Gore Pro Jacket - Review

Jan 26, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  

Gore Pro Jacket

Gore invented the breathable, three-layer sandwich that quickly became the basis for nearly all waterproof performance gear. For those not up to speed on the concept, a thin layer of porous foam is bonded between two layers of fabric. The holes in the sandwich layer are small enough to allow water vapor to pass through, but not water in liquid form. Jackets made from the stuff can keep a sweaty athlete dry inside, while managing to ward off the elements from the outside.

Exactly how and from what the Gore-Tex composite layers are constructed has a lot to do with how well the garment will perform that magic. Today's review item: the One Gore-Tex Pro Jacket, is built from that brand's elite level material by the same name, and constructed using every trick in the foul-weather handbook. It's available in black only and in small, medium, large, X-large and double-X, with a wallet-blistering MSRP of $500 USD.

Gore-Tex Pro jacket review


Gore-Tex Pro jacket review
Pro Jacket Details:
• Gore-Tex Pro laminate: waterproof, windproof and extremely breathable
• Polyamide fabric outer layer for durability
• Two front zip-pockets
• Fold-away drop tail
• Reflective elements on hood and sleeves
• Adjustable cuffs
• Dual=adjustable hood
• Two side-zip ventilation openings
• Fleece-lined, high collar
• Napoleon phone pocket with zip
• Black only, in sizes: small, medium, large, X and XX-large
• MSRP: $500 USD
• Contact: Gore Apparel


Construction

From the outside, Gore's showcase jacket looks simple - almost plain - but inspect the inside of the garment and you will see how well it has been constructed and marvel at its impeccable detail work. The taped seams, sealed zipper treatments and shock-cord hood and waist adjustments are so accurately applied that they appear to be graphic treatments, and everywhere there might be a wear point or a buildup of stress, you'll find a bar-tack or a reinforcement patch.

Gore-Tex Pro jacket review
Inside, there is a layer of comfortable, rip-stop fabric. The seams and zippers are meticulously sealed with bonded tape.


This jacket is designed as an outer layer to ward off rain and snow and as such, has no insulation. The outer fabric is a Polyamide (the generic name for Nylon) material crafted to resist abrasion and treated to bead off water. The rear panel of the jacket is dropped slightly and inside, there is a snap-up flap that extends the back by another three inches (75mm). The non-detachable hood has a reflective visor, and is designed to fit under a helmet. The hood can be adjusted independently from each side with small shock-cord draw-strings to maximize peripheral vision. The shock cord waist adjustments are inside the zip side pockets and both the hood and waist cords are designed so that they cannot be pulled through, either by errant use or a persistent washing machine.

Gore-Tex Pro jacket review
You can fine-tune the shape of the hood with independent left and right-side draw cords.
Gore-Tex Pro jacket review
A wind and water protected Napoleon pocket provides easy access to your phone.


The zip-up turtle-neck has a comfortable, velvet-like material inside and a waterproof outer. It is tall enough to hide under a full-face helmet to keep water from dribbling down your neck, and also to insulate it from any contact from the flapping hood when that is not deployed.

Should you produce more moisture than the Gore-Tex Pro material can expel, or simply need to reduce the temperature inside the jacket, two large side zippers are placed where the open panels will deflect wind-blown rain or snow, while maximizing ventilation. In theory, the breathable Gore-Tex material that the jacket is made from would provide more than adequate moisture control, leaving the vents to function as temperature regulators. If more ventilation is needed, however, the jacket's main zipper has two pulls to direct air from above or below the front panels.

Gore-Tex Pro jacket review
Two substantial side vents serve as temperature regulators.
Gore-Tex Pro jacket review
A concealed flap further extends the dropped back panel.


Gore's designers minimized the external features to the essentials, with two side zip-pockets and a convenient phone pocket that is protected by a flap mid-way down the jacket's front zipper. The fit is listed as "comfort" - a looser cut than what you'll find on, say, a racing jacket - but it is tailored for elite-level athletes and thus, may be a tighter fit for North American riders who tend to be chubbier than their European counterparts. Gore officials say that the fit is designed to be looser than a road or a cross-country racing jacket, but it is intended to be on the snug side to assist the transfer of moisture from the inner garment through the Gore-Tex barrier.


Ride Report

I had the opportunity to review the jacket without any preconceptions. A friend was in town. A winter storm was raging, I had committed to a long ride in the mountains, and there was no alternative date. Both of my go-to jackets were unavailable, so I opened my drawer of review items, grabbed the first jacket I found, ripped it from its plastic sheath and threw it into my gear bag.

We started in blowing rain and snow, descended a thousand meters with a few extended climbs tossed in to keep us honest, and through it all, I was never out of my comfort zone. I opened the side vents on one of the first climbs and left them open for much of the splash-fest, which should have drenched my base-layer - but my core stayed dry from beginning to end. I never overheated - which was a first for me. I was drenched to the bone everywhere else, but when I removed the jacket, my base layers were dry.

Even a blind squirrel finds a nut every once and a while. I could have been lucky that day and worn exactly the right combinations of base-layers under a mediocre rain jacket. Successive storms and abnormally low temperatures for California, however, afforded me the opportunity to try the jacket in a wider range of conditions - all of which ended with similar results. Impressed and curious, I looked up the jacket on the Gore web page and was not all that surprised to discover I had been wearing their five-hundred-dollar flagship rain jacket.

Technically, I found little to complain about. I would not have chosen a jacket with a non-detachable hood, and I prefer the hood to fit over my helmet. The Pro jacket's extended "turtle neck," however, eliminated any sensation that the hood was back there and over time, I came to appreciate wearing the hood under my helmet. Wearing the hood on the outside often creates scoops on either side of my neck that funnel frigid air towards my ears. The Gore jacket didn't do that. I liked the simplicity of the elastic draw strings at the hood and waist, but I found it difficult at times to operate the hood's hidden, cord-release tabs (they are concealed between two layers of fabric) with numb fingers. I liked the jacket's more tailored fit. I wear medium everything and the medium size moved well, both while I was climbing and when I was pushing my luck on the descents. Considering its sticker price, I would still advise non-professional athletes to try before they buy.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI won't lie to you. Five hundred bucks is a lot to pay for a rain jacket. That said, I was discussing the Pro jacket with a friend who designed climbing gear. He said that, 'all the top brands make one cost-is-no-object jacket to show their stuff. They don't sell a lot of them, but as you discovered: when you use the best materials and construction techniques, the end product is pretty damn awesome.' That sums it up for me. - RC





160 Comments

  • + 72
 I understand the price, I have some goretex pro ski apparel and the stuff works. However, I'd never spend $500 on a MTB jacket. I retire my old rain shells to MTB use and typically wind up ripping a hole in them within the first few rides. Ripping a new $500 shell would just hurt too much!
  • + 15
 ^^^ this. Gore-Tex Pro is amazing stuff but who in their right mind would wear a new piece for MTB if they have to pay for it.
  • + 18
 Just buy a mountaineering/ice climbing jacket in a sale, lots of more choice...and far better functionality: Also you can wear it when you're not on the bike without looking like a monkeyass
  • + 2
 But you could use it for MTB, Skiing, Rain gear, so it would be a great all around jacket! I always buy shells one size too big so I can layer up if in the snow! Gortex is good stuff, so the price pays for itself!!
  • + 7
 For 500 bills it better be crash proof.
  • + 2
 I was lucky enough to get prodeal pricing on a northface goretex rain jacket/lightweight shell. Absolutely love it and even though got it for a bargin very carful and look after it keeping it clean and most importantly look after the DWR with Nikwax every couple of weeks with heavy use. But $500... I'd get a good ski jacket at the turkey sale 1/2 price and a cheaper goretex rain jacket and be happy!
  • + 6
 I believe I bought my first DH sled, a Spesh Big Hit for $500. It came with xc forks, but still...
  • + 6
 "cost-is-no-object" - as RC has said, this jacket isn't designed for you or I.
  • - 11
flag gonecoastal (Jan 27, 2017 at 7:30) (Below Threshold)
 Last half of the first paragraph of the "Ride Report" goes to show what a conceded prick RC is. "Buy this $500USD jacket. I only reviewed it as I didn't have anything else to wear" ????
  • - 1
 Gore-Tex Pro makes no sense for MTB. Gore makes a lot of different 3 layer membranes that would be way better for MTB. The "Pro" moniker means that the face fabric needs to be of a certain strength, thickness, etc. which is really designed to prevent tears from rock abrasions, protection in extremely windy environments (stiffer fabric) and what not that climbers, skiers, and mountaineers would encounter.

Why you wouldn't use Gore-Tex C-Nit or something like, which is lighter, more pack-able, less stiff etc. and delivers you the same functionally from a membrane standpoint for MTB is beyond me.
  • + 7
 @dhx42: I think they use pro because it seems that lots of people cant ride without constantly crashing.
  • + 6
 @gonecoastal: He conceded the fact that he didn't have anything else to wear? Sounds pretty humble to me. Smile
  • + 3
 @levysac*nt: sounded dickish to myself this AM.
Solid name choice btw.
  • + 11
 The person that would spend their money on this probably rides a 29er yeti
  • + 2
 @webbe: then who cares about the review. Not you or I. cost is all ways the odject to Everyone I know.
  • + 5
 @Pnwdak: SWorks 29
  • + 4
 I agree with many of the comments. These jackets are not for everyone, especially the broke dirt bag who has to decide between a full tank of gas or a new rear tire! But for $500, I would probably buy a Arcteryx jacket. Much more R&D put in and a lifetime warranty.. To add on, it is not really fair to do a review on a jacket that has been freshly taken out of the plastic package.. we all know the DWR coating on the outside only lasts so long and the "real performance" of the jacket comes into play after a few dozen uses.
  • + 1
 @driftmonster: epic link ahahaha
  • + 1
 @driftmonster: chew like chew buy good price tank chew come gen.
  • + 2
 @NWshredSauce: From a cycling POV I'd argue this jacket is better than any dead bird. Unless you can get something on sale. Saying that I'd likely go with the 7Mesh Revelation Jacket.
  • + 2
 @gonecoastal: this is Pinkbike bruhh.
  • + 1
 @NWshredSauce: Do you know why Arcteryx has a lifetime warranty? It's because Gore requires it to use their fabric in their products. To think Gore is not putting just as much R&D into their products is a bit short sighted. Last I checked Arcteryx doesn't make a mtb specific jacket either. If I'm spending that kind of money for a biking jacket I'd want the ergonomics of the jacket to be designed around what I'm using it for. If one can afford to spend that on a biking jacket one most likely can afford to spend that for a second jacket designed around other activities they participate in.
  • + 0
 @lifeofloon: somewhat untrue. It comes down to the company. I have three 3L Gore Tex jackets (Pro, Active and C-Knit) and they all have five year warranties. Abuse isn't covered under it but the company will repair items for reasonable cost which i believe is fair.

My parents each picked up a 7Mesh 3L jacket on sale this fall, and after checking it out I regretted not purchasing.
  • + 26
 if you have ever ridden in a goretex jacket you will know how good they are.
  • + 7
 If you've ever been caught out in a massive rain, while you're wearing your goretex shell, you just feel bad for anyone else who's having a miserable time getting wet! It's hard to watch someone soak through their rain gear....
  • + 6
 the best bit of clothing i have ever had is my arcteryx jacket with goretex pro shell (made in Canada). The fit, the function, the style is unbelievable. i have worn it in snow to tropical thunderstorms, just simply amazing. The only problem is the price, it cost so much I'm almost scared to use it. Almost.
  • + 31
 I'm surprised by all the praises on Gore-Tex. I tried all of the fancy stuff (Gore-Tex, eVent, Neoshell and what not) and it never worked out for me on high-octane activities.

1. What actually prevent the jacket from being wet is a surface coating called DWR. This coating wears down, fast. Like a few days on the mountain. Without it, the outer layer soaks in all the water and the jacket doesn't breath. It can be reapplied, but it'll never be as good as new.

2. Body cools down by evaporative cooling. If outside relative humidity is over 85% (typical on rainy day), sweat will condense on the skin no matter how much money you wasted on your jacket.

3. Waterproof breathable membranes are usually 3 layers glued together. The glue is intolerent to body oil, sunscreen and other chemicals. They all eventually delaminate, much quicker than you would like.

4. DWR, glue and all this plastic is not eco friendly at all.

5. They are stiff and doesn't move well with your body.

I still like Gore-Tex for certain uses, such as backcountry sking pants, resort skiing jacket, camping, etc. But I'd never use it for mountain biking. I'd much rather have a good softshell.
  • + 0
 @Loche: that may all be true, but each single other jacket that I have owned decays just as much which evens out the field. I may have not tried enough but Goretex is best for me. As a rain jacket that keeps you warm and breathes better than a plastic bag. Now this breathability is off course silly. If you do any high heart rate activity you'll get as wet in a goretex jacket from your own sweat as you would from rain. If you happen to have synthetic fabric as thermal layer you may get quite cold. Also it has to be. cold enough for Goretex to show breathability benefits (like sub zero temperatures)

As long as I am not riding in absolute downpour, just some casual rain, I tend to use thin synthetic compression base layer, then merino wool thermal layer and some long sleeve jersey on top. In this way I am warm even when soaked through (as I would be anyways if sweated inside a membrane). I ride in rain jacket only if it's about to piss bricks because then the cold water from the downpour cools the body too fast. So only then a rain jacket makes sense to me.

The bigger problem for me here is that there are no reinforcements on elbows so this jacket won't survive too many bails. I am buying POC rain jacket this year. Relatively cheap, ok waterproofness, ok breathability and reinforced elbows.
  • + 5
 Whilst the cost is slightly higher I have bought GoreTex as it is easy to find a repairer in the event that it does tear. Saying that I've had a few Gore bits, usually bought on sale, which have lasted incredibly well, and I've not needed a repair yet! And that's in 6-7 years of use with a good few offs...
  • - 3
 @slimboyjim: easy to repair yes. But I had less luck with two of my jackets. Maybe the outer layer wasn't as good. BUT, having tried on the POC jacket, it just doesn't hurt to make well seamed cordura layer on elbows considering the type of usage.
  • + 4
 @Loche: These are all perfectly valid points, but they're applicable to almost every jacket out there, regardless of material. From my experience Gore-Tex ones perform the best, in conditions where you need waterproofing and breathability. I'd rather pay more for something that works better than others and keep it in best condition to preserve its lifespan. Given its intended purpose, these items are the most outer layer you'd use aimed at ultimate precipitation protection and therefore do sacrifice some flexibility (though after a while they do soften) in the name of weather defence. A softshell will be inherently more comfortable and insulating but won't offer as near as much protection.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: I've a nice Mavic jacket with rubber protection (!) on the elbows and backpack contact points. You may want to check them out?

Plus I've recently started to wear elbow pads on the outside of the jacket now. They are black like my jacket so I like to think no-one will notice! I might look stupid, but when the weather is that bad there's nobody else riding to see me Wink
  • - 3
 @slimboyjim: which one? crossmax h2o ultimate? The cool bit about POC is that it has also a highly vented (non waterproof) bit on the inside and under the arm pit. Does the mavic have that too? I get super wet from sweat gathering near the wrists in my current jacket so it may as well be vented. Also can it be folded into a rather small size? I use rain jacket ONLY when I really need to. Like riding to the woods for 30 minutes when wind blows into my face. Then I take it off. Put it on, for the way back. Then in case it rains bricks. I don't like backpacks so I need it to fit into the SWAT vest I wear under the ttop layer
  • + 1
 @T-Bot: iam not a doctor like you could not afford it.
  • + 3
 @Loche: Same here. Got a goretex jacket, great for a slightly rainy day but if it's really pissing it down I wear my Carhartt oil jacket with a proper baselayer under it. Might not be ideal in terms of breathability (about the same as a plastic bag) but at least I stay dry.
  • + 2
 @nuttypoolog: I can buy a *lot* of tissues and cough syrup for 500 bucks after I catch a cold though...
I agree with the quality of their stuff, but there's no way you need to spend this much to get decent protection.
  • + 3
 Value village has gortex jackets all the time. MTB is where gore tex goes to die. Mud and rips from crashing and branches, no way I get more than a season out of gortex...it's the best fabric though.
  • + 2
 Ive used a lot of goretex jkts over the years and its really the vents that make them breathable and comfortable, not the fancy fabric. MTB really needs a rugged inexpensive jkt with good venting that takes advantage of the constant air flow that you get while biking. The fabric itself does not need to breathe, we're not mountaineers moving at .01 kph up a mtn.
  • + 1
 @Loche: Not to mention it is designed for the helmet to be worn on top of the hood.


."The non-detachable hood has a reflective visor, and is designed to fit under a helmet."
I find my ski jacket very comfortable with the hood on top of the helmet.

Once again manufactures drop the ball. I think you are right Richard. Gore won't sell many of these jackets.

I do like gortex jackets I'm old and own 4 or 5. But as some one else said here in the Pacific North West. Mountain biking is where gortex goes to die.
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: try halkon hunt goretex stuff,it's for fishing but the pole jackets are the besttup
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I've a Mavic Stratos H2O. It's pretty pricey (I got mine half price and since you are looking at Poc I doubt you're going too cheap!) but built well and I can live out my Fabien Barel fantasies. Only criticism is that it has a window for looking at your watch and it steams up. Nothing a little soap wouldn't fix but I've never bothered! You never feel at inside though, and yes it has vents to cool you down.
  • + 1
 @Loche: So that's why my 10 plus year old kayaking drysuit with Gore-tex is still as dry as it was the first day I used it? That suit has seen an entire Chilean summer season of use as well as many miles of hiking in it with a 70 pound boat on my shoulder and multiple expeditions in saltwater. It's handled just about any conditions you could imagine and gets washed and treated once a year. As with anything proper care is required. If you don't take care of your stuff it won't take care of you. If you're soaking through your under layers you're most likely wearing too much to begin with.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm not sure how big the swat vest pockets are but I've had great luck with the Dakine waterproof/breathable shell. It does pack relatively small and has great under arm venting.
  • + 24
 Tip of the day, never buy yellow bottoms.
  • + 2
 Don't get the point of flouro yellow shorts with a rain jacket.
But I'm not #enduro so what do I know?
  • + 15
 Did anyone else misread the title and wonder why Go Pro were making a jacket?
  • + 4
 nice to see i am not the only one....
  • + 13
 Can you ride with a 500$ jacket ? I couldn't, I would be so scared to fall ^^
  • + 3
 Imagine that you have so much money that $500 has the same value to as $5 does now. Then you would.

The rest of us are probably not the intended customers.
  • + 12
 This reminds me, I have a dentist appointment.
  • + 4
 Top tip... Buy an Arcteryx Gore Tex Pro jacket and if it tears they'll send you a new one. No questions asked! I work in the film industry and a lot of our guys buy their stuff for it's durability and quality so they're keen to keep a customer base.
  • + 3
 Arc'Teryx warranty is not as good as before. They are not covering tears, only defects in workmanship, de-lamination, and material defects, they just denied my claim for replacement. The quality is starting to slide too.
  • + 1
 @mountain-life: What would you consider the "new" arcteryx? IE what Arc used to be when their stuff was top of the line...in the market for a new shell...my old Arc one was the best I've ever owned, but its 10 yr old now and kind of shot.
  • + 1
 @ross005: depends on the intended usage.
Is Arcteryx using the new Gore C-Knit fabric?
  • + 2
 @ross005: As Arc'Teryx becomes a mature company, a lot of their products are being designed to meet the needs of mass market consumers. A lot of the newer garments (in my opinion) are focusing on technical specifications (ex. weight) and design rather than fitness of purpose. I bought a bunch of casual Arc'Teryx products last year and 2 pairs of shorts and one pair of pants wore out in a few months. The pair of pants that I had ripped from low quality fabric in the butt (I occasionally wore them when commuting on my bike, warranty denied). I also had a pair of very expensive ($700) Gore-tex pro backcountry ski pants with a poorly designed cuff that was quickly damaged in only a few backcountry ski trips. The people at Arc'Teryx say that design and weight considerations lead to little reinforcing in this area. Arc'Teryx makes great products that look good and fit well, but they are not perfect. For 1/3 of the price, I got a Synergy Gore Tex Pro shell from Mountain Equipment Co-op and it performs just as good as my Arc'Teryx shell and has a real no-nonsense warranty. Some of the old guard from Arc'Teryx went out and started 7mesh, I'm probably going to give them a shot for my next shell. I am not saying Arc'Terxy is bad, its just that value for money is not great and warranty is not what it used to be, I learned that the hard way.
  • + 1
 @mountain-life: I never liked the Arcteryx even when they first appeared. They had water proof zippers instead of overlapping zipper flap. Which I prefer for looks and function. I have always been able to find a better gore-tex jacket from MEC for half the price. Now that Arc'Teryx quality and warranty have depreciated I don't see how they can justify the price.
  • + 4
 i'm not sure what it says about this site that they post reviews for stuff like this..
i'm not sure what it says about me that i read it and am posting a comment.
we're definitely all cogs in this marketing/hype machine though.
  • + 3
 How doors this jacket compare to the Endura MT500? The MT500 has a water resistance of 18K and a breathability of 64K and costs less than half of this. Is this jacket really worth double the price in water resistance and breathability and is it actually even better than the MT500? (Except for the looks; the MT500 looks like its designed in 2005, doesn't matter which colour you choose).

Since I commute 25km per direction to work and live in a very rainy country, the MT500 (jacket + pants) has probably been the best or at least one of the best buys I've had, even with its price tag. Even for road cycling / mtb-ing it motivates me to still go out even if it might start raining any second and even when it's already raining. Thanks to the MT500 I can ride much more since weather is not something that stops me anymore (unless the roads are frozen). Obviously I also invested in proper waterproof gloves and proper Bontrager RXL stormshell overshoes.
  • + 2
 Some weird words in there thanks to autocorrect and not being able to edit from my phone.
  • + 2
 I also own a MT500 and I love how the hood fits over the helmet. Very comfortable with the hood up. I have and older gortex 2 layer mec. jacket with a hood that I pack with me and wear when necessary. My newer MT500 is for Sunday riding only. We have too many blackberry bushes. They are very hard on clothing.
  • + 3
 I have a Gore-Tex PRO jacket (MEC brand), and I agree with this review completely. The stuff really works. It's too bad MEC doesn't sell this jacket anymore, because it was "only" $270 canadian dollars.

Pro-Tip though - for anyone with a Gore-Tex jacket who's afraid of damaging it - MEC sells these Gore-Tex iron-on patches. I crashed in the snow while commuting last year, and used these to patch both my rainpants and jacket. They stick permanently and work just like the original fabric.

www.mec.ca/en/product/5002-436/GORE-TEX-Repair-Kit
  • + 3
 I agree that GT stuff is pure gold in terms of breathability and waterproofness.

@RichardCunningham But as we are mountainbikers, what about vulnerability to the obligatory thorn trees? What about wear from Velcros accidentally touching the outer shell (saw some pretty ugly pulled threads on other jackets)? What about resistance to crash marks?
  • + 3
 Richard, you are sooooo outdated, its not even funny.There is NOTHING revolutionary about the construction of this jkt, in fact this look rather bulky and DATED....oh and that brim is hideous !!!You guys should take a closer look at smaller "not paying for your advertising " companies like 7Mesh..
  • + 6
 I must admit I don't think I could bring myself to rock the hood under my helmet.
  • + 5
 I'll stick with my black garbage bag with holes cut for the arms and head. You can get a heckuva lot of groceries for $500.
  • + 2
 I've yet to experience a jacket with better durability than a goretex jacket. After a using sombrio and alpinestars mtb-specific jackets I'm back to a black diamond goretex jacket, because the the mtb-specific ones end up getting worn out too quickly.

If you're hesitant because of the risk of ripping the jacket on branches etc. remember the climbing and mountaineering jackets are designed for just as exposed environments (sharp rocks etc) if not more. Just buy it in black and you won't notice it if you patch it up with an iron on goretex patch
  • + 2
 My thoughts exactly! Yes they're pricey bits of kit, but they're designed to be durable and well built, hence part of the reason for the price tag. If your judgement is based on constantly ripping jackets or getting scuffs in them but they have only cost you £60 then thats probably why they keep getting damaged. Nothing is indestructible but more money normally equates to better build quality and materials. Loads of other outdoors industries will go for expensive clothing as they want something that will keep them protected and alive. I'm actually surprised that there aren't more expensive technical mtb clothing products out there
  • + 5
 It's hard to look at this when you can get an Endura MT500 II for a whole lot less!
  • - 1
 Have had nothing but issues with my MT500 II jacket, though that was the 2015 one so hopefully they've improved since then
  • + 1
 @The-Sober-Fox: thought it was just me because everyone else I have ever spoken to about it is so damn evangelical about them. Should have known it was a piece of crap when the first time I wore it, I had to disassemble a pocket zip to retrieve my car keys because some idiot designer had specified the care label be placed up against the inside of the zip. Just went downhill from there
  • + 0
 @Puddings: The build quality and design features of them was atrocious! The zips, seams, hood design, fit, durability, all of the adjustment cords, etc. etc. nothing seemed to work! My particular favourite was using the helmet compatible hood adjustment cords to make the hood a snug fit in really bad weather, they did nothing for adjusting the hood but just made the jacket rise up and crumple around the chin.
Given the vast amount of praise they have, perhaps some of it was just a faulty batch, but then that doesn't say much for their QC
  • + 2
 @The-Sober-Fox: strange. two other well-known sites did a recent comparison on loads of jackets, and both of them said the Endura comes on top.
@Puddings: as above
  • + 2
 @gbcarmona: Hence our confusion!
  • + 2
 I have a previous version of this (or similar) Gore jacket, it's a few years old. Black with red trim. I've worn it almost daily for six months of the year, three years running, commuting to work during the week and on trail during the weekends. It's been fantastic. I'm glad go see the addition of pit zips and an expanded chest pocket. If mine ever dies, this will likely be the replacement.
  • + 1
 Pretty interesting to read when I compare the experience to my Endura Gridlock II jacket which seems useless for Z3 and above riding unless it is below 20F. That thing is ridiculously hot for as thin as it is and I only use a single base layer with it.
  • + 1
 Let me start by saying I randomly get to test Gore-Tex gear. Yes the price is high, but so are a lot of bicycle related items. I have quite a few Gore-Tex ski jackets, ski pants, and Windstopper bike apparel and would not trade it for anything else. One of the most important things is to make sure you layer correctly underneath so that you do not overdress/overheat. There are lower priced Gore items as well, this is one of their best. Look at the Power Trail Active jacket or the Element jacket for lower cost, but still Gore-Tex equipped jackets.
  • + 4
 Five Hundred US dollars?

You can rob me.
You can starve me.
You can beat me
and you can kill me.

Just don't GORE me!
  • + 1
 Here, here!
  • + 1
 When I ride I have a tendency to ride hard and fast so crashes/washouts are bound to happen. However, I never ride in the rain unless I'm commuting to work on my road bike. So spending a lot of money on a super nice rain jacket for MTB isn't an issue for me.

If I ever go riding and there's a slight chance of rain then I'll bring a cheap rain shell with me that's light and compact.

I do own an expensive rain jacket but primarily used for hiking and days when pouring outside or snowing.
  • + 1
 I just picked up an EMS Helix Neoshell for $150US, which is 50% off. There is no way that I would pay more than this for a mountain bike jacket, and there is no need to. Not sure how it stacks up against this one but Neoshell is waterproof and breathes very well. The Helix has good pockets, big pit zips, an extremely high collar, and a big hood that fits over my helmet. I buy helmets that fit, so putting a hood under is not an option.
  • + 1
 Klim makes a killer goretex shell that looks very similar to this for a fraction of the price. It's called the Stow Away.

www.klim.com/Cat/Outerwear/Gender/Men/Passion/Snow/SubCat/Jacket-Non-Insulated,Pant-Non-Insulated?_ga=1.207845521.2039395067.1449944711
  • + 1
 gortex is the only way to go when riding in the rain. That said, there are different price points with different brands. Do your research. Some gortex jackets go from 200 bucks all the way up to 800. What's the difference in the functionality versus fashion brand markup?
  • + 1
 I paid $70 Canadian at MEC for a 3 layer gortex jacket with attached hood that will fit comfortably over a helmet.
of course for that price it was deeply discounted. Because it had a waterproof zipper, that were not popular.
  • + 1
 Thats a two credit card jacket, and I am not a believer in Goretex or any other "breathable" fabric for high output activity.
Would look good walking the dog though, and last longer too.
  • + 1
 I thought the same until I bought my Endura MT500 jacket. Of course a wind jacket will always be more breathable, but if you'd give a cheap rain jacket a 0 for breathability and a wind jacket a 100, the MT500 rain jacket is around 65-70. Which is really impressive for a rain coat that is even more water resistant than non-breathable $120 USD raincoats by other proper brands. You can also open a zipper underneath the arm pots and the insides of pockets are also from see-through mesh, so if it's not raining (hard) you can open these and it will become a proper jacket that's also nice to wear when it's not raining.

But if its worth it also really depends on your situation. For example if it hardly ever rains in your country it is a waste of money. But if you live in a rainy country and commute 25km per direction to work it is really worth it's value, especially if it lasts for 5-10 years (grabbing a car or train every time it gets rainy would cost much more in the end).
  • + 2
 You do realize once the outside is drenched, it doesn't breathe? No fabric or technology does once it's covered in water. There's a $500 sucker born every minute.
  • + 0
 Horse Shlt!!! You own the material and get to sell it to every vendor on the planet yet you make a jacket out of your material and sell it for MORE THAN ANYONE BUYING THE RIGHTS TO THE MATERIAL?????

Thievery. Bell/Giro sell their MIPS helmets cheaper than TLD, etc because they own the licensing. Other brands have to pay to use it.

Stupid. Stupid. Stupid. A GORE branded jacket should be cheaper than their competitors, not more expensive....ever.
  • + 7
 You have no idea...
  • + 2
 If only the price of something were directly proportional to its cost.

The Gore-Tex brand has value; It's like the Apple of water proof fabrics. People would pay more for an Apple branded iPhone than for the exact same hardware, software, and service with a different logo on it.
  • + 1
 @sinatorj: WTF? HAVEN'T heard from you in years and that's all you chirp off?

Not even a perverse joke or punch line? JP....you got kids now or something? @scary1 you see this?
  • + 2
 @bizutch: hahaha. ...he works at gore. .lol
  • + 1
 @scary1: Wow! You gettin' that hook up? Hah
  • + 1
 @bizutch: hardly. Hes just lucky he can keep a jobSmile
  • + 1
 @scary1: Lucky huh?
  • + 1
 @sinatorj: Dammit JP. Do you realize how much I miss your evil chairlift discussions? Awkward, uncomfortable jokes with punch lines bordering on maniacal.

Did I mention I need some Gore gear? Did I?
  • + 1
 @bizutch: see what I can do..
  • + 1
 @bizutch: i almost feel like i need to get on this. Almost.
  • + 1
 @sinatorj: Fortunate? Kids do that for you
  • + 1
 @profro: The awkward, uncomfortable jokes part? FYI, I am now developing a desire to possess a 100 series Land Cruiser. Is it a sickness?
  • + 1
 @bizutch: Nope. They ate badass, bombproof vehicles. My wife has one amd its the high quality vehicle I have ever driven.
  • + 2
 I have one of these jackets, fortunate shop sample. The price is high but it is fully justified when you use it, excellent bit of kit.
  • + 1
 I was always wondering how good is a fancy gore jacket after being washed like 20x? Is it still as breathable and waterproof as new?
  • + 1
 Thats the reason you wash those materials with a special wash so it doesn't lose the desired properties. If those properties are dimished, then you wash them in a different wash which can restore those properties.
  • + 1
 Much like any 'waterproof' item of clothing, the DWR coating will wear off. When this happens (when the water no longer beads on the surface), it's time to wash it in a tech wash like Nikwax to revitalise the coating. Treat mtb clothing like footwear as it gets so muddy and abrasive, mud and dirt will mask the effect of the DWR coating so will affect the breathability and waterproofness. So normal washes (to clean rather than to revitalise) should be done after every muddy ride in order to keep the jacket in top condition
  • + 1
 Washing will help revitalize, just use powdered detergent as the liquid will tend to clog the pores.
  • + 1
 Please don't show this kind of stuff. I'd comsider this....if I didn't have two kids and the jones for a new bike. Nice jacket.
  • + 1
 $500 wow there practically giving it away......i mean its not like were all earning our own money right.....were all lottery winners here yeh?
  • + 1
 I ve yet to find a jacket that keeps you dry when it's soaked on the outside and allows sweat to evaporate from the inside !!!
  • + 1
 Do you re-proof your jackets? And do you pick ones with a high hydrostatic head?
  • - 1
 @The-Sober-Fox: You sound like a bit of an Anorak !!! Lol
  • + 2
 Found an Under Armour gore tex jacket at Ross(dressn 4 less) with an og tag=$500msrp for $60!
  • + 2
 If you really want sticker shock check out arcteryx. Makes $500 seem entry level.
  • + 1
 It's already on sale at Competitive Cyclist for $324.97!

Still not cheap, but not $500 either!
  • + 1
 I'll sell anybody a new goretex pro snowboard jacket for $150,it was also $500 new a few years ago.
  • + 1
 Get a Showers Pass Refuge jacket for half the price with all the features. I love mine!
  • + 1
 Showers pass make nice stuff.
  • + 1
 I think Richard's reviews are a bit biased, dated and boring. Please prove me wrong! Spend your money wisely,
  • + 2
 aw phone close to the chest(heart)
  • + 2
 At that price range, I would go with arcyteryx.
  • + 1
 500 for a jacket that gore made different branded for skiing or outdoor for half price... no sense
  • + 2
 Too bad I only ride in the desert.
  • + 1
 Any way this jacket is aimed at pro elite level riders and not chubby North Americans !!! according to RC ha ha
  • + 1
 Don't buy stock in Gore - global warming will see earnings growth decline across all seasons :-)
  • + 1
 Privately held
  • + 2
 In the fourth picture RC is the new Fonz!
  • + 1
 Sounds good but I seriously read that as GoPro jacket! Imagine the disappointment.
  • + 2
 I just read GoPro jacket. Haha that would be sweet
  • + 2
 Am i the only one who read "Go pro jacket " at first ? Big Grin
  • + 2
 "Insert comment complaining about the price"
  • + 11
 Have you ever been $500 wet?
  • + 0
 "but goretex"
  • + 4
 @DeeEmCee: yep and she was worth double that
  • + 1
 @AaGro: I hear you... wait, are we still talking about rain jackets?
  • + 2
 500 for jacket when monthly salary is 1000, quite rough but I'll pass...
  • + 1
 Sorry guys,I don't have bad enough weather in my country for a $500 rain jacket.
  • + 2
 Car worth less than bike, bike worth less than clothes?
  • + 1
 Eddie Bauer. $70 hardshell. High performance and bomb proof.
  • + 1
 Am I crazy or are PB reviews basically just really long advertisements?
  • + 1
 Fast, ultralite, and super cheap....plastic bag!
  • + 1
 That's a good photo of you RC
  • + 2
 Love my Goretex stuff.
  • + 1
 Way to drop a bomb shell.
  • + 1
 RC owns a cell phone!
  • + 0
 500 fucking dollars haha get the fuck out of here.
  • + 0
 I'll wait for the next REI garage sale
  • + 0
 Go Pro is making a jaket?
  • + 0
 Total Dentist coat, bruh.
  • - 1
 "cost-is-no-object"... but b@#...s are.
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