Review: FOX Float X2 Shock

Oct 28, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
FOX Float X2 shock review

A little over a year ago the first images of FOX's Float X2 shock began to pop up, and by the time the World Cup downhill season began, a number of athletes were aboard the new air sprung shock, most notably Aaron Gwin, who ran the float X2 on his way to clinching the World Cup DH overall title. Gwin's already shown that he doesn't need a chain or tire to put down an outstanding race run, so trying to judge a component's performance based on his results doesn't really hold water. For that reason, we got our hands on a production model of the Float X2 as soon as we could and have been giving it a thorough shakedown over the course of the last three months.


FOX Float X2 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / downhill
• EVOL air sleeve
• Adjustments: high- and low-speed compression, high- and low-speed rebound
• Weight: 506 grams (8.5 x 2.5)
• MSRP: $595 USD
www.ridefox.com / @foxracingshox
Billed as FOX's “highest performing air shock,” and aimed at gravity-oriented riders, the Float X2 has externally adjustable low and high-speed compression damping, as well as low and high-speed rebound adjustment. The amount of ramp up at the end of the shock's stroke is also adjustable by sliding off the outer air sleeve and adding or removing volume spacers as needed. There are six sizes available, starting with a 7.875” x 2” option and going all the way up to 10.5 x 3.5”. Our 8.5” x 2.5” shock weighed in at 506 grams. MSRP: $595 USD.

FOX X2
A look inside a coil X2, which uses the same internal design as a Float. Photo: Mike Levy

What's Inside?

The Float X2 uses a twin tube design, which is pretty much what is sounds like – a smaller tube is situated inside a larger tube, with bleed holes strategically situated at the bottom of the smaller tube to allow oil to circulate as the shock goes through its travel. Credit goes to Cane Creek and Öhlins for being the first companies to bring this design to the mountain bike world back in 2005, although it had existed on cars and motorcycles for many years prior.

How does it work?

When the shock is compressed, oil flows from the main tube, through the compression circuit, and then through the outer tube's bleed holes into the area behind the main piston. On the rebound stroke the process is reversed: the fluid exits the bleed holes, travels back through the outer tube, but this time it travels through the rebound circuit. The use of one-way check valves ensures that the oil reaches the correct destination during the compression and rebound portion of the shock's stroke.

Low-speed rebound / low-speed compression adjustment: When the 3mm hex screw is turned to adjust either the low-speed compression or low-speed rebound (there are 24 clicks for each), it moves a needle valve that regulates the flow of oil. The smaller the port gets, the harder it is for oil to pass through – imagine a crowd of people trying to push through a partially opened sliding door – which means that the shock will either be harder to compress or rebound slower, depending on what circuit is being adjusted.

Now open that sliding door all the way and the crowd moves easily and quickly through it, which correlates with reduced compression damping and quicker rebound speed, again depending on which circuit is being adjusted.

FOX Float X2 shock review
A 3 and a 6mm hex key are necessary to dive into the shock's adjustments, with compression adjusted on the blue side and rebound on the red.

High-speed rebound / high-speed compression adjustment: High-speed rebound and compression are independently adjusted by FOX's Rod Valve System (RVS). Turning the 6mm hex screw compresses a spring that increases the preload on the rod valve's shim stack, causing a greater force to be required to open the check valves for each circuit.

Confused yet? FOX has put together an informational video that might help make all of this easier to visualize:



Setup

Unlike a suspension fork, the way that a rear shock behaves is also influenced to some degree by the suspension design of the bike that it's installed on, which is why settings may vary between different models of bike. For this review, the Float X2 was installed on a Santa Cruz Nomad 3, which uses a 8.5” x 2.5” shock for its 165mm of travel.

Setting up the Float X2 begins with inflating it to the same air pressure as your body weight via the Shrader valve on the air sleeve and then slowly cycling it through 25% of its travel without removing the pump in order to equalize the positive and negative chambers. Once that's completed, it's a matter of adding or subtracting air pressure until the correct sag is achieved, and then using FOX's guide to dial in the base line settings for the two compression and two rebound adjustments. Turning the hex screw for each adjustment produces a satisfying click, which makes it that much easier to keep track of your settings. After that it's time for the fun part – actually riding, and tweaking rebound and compression as necessary.

For reference, my final settings at the end of the test were:
• Air chamber: 170 psi
• Low-speed compression: 20 clicks (all adjustments are from full closed)
• High-speed compression: 21 clicks
• Low-speed rebound: 21 clicks
• High-speed rebound: 15 clicks
• Volume spacers: 4

Those setting are quite close to the starting point that FOX recommends, with just a little bit quicker rebound and slightly less HSC on my part to reflect personal preferences.

FOX Float X2 shock review
Those black bands are used to reduce the air sleeve volume and increase the amount of ramp-up at the end of the shock's stroke, a simple process that doesn't require any special tools to accomplish.

On the Trail

Much of my time with the Float X2 took place in Whistler, BC, an ideal proving ground for any component due to the length and the steepness of the trails in and out of the bike park. The standout trait of the X2 was how well it handled high speed washboard sections of trail, the type of conditions that were common this summer due to months of dry and dusty weather. The shock made it seem like those repeated bumps had been covered by a layer of carpet – I could still feel them, but they weren't nearly as jarring and painful as they could have been, and the feel of the shock never varied no matter the length of the run. At slower speeds, the performance remained just as impressive, with plenty of suppleness to keep the rear end velcroed to the ground for maximum traction, and enough support deeper in the travel to prevent it from wallowing. Bigger hits never posed a problem either, and with four volume spacers installed there wasn't any harshness at the end of the stroke. In short, the Float X2 just plain works – there were no weird noises, no odd spiking or fading, just an incredibly consistent smoothness no matter what nastiness I rolled through.

RockShox's Vivid Air R2C is currently the most commonly seen DH-worthy air shock, so it makes sense to take a moment to compare it to the Float X2. The X2 weighs 90 grams less (for the 8.5” x 2.5” version), and has adjustable high-speed compression damping, which the Vivid does not. It's also easier to add or remove volume spacers on the Float X2 than it is with the Vivid Air. As far as on-trail feel goes, both do their jobs incredibly well, coming extremely close to emulating the feel of a coil sprung shock. However, I will say that I ended up preferring the feel of the Float X2 on the Nomad over the Vivid. It felt “sportier,” for lack of a better term, with just as much suppleness as the Vivid at the beginning of its stroke, but a slightly more supportive feel deeper in its travel, a trait that comes in handy when putting the power down to pedal through rough sections of trail.


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesThe Float X2 is a highly impressive shock, with excellent performance out on the trail, and enough tuning options to satisfy even the pickiest of riders. The only thing that could make it even better would be a lever to quickly add compression damping when faced with a long climb, but by the sound of things this should be a reality sooner than later, although final timing and pricing have yet to be determined. When all is said and done, the Float X2 earns its place as one of the best gravity-oriented air shocks currently on the market, one that's capable of anything from World Cup downhill racing to rowdy all-mountain adventures in your own backyard. - Mike Kazimer



230 Comments

  • + 129
 A ccdb air comparison would have beenmore accurate it having all the same adjustments and all.
  • + 29
 Been running the fox back to back with a CCDBA cs on my patrol. It's basically as good a damper, with a better air spring because of the negative air spring design of the fox. A cane creek air with something like a corset would even it up, and if you like the climb switch feature of the CC tip it ahead.
  • + 6
 You can get an XV Can directly from Cane Creek if you want, and it's not expansive.
I think CCDBA can also be ordered directly with this upgrade.

www.probikeshop.fr/cuve-d-amortisseur-xv-cane-creek-double-barrel-air/97457.html
  • + 7
 The XV can doesn't change the air spring rates the way the evol or corset cans do. Those cans make air shocks feel much more coil like.
  • - 26
flag yoshiro (Oct 28, 2015 at 1:57) (Below Threshold)
 Its advantage is weight, good for weight weenies who wanna get their expensive rig smashed up with no damage . . .
  • - 7
flag oneloosecrank (Oct 28, 2015 at 4:33) (Below Threshold)
 I'm currently running a CCDB Inline and one thing I was disappointed with over the Fox DHX5 it replaced, is that the CS switch doesn't make as much difference as the propedal. The DB seems to loose nothing in performance to the coil though. This X2 could be the better option as long as the predicted 'lever' is as effective as the propedal dial.
  • + 14
 also running an inline in a SB66 here I think climb switch is genius, there is nothing comparable for technical climbs I also don't get the trend for bigger air chambers as I had to put a whole volume spacer in the shock to get a proper spring curve. after all nearly every trailbike is designed to work best with air shocks and therefore isn't that progressive...
  • + 3
 @CliffRacer, it's the exact same thing for XV Can. I suggest you read this :
www.canecreek.com/products/suspension/db-air/features

@bluechair84, I have the same feeling but the other way round. The DHX5 air pro pedal is way under damped (but I admit I have an old version of this shock so maybe they were tuned differently on the latest versions). The Cane Creek isn't a real lockout but it hardens the rebound too, so I get a more stable overall platform.
  • + 2
 @jzPV Same feelings on the climb switch, works so much better than all the other rather crude solutions on the market.

I guess the correct air chamber volume is highly dependent on your frame, i also had to add almost two full spacers to my air can. What i wouldn't on the inline would be a larger negative chamber for better small bump sensitivity.
  • + 3
 @bluechair84 If you'd done your research you'd know that it was never intended to do that, as it switches over to a "secondary valve circuit" which is independantly adjustable to the open setting, bot compression and rebound. Which, in theory, should give you the opportunity to adjust it to almost fully locked.

Note: I haven't ridden the DBInline myself, only the DBAir CS, which should be quite similar.
  • - 1
 I agree that the larger volume cans are over hyped. My debonair monarch plus on my enduro is way too linear. I have to run insanely high pressures and all the volume spacers to get it to not bottom out harshly on mild (3-4 foot) drops. I'm at 25% sag at 280psi, and my shock pump only goes up to 300, making it extremely difficult to get more pressure in there.
  • + 12
 @hamncheez - It sounds like the issue may be more related to your shock pump. The Debonair takes more pressure than the standard air can Monarch, up to 350 psi. And volume spacers are part of the tuning process, not a fault of the shock.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer From what other riders with the same bike but without a larger negative spring say the bike rides best around 30% sag; Im at 20-25% and still I bottom out too often. 30% feels a lot better on the trail but I can't run it that low, with every spacer in the can.
  • + 4
 @hamncheez That's the beauty of a shock like the float x2 or db air. You can dial on the high and low speed compression. The high speed compression would take care of that. The monarch + debonair is not that great. Definitely the least impressive larger volume shock that I have ridden/owned.
  • + 3
 @hamncheez i've found the opposite. compared to my fox shock my debonair bottoms out next to never and has way better small bump. I hear that evo's do have odd leverage ratio tho so that may be some of the problem. I know if you buy a corset air can for evo's they send you a special model unless your under a certain weight due to the odd leverage.
  • + 1
 @nismo325 The debonair is very smooth on the chatter, there I do agree. However I'm pushing 210 pounds, so everything is underdamped out of the box.
  • + 4
 @hamncheez stole this from vorsprung's website. not sure if this could be part of your problem but figured id point it out. "The Enduros use odd shock sizes. While one model did run a true 8.5x2.5, most models use shocks that are essentially an 8.5 x 2.5 length shock with a spacer inserted so that they bottom out prematurely (at 2.125" or 2.25" depending on your model).
2. Because of this, the effective compression ratio (of the air volume) is lower than a standard 8.5 x 2.5 shock. This means that air pressure does not build up to what it needs to be at the end of the stroke. This raises the pressures required, and most Enduro owners will note that they typically run higher air pressures on those frames than on other frames."
  • + 1
 @nismo325 Yes!! That explains so much! I actually am looking into putting a 650b shock yoke on my 29er to slacken it out (67.5 degrees is way to steep), since you can't use two offset bushings on Specialized bikes. Ive heard that the CCDBair uses just a spacer as well, so it bottoms too far and the seatstay bridge contacts the frame on bottom out. I hope the monarch doesn't do this. I'll contact rockshox and see what they have to say.
  • + 4
 Same situation here. Had a dhx air with the propedal switch and switched to a dbair cs. The big gain here is obviously damping but after a whistler trip and some all day epics, I'm certain that the dbair is on a level that the dhx cant touch. My experience has been that the climb switch makes a big difference in pedal bob and traction dispite my initial skepticism.
  • + 2
 @brutalpedz they're not the same. Corset and evol cans have a different negative spring that changes the way the air spring feels at the start of the stroke. It's outlined here: vorsprungsuspension.com/blogs/news/17163160-vorsprung-corset-air-sleeves-the-how-and-the-why
  • + 3
 @cliffracer He is having problems with bottoming out so it has nothing to do with the negative spring. if anything its caused by the shock having more air volume than the shock it was desinged for. Thats why at the end of the stroke its not producing enough pressure to keep it from bottoming out. i could be wrong but it seems to make pretty good sense. corsets add more air volume thats why they had the same problem.
  • + 1
 @CliffRacer thanks for the link. You're right, they're different animals. Corset changes the begining stroke and CC XV changes the end stroke.
  • - 1
 @hamncheez. try putting spacers in the negative air chamber as well.
  • + 2
 all the negative air spring does is reduce break away force. I don't believe you can even put spacers in the negative air chamber
  • + 1
 you can and people do tune the shock using bands in the neg air chamber
  • + 2
 I thought a bigger neg chamber reduces the threshold actuation (or breake away force) for small bumps so, what is the interest of reducing the neg air chamber ?
Also, it is impossible to access the neg chamber on a CCDBA unless you rebuilt the shock.
  • + 0
 We were referring to the monarch plus, which is way easy to get to.
  • + 2
 @poah tell me what adding spacers to the negative air chamber would accomplish? as far as i can see it would do nothing but mess with the break away force. If anything you would accomplish more by just adjusting the amount of pressure in the neg chamber. Also after a quick google search i cant find anyone adding spacers to the neg chamber or any info from rockshox about it. they only talk about adding spacers to the actual air chamber. not saying i cant be wrong but in not seeing anything supporting your statement.
  • - 1
 not all bikes benifit from a larger negative air chamber
  • + 0
 @poah That's what I call arguing... any link or tech talk to justify what you're saying ?
  • + 0
 look at the Vorsprung site
  • + 77
 How many clicks does it take to find the g spot?
  • + 58
 AH ONE... AH TWO... AH THREE. *CRUNCH*

I guess the world may never know.
  • + 54
 a few strokes I imagine
  • + 25
 use your two fingers thats the secret Big Grin
  • + 26
 That does not work any more, you now need some tools...
  • + 21
 I just spit coffee out my mouth. Classic Pinkbike comments.
  • + 23
 pun thread? ... that's a shocker...
  • + 40
 Finally a review of the Float X2...right after I bought a Float X
  • + 78
 You chose poorly.
  • + 37
 Hardly a "review" of a complex product with lots of functionality. So it's "impressive" with "plenty of suppleness" and "good trail feel". Just what i need to hear to part with $600.
  • + 33
 That's the point. Like choosing a 1000cc superbike. They're all good, just choose the one you like the look of.
  • + 10
 Sisandro... so you'd rather hear that it is "underwhelming" with "lack of responsiveness."

Hahaha. I feel like his comparison to the vivid really helped.

The basics of the review said this "it's going to way out perform any monarch plus debonair or FLOAT X type shock. It has incredible adjustability so you can tinker with settings unail your heart explodes, and out on the trails it tracks well, it is more reponsive and lighter than a vivid air, and seems to be a great option for dh/FR and hardcore downduroing.
  • + 1
 It's funny because I can't remember the last negative Pinkbike review about Fox/Rockshox suspension I've read. Honestly I think a comparison between two brands would be so much more helpful than a overly predictable review. Not saying I dislike the reviews (they're great!), just a suggestion.
  • + 13
 @kdstones, both brands are producing excellent products, but if you read closely you'll see that there is in fact a comparison between RockShox and Fox in this review.
  • + 33
 Fox is stepping up their game no doubts about it, if they could only step down their prices. In Europe Fox stuff costs nearly DOUBLE the Rockshox. They are on par or even slightly above Cane Creek and with those volumes I can't get it. I am saving some cash for the Black friday and I think it is going to be a black Rockshox thingy...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns, I'm also planning to buy some RockShox stuff this year (Charger damper and Vivid r2c coil), wondering when's the best time for it and where (which country/online?) to buy all that stuff. For Charger damper I could find no cheaper that approx. EUR300 including shipping. The same thing's with Vivid. Any advises how to get best for your money?
  • + 12
 Bike components de
  • - 21
flag JMBMTB (Oct 28, 2015 at 2:50) (Below Threshold)
 The Fox stuff is a fair amount better than the rockshox and cane creek though so i'd say the extra cost is worth it if you can afford it, if not then rockshox is fine but i find the fox stuff to be a fair amount better.
  • + 32
 If Fox 36 is a fair amount better than a Pike then according to last weeks discussion with Marzocchi hot heads, Mz 350 is tripple as good as Pike, which then insinuates that a 350 with Öhlins cartridge would turn me into Jared Graves.
  • + 1
 Thanks!
  • + 12
 If I am not mistaken, Fox is made in Taiwan and came creek is made in USA. Fox really should be cheaper.

I really like the new 36. I borrowed one for a couple of weeks. It was almost as plush as my marzocchi 55. I would definitely consider buying Fox if it wasn't so expensive. Until they drop their prices I'll buy something else every time. Is it better than a vivid air? Maybe. Will I be able to tell the difference? Maybe. Will I be poorer? Definitely.
  • + 2
 In Brazil Fox, RockShox, Shimano stuff, cost 4 times more...
  • + 4
 Fox products I've owned recently haven't made it past the two month mark without needing to be warrantied. And then warrantied again shortly thereafter. Fair amount better I think not, but we all have different experiences.
  • + 1
 @JMMTB So just to get that right, you're basically saying a Fox 40 Factory is twice as good as a Boxxer World Cup given that the Fox is twice as expensive?
  • + 4
 I have a 6m/o Pike whose 3-position compression dial does not work anymore (I am hoping a rebuild and bleed of the damper will cure this, as I would rather not have to send it back fot warranty). That "little" issue aside, the fork is a huge improvement over the FLOAT 34 that I had before, which never gave me any trouble but rode like shit. I did not want to upgrade to a 36 since I was pissed off at Fox for the piece of crap they had sold me. Now I am pissed off a RS for their inreliable piece of crap. Somehow I am sure that if I had gone for a Mattoc I would have been let down one way or another!
  • + 2
 At least RockShox will warranty your Pike for two years. I blew up both my Pike and my POS Fox CTD shock in the last Month. RockShox says no problem we will fix it. Fox says we will fix it but since it's one and one month old it's gonna cost you about $200 bucks. Shit I'll just bite the bullet and spend a little more and put a Monarch on my bike. I've only owned 1 Fox Fork that didn't need sent back for warranty service in less than a couple months. As for Manitou I never had one fail, fork or shock.
  • + 9
 I owned a 2007 Lyrik U-turn for about 5 years and the only thing I needed to do, aside of regular service, was a complete rebuild that costed around 100$ in all sorts of seals. Now I own a 2011 36 Van RC2 and it is fantastic. You will get what you want, you just need to wait 2-3 years so that natural selection can do it's job. Now we know for instance that Mattoc is a decent fork
  • + 3
 @gustavomurad. . . .that's because of your governments insane tariffs on imported goods. There are stores in Miami that staff only Portugese speakers because it is often cheaper to buy a plane ticket, buy stuff in the US and fly it back home. Common for high end electronics, luxury goods, etc.
  • + 2
 It wouldn't have anything to do with where you ride would it? Smile
  • + 4
 Here in freedom land, this shock is actually about 40 dollars less than a vivid air. So fox and RS are super competitive here in the states
  • + 0
 yep, that's why i stick with rockshox it's more wallet friendly
  • + 2
 From my own personal experience, Fox sets itself apart on quality. I am a bike mechanic by hobby, so I maintain my own fleet in addition to the bikes of a big group of other riders. Of course this still limits my experience to that group, but Fox's products have been unflappable in my experience. Of course I won't say they offer the best performance or features, but they WORK...and they just keep WORKING. I've had to warranty or fix Rockshox, Marz, and X-fusion stuff, but I have not yet had a significant issue come up with a Fox fork or shock.

So it's a small sample size, but it's more than enough for me to recommend Fox when a rider asks what the best quality fork/shock is.
  • - 1
 I'm with Fox on this one, had stuff from manitou, marzocchi, rockshox and fox on a variety of bikes and fox stuff has always blown me away with ita suppleness and simplicity, always sensitive to small bumps, quiet and hassle free... I've had nothing but dramas and poor/inconsistent damping from marzocchi, rs and Manitou stuff has been ok but just seems flimsier and cheaper than fox and less fit and forget, never could find a sweet spot with the damping adjustments etc
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns , Mattoc is a fantastic fork, fox is decent.
  • - 1
 The new and improved Marzoochi USA is now a true American company called DVO. That is what NOBODY is talking about!
  • + 1
 The only suspension product I've owned and had literally no problems with despite a total lack of servicing, is my DSP dueler coil shock. I've replaced the bushings in the rear eyelet twice, but never done anything else, because it hasn't needed anything else. I've found marzocchi's old forks to be reliable, along with my totem. I've found marzocchi dbc to be unreliable and difficult to service, which is where rockshox wins hands down. Fox, I've never been flush enough to own.
  • + 6
 @adustytrunkmonkey marzocchi was Italian and dvo is made in Taiwan by suntour, wtf is true American about that?! Dvo wins for biggest hype juggernaut though, they make boost, 'enduro' and deity components look undersold
  • + 3
 Santoman...sounds like the nut under your compression adjuster has worked itself loose. Mine did the same and after removing the adjuster and tighting down the nut (8mm I believe) all was peachy.
  • + 1
 thanks @ramjm2000, I hope you are right. I actually tried to remove the adjuster a few days ago, but the 2mm screw over the LSC dial was quite tight and I feared breaking something if I torqued it..so I postponed it until the weather turns too crapy to ride!
  • + 2
 the main issue with this shock is that like most of their other shock (modulo the RC4/DHX5/4) you cannot service it yourself (without special tools) and you cannot revalve it yourself since it has a the bolt that holds the shim stack with empirical size and not metric as the reset of the suspensions (including Fox's forks). and since Fox don't believe in having any dumping in their shocks/forks (they are using 4 in the fork and 4 in the shock base valve) - unlike RS for example, you cannot do much if you like to do your own maintenance/customization. RS on the other hand would sell you all the things you need to maintain you suspensions and to customized it. BTW this shock is almost a carbon copy of the vivid internally (in term of how it is designed) - and the fact that it has external HSC setting isn't help you much if the valving is off since it is only preloading the shim stack
  • + 2
 Scangan@ I agree with maintaining part. Fox is impossible For a normal guy to maintain where RS is a bit easier, now revalving you better have a clue about shim stacks. You need to let me in on "empirical" and "dumping".
  • + 4
 This shock being a carbon copy of a vivid is a bold statement. One is a damper and the other is a dumper. I am also extremely sceptical of giving home mechanics the ability to play with shims, when all polls seem to prove that people can barely operate knobs. A dude at Fox test camp has like 5 dampers per rider, a dyno and a large box filled with shims and valves. He does that for living, every day. He can quickly narrow down the choice, a home mechanic operates with 2 shocks at best and it takes him half of a year to go through 3 setups, while a professional does it within an houe
  • + 2
 Wiki. . . Exactly! In Motocross everyone fast sends their susp. In to get revalved by someone that knows what shims effect what. Now 90% of bikes come valved for slow fat guys with money, I will use Cane Creek db air cs as an example, good shock for 90%ers. But if your fast you run out of adjustments. not much tuning possible and a lot of these new shocks are designed with a set amount of tuning. I have not seen this shock yet but I would bet all the Fox guys Are on a custom valved shock.
  • + 4
 You can buy factory shim stacks. My friend got one for his Fox 40 last year. PUSHing a shock costs 200$ and they do a great job.
  • + 2
 Just got an old Progressive 5th Element rebuilt by Avalanche w/custom shimming, and it is amaaaaaazing. Way better than any off-the-shelf shock I have ever ridden.
  • + 2
 5th Element was Way ahead of their time. Awesome Shocks.
  • + 3
 @MX298 James Doerfling and the entire Knolly crew who ride stock DB's don't seem to run out of adjustments, I'd say those dudes are pretty fast. Oh and Kurt Sorge won rampage on a stock DB, he didn't seem too limited by adjustments. Sorry but that's just a ridiculous statement.
  • + 5
 I just wonder if this BS of one high end product being superior to another high end product will ever end? How the fk spoiled we are in general? Look, in less than 3 years Öhlins, the world's best suspension company, present in all the topest of the topest areas of motorsports, will dial in their MTB products. That will be THE end of evolution of "traditional" MTB suspension. Then someone may add electronics to it, giving you antisquat or extra plushness, an actual active suspension. By 2025 latest there will be NOTHING to improve, since nothing has changed in MX since age. Please imagine that and never ever say that CCDBAir is better/worse than Vivid Air. We are chasing seconds while we come late by minutes. Those who chase tenths of seconds have no bloody clue where the rebound adjuster is...
  • + 1
 @ctd07 I'm tired of a statement like representing your country be scrutinized into some narrow minded angle. Manufacturing. This is the end of 2015. It's called globalization and everyone who is smart fk'in does it! I said "Marzoochi 'USA'" as in the dudes who have gained years of combined experience working on suspension with a great mtb suspension company. Americans become inspired when they are oppressed, and take action to make things for the better. They saw a vision and innovated their own ideas. They are "true Americans" since they noticed a better opportunity of just being in charge of their own company. These guys are your fellow brother fighting the tough world. They're certainly not being a foxes ba-itch. They are not a wealthy elite trying to make more money. They are just going through the logistics of running a small business in the corporate world of suspension bullies. Loosen up and understand when someone says "American" it doesn't mean the narrow minded angle of ONLY manufacturing, it means the people and fellow brothers fighting the struggle. The True Americans also make a better beer than you Aussies. No offense to the "open" minded Aussies who can consider different sides of a statement. Support your neighbor, and live a good life with people who are passionate about what they do. Cheers
  • + 1
 I just watched Act of Valor and Lone Survivor. Americans are hard cunts. Please bomb those artificial islands in the Spratlys.
  • + 32
 Why not test a DH worthy air shock on a DH bike? Isn't that what it was originally intended for?
  • + 5
 Exactly..... its a different kettle of fish... I have a Void on my DH but I would never stick it on my AM bike.
  • + 2
 The similarities between a nomad and V10 are surprising when descending. This shock is for bikes in the 150mm and up range.
  • - 4
flag ktmrider173 (Oct 28, 2015 at 10:37) (Below Threshold)
 Because chances are it would have blown up easier.
  • + 14
 The second photo isn't the same shock. Am I missing something?
  • + 9
 looks like they blew up a dhx2 rather than a float x2. didn't even click for me until i read your comment haha.
  • + 11
 2nd pic is the coil version, not the Float as stated in the caption
  • + 1
 That is only to show the twin tube layout I think. They probably have not cut up an x2 yet :-)
  • + 5
 you are right, the second photo is the coil version. However, they both use the same system, just one uses a coil and the other obviously uses air
  • + 3
 true. you can also see the threads
  • - 1
 Also goes to show people don't read, just looking at videos and pictures!

Caption under photo reads : "A look inside a coil X2, which uses the same internal design as a Float. "
  • + 3
 ^no, Mike Levy fixed the caption sometime this morning.
  • + 9
 Without reading it. Same as everything else:
It's 14% better under pedalling forces than last year & more active on smaller bumps, with larger bottom out for a less linear rate... (Probably by a margin of f*ck all. Let's all get new shocks!)
  • + 4
 Username checks out
  • + 1
 Was it a close enough guess! :-)
  • + 1
 haha yes
  • + 2
 PFFFFF...... Just another great review for a Fox product.Time will tel if it is really as good as the review states. Untill now all i see are great reviews but expensive and overstimated products(mostly forks). Untill then i will stay with my CCDB cs.
  • + 6
 How does it compare to the Bos Void and the Double Barrel Air?
  • - 18
flag z-man (Oct 28, 2015 at 0:13) (Below Threshold)
 Not even close. The X2 is smoother and more sensitive than any damper out there. Coil included, it doesn't make sense.
  • + 6
 @z-man You've ridden every damper out there huh?
  • + 3
 I know it's not apples with apples but I have a CCDBA on an Ibis Mojo HD and the X2 on an HD3. They're both very similar but I feel that the X2 has better mid stroke support. And FWIW I weigh 285lb rtr. Oh and I prefer the adjustment on the X2.
  • + 1
 Any reliability issues? I'm a 'Dale as well looking at shocks
  • + 2
 I'm 255# and this shock is the first air shock that could handle my weight. I rode an X2 all summer with zero issues on a Bronson and loved it. I also rode a DHX2 on my Nomad and it too was amazing except I couldn't use a SLS Spring...had to jump up to a 575# spring. Good luck..I highly recommend them!
  • + 1
 Mfro, was the better mid stroke support on the X2 due to air spring curve or damper settings?
  • + 1
 I work with suspension, so I have ridden almost all of them. I have a lot of rear dampers at my disposal.
  • + 0
 Z-man, if I may use your expertize instead of questioning it...: I PUSHed my CTD Float on my 125mm Blur TRc. It made the rear end go from piece of crap to acceptable. When I Pushed RP23 on Nomad it went from ok to un-fkng-believable. I could ride it fully closed, yet thing was opening up on tiniest square edge hit. Current thing seems like it has half of the travel at best. Seems too linear. It basically seems great only in fully open but then it bobs like Nomad. It feels like it somehow has lots of HSC in closed mode. Should I stick in more volume reducers and slightly lower pressure?
  • + 3
 don't you work for fox z-man?
  • + 1
 I would need to know whether ts a boost valve or a Belleville Spring Design or BSD style RP23. Also the tune and BV pressure would be a piece of valuable information.

If you really want you can PM me photos of the damper and we can go from there.

I no longer work for Fox. Now I work at a private suspension centre/race team. Which is why I now have so many more brands or rear dampers at my disposal.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns

'unfknblvbl'. Smile

Fox products require far too much maintenance, imo.
  • + 0
 m0ngy - have you actually owned one? Since I became a weekend warrior after I got my kids, I service my RC2 unit once a year and outer legs twice a year. Shock - 2-3 times a year, overhaul once a year. Guess what, it doesn't explode.
  • + 1
 @z-man I may have discounted your opinion too quickly if you say you worked for fox and now at an independent suspension shop. Sorry about that. Too many fanboys out there.

So I'll ask you, what ride qualities make the X2 superior to the BOS Void, DB Air, and RS Debonair (In my opinion it's three closest competitors in performance)? And what is fox doing inside the shock to make that happen?

Also do you have access to a dyno for testing or are you basing your opinion off riding experience only?
  • + 1
 Curler - call me negative but it is irrelevant. Just because someone gets an access to a tool with potential does not mean he can use it. As soon as two dampers or forks are comparable, the eventual gains are so little that A-they are hard to get advantage of by an amateur and B-they can be easily adjusted to by a professional. Give me Float R and this Float X2, and we can talk about differences but when someone gives me Bos Idylle and tells me how much better it is than a Boxxer Team, I will tell him to go fk himself.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns In real world, practical situations for Cat 1 riders and below, I completely agree.

I mostly asked the question to scratch the itch of my technical curiosity. z-man is an industry insider who might be able to share some info and shed some light (Assuming he isn't going to just shill for Fox). He said the Bos Void and DB Air aren't even close in comparison so I'm just looking for a bit of explanation.
  • + 5
 So for enduro or (EVERYDAY RIDING) switch to a coil shock and for DH use a air shock that feels real close to a coil shock.
  • + 4
 It's Deeight time! Romic had twin tube technology circa 2003. Shame their quality control was so poor. The shock I had was awesome.....when it worked.
  • + 5
 Is no one gonna say anything about a pedal article being longer than a $600 shock review?
  • + 3
 Everyone's gotta different way of peddling
  • + 1
 I think this is incorrect "from full open" - I think you meant to say "from full closed" based on Fox's site and my own settings on my X2 (which I also have on a Nomad 3). Your settings are (if from fully closed and not open) are pretty close to my own. Though I'm not running any volume reducers. How much of difference do the volume reducers make? My current set up feels spot on without them. Thanks.
  • + 2
 @ridgerider - Good catch, you're correct. I've updated it. The volume reducers do make a difference by making the shock ramp up more towards the end of its stroke, but it takes a couple of them before you'll feel the change.
  • + 1
 Thanks! I understand what the reducers do, but did you ride it beforehand and then decided you needed them? Like I said, I'm running the same shock on the same bike with essentially the same settings and I'm quite happy with the performance. Did you find the end of the stroke was too harsh or it wasn't ramping up fast enough - which is why you added them?
  • + 3
 I added them to make the shock ramp up more - to make the shock feel more progressive later in its travel.
  • + 1
 MIke, what is your weight?
  • + 3
 @derrickt - I weigh around 155 pounds.
  • + 6
 @mikekazimer eat a burger Wink
  • + 1
 @ridgerider I'm struggling with a tune for my Nomad CC 2016. What is your rider weight, I'm curious about the "no" reducer direction. Mine came with 3 installed. Can't seem to find a setting that deals with the square edge impacts. I tried the tune above but didn't get close to full travel. My rider weight is about 185-190. Thoughts?? My air pressure is 215 to get 19mm of recommended sag.
  • + 1
 @singletrackmarketing: Did you ever get your X2 settings dialed in? I have 3 volume reducers and can't get the shock to perform on fast chunk - I get full travel though. Would be stoked to hear what you settled on and why!
  • + 1
 I've since installed 4 bands in my X2 and run 185 psi in my shock, I'm about 177 all kitted up (173 on my bathroom scale). Since adding the bands, the bikes sits higher now and just feels better overall.
  • + 1
 @ridgerider: Nice thanks! Are you running recommend HS and LS rebound and compression settings?
  • + 1
 @nicolai12: My settings are spot on to what the reviewer above ran, I didn't like Fox's recommendations at all.
  • + 1
 I'm running this on my Pivot Mach 6 carbon. The bike was a weapon on descents before the shock was installed, but since I've installed it, the bike feels even more solid! @mikekazimer was spot on when talking about the bumps and big hits on the trail. It absorbs them so well, keeping the bike feeling smooth and significantly reducing the jarring feeling. It also climbs pretty well! I used to run a Float X, and would often chuck it in trail mode for climbing. I haven't noticed any more pedal bob since moving to this shock.
  • + 1
 Did you have to do any modifications to run it on your Mach 6?
  • + 2
 @btreglia nope! Just took out the float x, put in the float x2. Here's a photo of my bike with the new shock

www.instagram.com/p/7w0dxwsqtt
  • + 1
 Nice!
  • + 1
 I bought this shock and put it on a Intense Carbine 29 (with Fox36 Fit upfront). I have no issues pedaling up when needed and when I need to head down it does beyond what I thought. Wheels stick to the ground when needed and responds to the terrain as I had hoped- hands down better than any previous shock I ran in the past on even my V10. Very responsive. But a proper set-up from an experienced mechanic is best way to get those results.
  • + 2
 Mind sharing your weight and set-up (psi, hsr, lsr, hsc, lsc) with fellow c29 riders? Cheers
  • + 1
 @smuts: I had the guys at Dirt Labs in Boulder, Co set me up proper.
  • + 1
 f*ck, is NOTHING sacred any more!?
There are PLENTY of shocks made for 'Enduro' bikes. Fox itself makes TWO? The Float X and DPS.
Thankfully, Fox STILL believes that downhill bikes deserve their own freaking suspension pieces(unlike fricken Cane Creek).
Downhill bikes are heavier and ride differently than Nomads, therefore this 'review' should've been done aboard a DEDICATED DH BIKE!
I'm now gonna go look for an actual review that used the RIGHT DAMN BIKE
  • + 1
 Can anyone address the issue these shocks have with the air cans popping open under normal riding conditions? There are more than a few of these models out there that have come un-corked on trail because the can only takes a quarter turn to pop it open. Anybody have expertise in this matter?
  • + 1
 It is a lot of money, approximately £450-500 in the UK, and CCDB and Float X's weren't much cheaper which is the main reason I opted to buy an old DHX5.0 air off here for $100 and sent it to Avalanche Downhill Racing to have their SSD mod done. $199 later (+ $25 for a new IFP and $40 shipping to the UK), and I had myself an awesome shock.
  • + 3
 Have Avalanche do your forks too. . . . Then your done!
  • + 1
 Also get the corset air sleeve Wink
I'm considering doing the exact same thing on my dhx air, except in reverse order (air sleeve -> SSD mod).
  • + 1
 @MX298 - I also had Craig do my Pike so I'm sorted :o)
  • + 2
 Blew out couple of charger dampers, got a couple of Craig's cartridges. Not cheap but maybe the best upgrade you could ever do!
  • + 3
 So you measure the length with inches and the weight in grams. Why not go all metric and be done with it!!
  • + 0
 They leave out the part about how this shock eats travel, and is nearly too active for most trail bikes. Makes a great nomad/whistler shock no doubt, but all the intermediate riders who go out and buy this shock for their trailbike probably don't realize that mushy coil dh feel doesn't make you better. Just more bandaid technology. They didn't lie tho when tbey said it makes trail chatter disappear. It does do that well.
  • + 5
 That's what volume reducers and air pressure are for. Turns a heavy hitting trail bike into a monster. Exactly what some of us are looking for.
  • + 6
 @dualsuspensiondave is right. You could also increase the low speed compression slightly to give it better pedaling performance - that's the beauty of having all those adjustments.
  • + 1
 Trust me, I tuned mine to perfection. Was a sick shock for sure, just ate up the DH, 4 spacers, and bunch of valving...still ate travel too easily. Was loving it no doubt, but when I put my inline Cane Creek back on, I missed the munchability but it opened my eyes to just how easily that X2 moves and uses travel. Nice to have more of a firm platform. I feel the X2 likely has too big of a negative spring volume....why they don't make that more tunable, (maybe it is?) I'm not sure....
  • + 2
 @Yody it's probably the sticky air spring in your CC Inline that you are refering to when you say "platform". Both of those shocks should have comparable damping tuneablility since they are based off of the same Twin-Tube architecture. What bike did you have it on?
  • + 1
 ibis HD3. I think its the bigger negative air volume. It wants to suck the bike into its travel. The bigger the negative it seems, like the debonair, the more plush it rides like a coil. The downside of all that (including reduced stiction) is that it feels great going downhil, but anywhere else where you need to be able to load the suspension and push against it, it just pushes too much and makes the bike chopper out and when you want it to push back a lil......
  • + 3
 the HD3 has a progressive rate in the first half and regressive rate in the last half of the travel, I think that combined with the larger negative air spring might be why the X2 was wallowing or lacking support in the midstroke. I bet it works better with a Float X Boost Valve than the X2. Thanks for the info Yodi, Cheers!
  • + 1
 I am running the X2 on the HD3 with 3 volume spacers and no issues with wallowing - flies up the ups (I always run firmer side of LSC on reccomendations) and is still great on the downs. I found four spacers were too much for me as I wasnt getting the last of the travel otherwise. Dont get me wrong - there is movement but I wouldnt describe it as wallowing. Very similar to how the CCDBA I ran on my Mojo HD.
  • + 3
 How does it compare to a DVO Jade shock on a trail bike such as an Intense Tracer?
  • + 4
 They make one for the specialized enduros?
  • + 1
 From what I understand, they dont. Frown
  • + 0
 I don't understand the thing with high speed rebound?
The force that drives the return stroke comes solely from the spring, and it is greatest when the damper bottoms.
At that time (big hits, landings, g-outs) I want more rebound damping to counteract the force of the spring and keep me on the bike.
In the beginning of the stroke I like to have less rebound damping to avoid diving at brake bumps and roots at speed and keep the damper sensitive.
This shock does the exact opposite, can someone explain?
  • + 2
 @Drybear, those characteristics can be achieved with this shock - high and low speed rebound damping are adjusted independently, so if you want it to be quicker at the beginning of the stroke (slow speed), and slower at the end (high speed), it's simply a matter of figuring out just how much damping you prefer, and turning the adjusters accordingly.
  • - 1
 I dont think so.
At the beginning of the stroke (slow speed) is only one of the ports open which means high restriction/damping.
At the end of the stroke (high speed) is both the high and low speed ports open which means low restriction/damping.
  • + 2
 You're forgetting that the oil pressure is changing as the shock goes through its stroke - forcing all the oil through just one needle valve during high speed impacts wouldn't work well. Believe me, the adjusters work as they should.
  • - 4
flag Drybear (Oct 29, 2015 at 10:59) (Below Threshold)
 No I am not forgetting anything. If the force from the spring is high (end of stroke) you need a greater restriction ( smaller hole) to keep the same speed on the shaft.
  • + 0
 Since I put a X2 and a 36 160mm on my Tallboy LT about a month ago (along with wide carbon rims), my riding has jumped to the next level. The small bump absorption is amazing. I can really notice the increased traction on off-camber roots and Im bombing thru the rocks like never before. The shock is extremely active, so you are used to having a very firm platform for climbing then get the x or wait till next year. take time to set it up, and find that balance for XC. I found that 1 click of low speed compression can make a big difference in climbing feel. For those who moto the trail, like a plush ride and never lock out, then this is the shock for you.. Braaap
  • + 4
 Having a shock without tool-less adjustment is just bloody stupid.
  • + 5
 yeah, well, that's like, your opinion man
  • + 1
 "Credit goes to Cane Creek and Öhlins for being the first companies to bring this design to the mountain bike world back in 2005"

Did Romic not bring out their twin tube shock around 2001?
  • + 0
 can someone please explain to me how a bike can have 200mm of rear wheel travel with this kind of shock? I just had a confusing suspension epiphany that the travel in rear shocks is obviously not as much as the fork (just looking at the stanchions), yet the wheel travel is balanced front to back. How?
  • + 16
 The rear swing arm creates a lever so the wheel moves 200mm but the shock moves 100mm
  • + 11
 leverage ratios
  • + 39
 Magnets
  • + 9
 Leverages my dear Watson. Physics 101 Same was as you use long lever to lift small but heavy object. Longer the lever, more travel you get.
  • + 24
 Aliens
  • + 11
 Supplementing shoshy 's comment, you'll notice that your shock has roughly twice as much pressure as your fork because your fork is 1:1 but your shock is could be around 2:1 so it needs twice as much pressure to move it the same distance.
  • + 0
 ...sorry, move the wheel the same distance.
  • - 1
 Magic
  • + 7
 unicorn farts,,,duh
  • + 3
 double rainbows
  • + 1
 I got mine 3 months ago on an Ibis HD3 and I've had a total failure (explosion) of the shock. Anyone else experience this? Fox was great about fixing it, but makes me weary now when I approach and hit bigger features.
  • + 0
 Would like to know if anyone fitter this shock on the new Demo. I have installed it and have added 2 more spacers to it, to prevent it from bottoming out with 30% sag. My weight is 90Kg and with 230Psi pressure. So far it is working fine, but would like to know if anyone have a base settings for the Demo 8.
  • + 1
 Does it work with 32 to 36 degrees Celsius ,or does it still gets stupid and stiffer and with its own will ?bring that spring thing with a lock please
  • + 2
 This summer in Whistler 0 problems in a Norco Aurum.
  • + 1
 Anyone know if this will fit on a 2013 Jedi? Just returned a ccdb air because it wouldnt fit even though ive seen em on jedi's.
  • + 1
 Larger air cans are for lighter rider, the new cans with the bigger negative chamber increase small bump sensitivity.

Is high speed rebound nessary?
  • + 3
 I added a bit of high speed rebound to my DBInline (over the recommended tune) and it increased the control launching off high speed stuff where the shock compresses pretty far before coming off the lip. No more pitching forward.

So for me yes, it's nice to have the ability to increase rebound damping from deep in the stroke and not slow things down too much on the smaller chatter.

A single rebound adjustment is going to require more compromise.
  • + 2
 $600 shocks have only one disadvantage - not enough qualified mechanics to service them
  • + 1
 I have this shock on my Evil Insurgent and I have 0 regrets. I was iffy coming from a coiled DHX 4 and this feels much better and also lighter
  • + 0
 I don't think you understand how jealous I am of your ride
  • + 2
 lol. It was a nice upgrade coming from a '10 Glory 00
  • + 1
 I am also on the Nomad and wonder what you weigh Mike. I see where you list your settings you settled on but that detail will help when it comes to PSI referencing. Thanks.
  • + 1
 I weigh 155 pounds.
  • + 1
 The Float X2 has been available since may for $800 CAD at Dunbar cycles.

I've had one for a long time. The thing is insane and has forced me to rethink air dampers.
  • + 1
 That's crazy mad hysterical yol! what would you change? does it drink too much Fago?
  • + 3
 What I wanna know is, is it better than the dhx2?
  • + 2
 performance wise i'd say it's so close it would be hard to notice maybe with the DHX2 having a slight edge with how plush it is but then the X2 is a fair amount lighter and is still virtually identical in performance so i guess it's personal preference.
  • + 1
 Yer, I'm running DHX2 on my dh rig and I just wonder how it could get much better
  • + 1
 yeah i think it's basically just weight to be honest, both are great shocks though
  • + 2
 I'm very happy with mine using it only for DH.

Does anyone knows how it's compared with the Bos Void?
  • + 1
 Anyone know where you can get the volume spacers online? Local dealer hasn't got them
  • - 2
 REALLY PINKBIKE??? A shock with 6 different adjustments and your recommendation to make it better would be another adjuster dial... between high and low compression, high and low rebound, air pressure and air volume you would have thought you can find a happy medium to not need pedal assist
  • + 10
 The dial is external, allowing for compression to quickly be added without needing to break out the allen keys. Like this: www.pinkbike.com/photo/12516871
  • + 2
 Delete the comment, change the photo caption.... No one will ever know
  • + 1
 looks like some kind of time travel device
  • + 1
 What does "slowly cycling it through 25% of its travel" mean please????
  • + 1
 I love this design. Just regret I cannot afford it at the moment Frown .
  • + 1
 nice video showing oil flow
  • + 1
 Climb switch with be next year on the x2 Wink
  • + 1
 I'll stick with my 11/6 for now thanks.
  • + 1
 $600 for a rear shock. It better do the dishes too.
  • + 1
 A vivid air is about $700, db air cs is $600, db inline is $550.
  • + 2
 Not saying that there aren't expensive shocks out there. More commenting on the overall pricing of rear shocks as a whole.
  • + 0
 Meh, that's not that much money considering the difference it makes (when considering how expensive bikes and other components are). Now that elevensix is ridiculous in price though. I will say that service price for a rear shock is crazy. It's about $200 for a rebuild.
  • + 1
 MIke, how much do you weigh? 170lbs?
  • + 0
 I got leaks for $5, leaks for $5, can I get $10?
  • + 3
 Leaks as in we knew well ahead of time that this shock was coming or that this shock will lose pressure due to an inability to contain it in its chamber.
  • + 8
 I think he's trying to sell soup ingredients...
  • - 2
 Thats À weird looking ccdb. Gotta hand iT to fox. They made à decent shock. Really good from them. God knows, maybe they even give iT à Nice ctd option for 2017......
  • - 1
 Anyone had time on the x2 and the vivid air? Can't decide which one to get for my Spartan
  • + 16
 Me. But you'll have to read the review to find out what I thought.
  • + 1
 ZING!
  • + 2
 I had the Vivid Air in the Nomad and in my old V10 and the X2 in the Norco. The Vivid is a great shock, maybe it's better value for money than the Fox. The Fox feels a little better but not a big difference. Maybe the biggest difference is the temperature issue. The Fox has better performance in longest sessions.
  • - 1
 is it to much to ask to not have to pull out a tool to adjust my suspension?
  • + 0
 Went with a new Float X and I'm 100% satisfied.
  • + 1
 Oh...FOX Kit Kat
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.135549
Mobile Version of Website