Review: Michelin's Wild Enduro Tires Deliver Tons of Traction

Jan 29, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  
Michelin Wild Enduro tire review


Michelin's Wild Enduro tires launched last year after a two year development period where Adrien Dailly, Jerome Clementz, and other high-level racers put various iterations to the test. Not surprisingly, the tires are designed to work well in a variety of terrain, and to withstand the abuse that comes with aggressive riding. There's a front and a rear version of the tire, with two different rubber compounds available for the front.

Available in 27.5 x 2.4” or 29 x 2.4” versions, the Wild Enduro tires retail for $64 USD.
Wild Enduro Tire Details
• GumX-3D rubber compound
• Tubeless ready
• Reinforced "Gravity Shield' casing
• Sizes: 29 x 2.4" (tested), 27.5 x 2.4"
• Weight: 1040g (front), 1110g (rear)
• Front and rear specific tread pattern
• MSRP: $64.99 USD
bike.michelin.com


Michelin Wild Enduro tire review
Tall, blocky knobs show that the Wild Enduro Front means business.


Wild Enduro Front

The Wild Enduro Front tread pattern is big and blocky, with tall, rectangular side knobs alternating rows of trapezoidal blocks in the center. All of the knobs are siped, but the siping is fairly minimal.

There are two different compound choices for the Wild Enduro Front – either Magi-X² or Gum-X. The Magi-X² compound is the harder of the two, although, somewhat confusingly, Michelin say that it offers more grip at higher speeds than the Gum-X rubber.

The Gum-X3D rubber is billed as being the better all-round option, offering “maximum enjoyment in complete safety.” I'm not sure about that marketing phrase, but I do know that I tend to prefer a softer rubber compound for the slippery conditions that prevail here in the Pacific Northwest, so I chose to test the Gum-X compound.

Michelin Wild Enduro tire review
The Wild Enduro Rear has a similar tread pattern design, but the center knobs aren't as tall.

Wild Enduro Rear

The tread pattern of the Wild Enduro Rear mimics that of the front, although the knobs are closer together and slightly shorter for reduced rolling resistance. The Gravity Shield casing has a lower thread count than the front, and also receives additional reinforcement around the bead to help prevent pinch flats.


Michelin Wild Enduro tire review
Michelin Wild Enduro tire review


Performance

Mounting up the Wild Enduro tires tubeless didn't pose any issues; I was able to use a floor pump to get both tires seated and sealed on wheels with an inner rim width of 30mm. Actual tire widths don't always match what's printed on the hot patch, but Michelin's calipers seem to be properly calibrated – both tires measured a true-to-size 2.4”. My typical pressures were 20 psi in the front, and 22 psi in the rear.

The thick, minimally siped knobs on the Wild Enduro gives them plenty of support while cornering, and if there's even the slightest bit of give to the dirt they'll dig in like a serrated knife cutting through a crusty loaf of bread. It's hard to beat the “rrrrriiippp” sound that emits after hitting a corner just right. The overall tire profile is more square than round, but transitioning on and off of the side knobs was still smooth and predictable.

There was plenty of grip on tap for dealing with slippery roots and rocks, although the knobs are fairly stiff, more like a chilled Swedish Fish as opposed to one that's been left out in the sun. At times it felt as if the tires were trying to force the ground to conform to them, rather than conforming to the ground. For this reason, they reward a more precise riding style – riders who tend to pick a line and stick with it will have much better luck than riders who tend to roll into a jumble of rocks and roots and hope for the best. There's not the same level of forgiving compliance that you'll find with a Maxxis Minion or a Schwalbe Magic Mary.

The rear tire didn't roll quite as quickly as I'd expected given the lower profile tread pattern, but it does deliver an impressive amount of bite in softer conditions. It also shed mud quite well, and while a more open tread pattern with deeper knobs is the way to go for really nasty glop, I'd happily run the Wild Enduro Rear all year round here in the Pacific Northwest.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe Wild Enduro tires are a worthy option for hard charging riders, especially those whose typical trails conditions tend to be on the softer side of the spectrum. They're not the fastest rolling option out there, but they make up for that by offering a high level of traction, toughness, and cornering support. Mike Kazimer








177 Comments

  • + 163
 I too enjoy a softer rubber in slippery conditions for maximum enjoyment in complete safety! Wink
  • + 17
 Bust a rubber win a baby
  • + 6
 don't wanna have some fluid leaking through that rubber
  • + 6
 @bashhard: wouldn't want to be riding to hard, and break a side wall. That would result in a very sticky mess.
  • + 5
 I like to ride it down to the rim.
  • - 2
 And if you put Yoanns La Baguette insert in you won’t get a flat or starve!
  • + 4
 @Santamtnbiker: whooooosh... right over the head
  • + 1
 @Santamtnbiker: LMFAO i actually liked that
  • + 2
 correction..."98% safe if used as directed"
  • + 1
 Came here looking for this comment. Was not disappointed!
  • + 45
 Thanks for the review ! As a potential buyer, I'd really like to know the country of manufacture. That does also apply to any other product reviewed. Any chance that you'd start mentioning it ?
  • + 7
 This!
  • + 3
 They are made in Thailand.
  • + 2
 @endlessblockades: maybe just list cycling products that aren't made there. There goes 99.9% of the list
  • + 2
 @oldtech: In Thailand? Maybe you're thinking of Taiwan? Thailand big in rubber, though. I've been there a couple times.
  • + 0
 @nremi: No problem -I have a set here in my office.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: so they are made by Vee Rubber?
  • + 1
 @FarmerJohn: I don't know, but Google doesn't seem to know either. I did find that Michelin runs a least 6 of its own tire plants in Thailand (which has become the tire capital of the world - especially with Trump's tariffs on China).
  • + 2
 @endlessblockades: Taiwan for frames and metal bits. Thailand for Rubber and massages
  • + 23
 I’ve been loving Michelin since the Comp16 and I’m happy to see them back with quality offering...but man they need to do something about those non-intuitive rubber rating. How are we supposed to easily figure that out which is the softest between Gum-X and Magi-X... WTF???

How about going back to the old Durometer ratings? How about Soft, Super Soft, Soft AF?
  • + 7
 @AProulx No way.. those words are boring words and has little or no meaning for those evil j*rks of Marketing depts. They love to made our lives tougher with such mumbo jumbo.
  • + 2
 @Topabajo: Well at least they did a good think with "FRONT" and "REAR" designations and I applaud them for it. Take maxxis and schwalbe for example. DHR/DHF designations I understand, but some have DHR/DHR, some have HR/HR HR/DHR or any other combination. It really confuses the average user. Schwalbe has hans dampf and and most use it as a rear tyre, but in reviews you have it as a front tyre as well. There are many other examples as well which doesn't help the industry to be honest.
  • + 9
 @AProulx "How are we supposed to easily figure that out which is the softest between Gum-X and Magi-X... WTF???"

This! Will tyre manufacturers stop giving their compounds gimmicky names FFS!

I haven't got time to trawl every manufacturer's site to figure out the specifics of your various "SUPERGNAR GX CASING, STICKY NOBBLE 3 COMPOUND"!

Soft/light, medium, hard/heavy will do just fine thanks.
  • + 2
 it sounds like F1 pirelli tires !!!!
  • + 1
 Well they just told you the Mag X2 is stickier at high speed than the softer Gum X. Therefore, the Gum X is softest, and softer is not necessarily any better for traction, especially in rough high speed situations.

This isn’t rocket science boys. The question is: are you fast or are you slow?
  • + 2
 @aledh30: LOL, "he's on the super softs.... which happen to be the hardest compound of the weekend..."
  • + 2
 @AProulx : There is a marked difference between "softness" and "rebound speed" of rubber. Most tire manufacturers don't provide info on that and just increase both simultaneously for increased traction.

However, Michelin seem to have a unique approach, with their Magi-X2 tires using a harder compound with very, very slow rebound. If you apply enough force (=ride fast enough), then the harder compound will compress without being squirmy and the slow rebound will provide control.

Its a cool idea, and Michelin know more about rubber than anyone else in the business. Not sure if that approach is beneficial for anyone who isn't racing though. And slow rebound has the drawback of very high rolling resistance, making those tires a bad choice for pedaling.
  • + 1
 @Ttimer: Michelin's are all much slower rebound and much softer than just about any other brand. It is why I wore out a set in 450 miles. The slow rebound is why the tire occasionally transmits jarring chatter- Michelin's choke up and bog down over high speed impacts in a similar way to cane creek's double barrel spool valves. The result is sudden loss of traction.

However, they are much stickier in loose conditions than any other tire I have owned. I loved mine- a set of Country Race'r tubeless in 29x2.1 rolled nearly as fast, weighed more, and gripped significantly better in loose conditions than my Schwalbe rocket rons in 29x2.35. I lost 90 seconds off an 17 min 30 sec loose loop when I finally cut through the casing and had to switch. I haven't got that time back yet.

Though, I would like to know how you know Magi X2 is slower rebound than Gum X.
  • + 25
 If it ain't a green tire from Michelin I'm out!
  • + 2
 Funny about that... found on my basement a 26" XC tyre from Michelin and is green... forgot completely about it.
  • + 4
 I had a pair of bright red michelins on my first real mountain bike. I think they were considered large at 2.25" wide!
  • + 5
 With the gum sidewalls!
  • + 11
 They should release their fat bike tires in green and the width should be 4.20
  • + 1
 @srjacobs: those were the hot s and they were amazing for their time. After those tire Michelin tires went to crap. Looks like now they are finally stepping back up.
  • + 12
 I demo-ed a NukeProof Mega 275 with these tires and was very impressed. I normally ride Minion DHRIIs in 2.4 and thought these were every bit as good, maybe better.
  • + 3
 I rode the same bike as well with these on at the Pearce demo day - I thought they were loads better than the Minion and High Roller I normally ride
  • + 0
 @JoelAllport: I rode them at the Pearce demo day as well. Was it the purple size large with the red lyrik?
  • + 12
 Hey Michelin - kiss my 26" as*
  • + 4
 I totally agree with you buddy. I'm a 26" rider as well and just ordered the new set of wheels 26" just to have them as a spare wheels for my future rides, I also have 6 spare tires as well, our fellow riders moved to 27.5 and that's their choice. for me 26" still works perfect and I enjoy every single ride with them. I don't race, i ride for fun, I ride because I love it, I have as much fun as the 27.5 and 29-ers. Cycling should be fun and joy. Also still on 10 speed setup. I had YT Capra CF with 27.5" and setup 11sp. You may call me retro or retired, but every one has their own style of riding, even so I can set up my bike banshee rune for a 27.5 and 11 or 12 sp, I'm happy where I'm. Advertisement it's a big thing lately, and brands are trying to sell even their own shit, but not to me, thanks. Sorry for being rude, with my words.
You need to be attached to your bike and love every second spending with it. I did find my ride and happiness with it, so I'm 26" rider until my Life split us apart.
R35P3C7 2 411 7H3 R1D3R5
  • + 5
 26" bikes are still used for DJ, 4X, and slopestyle. Keep ya' head up haha.
  • + 7
 @Neale1978: And kids bikes!
  • + 2
 Roger that.
  • + 0
 Shoutout to manufacturers for limiting their 26” offerings. Saves me a fair bit of time reading reviews. More time to ride.
  • - 1
 Bitch!
  • + 4
 Keeping it real here with 26” as well brother!
  • + 6
 Can still get Rock'r 2 in 26 which is an excellent tire.
  • + 2
 @dirtpedaler: wild enduros are awesome but I still think the wild rockr2 is their best tire and is made in 26/27.5/29. Michelin are making the best tires atm......again
  • + 2
 @won-sean-animal-chin: great hardpack tire, but I go back and forth with shortys, hard to give up that hard pack performance thinking that the enduros could be the do it all tire but the enduro does sound like a good replacement for the shortys.
  • + 1
 @dirtpedaler: the shorty is one tire I haven’t tried. It does seem like the wild enduro would be similar. Maybe somewhere between the shorty and a magic mary. Good in loose or muddy conditions and still not give away too much on hardpack. If there’s too much clay in the mud the wild rockr2 will pack up with mud
  • + 10
 Who else followed the link and read the whole Swedish fish Wikipedia article
  • + 4
 I won't qualify those tires as durable at all when only after 400kms (3 months of ride) the knobs started to tear. My tire was also sweating sealant from everywhere possible (knobs, side,...) www.pinkbike.com/photo/16811574 (Michelin Wild Enduro Magi-X²). Appart from that it was an excellent tire. But except sponsored riders, I don't know how anyone can afford to run with those tires.
  • + 8
 400km out of a rear tire?
  • + 2
 The review itself said suitable for trails at the softer end of the spectrum? What conditions were you riding in? Blurry background of photo looks rocky? 3 months wear probably isn't too bad on rocky terrain?
  • - 1
 @irck: From the picture i'd say Front tire, which then is a rather poor performance indeed.
  • - 3
 @Balgaroth: OK so you know more about tyre choice than Sam Hill?
  • + 6
 Mine at 80 miles (130km) Used on front, Magi-X compound.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/16091473

Our terrain consists of granite and lava rocks, with "dirt" mostly being decomposed granite (similar to Bootleg Canyon in Nevada). Very abrasive and hard on tires. That said, I get 200+ miles out of Minion 3C and 350+ miles out of E13 classic (not the new one) TRSr and Wild Rock'R2 Magi-X.

Wild Enduro probably works well on loam, softer dirt, and mud, but definitely not durable on less-forgiving terrain.
  • + 3
 Yep the tires don't last long. I ride most of the time on soft ground but 40% of the trails have rocks.
I didn't see any hard wearing on the front but the rear got something. I couldn't ride that much since I have them because f*cking ice.
However if it is deep mud , offcamber roots. Green rocks and other stuff what is hard to get traction on it those tires just got it. That is the main reason I will keep them. They are f*cking Epic. Rolling resistance on the other hand uphill is only meh.
  • + 0
 @nono123: 400km riding park or riding uphill + downhill ?
400km of park riding is a lot for a tire, for xc it is not so much, and if you ride techy trail it is very reasonable. my HRII start "sweating sealant" generally after 100km, so I would be happy to switch to this...
  • + 4
 @aljoburr: I guess Mr Hill may have a new set of tires (or sereval) at each race.

Nono123's picture is located in La Ciotat, south of France, so probably mostly rocks in very warm and dry wheather.
  • + 3
 "My tire was also sweating sealant from everywhere possible (knobs, side,...)"

naa, it was simply really happy to see you.
  • + 6
 Durability is going to vary depending on terrain - where I live the trails tend to be muddier more often than super dry, and there aren't as many jagged rocks trying to rip the knobs off. A taller tread pattern like this is more prone to that type of wear, which is why I suggested that this tire is best suited for softer conditions.

I wonder if the Magi-X compound is more susceptible to torn knobs than the Gum-X tested? It would make sense that the stiffer rubber was more likely to tear. But as far as sweating sealant, I haven't had any issues over the last few months.
  • + 1
 @Ghouls: I’d say 3 months & that wear already is garbage! I’ve been riding my Maxxis Assegai for 6 months now and looks like new compared to that tire! Mine does have the DH casing & I shralp as much as possible over all kinds of rocky terrain with loose over hard and everything else.. doesn’t look near as close to the way that thing looks after 3 months!
  • + 2
 @aljoburr: wtf you're talking about mate ? Sam Hill probably doesn't even use the same compound/casings and such, ya know that's why it says "prototype" on his tire flanks... plus i was talking about durability performance not grip performance which is the only thing that Sam would care about, a bit like F1 tires that are used from 20laps and then are good for the bin.
  • + 2
 @aljoburr: Sam Hill can get new tires every single race.. that’s just a few days of use for each tire set.. I’m sure you don’t want to buy tires for every other race! Maxxis Assegai ftw!
  • + 2
 @Jaybirdy: 6 months one tire? Whaaaat? There was only on e tire I had for 5 months and it was the older MK2 Trail King from Continental. That Tire really was HAAAARD but also suck ass.

The best combo on Rough rocks with granite was the Onza Ibex.
I did the upper part of the Mega Avalanche everyday and there are ONLY sharp granite rocks everywhere and yeah well the tires even after that looked okay. Sliced it only once, with sealant and tire plug 2min work...
  • + 1
 @Serpentras: Dude No Joke.. I’ll post pic’s if i have to! This thing is the best dam front tire i’ve Ever tried in my life! From Shwalbe nobby nick to Hans dampf to Continental Mountain king to Maxxis High roller2 to DHR2 to DHF to WTB vigi & now back to Maxxis for their Assegai with the DH casing & i can almost bet that it will last me until at least the summer! BTW i have year round riding where i live so No Off the bike Months!
  • + 1
 400kms? or a weekend at Whistler bike park.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: The ones I posted about issues with tearing in dry conditions were Gum-X. Seems that these tires are a good option for soft/moist conditions, but in dry rocky stuff they get torn up way faster than maxxis compounds.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: In my experience it is sharp gravel that seems eat away at base of nobbys on Michelin's also have been thinking of a solution but that is an other story
  • + 4
 What makes a tire fast is not how soft it is but how slow the rebound is. MagiX is VERY slow. I have the Wild Enduro and compared to my MM in ultra soft 29" (the best front tire in the universe) its grip in dry and moist in corners and braking is as great as the MM and the break away is even mellower. Haven't tried it in the slosh. Unfortunately even on the front it rolls worse than the MM in DH casing although weighing 400 grams less.
  • + 3
 The review is disappointing because it makes no mention of durability over long term. I really like Michelin tyres (compound, design, casing strength and support) but have found the older models to not last very long and the knobs to break off at the base well before they should, making the tyre worn out before the end of its normal lifespan, like the Schwalbe ones used to do.... Please can future reviews at least mention how long they were tested for and how long they lasted, even though this will be very subjective obviously. Maxxis are popular because they have good designs and most of their product range holds up very well. The aggressor DD on the back just seems to just last forever for me.
  • + 0
 They haven't been around that long - have some patience.
  • + 6
 WOW a 2.4 that actually measures 2.4. Have engineers in the cycling industry taking measure reading device classes?
  • + 3
 I've got no experience with these tyres but I'm currently running a Wild Grip'r advanced reinforced on the rear and it's been faultless, much better than the previous Maxxis and Schwalbe offerings I've tried
  • + 2
 A couple of mates have started using these after tearing various Scwhalbe & Maxxis offerings and they seem happy with both grip and durability so far. Can't really get my head around the tread pattern, but if it works, it works. Good Year are another alternative that has faired well in our extremely rocky terrain. Quite spendy, but the durability seems to be there.

On casing durability, for lightweight riders snakeskin/exo make sense on the front, as the tyre conforms better to the ground. Heavier casings feel harsh to me at the front. For the rear, tyres around or just over 1kg are a happy compromise. WTB Tough/Fast casings have been perfect for me.
  • + 4
 These are great tyres, used the Magi-x during the summer. Serious grip and roll surprising fast. You would want the Gum-X for wet roots/mud.
  • + 2
 I've been running them after years of Maxxis, and the stability, support and traction are on a totally different level. Yes they're a bit slow (OK really slow) on tarmac. But they're an enduro race tyre, designed to get to the bottom fast. Never feel like they're going to fold or burp. Plus, the front one just looks totally moto-x!
  • + 1
 I was excited to try these. I finally found some in stock. After one 7 mile ride in dry desert conditions, a couple side knobs on the rear were ripping off. After less then 100 mi it was completely deteriorated and done. The front has held up better with the knobs being a bit beefier. I don't understand how Sam Hill even made it through a full ews weekend in dry conditions with these. Back to maxxis.
  • + 2
 Where do you ride? Obsidian Valley? I've got 100 plus miles in - hardly any real wear on the rear and nothing on the front.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: The 7 mile loop I did was on these trails a href="https://www.trailforks.com/trails/goat-trails-outlet/" target="_blank"> www.trailforks.com/trails/goat-trails-outlet//a>; The next day I did this ride a href="https://www.trailforks.com/trails/palm-canyon-epic/" target="_blank"> www.trailforks.com/trails/palm-canyon-epic//a>;

After those two rides I took these photos of the rear tire, showing a few of the many deteriorating side knobs.
a href="https://www.pinkbike.com/u/silkyrhino/album/wild-enduro/" target="_blank"> www.pinkbike.com/u/silkyrhino/album/wild-enduro//a>;

My normal riding is dry socal stuff and I get more than 450 miles out of a minion dhr in the rear before the side knobs start to look like that.
  • + 1
 @silkyrhino: Palm Canyon is brutal and you did a great job documenting the failure. Our dirt is a lot more forgiving up here! Mad respect for the PCE - I booked a shuttle over NYE with CrazyBear but was too sick to go. Bummed. Next winter for sure!! 26 miles of hell!
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: The 7 mile loop I did was on these trails www.trailforks.com/trails/goat-trails-outlet The next day I did this ride www.trailforks.com/trails/palm-canyon-epic

After those two rides I took these photos of the rear tire, showing a few of the many deteriorating side knobs. www.pinkbike.com/u/silkyrhino/album/wild-enduro

My normal riding is dry socal stuff and I get more than 450 miles out of a minion dhr in the rear before the side knobs start to look like that.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: Palm canyon is definitely rugged terrain. I think dry/rocky stuff is a problem for this compound. Two of the knobs already looked like that after the first 7 mile day, which was pretty disappointing because I like the design of these tires.

The ride was awesome though, especially the first part. Hopefully you get to do it. In the second half there is a lot of pedally stuff that slowly wears you down, so bring lots of water and snacks!
  • + 1
 I have these on my Commencal Meta AM 4.2 and though they are great (I ride the north shore - yes, even in Junuary) and I really liked them until this past weekend. I noticed that the knobs are starting to sheer and rubber coming off of the knobs. I will ride them until they really fail and then will most likely replace with the Minions I have waiting to swap out if they fo fail.

I am not a hard braker (no purposeful skids) and they only skidding that may take place is down some larger rocks with loose dirt on it but nothing aggressive. I rode these in Fall and they were questionable on the traction side but I thought I'd give them a full year. I hope that they can make it. I have never used up a tire in 12 months as I do not ride that much (more XC-ish with some AM riding but nothing like the videos posted by riders).
  • + 3
 Forgot to talk about weight!! Btw they are way stiffer than the wild Am I rode last years. And same thread for the rear tire. Identical. They are amazing tires.
  • + 1
 I used this tyre last year for racing enduro, and found it to be really grippy in wet as well as dusty conditions, with really good stability in corners but unfortunately they started to crack round the grips, so may need to run them not quite as soft as you would your Maxxis or other makes of tyres.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer I get a little confused with the review. What I have read on the Michelin site, the MagiX is the softer/grippier compound. But according to the review the GumX is softer/grippier. Are there something I got wrong?
  • + 1
 As far as I can tell, the MagiX has a softer durometer outer rubber, but the base compound is harder, which makes the knobs more difficult to flex. The GumX doesn't have as soft of an outer compound, but the base compound is softer, so its a better choice for everyday riding. I really, really wish Michelin could figure out a way to explain things more clearly.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer:
bike.michelin.com/en/technologies/technologies-for-mtb-tires
Michelin does us no favors with the names. They have Gum-X, Gum-X2D, Gum-X3D, Magi-X and Magi-X2. Were the tires you tested Gum-X or Gum-X3D? And Magi-X or Magi-X2?
  • + 2
 @eyeore: Gum-X3D and Magi-X2
  • + 1
 I'm running one of the enduro front tyres (Gum-X compound) and can confirm everything Mike mentioned about the tyre. It offers a very laterally stiff, supportive cornering feel on hardback (worlds better than a MM) while also giving good bite and security in softer, dusty conditions. Very sharp steering and responsive tyre. It is however a lot more vertically stiff than either a DHF or MM, so "small bump compliance" obsessives may be disappointed. In really steep, soft and wet conditions I would probably still reach for something a bit more forgiving like a Magic Mary, but this is a great tyre for Australian summer conditions.
  • + 1
 I have been running these for a bit, both on my Remedy (27,5") and Fuel Ex (29")

For some reason both rear tyres bled quite a lot of sealant through the sidewalls initially and both rears retain slow leaks, that is not mind blowing for the asking price.

Grip wise, in soft conditions, they are fantastic. Quite slow rolling but they are chunky so not surprising.
Cornering grip on anything soft or loose is great.

However, on wet rock slabs and roots they remind me of Maxxis Shorty: a bit squirmy.
Side knobs feel "tall" on stuff like that compared to a Maxxis Minion for example.
  • + 5
 The Wild AM is my all time favourite,can only imagine how rad these are
  • + 4
 The Wild AMs are superb.
  • + 2
 I have orderd a set of them on 5th of January.
ESTIMATED date of delivery for the rear tyre: 12th of April!?!?
So... i keep my money for a few month longer.
But a nice Review anyway.
  • + 1
 Haha I guess I was lucky because last year I ordered them in the holidays and got them 27.12. The interesting part is that the are no longer available on probikeshop.fr The biggest complaint about the tires I have is that almost no-one is selling them.
  • + 1
 @Serpentras: Right now, there is realy no one selling the rear. Front is no problem, but wherever you search, there is no rear - for at least three months!
  • + 1
 @Werratte: I know, I did searched for a kumpel Big Grin
  • + 3
 MSRP of $64 is pretty good considering a comparable Maxxis is $90 and Schwalbes are around $100
  • + 3
 “maximum enjoyment in complete safety.”
Just what kind of rubber are they selling here?
  • + 3
 Gum-x was the hard compound before, and magi-x the softer. Does they exchange each by the other?
  • + 2
 I thought I was taking crazy pills reading that article. Here's a 2014 article about the Wild RockR2: yep, MagiX is the soft and GumX the hard! www.pinkbike.com/news/michelin-wild-rockr2-tire-reviewed.html
  • + 10
 Magi-X ist a bit of very soft rubber on top of a rather hard base while Gum-X is soft(but harder than Magi-X) on top of a not that hard base. At least on the Wild Enduros.
Having had both (even changed mid run, girlfriend running one, me the other compound and swapping wheels to test) I found:
- The Magi-X needs a lot more commitment to really shine, you will find the Gum-X to be mire forgiving if you don‘t go all out
- The Gum-X has more grip on wet roots, the Magi-X is better on wet rocks. In the dry, see above.
  • + 3
 @lukesky: well that clears things up
  • + 1
 What size tyres do most run, as they now have 2.4, 2.6, 2.8...... I’m guessing most opt for the 2.4 looking at picking up a set of front and rear for some racing this year
  • + 1
 I have wanted these tires since before Christmas but they haven’t been in stock for 29” magi-x compound yet on CRC. where else can one get these tires in BC?
  • + 2
 I got 2 sets from CRC during Black whatever sale for about $48 USD each. Quite happy with the price n performance. They did sit in US Customs for a week however. - not CRC's fault, but their CS dept couldn't locate them when I inquired.
  • + 2
 Cycles Lambert is the canadian distributor.. so any bike shop will be able to order you one... I recommend Obsession Bikes in North Vancouver.
  • + 1
 @denomerdano: Didn't know Obsession stocked Michelins. Thanks
  • + 1
 @Davidsym: Looks like Lambert no longer carries Michelin Brand, but im sure the shop will sort you out.
  • + 3
 Are those Canadian Tire digital calipers?
  • + 3
 These look ok but for dry conditions the Wild Rock'R2 seems better.
  • + 3
 That tire is fantastic on dry/wet rocky @ hard pack but lacks volume. Super good cornering,
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: buy a bigger size?
  • + 2
 @multialxndr: thant wild rockR2 is only 2.35.. and gets too squared on wider than ~25mm ID rims
  • + 4
 We want the DH22!!!
  • + 2
 That is the truth.
  • + 3
 Looks like a...
  • + 10
 Tire
  • + 1
 Intense 909!
  • + 5
 Eggplant?
  • + 1
 THese look like the original Specialized Team Control tires from the 90's. I liked those. I would probably like these.
  • + 2
 Looks good but there's not a single fault with Schwalbe so why bother.
  • + 1
 $64USD or About $120CDN. LOL
  • - 1
 Wake me up when a tire is clearly better (or the same but way cheaper) than a DHF or DHR.
Until then I have one less choice to make on my bike.
  • + 1
 Are they waiting to sell all of these before they release the DH22/34?
  • - 3
 "The Wild Enduro Rear has a similar tread pattern design, but the center knobs aren't as tall."

So the rear comes pre worn? For the same money I can buy two fronts and get more life out of my rear tire?
  • + 1
 Not a bad idea
  • + 1
 hahahahaha
  • - 2
 Looks pretty good but the Magic Mary has a model that has 145 grams less.
  • + 10
 Yeah and goes into pieces in a matter of few rides and anything can puncture it. Mary is great when it is in SG or DH casing. Snake Skin casings for aggro tyres are a joke. Not to mention that this tyre will do well in the dry while Magic Mary is virtually a mud tyre squriming in the hard pack.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: From the review I got the impression the michelin tire was worst in the dry than the magic mary. Magic Mary is the standard to which I compare all other all round tires. I do agree that the single ply version is more fragile and cuts more easily but when run with procore it is lighter than the SG version with tubes and provides more grip!
  • + 3
 S-Skin Schwable is very fragile when rode hard, I found the Michelin to much more robust.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: You can get away with Snakeskin on the front but definitely need at least SG with Schwalbe tyres on the rear.
  • + 4
 @KxPop: its very personal.. if you take poor line for your tires (which an be good lines), you are screwed if using 800-900 tires. fact. I cant get away with SS/EXO front or rear..
  • + 3
 Don't trust Schwalbes claimed weights! My last MM was ~120g heavier than advertised. Great tires, but if i was heavy or lived among sharp rocks i would put my faith in the Michelin casing.

These Michelins have some very smart aspects, for instance that the rear specific tire has a tougher casing than the front specific one. Too bad that they don't roll well. There is a serious shortage of tough, fast rolling tires (that are not semi-slicks).
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: I punctured Snake Skin through Procore on a flow trail. I punctured Spec Grid with Huck Norris, sorry, I ripped it apart. Then comes the issue of tyre stability. there is a reason why Dirt Jumpers run 1ply tyres at 4bar or more. I don't feel right on 1plies at 2,5bar on pumptrack, would not run under 3. So long bike + catch berms on steep, long corners through rough bits - give me SG or DD . With procore for the rear. Magic Mary and dry as long as it is not hard pack. Maybe it's a matter of taste - I'm fine with that. But it does not suit my taste. I don't know how this tyre can be worse than MM since knobs are shorter and with more base. Maybe it's a matter of taste Smile After all Matt Wragg is a great rider and finds MMary to be good on rocks of Italian and French rivieras. I won't argue with that.
  • + 1
 @Ttimer: "There is a serious shortage of tough, fast rolling tires (that are not semi-slicks)" or with shitty rubber compound.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: in the dust on top of hard pack of Southern California, the MM grip as good as anything else out there, probably better. Tons of people run them on the front here, despite the slower roll.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: I don’t know. Everytime I am to push a tyre into a harder packed corner at any “bigger” lean angle I feel how it squirms and it makes me feel reluctant to do so. On Minion I feel like I can push as much as I want. I can compare it to skiing on a softer ski, the general grip is there and it is hard to argue whether one has more actual grip than another, but I feel little incentive to remain active. I actually experience MM like a more well rounded version of the Shorty. In wet soft, the grip is amazing, on hardpack it is there, but I don’t feel confident pushing it with arms and hips.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: You are getting the wrong model of the Magic Mary then. There are three lines. Evolution (Folding), Performance (Wired), Evolution (Wired). I have not had any problems with the casings and I ride in really sharp rocky tech. The MM hooks up well in dry loose conditions with gravel on top and hard pack underneath. If you are pedaling up the light MM is such an awesome tire.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: How much do you weigh? That could be a factor. I weight 150lbs fully decked, so lighter than most.
  • + 2
 @tacklingdummy: I'm with you and @Rubberelli. I haven't had any problems with my Magic Mary. I ride a lot of dry, rocky terrain here in the Front Range of Colorado, with a lot of loose dust and sand over hard pack. I haven't had many problems with the performance of the tire on this terrain. Great traction, doesn't squirm. Rolls great. No apparent problems with wear at this point in their life. I weigh 185 pounds.

I heard a lot about the MM being an under-performing tire compared to the Minion DHF, and the only reason I went with the MM is because it came on my new bike. I figured I'd give it a try before I went back to Minions or Spec Butchers. Minions feel like you're rolling in sludge by comparison, and I haven't compromised anything in terms of performance. I don't think I can really comment on durability until I've had them a little while longer, but I haven't worn them out in a few rides, as I've read. So far, so good -- that's all I can say. In fact, the only thing at this point that would keep me from buying another set is the price compared to Maxxis or Specialized.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: I am 165-170. SS and SG casing in addix soft It is the knobs that are squirmyfor my likes. Godly grip in soft, especially wet loam, but squirmy on harder surface
  • + 1
 pf MM are made overseas and cost the same if I want the good model as the baron or kaiser but they are made in the EU. Fuck this outsourcing for the same price I buy local...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I agree on a rear tire the soft compounds get tore up quickly in rocky conditions and are pinch flat susceptible. Two things I have done to help that. Move to the hard compounds and use higher pressures. The harder compound knobbies don't fold over as easy but not as grippy. Always a trade off.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: it's not about wear, at least as long as knobs are not getting torn out. Knobs squirm, it's not a rocket science, Marys knobs have less base than Minion or some other tyres. This flex is what makes them good in soft underlay. Some people probably don't notice it, I do. I like to load the front tyre into the apex, main pressure point, whatever you call it and expect planted feel, and rather directly.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I haven't found much problem with MM's side knobs folding over with the harder compounds. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the Minion DHR. I tore that tire up in a month. The casing was pretty good though. Haven't tried the DHF yet because I like the MM so much in my local conditions of the Santa Cruz area.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: DHR or DHR2. Major Difference. Again I am not saying one is better than another, I feel confident with less squirm. That's how I get faster on DHF than MM. You may have it other way around. I would haowever argue than from definite factors, Maxxis last longer than Schwalbes. I am not sure which tyres are less durable than Schwalbe. Especially in the dry. I destroyed EACH single Schwalbe I had quicker than any other tyre I had. Make no mistake, the ROck Razor in SG soft is the best "enduro" rear tyre I have ever had, and I will buy it, despite the fact that I wore it out in 2 months. It is worth every penny to me. Also... I thought that Super Gravity and DH casings come only in soft and ultra soft mhmhmhmm...

side note DHF brakes worse than DHR2, but it has more predictable lean over and setting into the lean. DHR2 is half way to Highrollers of both kinds which I personally hate for lack of predictability and on/off grip. Super grip, possibly biggest grip I have ever experienced, when you rail it rails, but when you go over the edge... you know it after you are on the ground. Minion DHF simply talks to you a lot.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: In my experience, HRII's wear much faster than most Schwalbe tires. When they are good, they have the best braking there is, but after a couple of dozen rides, there will be a point that they just slide, rather than skid.
  • + 2
 @Rubberelli: actually thank you for reminding me, one of several reasons why I will never buy one again. And if you thought than HR1 wore out fast, check out HR2.
  • + 0
 @KxPop: schwabe makes the worst tires on the planet get yourself a team issue Bontrager
  • + 2
 @oldtech: in my not humble opinion Bontrager makes best xc and intermediate tyres out there, and then some of the best DH tyres. Maybe because those DH tyres look like minions. I haven’t tried the latest maxxis like Rekon Race though. But all XR and SE family is full tits. Hard to find a crappy tyre from thm
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I agree. I think a G5 and SE5 are the best front tires there are, with the 4's great for rear use.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: these are virtually DHRs2. Have them. The Se3 and 4 are great intermediates if you want to pedal a bit faster and slide a bit. One cannot suck on those meaty Minion like side knobs all year round Smile get loose!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I know you are a Bontrager Fanboy and you are never humble. I've been reading rants for years. AKA Pro perp, stink bike lies. Keep them in line wacky! At least we can always agree Bontrager tires are lightning and super glue all rolled into one. I also am a huge fan of a few Vee rubber tires but I would never tell anyone that. That fat Crown gem has never left me stranded. From downhill runs to Flat Florida fun. Only on the front though.
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