it in a house. And I will ride it with a mouse. And I will ride it here and there. Say! I will ride it anywhere! I do so like That Focus Sam! Thank you! Thank you, Sam-I-am
  • + 4
 @thebradjohns

I'll take a couple of ounces please
tup
  • + 2
 @Dropthedebt: of green eggs and ham or ?????
  • + 15
 Thanks for the review. More pictures online or in our album.
  • + 7
 What about AL version?
  • + 3
 @q232: There is only the 9.9 carbon/carbon and the 8.9 carbon/aluminum version.
  • + 3
 I like that you have a alloy rear triangle option, its a nice looking bike, i think you could do well here, i'm guessing Geoff Gulevich must be stoked to have this one come out. One thing i like in an enduro bike is adjustable geometery so you can slacken it out for park days and throw some beater wheels on it.
  • + 13
 They should do a new standard where they invert the taper on the fork.
  • + 19
 Totally. I'm really concerned with the level of flex at my stem interface.

But then two years later they'll realize they still want stiffness at the fork crown so they'll do a new standard that's 1.5" top and bottom, but in a metric equivalent so that it's still different from the last time that was a standard, and also so you can't fit any current components onto it.
  • + 7
 The extra brace on the seat stays helps if you want to convert to v-brakes. Nice touch.
  • + 12
 As someone named Sam, and someone who can’t focus. I can really connect with this bike on a personal level...
  • + 9
 Testing an enduro bike without testing his climbing abilities...well it's kinda incomplete.
  • + 11
 It’s only a “first ride” not a review. The tester is pretty clear about his limited time on the bike.
  • + 34
 It climbs like a goat, trust me
  • - 4
flag Balgaroth (Sep 17, 2018 at 5:29) (Below Threshold)
 Enduro bikes shoul dbe DH bikes that offer the option to pedal uphill, this has eagle transmission so it will pedal uphill and that's the end of it. If you want a climbing review look at XC bikes ...
  • + 10
 @Balgaroth: well Eagle wont help you much on a technical climb if the rear and hops around.
And techy climbs are fun.
A good enduro should be also good at technical climbing (Knolly Warden is a prime example)
  • + 10
 @Balgaroth: well I disagree alot, Enduro Bikes should not climb perfect but comfortable to reach the top with speed and without a painful face.
To go seamless into full sending mode with strength.

Bike's who can't do that are shit email Enduro Bikes, Park-Bikes...

The eagle don't tell what climbs well and what's not. My so called Super Enduro with 180mm of travel is super shit at climbing and lacks behind my sold 2015 SAM with 11-42 SRAM GX and 400g more heavy wheel set compared to the xx1 eagle + 1590g wheel's I have now.

If it is not efficient for pedaling your also total sluggish and can not accelerate when needed. On more mallow trail's you have no fun because you can not speed it up as a example why it is important to have that on a Enduro Bike.

If I want a DH bike who can climb I Look at freeride bike's who have the eagle.
  • + 4
 @vtracer Actually, the new SAM climbs like a Ram.
  • + 0
 Clearly not the bike for you if your concerned about the climbs.
  • + 6
 A linkage-driven variable-ratio single pivot that isn't built by Evil Bikes! Finally, Pinkbike readers will get to learn about this suspension design, even if it is four years late. That is a seriously clean looking frame design btw. No idea how it rides but it looks good.
  • + 2
 Trek and Kona fall under that category as well
  • + 1
 @kleinblake: The Kona Process line is single pivot but to my knowledge does not vary its leverage ratio using a linkage. The Trek ABP is also a highly modified single pivot but its modification to braking does not include a linkage-driven leverage ratio modification.

To my knowledge, the only bikes using a linkage to vary the leverage ratio of a single pivot are the Black Market Roam, the Evil DELTA, and the Sam. I think there was an aluminum north shore prototype that looked like the DELTA a while back but unsure if it ever reached production.
  • + 2
 @Mtmw: the seatstay and rocker would be the linkage that varies the leverage curve
  • + 1
 @Mtmw: How about the new Jamis stuff or the nonprototype Gambler? I hope to see more of this design in aluminum or steel, as the articulated rocker appears to remove some of the need for complex frame elements. The Sam is especially clean/minimal.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: new foes trail bike as well
  • + 1
 @kleinblake: So much for a minimal look, where the complexity is in the linkage--but thanks. I wonder how many bikes Foes sells yearly.
  • + 10
 That's one nice looking bike Wink
  • + 7
 Nice bike, seems well balanced. Good to see that there's still some companies concerned to create fun and nimble bikes.
  • + 7
 Hot damn, now I can no longer tell a SAM from a JAM. Can't you imagine how confused I now am?
  • + 3
 Damn
  • + 3
 @gnarnaimo: I wonder if it climbs like a ram?
  • + 1
 @jacksoneaker: and comes equipped with SRAM, but not a 29er is like a slaughter for a lamb but it’s good to the see carbon saving each gram
  • + 1
 I'd tell you to weigh them, but they both weigh 32 pounds: www.northernride.com/Focus-Bicycle-Weights-2019-s/2164.htm
  • + 0
 To da one on da flam Boy it's tough I just toss that ham in the fryin' pan
  • + 1
 No cypress hill fans in then lol
  • + 1
 @iqbal-achieve: It's been a while. I've got one on vinyl and another album on cd. It is only now that I recognize that sentence.

Music is always a bit of a niche thing. There is one sentence from my favourite band I thought would be appropriate here, but can never expect people to know their classics:

"Fake down to your pathetic narrow minded approach to life that reflects your lack of abilities."

Beautiful, innit? And then comes the guitar solo that got me hooked. Do you know what it is, without performing an internet search?
  • + 1
 @vinay: I thought I was really cool quoting cyp hill but probably just showing my age lol
I don’t know who that is even with an internet search! But I’ll have to give em a listen now, im not averse to a bit of metal. Only a bit mind
  • + 2
 @iqbal-achieve: Seems I mixed things up a little, sorry...

From "Mentally Blind"
What would you do without your pathetic narrow-minded approach to life,
that reflects your lack of abilities

From "Trapped in a Corner"
Fake down to your mind and appearance
You will fall short of the dreams to destroy
In time you will find yourself trapped in a corner
These four words my friend, I promise you will not forget
(after which that cool guitar solo starts)

Both are from the Individual Thought Patterns album from Death, 1993. This album definitely got me hooked to the band, still miss poor Chuck (died from a brain tumor back in 2001).

Today I received a couple of cds from Mayan. Their Dhyana (mindfulness) album (I pitched in for their crowdfunding campaign) along with some extra cds that probably won't be available outside said campaign. They even have a bike (motorbike or bicycle, according to them) related tune on the album:

mayanofficial.com/index.php/component/content/article/84-news/155-the-rhythm-of-freedom-lyric-video-pre-order-dhyana

A good mix of different styles of metal, and more. Enjoy!
  • + 4
 Looks like we have a new record, putting Yeti to shame. An almost $8000 bike with GX components and Raceface wheels??? Holy shit.
  • + 6
 Black, vertically mounted shock, clean lines. Beauty.
  • + 1
 I'm still trying to figure out the use of the "regressive progressive" leverage curve and I even have an o1e. It seems that if it's regressive from the sag point, you should be able to run LESS sag. But they put the sag point at like 30%.
  • + 5
 If you take a closer look at the video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=peflqTd2oMY

In the first phase, the characteristic curve of the rear triangle is degressive: the suspension responds extremely sensitively and absorbs even the smallest of bumps and dips, which produces the noticeable extra traction, compared to other rear triangle systems, that is typical of our F.O.L.D. system.

In the second phase, the characteristic curve is progressive in order to offer sufficient control even with stronger impacts, as well as prevent rim damage. Thanks to F.O.L.D., the suspension travel of the rear triangle feels longer than it is and ensures the rider has full control in any riding situation.
  • + 1
 @Focus-Bikes: I'm just trying to wrap my head around why the degressiveness of the first 30% of the curve makes it sensitive. I mean, I see that it's flatter at the peak, but it would seem that resisting going to 0 would limit how far the tire tracks down a ledge. So that the first 10mm or so would be rarely used in the same way the last bit of travel would be rarely used.
  • + 1
 @Focus-Bikes: is degressive the same as regressive?
The leverage ratio at the beginning of the stroke is a low leverage ratio that increases in leverage then switches to a progressive leverage ratio?
Thus the leverage ratio becomes lower a full compression.?
  • + 0
 @Focus-Bikes: Sorry, but that is complete BS and a lie. It is not that hard to understand and of course it is NOT good for small bump compliance to have a digressive curve at the beginning. I run a suspension design similar to this (luckily not that digressive) and the only real „cure“ for the not optimal curve is a coil shock with enough damping (not the best mid stroke support either). But I guess that‘s what happens when you let marketing muppets run free....
  • + 3
 @ArturoBandini:
Dear ArturoBandini, sorry but this is not true. The first degressive phase has a high leverage ratio and therefore a very good small bump sensitivity. To have enough midstroke support and bottom out resistance we made the leverage curve progressive from sag point on
  • + 1
 @Focus-Bikes: But how do you explain that nearly every bike magazine testing the SAM complains about either missing mid stroke support and a tendency to bottom out or missing sensitivity for small bumps. Since the team of focus has put a lot of effort into preventing exactly this, i wonder why this is happening. And what would you recommend to the riders to solve this problem?
Don't want to be rude, i'm just interested.
  • + 5
 No XL? i guess everyone in germany is under 180cm?
  • + 1
 Been waiting for this bike to come out for sometime... even more excited when I seen a few pop up at Crankworx in Whistler.

Severely disappointed though - No XL size, tyres (around the wrong way), brakes should be Codes, GX Group, Cockpit and wheels are second class too. Nothing seems right and the price doesn't suite.

What a shame.
  • + 4
 I have the 2017 model and I was very pleasantly surprised with how well it rides. I think this may well be my next bike
  • + 4
 Any good for the Megavalanche?
  • + 1
 Can anyone tell me what is the difference between the rear suspension system of Focus SAM and BlackMarket Roam?
They look the same for me. Check out yourself:
www.pinkbike.com/news/Black-Market-Roam-Review-2014.html
  • + 1
 If you take a closer look our linkage consists of 2 links, not of 1.
The GUIDELINK and the MAINLINK. The F.O.L.D. would be the same if we would connect the rear triangle directly to the MAINLINK, but there the GUIDELINK is in between rear triangle and MAINLINK.
Check www.focus-bikes.com/int/fold to see how F.O.L.D works in detail.
  • + 1
 I’m glad this is a 27.5........ it will be a welcome break from the “but it’s a 29er wahhhhhh” crying that some of 29 haters partake in.
  • + 2
 A good looking new bike. I'm not sure what to complain about right now. *edit* Never mind! There's no XL! WTF
  • + 1
 It may seem trivial but giving the growing number of tire companies settling around 2.6" tires, it seems like poor planning to limit the frame to 2.5s
  • - 3
 poof reading.
  • + 3
 @ColquhounerHooner: Try this: 'Stiff, yet light. The one-piece rear triangle holds tires up to 27.5" x 2.5".'
  • + 1
 It's a 170mm travel bike.
Most of the tires worthy of it are 2.5" or less.
  • + 1
 @acali: I've been running 2.6 tires on my 130mm trail bike for a year and the added grip is phenomenol and with more and more awesome 2.6 tires being introduced almost weekly it seems to be where the tire debate is settling.
  • + 3
 reach size is like so 2012
  • + 3
 You got the tires on backwards, DHF in the back High Roller in the front??
  • + 3
 best tire combo ever!!!
  • + 4
 So ur saying It’s the Cat’s Meow...?
  • + 3
 Unless you want more grip up front and better front wheel braking with a faster rolling tyre on the rear.
  • + 2
 The Highroller is without a doubt the best the front tire with the widest range through all conditions. But if you mount it on the rear it is gone within a few days hard riding. The DHF, on the other hand, gives a great cornering control on the rear with a smooth drifting ability on the back and lasts wayyyyyy longer! (We assume you have to pay quite a money for your tires)
  • + 3
 @Focus-Bikes: most people don’t understand that the minions a very specific tyre that only really works well in certain conditions. High roller is a way better allround tyre with unreal levels of grip over most conditions.
  • + 4
 That is extremely nice
  • + 3
 Looks decent. Linkage reminds me of the Blackmarket Roam
  • + 2
 If it was transition it would be the new
H.A.M. = hard as a motherf*!#er
  • + 1
 Seat angle measured at highest extention point(of seatpost)
This should be the standard.
  • + 2
 "Sam! Drink Orange Juice Concentrate to help you Focus"
  • + 3
 sexy bike tho
  • + 1
 As long as SAM specs SRAM, then I AM...uh....green eggs and HAM.....uhhmm......out of rhymes ... :-(
  • + 1
 After seeing 170mm travel I stopped reading, cause it's useless to me. But man, it's a looker.
  • + 0
 Lightweight... but so boring, awfully boring, aesthetically boring, germanly boring, and based on a short term carbon treachery.
  • + 1
 >> Frame weight: 2.337g

Smells like Germany spirit.
  • + 1
 You can omit the point there. It is just 2337g. Not down to the milligram accurate so nothing too German.
  • + 1
 Racist brake routing yet again. No sale.
  • + 2
 No beer bottle mount?
  • + 0
 Looks like a S... *cough* BlackMarket Roam sorry.
  • + 1
 Not as ruggedly handsome as a Roam, smaller too.
  • + 0
 a 29'' version would be nice
  • + 0
 bad spec for the price. seems kinda eh.
  • + 1
 No kidding... GX on an $8000 bike is absolutely ridiculous, and frankly insulting to the consumer.
  • + 1
 What?! no Knock Block!
  • - 1
 They lost me when I saw the PF bottom bracket
  • - 3
 Named like a session
  • - 2
 poof reading.
  • - 2
 buy a Jamis 3VO?
  • - 3
 This is primarily an electric moped company, so DO NOT SUPPORT.
  • + 3
 With all die respect...you sir or madam are an idiot.
  • + 1
 Hi @Casman86, did you check our bike range?
We are coming from a CX racing background and have tons of pure bikes.
www.focus-bikes.com/int
Enjoy browsing!
  • - 1
 Wrong suspension
  • - 1
 Looks like a slash.
  • - 3
 Still waiting for a bike that it's intended use is: having fun while riding instead of limiting me to a discipline.
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