Video: Advanced MTB Cornering Techniques with Christina Chappetta

Dec 4, 2020 at 19:53
by Pinkbike Originals  


With the basics of cornering out of the way, it's time for Part 2: Advanced Cornering. Join Christina as she teaches how to corner in technical terrain.







156 Comments

  • 120 2
 Christina's great at hosting this kind of content. gave me a few pointers for the next ride, thanks!
  • 38 1
 Thanks a million!
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: how many takes does it take to get each spoken section done???
  • 20 0
 @unrooted: So many! I usually have a few stuttering moments and eventually get there. It all comes down to great editing
  • 1 0
 100% this.
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: -love how you present your tips,i get a lot out of it
  • 1 0
 It’d be so awsome to see some of your outtakes. I always love your content for its human feel, and I reckon the behind the scenes action would add to this sooo much. @christinachappetta:
  • 75 2
 Christina is a great presenter and a huge asset to pinkbike! Thank you for this content.
  • 13 1
 Thanks so much! Super glad you enjoyed :-)
  • 2 2
 @christinachappetta: Yo da best christina!! Smile
  • 3 0
 I was about to say, she has some skills when it comes to presentation, rithim and flow of speech, carisma and etc. Definately proper presenter!
  • 30 0
 Every time I read her surname It resembles me a ciabatta and then I get hungry
  • 7 0
 Today's special is an heirloom tomato and house smoked salmon chappetta for 11$. You get 4 peices on seeded rye with fresh basil and a tire sealant reduction.
  • 1 0
 LOL I have also done that
  • 21 4
 @christinachappetta The elbows out tip get critisized more and more during the last years. If you watch pro riders, they prefer a natural and intuitive ellbow position, which is way more efficient and economic to the muscles of the shoulders. There is no need or advantage to take them out like coaches do, it can have some disadvantages eg. the tired muscles and a too forward position eg. in landings. Of course there is a range of individual styles, Myriam Nicole rides more ellbows out than Marine Caribou etc. But the generell tip to take the ellbows out gets more critisizm during the last years and more coaches change their concept about it.

We as coaches have to analyse that a central and low position has nothing to do with the ellbows out thing. My tip would be, grab your bars, concentrate on a central position (weight on the feet, light hands) and trust your natural and intuitive ellbow position. It may look different depending on the geometry, body size, bars size etc.

Greetings from Germany,
Marc
  • 3 4
 Elbow out initiates rotation of the body into the turn, I think it's controversial because it's not so important in and of it's self, but it is often a result of looking where you're going combined with rotating the body. It also helps with putting more weight on the outside hand. IMO anything that can help the rider with technique is valid, and even if elbow out isn't necessarily extremely important it's self, I think it can help. Also, many top riders do have their elbow out so it's not leading anyone astray.
  • 4 0
 I generally see coaches/curriculum talk about elbows out to aid in body-bike separation, so it should be applied most aggressively for turns and aggressive climbs. Coaches often latch on to the message without understanding the, "why." Because of this, we often hear coaches and parents screaming, "ELBOWS OUT," endlessly at youth races.

Aside from when it's useful/necessary, you're right, elbows should be natural/relaxed.
  • 3 0
 Should be more a "hinge at the hips" thing, but you have to understand most new mtbers generally want to "squeeze" the bike literally with their knees and figuratively their elbows. Its a transition from having elbows in, to elbows out, to elbows relaxed (but more out than in).
  • 2 0
 Elbow's out might be more difficult on your arms but it actually relaxes tension in your shoulders and core which provide better balance, control, and stability. It's maybe just time to strengthen your arms. There is not really a "natural or intuitive position", the position is a byproduct of your fitness, somebody with strong legs doesn't have the same position as somebody with strong arms.. In general traditional cyclist will have a weak upper body and riders with a moto background will rely more on their arms (and elbows out)
  • 5 0
 IMO more experienced riders should find a technique that works best for them and coaches should help them in that process, rather than push their (personal) views onto them. For me keeping the elbows up and knees out stabilises me and the bike on rough sections.
  • 4 0
 As another coach, I teach 'elbows out' because it helps people not revert to t-rex arms. It's less about getting really wide 'orangutan arms' and about getting people into an open/aggressive position that is comfortable. You learn 'elbows out' so that when you become better you have a strong position in your muscle memory to revert to, rather than a weak one.

As Ra1der gets at, elbows-out aids in good bike-body separation too.

And as thustwhumber says, hinging at the hips is hugely important.

What needs to be remembered is that you should teach a step at a time, and then the whole thing as a cohesive movement, and tell people how that works.

(E.g. Elbows out. Hinging at the hips. Bike/body separation. Hip rotation. Pointing with the knee's. Combine)
  • 2 1
 I’m now spending time wrapping my elbows tightly so that the EA or Elbow Angle does not exceed 120. I combine that with a rigid front fork and 120mm in the back. Makes for a super exciting position on the steeps.
  • 4 0
 @2d-cutout: Elbows out helps weak/young riders from collapsing into their stem on landings... Friday fails is full of 'elbows in' weaklings turning into pretezels
  • 3 0
 @AntN: hahah Great example of what NOT to do every Friday
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: Number 1 "Elbows out” spreader Lee Mc Cormack says today:

"Ellbows out" was wrong, and I apologize. That position is weak, encourages you to pull and push in the wrong directions, and, it turns out, is very bad for your shoulders. I really am sorry.
Now that I know more, I suggest your elbows spend most of their time behind your grips. As you might expect, your handlebar width determines your elbow position. Elbows relaxed by the sides — not sticking way out! — and they’re behind the grips. This is strong, effective and safe.

When you pull hard, your elbows will draw inward toward your torso. When you push hard, they flare outward. This is normal. Let it happen. But your median, ready elbow position should be directly behind your hands.
You might be thinking, “This is wrong. I see lots of great riders with their elbows out.” You are correct! There are moments when their elbows are out, but these are integrated moments. Top riders like Brian Lopes and Aaron Gwin are not trying to maintain a static elbows-out position — but they’ll flare their elbows in some moments. One example: Tucking low. Another example: Preparing for a big push into a turn or off a ledge.
Also, the wider your handlebar is, the wider your elbows will be."

Source: www.llbmtb.com/members/riding-skills/row-anti-row/riding-positions

"So learn what to do with your elbows. Sorry, I was wrong about them being out all the time."
  • 1 0
 @Meles: Yeah, but we're talking specifically about cornering here, not just riding along in the "ready" position. In this instance "elbows out", in terms of your outside elbow, is absolutely NOT wrong.
  • 10 1
 well.....CC....I've been working hard transferring my technique from over 35 years (yep....don't do the math) of XC onto the geometry in the latest generation of bikes, and find that your cornering tutorials are FANTASTIC for unlocking the secrets hidden in the new characteristics of these rigs. Bike-body separation was a natural carry over from skiing the moment you mentioned it, and suddenly I was able to carry momentum and precise direction through berms. But for my Jurassic Period friends and me - who spent all our time trying to stay on the ground, not in the air - it would be great to have more advice on cutties and manuals - and I guess most important, the reason why I (and the older generation) find it so hard to break from the Earth's gravity and lose the deephabits of absorbing everything rather than using things as a launchpad for low orbit trajectory...

Bikes: Ragley mmmBop, Transition Sentinel, Cotic Soul, and Stanton Switch9er ti,
  • 5 18
flag 8tom8 (Dec 5, 2020 at 13:10) (Below Threshold)
 That’s too long I can’t be arsed reading that
  • 3 0
 I think this is a good start:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCkn_rsFvxI
  • 4 1
 @davec113: thanks Davec - I seem to live in a high gravity environment...so this looks to be a very good start...
  • 5 0
 Haha.
It's because when you get older, airborne = the middle bit of a crash.
  • 1 0
 @vercorin1: Well, you gotta pull your bike out of the mud before it'll get air. Wink I'm in the same boat, too many years of bad technique to correct. I've found my recent '9ers ('18 Slash and '20 Enduro) to be more demanding as far as cornering technique, but it's satisfying and scary fast when you get it just right.
  • 3 0
 I will kill anyone you want for that bike stable. Give a man a name and it is done.
  • 1 0
 @4thflowkage: the Ragley is now covered in nasty winter mud...20km in single track this morning...minus 1.5 degrees and foggy. 5mm of ice on the handlebars and it stayed the whole ride....
  • 3 0
 @Ooofff: " can't be arsed". Good news my lazy friend, nobody is -arsing- you, in case you had not noticed.
  • 4 0
 @uponcripplecreek: ...thanks for this...I did wonder about that comment...personally I find reading to gain insight into the thoughts of others to be a pleasure, not a chore....
  • 10 1
 Great job as always, Christina. A video about climbing and cornering with rocks,roots, ledges and tight switchbacks would be great to counter balance this. .... not as fun for sure
  • 9 0
 HAHA Good point! I was thinking of this yesterday actually, out on a techy climb. Then realized how tired I would be hammering uphill features for a day. But it's actually a great idea bc we all struggle a bit at times and could use a little cheerleader :-)
  • 7 0
 "technical climbing with guest coach chris akrigg"
  • 3 1
 @christinachappetta: I nominate Levy to take that one team and do all the hammering while you heckle...err coach him through it.
  • 1 0
 this would be great. always the trickiest part of my rides!
  • 1 0
 @GumptionZA: I'd pay good money for that
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: Good idea. Tips on the tight uphill switchback “power turn”. So many friends end up spilling down the slope or just giving up.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Prime time to bring on a co-host! Good idea :-)
  • 6 0
 Thaks for good lecture! During second wave of covid, I finally payed enough attention to hidden XC track in a small forest nearby, and it's packed will all kinds of tricky turns in all dimensions. Some parts of track go through WWII trenches on hillside, so there are a lot ot of creative lines. First I though many places are just not designed to go fast, now I'm "unlocking" it turn by turn, surprising every ride. So cornering hints is what I need right now.
  • 1 0
 that sounds rad! Europe is so cool that way, casually riding through old WWII trenches. Good way to practice navigating tight terrain for sure!
  • 3 0
 Christina is always super, but this may have been the best yet. Video cuts were spot on, instruction was concise and clear, the tips were of real value and built upon the last video as promised, and the riding itself was great and fun to watch. Distilling the thought process to alliterative catch phrases to remember is fantastic too. I liked the advice to look at “now and next” from this video. Thanks!!!
  • 3 0
 Christina is a great presenter and the slowmo shots show her great skill. But something about pro's doing coaching that never hits for me. I feel like these kind of videos are fun to watch but aren't as practical as some of the more kooky coaching you can find online. For me it's the little practical tips that come out of the more drawn out coaching that I can remember and implement on the trail. When applied on top of all the other cornering techniques; tips like "drive your outside knee forward through the turn" (I got this from a Fluidride oldie on youtube) really unlock the control and front wheel traction confidence I needed to get fast. I'd like to see someone young and tallented like Christina adopt the Ryan Leach or Fluidride slow and methodical approach to breaking down riding training into it's smallest details. But address the things people want to do now, like big whips, squashing lips and shralping corners.
  • 3 0
 You talked about weighting the outside foot, and the bike wanting to stand up, but do you recommend weighting the inside hand (opposing forces) to help maintain grip? Left foot/right hand and vice versa.
  • 6 0
 Hi! Weighting the inside foot or hand will tend to push the bike upwards (from the contact point of the tires) thus causing loss of traction. Dropping the outside foot and carrying a corner will indeed stand the bike up, but it does work in moments of need (slamming the outside foot down momentarily). Generally you can drop the outside pedal to 45 degrees (regardless of what foot happens to forward) and maintain positive cornering pressure with outside hand pressure. To make more sense of this, try it stationary on your bike... lean your bike to the right (right bar down) with your right hand and press to the left with it (simulating a right hand corner). Now..same starting position....do the same thing with your left hand (pressure to the outside of our simulated corner), right bar down...pressuring with the left. See the difference? Now try it with the feet.. same drill. Lower pressure positions destabilize the bike, higher ones make it dig in. Hope this helps
  • 3 0
 video one
  • 2 0
 @GRAV-Intense-Racing-Canada: Very awesome in-depth explanation, THANKS! In this scenario, I try not to let myself become a human X and weight from different sides too much. Like I said, a little movement can go a long way! So "unweighting/relaxing" the inner arm is what I go for more. I don't need to force the bike into that leant over position bc that's what the shape and angle of the corner is doing. I merely need to manage that terrain by separating myself from the bike for a brief moment, mid-corner'ish, so the forces are balanced. Probably should have paid better attention in Physics class! I find it's a lot less aggressive of a movement than we give it credit.
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: I always fully drop my outside foot on loose flat corners, doesn’t feel like the bike wants to stand up at all but that might be because I really weight the outside hand as well. It feels like the tyre actually wants to bite into the soil. On short or grippy turns I do keep my feet level and usually whip the back end around a bit.
  • 2 0
 m.pinkbike.com/photo/19825073

Any feedback from a coaching perspective? I remember feeling pretty comfident in that turn, despite the slight off camber and loose dirt..
  • 1 0
 @bonkywonky: Looks very similar to my pic up top! Lower body looks on point for sure and your eyes are up and looking ahead! Not a super aggressive corner so I wouldn't expect any more of an aggressive body position. Can always practice going a bit lower in the bike and see how it feels and looks different. Same corner if you can!
  • 1 1
 @christinachappetta: Heya Chris.. Agree.. not looking to shift weight all over, I just know that many people tend to see a corner, then they drop their outside foot, and hold it the whole time (off camber stuff is out side of this conversation/technique analysis) which tends to offset their body position for optimum control/exit speed....it kinda undo's what they want to achieve. Forcing anything onto the trail always ends with a trip to the ER. Hahaha.. I encourage people to accommodate the terrain, to ultimately work with the trail to squeak out some time off the clock. Cheers on the great segments!
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: thanks for the feedback, I’ll give it a try.
  • 2 0
 CoMfident = coNfident by the way..
  • 1 0
 @GRAV-Intense-Racing-Canada: Mate I am really trying to get what you're saying, but can't quite... Can you say it differently? Are you simply trying to use your outside (high) hand to lean the bike? Thanks!!
  • 2 0
 Nice vid Christina, great content once again. There are so many little details that help tailor a session to a particular rider that you did well narrowing this down to the most important topics.
Side note: I always stipulate to people who aren't in the habit of being central on the bike that it requires some upper body strength - with weak shoulders, as soon as they get tired you revert to having your weight further back. This is why at least a little training is important.
(I've experienced this first hand while recovering from a shoulder injury, I rode hard too early, technique was good at the top of the trail and sucked at the bottom as my strength failed.)

Love watching and listening to other coaches explain stuff, it's how we continue to learn. (so keep checking the comments, I know I will be!)
  • 2 0
 Thank you! And great point for sure about the upper body strength. I hope to do some gym videos this winter and touch on that subject directly.
  • 2 0
 On flat corners sometimes I’ll get my weight back, pull pack slightly on the bars and “ carve “ through the corner steering primarily with my rear wheel keeping the front light. Similar to steering with the throttle on a 2 stroke dirt bike. Is this a bad habit? Seems to work well when I’ve got limited traction. Your thoughts?
Thank you
  • 1 0
 I like you explanation and if it works, then sweet! As opposed to having the driving force of the throttle to save you and "power through" in your situation, I feel like leaning back is not the best idea for the lightly weighted bicycles, especially with no throttle to power through. It's unlikely you'd throw in a pedal stroke to get a similar effect mid-corner. Shifting the weight back seems to me like you'd lose speed in the corner rather than coming out with more speed from pumping and leaning in the corner. Give them both a try on the same corner and see if you can feel the difference. It will take some mind power to get out of the usual habit but hopefully you see a difference!
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: Thank you for the reply. It’s not a habit yet so easy enough to amend.
  • 2 0
 Another awesome vid in the series! Really dig the camera work and how the information is presented - accessible and unpretentious. Been riding MTB for 30yrs+ but could always improve/learn new skills/techniques. I think I've actually been getting quicker on the trails! All the guys I ride with are half my age and I'm always waiting for them to catch up LoL
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta I've been riding mountain bikes for a very long time and in the last 5-6 years I've realised that I've picked up lots of bad habits over the years. Now, your tutorials are really helping me to get rid of those habits and evolve as a rider. Like, a lot! Awesome work, I'm truly grateful for this kind of content.
  • 1 0
 Amazing! Thank you! I feel you for sure. Intermediate/expert riders are the hardest riders to teach bc they have developed so many habits already. So breaking those habits and trying to rebuild up again is super difficult. Good on you for giving it a go and seeing the improvements.
  • 2 0
 Another great video @christinachappetta well presented and with clear tips.
Would you say that the “Now and next” element is along the same lines as picking focus points as you’re approaching, entering, negotiating and exiting a corner?
I’ve found this to be really useful, particularly in helping me to make better line choices.
  • 2 0
 Definitely! I just keep it even simpler sometimes with 2 words/key points to focus on. Doesn't mean you need to look at only 2 options but it helps to keep my eyes from wandering off trail or onto a feature that has nothing to do with my line.
  • 1 0
 I'd like to hear more about weighting and unweighting the bike entering and exiting turns, Also, what is going in with the knees and pelvis? Seems like as the upper body is lowered, with elbows out, the inner knee turns in and the pelvis turns out.
  • 3 0
 Pointing the knees in the direction you want to go will inevitably shift the hips to a different position, thus moving the center of gravity as well. This is quite helpful bc as the bike leans into the corner, the shifted weight is helping to keep everyone up and off the ground! Had the hips stayed put, might have been too much weight falling in to the corner and could lead to a wipe out.
  • 4 0
 Just here for the slow motion shots. Love to see the suspension and wheels flex for traction
  • 1 0
 It's pretty good hey?! Max crushed the filming as usual. It helps to see the little details a lot!
  • 5 0
 Excellent video! Thank you for the tips and coaching, Christina!
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the video Christina. I feel like at times when cornering I struggle with my body position and end up off the back a bit. I will for sure use LOW, LOOK, LEAN. Great cues.
  • 2 0
 I'm of the "keep it simple stupid" mentality. Little key words help me to regain focus quickly. Stoked I could be helpful for you :-)
  • 1 0
 To get home my track has four short steep off cambers slick with rotting wet crap. Some days on those you have to keep the bike perpendicular and you are the outrigger. Let it drift, when it stops your the one still on your bike.
  • 1 0
 Now that we have these topics covered, I'd love to hear how @christinachappetta thinks about the finer points of how to aim/maneuver knees / hips (feet?) and timing to initiate corners for given conditions (how early, for what features, etc) especially for back to back technical corners at speed.
  • 1 0
 One thing which is there but quite deep down the first video is something really fundamental to the cornering technique which Christina C is building up for people - and that’s using pressure on the lower, inside side of the handlebar as the MAIN steering force. You are effectively pushing the handlebar by pressuring it, and releasing it - and this is the main steering action - rather than pulling the inside and pushing the OUTSIDE or upper side, as surface appearance would have it. In the brain-arm-handlebar system, the brain and arm can release force on the lower side and have an effect much faster than pulling on the upper side of the bars, since the moment you release force the bike is doing what it wants to do, which in a lean is to turn. I remembered this from high level motorbike training many decades ago, and having seen the first video I really concentrated on using pressure on the lower side - the LH side in a LH turn - and suddenly, combined with bike-body separation, lo-and-behold: major increase in smoothness and speed.
  • 1 0
 I've always wondered if switching your forward foot mattered in corners. It definitely seems to help with shifting my hips side to side to get my weight over the tires, but I don't always have time to do the 1/2 pedal forward or back, between corners. I'm also not as comfortable holding a line in rough stuff with the bike leaned over on my off (goofy - right) foot forward.

Would be awesome to have a video dive into this, as well as body positioning, and the handlebar weighting.
  • 1 0
 Would love to see some videos in anything other than perfect dirt. Dry / dusty / chalky / off-camber / no berms / rutted / tight trails; so much of the local riding is overgrown / super fast (or super slow) 7" wide trails with horribly formed turns and cactus around the edges. I presume that just means 'more' pre-braking, but fast guys are obviously able to carry materially more speed through sections, just curious what makes them faster.
  • 1 0
 Great vid as usual! Interesting thread above on the elbows out thing. I came to MTB on the late after racing triathlon and road, and there’s no amount of self flagellation that will get my chicken wings out. It kinda works, but it makes for terrible non-action shots.

One thing I’d love to hear your thoughts on - like many riders I have one turn that goes better than the other, in particular I tend to lean the bike on the same inner thigh for both turns. Makes me wonder how the bike turns at all on that inverted position. Anyway, the question is: do you think you can break down where the lean initiates from? As I need to correct that bad habit, I catch myself wondering if you tend to push the bars in w the outside arm, vs pulling it from the inside. Not sure I’m making any sense. Thanks at any rate for the awesome content, keep it coming pls!
  • 1 0
 Great work @christinachappetta You have such a great way of imparting a lot of information in an easy to understand concise way. I’ve been a coach for a few years now and you’re my new hero!
  • 2 0
 Hey Christina this was really good , thanks. Every corner I went into today I was muttering pro line under my breath and going wider. Keep em coming.
  • 2 0
 hahah I laughed out loud on this one! So good! Getting in your head!!! It helps though hey?!
  • 3 0
 I love the videos focusing on advanced techniques! There are sooo many beginner videos out there!
  • 2 0
 Awesome, thank you! I like how we did a more "intro" based video first then built on that one here. Too much info to take it all in one video I recon.
  • 1 0
 @christinachappetta: Yeah it was definitely a good way to segue into the advanced techniques video!
  • 4 0
 So I turn the bars and look at my front tire, right?
  • 2 0
 LMAO!! Yes exactly! Then, send your vid into Friday Fails!!
  • 1 0
 heheheh G!!!!! Yes please, and like mate said, send it into Friday Fails
  • 28 29
 Sorry, but if you can't ride tight switchbacks corners, you should not take your foot out and skid around them, you need to go and learn that technique! Skidding ruins the type of natural non-bikepark-no-maintenance-team where you're going to find that type of corner and it's important that we as users of a trail system open to all types of user respect that. You do not need to be able to endo/nose manual to be able to tackle switchbacks. Speaking as a guide who rides switchbacks trails in France for breakfast lunch and dinner, usually with both wheels on the ground.
  • 20 1
 She never said to skid around the corner.
  • 11 2
 I live in Liguria, we are full of switchbacks corners like you in South France. A lot of amazing riders from usa, canada and so on are not used to that corners, it is normal that they are not comfortable with switchbaks. I also worked a lot of years as a guide in places like Nava, Sanremo and Molini di Triora, I also worked with riders 2 times faster than me but they can't do nose press. You are good in what you are used to ride, that is normal.
  • 7 2
 @unrooted: she never said to skid, but every time I witness someone using this technique, they skid the rear end around.. So, while not stated, it is somewhat implied and not described how to foot out whip a corner without rear brake.
  • 4 21
flag unrooted (Dec 5, 2020 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 @deserat If the trail builders were lazy in building the switchbacks, then why would it come as a surprise when riders are lazily riding the poorly constructed switchbacks?
  • 6 0
 Thanks for the kind message and I agree, don't go skidding about! I even said it somewhere in the video haha But as we don't have terrain like that, whatsoever!, here in Squamish area...it's pretty hard to find trails to practice on. I have gotten better over the years but as you can see in the "example clips" we added here, even a lot of the best riders in the world put a foot down in 180degree corners of fear of falling into that super sharp Mediterranean sea rock. There's no dirt left to skid off haha it's all rock!
  • 4 0
 @christinachappetta: Omniafreeride are waiting for you in Italy to ride in Imperia\Sanremo\Finale Ligure area, free place for you in the shuttle Smile and we will not make trails with too many switchbacks, I promise Smile
  • 4 0
 @unrooted:
Because the trails are hundreds of years old and are shared trails. Or because there is no room to build nice round corners...
  • 2 0
 @lukesky: it’s only no fun, when you can’t master it.
It’s as much fun as railing berms.....
  • 2 1
 @christinachappetta: any time you're visiting the French Alps, drop me a line and we'll have you switchbacking like a boss in no time. ????????
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: A lot of us are riding on trails that weren't built for mountain biking specifically, and are only sporadically maintained. Outside of for-profit bike parks, we're all responsible for maintaining trails for everyone. That means trying not to destroy them and doing whatever maintenance we can. It's not about surprising anyone, it's about not thrashing trails for everyone because you feel like schralping.
  • 4 1
 @unrooted: trail builders of 100+ years ago had no idea what a mountain bike was, they didn't exist in those days.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: She's French, let it go. LOL
  • 1 0
 @deserat: totally, show me a video of someone foot planting w/o locking up the rear wheel, the whole idea is you do it because you’ve lost traction!
  • 3 1
 Skid... coz that's what the pros do. Smile

Foot out, flat out.
  • 1 0
 @kompostman:
I think it‘s fun too, but in two weeks of riding in the sea to sky area I haven‘t found one corner on a trail where it would be faster or more fun to ride it like you would have to ride really tight switchbacks.
  • 2 0
 @jannoski: haha SICK! I'll be taking you up on that for sure! But maybe I need the switchback trails?! Yall can show me the right way ;-)
  • 1 0
 @gravitysgirl: Yes please!!! I LOVE the Alps! I remember racing Mountain of Hell and those must have the hardest switchbacks ever down to Venosc. Ahhh memories...of Frenchies taking the French line and plowing straight down the hill hahahah scary!
  • 3 0
 She turns out to be great at coaching as well.
  • 3 0
 Thank You!
  • 2 0
 Reminding me this morning to keep my chin in the right place at the bike park flow trail today, thanks.
  • 2 0
 NICE! Bike Park Flow Trail!!! Where are you riding?!
  • 3 0
 @christinachappetta: Sweetwater bike park in South San Diego.
  • 4 1
 Your telling me Christina is better at turning than me?
  • 3 0
 I always seem to learn new things watching these videos! Thanks Christina!
  • 1 0
 Awesome!! Truth is, I could go for days and days on this stuff because there are so many tricks of the trade, but I like the info that was shared here and know it can make some huge gains for a lot of folks. Thank you
  • 2 0
 When she was referring to "tools", was it a reference to devices or people? Lol.
  • 3 0
 Great coaching as always, thanks CC!
  • 2 0
 You are awesome chica !!!! I really like how clear and smooth you are in all the videos ????
  • 1 0
 Thanks bud! That's great! It's taken lots of practice, and a good support team :-)
  • 5 2
 Great to see a female in a front and center position like this. Good job.
  • 2 0
 Thank you! Pretty awesome and dynamic team we have here at Pinkbike. I'm one lucky duck!
  • 2 0
 Another amazing video from Christina. Everything about it was spot on. I hope Pinkbike gets her doing more and more.
  • 1 0
 Cheers for that! I love sharing this stuff and feel so good when I get the amazing feedback telling me it was helpful, so thank you!
  • 2 0
 Maybe a technical climbing training video someday, gear choice, line choice, body position etc.
  • 2 0
 For Sure! This is on the radar, maybe come early spring when I've forgotten how much I "love" climbing and need to do a full day of it.
  • 2 0
 It’s not a question Braaa
  • 4 1
 Brilliant video thanks
  • 2 0
 Excellent little series Smile
  • 3 1
 Great simple and clear but powerful presentation!
  • 3 0
 Absolutely the best!
  • 2 0
 More of these please! Awesome video
  • 2 0
 More of this please - well done.
  • 1 1
 This, along with Pick a Part from Wade, is the best content on Pinkbike right now. Unless I win something from the Advent calendar that is.
  • 1 0
 hahah good little plug there. Thank you!
  • 2 0
 So can I take my brakes off after mastering this stuff?
  • 1 0
 hahah that depends more on the trail I think! A really well built flow trail...maybe?!
  • 2 0
 @christinachappetta: taking em off now. Ill report back.
  • 2 0
 Really well done.
  • 1 0
 Thanks Mike! Appreciate that :-)
  • 1 0
 Solid tips. Closing laptop and going riding now. Thanks for the stoke!
  • 3 0
 YES! That's the result I like to hear :-) Hope it was sick!
  • 2 0
 Thanks for this!
  • 1 0
 Nice save on that last clip!
  • 3 0
 Great Spot! That was a near moment haha
  • 1 0
 a 103 turning course more about the foot placement and weight please
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