Brake Force One Disc Brake - Review

Mar 12, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Brake Force One

Levers and Lines

Brake Force One manufactures both their levers and lever bodies out of carbon resin, with the brake's one-finger blades (there is also a two-finger option) featuring a forgiving and grippy rubber coating where your digits rest. Lever reach and bite point can be adjusted independently of each other, with the star-wheel dial at the front of the assembly allowing for a massive range of pad engagement, and a small 3mm hex adjuster on the side of each lever is used to determine the starting point. The brake's biggest talking point, and the one that most people asked about at the trailhead, is their clear lines that allow you to see the mineral oil within - BFO offers red, blue, green, yellow, orange, black, and even glow in the dark fluid, as well as more traditional non-transparent lines. While this may sound gimmicky at first, BFO says that it does allow users to easily spot any air that may be present in the system.
Brake Force One Details:
• Intended use: XC, AM, and DH use
• Closed brake system (no reservoir)
• Carbon resin lever body and blade
• One-piece caliper
• Mineral oil
• 198 grams per end (w/o rotor)
• MSRP $498.95 USD per end

BFO brakes

With their clear lines and unique looking carbon resin levers and bodies, the Brake Force One stoppers don't resemble anything currently available.



Closed System

An open brake design refers to a system's reservoir, which is a small chamber of fluid that is usually backed with a rubber bladder that can compress in order to compensate for heat and fluid expansion. When the brake lever is pulled on an open design, the plunger compresses the piston, closing off the oil port for the reservoir and then only acting on the fluid in the brake line and caliper. This means that, in a way, the open design becomes a closed system as soon as the brake lever is pulled, which is why a poorly bled brake can sometimes "pump up" until you release the lever and the reservoir is allowed to compensate for said pumping. Brake Force One's design is closed - there is no reservoir - and they utilize a larger than average gap between the pads and rotor to offset any heat buildup that might occur, as well as their "hydraulic booster" to increase power.

BFO

While pretty much everything else on the market employs an open design, Brake Force One uses a closed system in conjunction with a novel hydraulic booster within their caliper.



Power Booster

Hidden inside the impressive looking one-piece caliper is a small "hydraulic booster" that BFO claims adds a considerable amount of power. The design is a two-stage system that allows BFO to control how fast the 22mm pistons move in relation to lever pull, with them travelling out faster during the initial action. This first stage compensates for the extra clearance between the rotor and pads. As the pads make contact with the rotor, the system switches to allow for more oil volume to act on the booster, lowering the required force at the lever compared to a more common brake system, as well as greatly upping the power according to Brake Force One. While all of the above may sound complicated, it is essentially changing the brake's mechanical advantage by altering the oil volume that is acting on the pistons.

BFO brakes

The massive one-piece caliper houses 22mm pistons.



Installation and Setup

BFO may approach braking with a different philosophy than what we are used to seeing, but installation and setup is similar to other offerings on the market. The post mount caliper design makes centering it over the rotor for drag-free running simple, although both our front and rear brakes did require some fine tuning by hand after doing the ‘ol lever squeeze and bolt-tighten routine. The extra clearance between the pads and rotor is a big help at this point in the installation, with us being able to easily sight the gap between the two and use it to align the caliper correctly.

BFO brakes

Don't over tighten the brake's hardware - the carbon resin construction is not as forgiving as other materials.



Split perches make fitting the levers to the bar quick and easy, although care needs to be taken when threading the T25 torx head bolts home: we confess that we cracked a clamp when we went to snug up one of the bolts. Although we have to admit to not using a torque wrench at the time, the clamp cracked a bit too easy for our liking - care needs to be taken when tightening the bolts into the composite body. Our BFO brakes came with mounts for SRAM shifters (Shimano compatible versions are also available), and much like other combined mounts on the market, they make for a tidy looking handlebar setup.

Once on the bar it was quickly apparent that lever position is a vital setup point with the BFO brakes. This is due to their pronounced hooked shape that has been designed to function with only one finger. Now, one-finger braking is how we all do it in this age of powerful and reliable stoppers, but the large majority of brakes on the market allow for more digits on the lever should the need arise. BFO’s lever, on the other hand, is not only shaped to function best when used with a single finger, it is actually the only way to do it since the finger-well is so pronounced. We found that it only took a few millimeters inboard or outboard of their ideal position for them to feel awkward under-finger, but taking a short amount of time to really dial-in the best possible location made for a world of difference concerning comfort, and we were quickly able to find a position that worked well us. Having said that, we can see many riders preferring BFO's more traditional two-finger levers that are quite comfortable.

Just as with any other brake system, we began by first tuning the reach to our liking, then adjusting the bite point. There is a softer sensation at the lever when comparing their feel to more common brake options on the market, with the levers pulling in towards the bar more than we’ve become accustomed to, even with the bite point dialled too far out for the large majority of riders. At this point many readers would likely assume that air in the system is the root of the issue – we made the same assumption – but a good bleed ensured that this wasn’t the case, as did the clear brake lines that allow air bubbles to be spotted easily. Another foible popped up while we were trying to tune-out the soft lever feel: that generous pad clearance that BFO touts as making for a drag-free design evaporates as the bite point is brought out to a useable setting, and by the time a workable compromise is found there isn’t much more clearance than you’d find on a standard braking system. Yes, it still ran drag-free, but so does any other brake system when set up correctly.


On the Trail

We ended up spending time on two different sets of BFO's brake, although that's only because our initial set left a lot to be desired when it came to power. Performing a proper break-in is essential if you’re looking to have your brakes perform to their full potential, and we did our due diligence as we worked to get the our first set of BFOs up to operating spec. Doing a countless number of break-in stops didn’t seem to wake up the new pads and rotors, though, with the brakes going from having very little initial bite and power when new to offering only a marginal improvement. Outright braking power isn’t as important as many riders assume, though, with proper, useable power and quality modulation sitting far higher on our priority list. Having said that, those first BFOs were lacking on all of those points, with initial bite not providing the grab that we’ve become accustomed to. This led to more than a few accidental late-braking situations until we eventually got used to the feeling and moved our braking points out accordingly. We wouldn't blame you for assuming that those symptoms read like a set of contaminated brake pads, but both a close inspection and a brake pad and rotor swap ruled this out as a possible cause.

BFO brakes

While they are light and look great, the Brake Force Ones left us looking for more



Interestingly, they also seemed to be affected by ambient temperatures, with a very noticeable change in feel when going from our heated workshop to chilly riding conditions, enough so to require us to compensate with the adjustment dial. Anyone who has used closed system brakes from the past will be familiar with this sensation. In the end we never could pinpoint the exact reason for those original BFOs to let us down so drastically, but we decided that spending time on a second set was needed in order to give them a fair evaluation.

How did round two go? Much better, actually. Our second set of BFO brakes showed large gains in power compared to those first duds, with no complaints when it came time to lock up the wheels up in a late braking situation. We would still say that they are down on power when compared to the strongest two-piston brakes on the market, and you likely won't see us using them on a downhill bike anytime soon, but they offer more than enough grunt for any cross-country or trail rider. While their power may not be anything to write home about, the BFOs do offer an impressive amount of feel through the levers that makes it seem as though your brain is connected directly to the calipers. That fact equals great control in medium-force braking moments that are past the initial bite but before you're looking for all-out, anchor dropping stops. This translated to plenty of control in low traction settings such as wet or extremely loose conditions after a long dry spell, and it was easy to modulate the power right up until the moment when the tires begin to lose traction and slide.

Do the BFO brakes perform better than other options on the market? We'd have to say that the answer is no, despite the impressive modulation on tap. It comes down to them being a touch low on power relative to the competition, something that will put off those who frequent steep terrain, or are bigger or faster riders. That's not to say that BFO won't find any fans, though, because their unique appearance, design, and function are points that will likely win over some riders.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesOur curiosity was piqued when we spotted BFO's brakes being shown off for the first time at a tradeshow, and we were admittedly quite excited about the fact that a new player in the brake market was not only looking to take on the recognized names, but also doing it in an unorthodox fashion. Trail time has shown that while they certainly won't be for everyone, especially heavier or aggressive riders, their extremely low weight and great modulation will make them a viable option for some, especially those with deep pockets. - Mike Levy


www.brakeforceone.de


141 Comments

  • + 209
 BUT THEY HAVE A GLOW IN THE DARK FLUID OPTION
  • + 75
 but... bu.. buu... but... IT GLOWS IN THE DARK!!!!
  • + 41
 worth every penny
  • + 28
 also you can use this oil to cook come pancakes
  • + 55
 I hope that isn't a typo.
  • + 14
 clear plastic tube, hmmm if you cant tell when your brakes have air in them by pulling the lever its probably time to quit
  • + 127
 Glo in the dark fluid, so when you crash and rip the brakes line out , you look like an injured predator, GET TO THE CHOPPER!!!
before someone sees i spent $1000 on these brakes.
  • + 20
 "your 1 ugly mother f*cker"
  • + 42
 if it bleeds we can kill it!!!!!
  • + 54
 Poncho: You're bleeding, man. You're hit.

Blain: I ain't got time to bleed.
  • + 17
 I really like the idea of transparent brake lines!
  • + 6
 Chuvak imagine glowing pancakes. It must be nuka-cola not brake fluid.
  • + 30
 Awesome, a urinary catheter tube on my bike!
  • + 9
 @Worm-Burner
Easy-to-repair brakes blowing the market. lost your fluid? air trapped in the brake? have no worries, rider, you can detach this catheter and fill the brake with your urine! done? go, shred the trail!
  • + 4
 I can't believe they just slip on the hose, catch a twig in the line or squeeze too hard and it'll pop right off the lever body
  • + 5
 Looks like a Magura but does it stop like one, or modulate correctly. Those flimsy lines are getting old and have seen many a weekend ended early do to that. Save weight somewhere else, give me some braided lines.
  • + 4
 Glowing pancake glowing shit
  • + 6
 The scariest thing that came out of Predator is that, not one, but TWO of the actors became state governors…
(tried to think of a quote, but I think we're covered above)
  • + 15
 "Don't over tighten the brake's hardware - the carbon resin construction is not as forgiving as other materials." Snapity snap snap on every crashity crash crash. Sign me up!!!
  • + 9
 Yes! Like watercooled computer! My bike is now renaimed from "stumpjumper" to "LoRdKill3r PwNd U". Oh yeah my whell are overclocked from 26 to 27.5!
  • - 8
flag Patrick9-32 (Mar 12, 2014 at 5:17) (Below Threshold)
 The new Specialized 420BlazeItF4ggot.
  • + 8
 "Stick around"
  • + 9
 Time to put those clear lines on my saints and GLOW IN THE DARK!!!
  • + 8
 "Come on! Do it! Do it! Come on. Come on! Kill me! I'm here! Kill me! I'm here! Kill me! Come on! Kill me! I cant believe i paid $1000 dollars for these brakes KILL ME!!!!
  • + 1
 "Im gonna have me some fun, Im gonna have me some fun, Im gonna have me some fun"
  • + 11
 Can we have a review on just the glow in the dark fluid...?
  • - 4
flag Spicy-Mike (Mar 12, 2014 at 11:34) (Below Threshold)
 I actually want to try putting Saint M820 levers on this caliper Big Grin
  • + 3
 Turn around, turn around....... And That's what the little voice should also be saying as you walk to the counter with these in your hand.
  • + 2
 'I'm back!"

but perhaps you will be "sticking around" as your try to unjam your closed brakes which have overheated

anyone else remember the horrors that were Hope C2 brakes?
  • + 3
 Holy cow they this article got on the front page really late, its from almost a year ago. Look at the date of the top two comments.
  • + 1
 They must have forgot to set their clocks ahead for daylight savings.
  • + 1
 so XC only??
  • + 48
 Formulas R1 are lighter, cheaper and the lever does not look like a sprayer from window cleaner. Magura did that mistake as well, who cares if it is expensive resin if it looks like cheap crappy plastic they make vacuum cleaner heads from.
  • + 13
 so true, not sure it is possible to make a brake set look more sh*t, seriously I would be very surprised to ever see a set of these in real life
  • + 10
 Wow, for once a WAKIdesigns comment that wasn't blatant sh*tposting.
  • + 3
 ^ Lol he has plenty of those good comments, all the time. Depends on your interpretation really, as his satirical write-ups and artwork have very specific messages behind them..
  • + 4
 Hah, that is surprisingly funny. I haven't wrote a comment with such a bitchy, negative intention with no positive insight, since a long time, and wow, so many positive props. This is scary Smile
  • + 3
 Come on Waki you've been on Pinkbike long enough to know that bitchy, negative, baseless arguments get the most props.
  • + 1
 Excellent point, WAKI. The first thing I thought after seeing the price was 'WHAT!!? Those are the ugliest damn brakes I've ever seen.'

So... We have, what? Brakes that A, cost $1000 and B, don't stop well if you're 'heavy or an aggressive rider' that C, are ugly as shit.

Wait, what? Go home, BFO. You're drunk.
  • + 1
 @durza11 - funny that. I actually think your post is a typical example of shitposting...
  • + 34
 With no power, comes no responsibility.
  • + 10
 Story of my life.
  • + 21
 Closed systems are so outdated it's not funny. Cold temps - fiddle with dial, long downhill - fiddle with dial, long uphill - fiddle with dial and so on and so on. There's a reason everyone went with open systems. Clear lines are kind of cool though, although you guessed it, fiddling with the dial...
  • + 4
 Haha very true, the last thing i wanna do on the trail is mess with my brakes.
  • + 20
 Holy gimmicks batman! Arent regular hoses internally reinforced with several plastic/braided layers to make them 'stiff', ie stop them expanding under pressure, that cant help with lever feel and power? Couple that with plastic levers that must be relatively flexy and a resivoir system we havent seen since the hope c2 was introduced nigh on 20yrs ago?! No thanks....
  • + 25
 THEY COST A GRAND A SET!!!!! Sweet baby jesus....
  • + 27
 Ill stick with shimano for the time being…
  • + 7
 I'd really love to see a Vs test with these against a cheapo set of Deore brakes. I wonder if the huge percentage price difference is matched by a huge percentage performance improvement?

Oh, and by the way HA HA! Plastic brakes !!!
  • + 6
 I'll keep my u-brakes
  • + 4
 I've ridden deore brakes... cheapo isn't how I'd describe them. They were on a demo bike, and I went home and ordered some XTs (I'd been riding elixrs before.) Only reason I went for the price premium of the XTs was icetech, but I'd have been quite happy with the deores over the much more expensive elixers. (I get that you probably didn't mean cheapo in that way, but those brakes really do rule pretty hard.)
  • + 3
 For that money, if you shop real hard, you can have a set of XT brakes that work AND a nice wheelset.
  • + 1
 a very nice wheelset, really. I paid 240 for my set of XTs a year ago. MY current wheelset cost far less than 760 to build, and is pretty awesome (Hope+Flows)
  • + 1
 You're right groghunter. I didn't mean to belittle Deore brakes, they're what I ride on my bike and I have every intention of putting them on my current project. Great brakes! Just wondered how much better brakes would need to feel to justify a thousand dollars?
  • + 21
 I kinda wonder why anyone ever buys any brakes that aren't Shimano. Even Deore's are awesome. XT or XTR for lighter, and Saint for tougher. Although the hoses do look mint..
  • + 5
 Slx are good also, they don't feel to much differant from xt's
  • + 4
 Zee brakes ftw
  • - 2
 Formula
  • + 1
 Yeah same here, I prefer formula to shimano, my RO's are lighter,stronger and for me have a better feel than saints, with a more elegant design and have proven to be 100% reliable - have two sets on the DH and AM bikes.

Interesting how people either love or hate formula.
  • + 1
 Slx and xt have larger, ceramic pistons which have more stopping power and stop your fluid from heating up so much on long descents. good for the alps, but in rainy wales you'll struggle to tell the difference from Deore's. Also, saints have a lot more power due to the long pad and 4 pot caliper. Formulas feel nice but need bleeding way too often.
  • + 1
 I run Formula Oro K24's on my xc hardtail and haven't had a problem with them yet and I run Zee's on my freeride bike
  • + 2
 dang, guess Formula ain't particularly liked 'round these parts Wink I've not ridden Shimano; I have post-shimano stress disorder from all the gimmicky crap they pulled with planned obsolescence in the 80's and 90's. That said I'm glad so many people love their brakes, though I'll continue to ride Formula brakes and SRAM drivetrains...
  • - 2
 Avid for life baby!!
  • + 1
 2 bikes, both with formula and both work a treat. . . . .
  • + 14
 im not gonna lie who else thinks they look like they were made at toys r us black edition?
  • + 9
 I think I still have a box of legos in the attic…gonna go put together a set of breaks…I mean brakes.
  • + 1
 i as well
  • + 6
 Yikes. For $1000, I'd really like brakes that stop, that will handle abuse, and that, beyond the appeal of glow-in-the-dark fluid, actually add something to the MTB braking industry. The fact that they're ugly as shit isn't winning points, either. Closed system? Flimsy brake lines? Weirdly fragile mounts? Braking that isn't recommended for an aggressive rider? PASS.

But good, thorough review, Mike. Well done.
  • + 9
 Better get my lipstick and high heels on and hit the corner,this is gonna be sore but so worth it.
  • + 9
 Weren't you the guy who wiped his ass with newspapers for 6 months?
Don't forget the lube.
  • + 3
 Hang on, how do you bleed these? Seeing how its effectively 2 separate hydraulic systems, either side of their 'booster' thing and there only appear to be 2 bleed points, one on each system?

Take a look at the cross section.... do you have to take the bore caps off to do it?
  • + 3
 Umm those are clear nylon lines. I'm not sure anybody wants those. They will flex, or if they are a harder nylon, will get brittle over time. If you crash and wrap your bars around kiss your brakes goodbye, those lines will pull right off hose barbs. Anybody pull the line off their reverb. Not too hard eh?

Certain things like brakes maybe should come with safety standards....
  • + 1
 I was thinking the same thing ukr77. not so much about the safety standards more about how cheap the lines and connections looked.
  • + 5
 4x the price of my XTR trail, slightly lighter only (50g per brake), nowhere near in term of power or reliability...
I guess everybody knows how it will end...
  • + 5
 ...weight weenie idiots will ride these, and talk about how much lighter they are, as if it directly correlates to an increase in their penis size?
  • + 5
 I'd just get the Dremel out and go to work on some XT or XTR brakes, should be able to shave a few grams off them, saving you $$$'s
  • + 6
 I'm pretty sure that would be less ugly than these levers.
  • + 2
 i think you can get some more power out of them if you go for a set of reinforced lines or even steel braided (although these add a lot of weight).

much of the low end power and mushy/elastic feeling in brakes is caused by flexible lines ...
  • + 2
 While clear lines are a good idea, it sounds like there isn't a whole lot of power within the system. If they could figure out how to make the brake more powerful, enough to compete with a mid-range Shimano, I could see a much more positive future for these guys. I would love to have a clear line on my Saints- I know this is probably the place of a lot of loss of power, but bleeding the system would be much easier, and it would be nice to actually be able to see the color of your brake fluid so you know when a full-system flush is necessary. Good idea, but it needs more work from what I read.
  • + 1
 To be honest I think that bleeding Saints is really easy and funnel costs next to nothing comparing with Avids Bleed Kit. Another thing: even with transparent cables you won't be able to get rid off all the air in the system.

I have doubts about about transparent cables being resistant to increasing pressure from the brake fluid. Stainless braided cables are made from core reinforced with steel and here it looks just like a core without anything on it.
  • + 3
 i like the concept and idea... clever... but the leveer is awful
  • + 6
 I have actually got these brakes, although I don't have the clear lines, I think the expansion problem is not that relevant for these brakes. On normal brakes the MC piston diameter is probably half the size, which means you can apply more pressure to the line.
Here, the piston diameter is large, meaning pressure will be lower. What in turn makes these brakes work with a larger MC diameter is the booster valve in the caliper, which increases caliper piston pressure, while line pressure stays the same.

My experience with the brakes
Pro: Plenty powerful(with aftermarket pads), excellent modulation, light weight, lever feels really good, although it looks cheapish.
Con: My fingers get really tired because of the long lever stroke on days with a lot of fast riding, you have to adjust the brakes when temperature changes, price, availability of spares.

Conclusion: BFO's are currently laying in a cardboard box, XT trail brakes fitted to my bike.
  • + 3
 oyvin is right about the low line pressure, I doubt line expansion is a big deal for these. And like the review said, it's probably plenty of power for like 75% of riders (all but the ballsiest DH riders).

But having to adjust the system EVERY. TIME. ANYTHING. HAPPENS??? Complete dealbreaker. Being "different" is not a good enough reason to use a design with such obvious drawbacks as a closed system. Not sure I really understand what they gain by having it closed anyway... isn't the modulation due to their piston design? Seems like you could put an open bath on there and still get the modulation they want.
  • + 2
 I think the main reason behind the closed system is pad clearance. There is no spring between the pads like on traditional brakes. Instead, the pump has an internal spring which pulls the pistons back when you release the lever. And the pistons are magnetic, making sure the pads keep up with the pistons movement.
  • + 1
 I like some of the features of this brake. What I want in a brake is it to be reliable, powerful, good eronomics, short lever throw, wider distance between pads and rotor, limited noise, not affected by tempurature, servicable, easy to bleed/quality bleed kit and good customer service from the company.
I have tried a lot of brakes (hayes, formula, tektro, avid, shimano)and none have all these things. So far my favorite brakes have been Shimanos, but they are not perfect. When running the levers close to the bars I have to add fliud preloadind the master cylinder in order to make the throw short. This makes the pads close to the rotor. Cold temperature does make the lever throw very short. The bleed prosses isn't bad but they need better fittings. Another downfall is that they are not serviceable. You have to buy complete levers or calipers and dealing with Shimanos customer service can be like pulling teeth.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the proper review. It`s very useful to know it wont suit everyone. As a big guy i had a real trouble riding on a steep, long DH track with a low power brakes. Suffered severe finger fatigue after the first couple of high speed corners and it`s a whole miracle i managed to stop somehow and rest before i crash badly somewhere. Always hated to throw packs of money through the window and decided to fix it somehow instead of buying a new brake i cant afford. So i ended replacing the lines of the current off the shelf m800 with goodridge, levers with BRL-595 and that worked awesome. The setup is hard to beat even by the latest XT`s in terms of power and modulation so i`m still riding them.
  • + 1
 I like some of the features of this brake. What I want in a brake is it to be reliable, powerful, good eronomics, short lever throw, wider distance between pads and rotor, limited noise, not affected by tempurature, servicable, easy to bleed/quality bleed kit and good customer service from the company.
I have tried a lot of brakes (hayes, formula, tektro, avid, shimano)and none have all these things. So far my favorite brakes have been Shimanos, but they are not perfect. When running the levers close to the bars I have to add fliud preloadind the master cylinder in order to make the throw short. This makes the pads close to the rotor. Cold temperature does make the lever throw very short. The bleed prosses isn't bad but they need better fittings. Another downfall is that they are not serviceable. You have to buy complete levers or calipers and dealing with Shimanos customer service can be like pulling teeth.
  • + 1
 The only reason they can get away with those clear lines is because of the so called "power booster" it compensates for the lack of master to slave cylinder surface area ratio. Adding seal swept area in the brake system all contributing to a soft lever feel and possible reliability issues.
  • + 4
 if those lever mounts cracked during installation, I would hate to see them after a crash....
  • + 1
 braided hose vs. clear plastic pipe with slip on connector ..... closed fiddly system vs. light alloy robust open design ... aka. i have hopes with braided goodridge hoses they might not be the lightest but after heavy DH and numerous crashing they still work and other than the necessary pad change and bleeding while changing pads they never ever missed a beat ... would like to see these cheep ($500 !?) looking simplistic things stand up to that .... i personally think they not only look feeble but due to their minimalist design and weight saving (WHICH IS NOT what EVERYTHING should be revolved around especially with gravity disciplines!) makes them a thing i would avoid ... next step bring back cable disc brakes with super expensive spider silk cables ..... Frown
  • + 4
 Might those clear lines be flexing a bit at peak pressure and causing the lack of power?
  • + 2
 blehed^ i was wondering the same thing? it would be interesting to hear how they feel with some real(normal) lines on them
  • + 4
 Carbon resin? In other words plastic. $500 for plastic brakes.
  • + 2
 HAHHHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!! Jesus mother f***er! This has to be a joke! WTF!? Ugliest, flimsiest piece of shit EVER with a GRAND price tag!
  • + 1
 At first, I thought it was, too... It HAS to be a joke.
  • + 2
 back in the day i had a 1998 Monty X-lite and it had clear brake lines on the magura's I haven't seen clear brake lines from that day to this, its taking me way back!
  • + 2
 OMG !!!!! Thank you SO much !!!! This has been bothering me all day. I bloody knew I'd seen clear break lines somewhere before.
  • + 2
 So if you can crack em that easy with the bolt, what happens when you prop your bike up on something and it falls over? Or because this never happens.... To anyone....crash?
  • + 2
 theres no way these plastic lines have less expansion than steel braided or Kevlar reinforced. I'll stick with my braided hoses for that price on a hopetech X2
  • + 2
 So "tempting" but I'll stick with my Saint/Zee/Unex Cables combo. Mounting of cables with brake lever looks too cheap even for walmart.
  • + 3
 It doesnt have an olive does it, it looks like it just pushes onto a barb? Cant be very strong?....
  • + 1
 Exactly Smile
  • + 2
 They could reinforce the lines with glass tape and still keep them partially clear, at least they'd work. This is form over function, big time.
  • + 3
 Why pay this much money for this brake system when you can buy Shimano? Shimano brakes, the best, right?
  • + 1
 Has anyone covered the likelihood of sunlight heating the fluid on those hoses? Specially on really sunny days when you are riding for more than a couple of hours?...
  • + 3
 I wonder if rotors with more meat and less cut-away would have helped?
  • + 1
 I was wondering the same thing , barely a surface to grip really.
  • + 1
 sounds like ashima syndrome...
  • + 3
 Buys it for glow in the dark fluid, never rides at night Razz
  • + 1
 At a grand, I would expect good looks and virtually indestructible no matter what the discipline.
  • + 0
 just think of all the natural resources that went into building every crap avid, magura, hope etc brake ever made. mind-boggling.
  • + 3
 Bear Force One Yeah~~~
  • + 1
 This prompted some of the best PinkBike comments ever written!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 So... it is exciting that they are now doing what magura has done for years?

I do like the carbon slurry assemblies though!
  • + 1
 "I can't believe its not Butter", look like virtual brakes , with glow sauce
  • + 1
 anyone remember the clear lines came on the mountain cycles prostoppers disk brakes backin the early to mid 90's
  • + 2
 Dont think i could get over the "special needs" looking lever
  • + 3
 they look complete turd.
  • + 1
 Meh. XT's Kick ass, have great modulation and dont look cack or are weak stoppers like avids. #1 so why bother??
  • + 2
 Solid review. Good job Mike
  • + 1
 Why do companies bother competing with shimano and formula in the mtb brakes market?
  • + 2
 Damn, I want clear lines!
  • + 1
 Clear cables are a great idea, I want some!
  • + 2
 Another HammerSchmidt?
  • + 2
 German overengineering.
  • + 2
 Just like the Magura MT8. Expensive like nothing else, and yet... they don't work better than what Shimano or Formula have to offer, but they cost a fortune and then they don't even stop properly! I mean, I just bought a set of Shimano SLX brakes for 120€ (roughly 140$ excluding Tax), and they are bloody brilliant! Okay, they are 300g per end instead of 200g, but they are known to be reliable and the stopping power was awesome from day one.
  • + 3
 SLX brakes are God's gift to humanity indeed. Cheap, easy to bleed, reliable, long service intervals and they work like XTR.
  • + 1
 look reminds me somewhat of the magura (caliper) though the MT8 lever are much better looking. Surprised to read so much negative feedback on magura as I've been very happy with them - yes they are expensive but I love their power/modulation and long lever comfort. customer service has been incredible to me - they replaced a pair of 4 years old martha SL lever with brand new MT8 for free when I ran into issues and threw a bleed kit. Try that with shimano !
I have 3 of them (martha SL on AM bike, now MT8/Martha combo, and latest Louise BAT on DH bike (cheap) and very happy. I've tried Formula One (came with bike, not very powerful and noisy as hell) and Hayes Stroker Trail (really inexpensive in a very bad way) and my friends have nothing but problems with avid elixirs.... never tried XT though. Competition is always good. vote with your $
  • + 1
 They look cheap but they are not, WTF
  • + 1
 how much for just the hose lining?
  • + 1
 glow in the dark brake lines seem awkward
  • + 1
 This is a good example that you can not polish a turd!
  • + 1
 Thanks but I'll stick with XTs.
  • + 1
 cute but hope4life
  • + 1
 nice!
  • + 1
 I like it!!!
  • + 1
 Looks like magura junk!
  • + 1
 have you actually tried maguras ? love mine... and the reviews of Martha SL and louise (haven't tracked the latest MT models) have been very positive. Expensive, yes, though I bought a set of latest Louise Bat new for under $160 2 years ago (and a slightly used for $100) for DH bikes. hard to beat that price and power...
  • + 1
 Hope or formula and shimano are the only best brakes out there
  • + 1
 looklike a toy
  • + 0
 Sounds like an Avid Brake...

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