Ask Pinkbike: Choosing a Hardtail, Tire Width, and Stumpjumper Shock Options

Jan 10, 2017
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.



Which Playful Hardtail?

Question: Pinkbike user Bizzam asked this question in the 29er forum: I have a build kit for a 29er sitting in my garage right now, and all I need is the frame. My goal is to have a hardtail that is super playful, but that can also be competitive in long distance races. I rode in a couple of 40-mile events this season, and next year I want to do a few more, maybe even some longer ones. I really like the Kona Honzo ST, but the weight is scaring me away. The Canfield EPO would probably be the perfect bike, but it's not available with Boost and I have a non-Boost carbon wheelset ready to go. I'm trying to keep the price for the frame around $1,000 USD.

bigquotesA playful bike and a long distance race bike are usually thought of as two very different things, but you could do that latter on anything if your priority is the former. And, if you're considering a Honzo, it sounds like that's the case. I've yet to ride the Canfield's EPO, but I did spend way more time on the Honzo CR than I needed to during testing, simply because it's one of the most fun bikes that I've ever ridden. It is the perfect example of a hardtail that likes to party, and I also wouldn't hesitate to do some cross-country races aboard it.

The steel Honzo ST frame is obviously heavier than the carbon CR version, but the geometry is what counts here, especially if you have some light-ish wheels to put on it. It also sounds like your build kit (with the carbon wheels) might be lighter than what came stock on that 25lb 3oz Honzo CR that I reviewed, so the weight might not be all that different. In US pricing, the steel Honzo ST frame is just $550, the lighter weight alloy frame is actually less expensive at $499, and the carbon CR frame goes for $1,599. If it were me, I'd scrounge up the extra for the carbon frame, or maybe try to find a used one. If that was a no-go, I'd save some money and weight by finding the aluminum model.
- Mike Levy

Kona Honzo CR Photo by James Lissimore
The Honzo is all about fun, no matter if it's the steel, alloy, or carbon version. Photo James Lissimore




Should I Run a Fatter Tire Up Front?

Question: Pinkbike user @Paxx asked this question in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: Just curious how many of you out there ride a wider front tire than rear? I noticed a lot of people mentioning this in the tire width poll that PB posted. If you do run a wider front, why? Does it lead to better steering traction? What are the benefits of a narrower rear tire? Do you mix and match rim widths as well? Interested to hear everyone's thoughts on this.

bigquotesThink about it this way - which tire would you rather have losing traction and breaking free in a turn? It's much easier to regain control of a drifting rear wheel than it is a sliding front end, and running a slightly wider front tire helps keep you locked into the turns. That front tire is also the first portion of the bike to encounter an obstacle, so it makes sense to have a little bigger cushion for those initial impacts. It also wouldn't hurt to go with a stickier rubber compound up front for extra grip in the steeps - don't forget, the are multiple factors that go into choosing the right tire, and it can take a little experimentation to find the combination of width, tread design, and rubber compound that works best for your riding area.

On a related note, you'll also see riders running a more aggressive tire up front paired with a semi-slick option on the back, something along the lines of a Specialized Slaughter or Schwalbe Rock Razor. The same reasoning applies to this scenario - in the right conditions, the front tire provides enough traction that it's possible to shed some rolling resistance by going with a lower profile rear tire.

As to mixing and matching rim widths, I wouldn't say that that's necessary. Yes, Mavic does make wheelsets that come with a wider front rim than rear, and you will occasionally see racers running a wider front rim matched with a narrower rear, but for the vast majority of riders, there's not going to be a noticeable performance gain out on the trail. - Mike Kazimer

Maxxis Minion DHF 27.5x2.3 review
When conditions warrant, running a wider tire with a more aggressive tread up front...
n a
...paired with a faster rolling semi-slick rear can be an entertaining tire combination.




Alternative Shocks for My Specialized Stumpjumper

Question: ZeGermans asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: I'm fortunate enough to own a 2016 Carbon Stumpjumper. Its a great bike, but I'm looking to get some more performance from the rear shock. The existing tune is very soft and linear, which is unsurprising considering the bike is an all-purpose trail bike and is likely designed to give a more comfortable ride than a supportive "racing tune".

I find I have to run close to 19% sag and run the second trail CTD setting to stop the bike using ridiculous amounts of travel on medium hits and at speed. This though is at the sacrifice of small bump performance. Ideally, I'd have a bit more ramp-up/progression so i could run a bit more sag and a larger negative air chamber, with a similar amount of compression and rebound damping. I also find the shock gets very hot on prolonged descents and loses some of the rebound and compression damping. A piggyback would be nice, but I don't know whether one will fit with the available space. Has anyone had a go at putting a different shock into the stumpy? Are there upgrade shocks with the specific mounting, or would I have to have a go with, aftermarket yoke? Has anyone tried to fit a shock with a piggyback?
Bike Yoke shock adapter for Specialized Stumpjumpers.
BikeYoke makes adapters that convert standard shocks to fit late-model Stumpjumpers.

bigquotes Specialized's shock yoke uses a post-mount shock interface that limits your options, but there is no doubt that a piggyback shock will fit your 2016 Stumpjumper. Jared Graves and Troy Brosnan started the 2016 EWS season riding Stumpjumpers with Monarch reservoir dampers. You could try to scare one up by contacting RockShox directly, or you could purchase an alternative yoke that fits conventional shock eyelets from BikeYoke, which would allow you to pick and chose exactly which brand and type of shock suits your riding style best. I'd suggest the second option. - RC

Jared Graves and Troy Brosnan
Jared Graves and Troy Brosnan raced Specialized Stumpjumpers fitted with RockShox Monarch reservoir shocks at the first EWS races of 2016.




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.
Must Read This Week

117 Comments

  • + 216
 Hi, I too am interested in running a crazy component build so that I can sound cool to my buddies at the trailhead. Why run tried and true combinations when I can go completely off the chain and insane and sound interesting while drinking hoppy IPAs around a campfire?!

For example, I am going to run my tires backwards, because my scientific studies have shown that it's simply better (by scientific, I mean I tried it a couple of times on the flat 3-mile asphalt loop near my place, and I swear it felt awesome). I also shave off every sixth knob off the driveside of my rear tire; I'm right-footed, so it helps me with my left turns.

Also, I run the following pad combinations on my brakes: Front-Left Pad: organic / Front-Right Pad: Semi-metallic / Rear-Left Pad: organic sintered sprinkled with titanium shavings / Rear-Right Pad: I leave this empty to save weight. This is much better than the default settings bike and component companies force on you. Who's smarter? Me or hundreds of engineers at Shimano/SRAM? It's a rigged system, so do your own thing.

I also run only two disc rotor bolts (instead of six), to save weight.

I add 12 drops of turpentine to my mineral oil when bleeding my Shimano brakes. I swear this helps with modulation (subjective; as you can tell, all of my conclusions are based on subjective opinions, since those can't be proven wrong by my bike buddies or cats on the bike forums).

Regarding the yoke on a Stumpjumper, you'll get much better results by using the wishbone link off a 1966 Ford Bronco's rear transaxle (I prefer the one on the driver side, since it's left-hand thread). The metal used in the 60's also provides better damping for your shock, especially off big jumps. For east coast riders, I recommend coating the yoke with Crisco (for west coast, use Wesson), as this allows the resonant frequency of the metal to minimize coil spring vibrations (if you're running an air shock, it keeps the shock temperature from rising too much on a long DH run).

I also swear by running my saddle backwards; since I've been doing this I have not had testicular cancer. If that's not causation (not correlation), I don't know what is. Prove to me that it doesn't work!

Regards,
That crazy mountain bike dude who thinks he knows more than the engineers who actually built and designed the thing!
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  • + 47
 Loved this post, funnier then usually everything waki writes I might say.
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  • + 16
 @tigerteeuwen: hey man. Leave waki alone. He's sensitive
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  • + 4
 T-(the 1% of people in North America who actually ride their bike) versus everyone just commenting on the Internet.
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  • + 14
 How long did that take?
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  • + 3
 You are my hero
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  • + 2
 You sir, won the internet today....
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  • + 1
 Prove can't wrong anyone?
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  • + 3
 @singletrackslayer ... why not change your user name to bullshit slayer? Funniest thing I've read in quite a while Smile
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  • + 0
 @singletrackslayer - that was the best thing I have ever read on Pinkbike... on bike internet in general. You have beaten Team Robot and his take on Crank Bros wheels. That was like Louis CK having a gig on mountain biking. I laughed, oh I laughed. Thank you.

P.S. Where were you when progressive middle aged radicals were putting 650B wheels into Blur TR. It was like Riley Reid on Blacked...
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  • + 5
 I've likewise been having trouble with my left turns. I will have to try that every-sixth-knob idea. Last year someone on MTBR recommended I shave only my left nut, but my berm slashing has not improved. Maybe because I waxed rather than shaved?
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  • + 1
 Well then, can I run a Monster T on my Highball?

I think it would help on the downs while still keeping the bike playful.

SC says it voids the warantee, but they don't know what they are talking about.

I know better, you see, my dad owns this awesome set of tools...
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  • + 27
 One more reason to go bigger on the front is that braking effectively transfers load to the front tire which means it can usually provide more braking force. Same reason brake rotors tend to be larger in the front.
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  • + 12
 You can get the Rock Shox Monarch plus for a Stumpy directly from Jenson USA.. (at least you could last year).. I was in the same boat and switching to the RS was a dramatic improvement on the 16 stumpy in my opinion..
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  • + 5
 Just stock up on volume reducers because you'll need quite a few.
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  • + 3
 Get your current shock Pushed
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  • + 2
 Or trawl through the pinkbike buy/sell section and see what you can find. There used to be a load of Enduro & Stumpy only shocks for sale at good prices
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  • + 4
 Have the oem Fox shock custom tuned by Avalanche suspension. It is unreal what that shock can do
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  • + 1
 @jimmyz: @ZeGermans: Not a bad way to go. You can also get a Vorsprung Corset for the fox shock. Relatively cheap upgrade and it did wonders for my Enduro.
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  • + 2
 @jimmyz: yes. Avalanche for the win!!
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  • + 1
 For now I've installed the largest possible volume spacer and the bike is much better. Im not sure the size of the performance gain from an Ohlins shock is worth the price. I've been roughly quoted $1500 AU for the Ohlins...
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  • + 1
 @Rdot84: Yes, before you put big $ into a new shock, get a vorsprung corset for about $100 USD. I got one for my Fox shock and it made a big difference. If you still want even more, you can easily sell your shock with the corset.
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  • + 1
 @jimmyz:

That's a good option but then it'll climb like sh*t. I tried it then just said f*ck it and got the bike yoke and monarch plus. The Avy tune's better than the stock fox shock if you don't mind losing a useful climb switch, and the monarch plus is better still.
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  • + 1
 I run a debonair monarch plus on my 2013 stump and its killer. Also I don't run any spacers and don't have any trouble with bottoming out.
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  • + 1
 @nismo325:

Crazy! Glad it's working for you. I'm almost maxed out on spacers (with the M/M tune) but I'm over 200# kitted up and enjoy getting airborne on occasion.
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  • + 2
 i had mine tuned by Vorsprung and was blown away at the difference. Night and day.
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  • + 1
 @nismo325: Your bike has entirely different frame geometry (and shock size) from a 2016. You can't really compare the two side by side.
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  • + 1
 @Helm72: Did you get yours pushed? Do you have 2016 SJ?
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  • + 2
 @Creech1: yes and yes. Made huge difference
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  • + 1
 Part number: 00.4118.139.009

rockshox monarch plus
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  • + 1
 I have a Monarch Plus on my stumpy. I think it must have come from the enduro as it has autosag stil
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  • + 9
 Reasons to run the SAME tire front and rear:

When the rear is looking dodgy put the partly-worn front tire on the rear and put a new tire on the front. Repeat ad infinitum. If you ride hard it is always a good idea to have a spare in the garage, so now you only need to stock one tire instead of two.

Sure, it is true you want the front to grip better than the rear, but that is why you 1.) do the above, and 2.) run 3-4 psi less in the front.

Is running a skinny tire on the rear a good idea? Which rim cops the more abuse, the front or the rear? That's right, the rear! So don't put a skinny tire on that or say hello to periodic flat spots, pinch flats, punctured sidewalls and dented rims. Either that or run super-high pressure on your cheese-cutter tire and have worse grip and an uncomfortable ride.

Food for thought, is all.
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  • + 10
 29er Hardtail - Production Privee Shan GT.... Its got to be not only the best looking 29er hardtail but the geo reads spot on too. Cant wait to try one
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  • + 1
 me too mate! I run the 27.5 Shan right now and will hopefully be picking up a GT as well.
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  • + 2
 The person asking for the 29er hardtail is afraid of a few grams, and probably will not get a steel frame, even though the steel frame will be softer, cheaper, and more fun to ride.

"I really like the Kona Honzo ST, but the weight is scaring me away."
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  • + 6
 @abzillah: yeah, I understand that the guy is looking for weight conservation, everyone has different priorities and thats okay!
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  • + 12
 Get a Chromag! Try to scrounge up one of their 29er frames from before they went boost. Heck, email them and I bet Dekerf could weld you one. The surface is literally designed as a combo race bike and north shore shredder. Bike of dreams right there.
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  • + 4
 @abzillah: I recommended the Guerilla Gravity Pedalhead to him in that thread, which is a slack AM steel HT made in Colorado. Funny thing, I read that thread and actually went and did some research on the GG Pedalhead and decided to get one myself. Frame on the way!
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  • + 7
 Canfield Bros EPO or Yelli Screamy. Most fun I've ever had on a hard tail...ever.
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  • + 2
 @Nizhoni: Nice! The Guerilla Gravity Pedalhead frame looks sick!
I have an On One 456 and a Production Privee Shan. The 456 is perfect for my riding style, pops and jumps, but the Shan isn't; which climbs like a goat and rides down fast, but doesn't get into the air very easily.
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  • + 20
 Can someone parse this for me? "The Canfield EPO would probably be the perfect bike, but it's not available with Boost and I have a non-Boost carbon wheelset ready to go"

EPO = non-boost
Has non-boost carbon wheelset ready to go

What is issue?
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  • + 0
 Santa Cruz Highball CC. Mine comes in at 21lbs and it descends like a beast. It gets real stable with a 120mm fork.
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  • + 2
 @CarlMega: yea sounds like he is all set to me as well
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  • + 1
 @CarlMega: wondered same thing. @MikeLevy
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  • + 1
 @CarlMega: Typo by the author I'm assuming. I think he meant to say it's ONLY available with boost and I have a non-boost wheelset.
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  • + 1
 @CarlMega: Yeah, my brain got stuck on that too. Still is...
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  • + 1
 Definitely feeling some typos going on there.
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  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: Canfield EPO (2017 just was press released btw) is 142 - so it'd have to be that it's his wheelset that is boost. Just my guess.
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  • + 1
 @Tannerstolt: have a poo before you go out on the trails and save hundreds of dollars or pounds......actually what is the cost of 473 grams ( average poo weight )
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  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: That's the way I read it. For the OP, I have an EPO and it's definitely 142. I was looking for that specifically, as I had some Kings I wanted to lace up to the new Flow MK3's.

I like the way steel rides and prefer the aesthetics of a simple steel frame (I have a Stanton too) but the EPO actually rides better. The geo on the Canfield is considerably more to my liking. I've not ridden the Honzo so I don't have a direct comparison but compared to my Slackline, the EPO is laterally a bit stiffer but significantly more vertically compliant. The shape was off-putting to me initially but now I appreciate the bow like design of the seat stays.

If your definition of "playful" is "likes to manual, and pop off every little feature on the trail", I think you'll be happy with an EPO. Not everyone likes short chainstays but I believe that's a big part of the recipe for playfulness. It's a comfortable ride but not flexy.I don't compete nor do I measure my time or speed, but surprise, this thing climbs like a hardtail, that is, very efficiently. Which is part of its drawback for me; as comfortable as it is, you won't forget you're on a HT. If you come up short on a gap, you're going to get bucked. But for really long days, I'd probably choose something even more forgiving, as I get sloppy when I'm tired and I have enough injuries already. Good luck!
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  • + 1
 @CarlMega: I agree, that's probably what he meant. Because otherwise if he already had a non-boost carbon wheelset the EPO would be a no-brainer. Someone ought to correct that if it's a typo
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  • + 8
 Ã–hlins has the STX22 Air that is a direct fit to the 2016 and 2017 Stumpjumpers.
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  • + 5
 It's not cheap, but it's worth the money! I have it since half a year on my Stumpy 29. Great performance so far!

+Very low breakaway force
+Good ramp up
+Nice tuning possibilities (low and high speed comp)
+Lighter than X2 and vivid
-Expensive
-Service Center?

Forget the Float or monarch, the STX22 plays in my view more on the level of an X2 and co.
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  • + 4
 The hardtail solution is to pick something that can also take a conversion width 650B plus tire as well as the 29er tire. The WTB Trailblazer 2.8 is meant as a conversion tire for 29ers and will fit many frames/forks so a second wheelset to swap in is all you need to go from a 40 miler 29er bike to a playful hardtail with bigger air volume tires and a slightly lower ride height.
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  • + 4
 I feel like this ask Pinkbike was made for me. I was in search of a playful hardtail, I ended up going with a Trek Stache with 29+ wheels. This was a few years ago and there are a lot more options available now. It is AWESOME. I run a Maxxis Minion 2.5 WT on front with a Minion SS 2.3 wide on the back and it is AWESOME. My last bike was a 2013 Stumpjumper with a crap brain shock that I wanted to replace. I got to either replace the shock with the mentioned BikeYoke adapter or replace the bike... I replaced the bike as it was NOT AWESOME!
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  • + 3
 How is playful defined? My local trails are twisty singletracks. So it requires much steering at a speed about 25km/h. Therefore I prefer a more steep HA, so the bikes handles "twitchy". This means the bike is in the highspeed sections (10%) a bit unstable. You must have the guts (like Nino Shurter, Manuel Fumic) do get real speed. It makes you feel alive!

So what are your trails you do like to ride with this bike?When considering a steeper HA there are so freaking many more lightweight frames options available.
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  • + 5
 Pinkbikers ride playful bikes in technical terrain. That's the way it is.
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  • + 29
 Pinkbikers bikes ascend like a xc bike, descend like a dh.
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  • + 2
 I call BS on the tyre volume reply. First of all, grip is largely defined by air pressure. For trail riding you want to run the right air pressure for the trail conditions and weather. For this you need volume to play with. Less volume - less adjustability. Second, more than half the weight is over the rear wheel, so how are you going to get both grip and pinch protection without that volume? The "less volume at the back" myth is dead. Period.

You do not want a bigger front tyre - you want a big rear tyre too.
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  • + 1
 Depends on the conditions. I am currently running a Magic Mary on the front in all the slop and it is amazing, but there is no way I'd want to be running that in the rear too!!!!! I've got a Butcher Control for that, but when things dry out a little I do run equal Butchers front and rear.
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  • + 1
 But you completely ignored the downside which is a heavier tire with more rolling resistance. Striking a balance is key. You're right that larger volume in the back will give you more grip, but at the expense of a slower ride. Also pumping up your plus tire to high pressures in the recipe for a bad bouncy experience. I run a 2.5 front 2.3 rear and it's certainly noticeable if I switch to a 2.5 rear. Sometimes it's better for certain conditions, but all around I prefer the 2.5, 2.3.
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  • + 1
 @tgent: Butchers are relatively fast tyres though anyway. I don't really find the Butcher much slower than the Purgatory that was on the rear and it's only about 70g heavier. I tend to run 20psi front and 24psi rear. I will pop the Purgatory back on when things dry out, and will probably be amazed at how fast it is!!!!
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  • + 1
 @TrailCrewBiz: Totally agree! My comment was more directed at simenf. I run a similar combo, Minnion DHF 2.5 front, Minnion SS 2.3 back. If things are super sloppy double DHF is like glue, but switching to a narrower SS is the sweet spot for me. I also have a 29+ Hardtail with 3.0s on front and back and I would never ride anything narrower than a 3.0 on that, but I'm sacrificing rolling resistance and weight.

It's all subjective, I just don't think saying "less volume at the back is dead" is accurate. Depends on a ton of factors.
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  • + 2
 regarding tire width...business in the front, party in the back...

if in doubt use the mullet ratio teenquest.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/mullet-ratio.jpg

You'd preferably have a 1.1 - 1.3 business to party ratio depending on how you swing.
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  • + 5
 More people should throw a Rock Razor on the back. Unless it's slop out, the Rock Razor is so good.
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  • + 2
 No. Side knobs wear out waaaay too fast
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  • + 6
 Minion SS - side and center knobs wear better than the Razor and performance is similar
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  • + 1
 @ibishreddin @jasdo: I have a RR that's over a year old and the centre nobs are practicaly non-existent, but the side nobs (side nobs! nobs! side!? nobs! side nobs!!) are looking fine.

I just got a Minion SS, and its narrower than a RR, and the side nobs stick up much more centrally, I expect those to wear faster than on the RR.
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  • + 1
 @jasdo: Love my Minion SS on the rear, paired with a DHF 2.5 WT on front is magic.
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  • + 1
 I've had no issues with the side-knobs wearing out. The middle knobbie lose the hard edge, but still hook up well enough when worn.
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  • + 3
 www.jensonusa.com/Rockshox-Monarch-Plus-RC3-DB-Rear-Shock.. Available now on Jenson, pull down shows which one fits which bike..BTW.. its a cheap upgrade because you can sell your existing shock for $200-250
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  • + 1
 I have to comfirm that the Kona Honzo Carbon is one hell of a bike.
I have shitloads of bikes and as i keep track on what bikes i ride, I can only tell you that since i have got the Kona, I have been riding it 70% of all my rides... and i ride almost every day, to be exact 331 days of the 365 in 2016
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  • + 2
 Rockshox Monarch Plus RC3 is the way to go for the Stumpy. Great shock with good justifiability. Forget about getting a Fox or other brands of shocks unless you get a Yoke to fit.
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  • + 2
 Hnnnngg! there it is again. 'bike likes to party'. i was hoping this redonkulous phrase was officially discontinued in 2017 but i see it's crept into the new year. sigh sigh...
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  • + 26
 You don't get to wish for phrases being finished and left in the past if you still choose to use the phrase ridonculous. Just sayin...
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  • + 4
 As cheesy it sounds its true. The honzo is a party animal!
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  • - 2
 @VwHarman: or if you are the guy that is just saying
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  • + 3
 "The Canfield EPO would probably be the perfect bike, but it's not available with Boost and I have a non-Boost carbon wheelset ready to go."

Hmm.. so whats the problem?
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  • + 1
 I have the same rim width front and rear, but if you chose to use one rim to be wider, might it make sense to have the wider rim in the back? Doesn't the rear carry more of the riders weight, making it more prone to squirming and burping?
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  • + 8
 If the wider rim makes more contact points for a tire than you want it in the front. Losing traction in the rear wheel isnt a big worry, happens. But losing traction in the front is when you should be worried
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  • + 1
 For those of you that have a 2016 SJ, do you see any difference in the lever settings? I feel no difference. I blow through the travel at the smallest jumps. I weigh 200 pounds. I feel I have to add more air at the expense of no small bump compliance. If anyone has a 2016 SJ and experience with these other options, please let me know. Btw, even with current setup, the bike is great.
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  • + 2
 the Monarch Plus RC3 came on my Banshee Rune and it has surprised me by how good it is - feel like it doesn't get the props it deserves
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  • + 4
 To the hardtail guy... buy a Stanton Sherpa! You're welcome.
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  • + 2
 Actually I'm curious with 27.5 ones. Pick Switchback or Slackline, which the best for all day long riding.
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  • + 2
 29'er frame, Banshee Paradox. Not super slack, but fun bike, short rear end and very capable.
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  • + 2
 Looks like that's been discontinued for '17. maybe it's in the process of getting a much needed update
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  • + 1
 For the hardtail dude...save (or steal) so more money and get a Kingdom Vendetta for whichever option you want! Welcome
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  • + 1
 Surely entering 40mile races qualifies you to choose your own frame based on what you were riding before??
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  • + 1
 Awesome! Thank you for the response. The Honzo CR is at the top of my list.
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  • + 1
 @Bizzam Interested in used? I'll be selling my medium frame. PM if interested in discussing.
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  • + 2
 The DVO Topaz will be available for the Stumpy......... eventually.
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  • + 2
 Isn't the carbon Honzo boosted out?
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  • + 3
 Yes it is. So the original question should have been what is a playful non-boost hardtail 29er?

I have a Honzo CR and it is fun I agree, but I highly doubt I could even tell the difference those damn 6 extra millimeters make.
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  • + 4
 @tsn73: the wording on the question is kind of confusing. I think there are shims and adapters now to run non-boost hubs on boost.
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  • + 3
 @iantmcg: Some hubs allow for a "Boostinator" but not all unfortunately.
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  • + 1
 Yes the wording is a bit confusing. I already have a set of boost wheels and cranks, and am looking for a boost frame.
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  • + 1
 @iantmcg: it's just a typo. My original forum post says I have a set of boost wheels.
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  • + 2
 @Bizzam: Better in this day & age to have boost. I found my 1.5 year old chris king wheels to be a limiting factor in frame selection. No way I'm spending 650 on a rear hub just to sell it used for nothing! Luckily got a 2016 Honzo ST to replace my non BA rootdown, so we'll see how that works out. Good luck with the build. Don't be scared of frame weight! A full bottle of water is over 2lbs...
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 @JesseE: So what does your Honzo ST weigh?
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 @RLEnglish: yes, I would also like to know this. A little weight I'm ok with, but the honzo ST is over 7lbs which is a lot for a simple hardtail. Most steel hardtails are about 5 lbs. To just go carbon and be closer to 3lbs is a big swing.
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 Stanton is legit. I ride a Canfield and would trade for a switchback in a heart beat.
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 Hmmm, congrats!!!

I believe youre the first ever on the internets saying that would change the EPO with something else Wink
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 Quick Stumpy list of the best rear shock upgrades ...go!
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 Bike yoke and a Fox X2!
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 @MX298: not specific enough...need shock measurement if custom/ modded
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 The stumpjumper really looks dated...
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