Neutron Components Releases 55 Gram, Frame-Mounted First Aid Kit

Nov 19, 2020
by Neutron Components  
First aid kit contents

PRESS RELEASE: Neutron Components

“Yeah, I reckon I could make that” — confidence is 90% of mountain biking. Unfortunately it’s the other 10% that really hurts… and that’s what we at Neutron Components are working on. We thought we had it covered when we released our onboard multitool, the Oh Sh!t Kit, earlier this year, but we’ve since realised that fixing the bike is only half the job. So, we’re stoked to lift the veil on our follow-up product, an ultralight first aid kit with all the essentials.

Half the challenge with conventional first aid kits is carrying it, so we set out to make our mounting system as versatile as possible. The elasticated strap lets you secure it to your bike, backpack, or trail dog, plus we’ve thrown in a self-adhesive hook & loop pad for even more flexibility and added security. And with the complete kit weighing only 55 grams, you’ll forget you’re carrying it at all - until you need it that is.

First aid kit under saddle
First aid kit on down tube
Multiple mounting options means you can strap the kit anywhere you can find a space.

Whether you’re into biking, hiking, climbing or kayaking, our first aid kit is designed as an ultralight, easy-carry emergency kit for adrenaline-junkies and weekend warriors alike – by stripping it down to the essentials we’ve managed to pack it into a size that’s practical to carry even for short missions. To be honest, we were amazed that nobody had done it before.

The first aid kit includes the following:

• 1x small dressing
• 1x medium dressing
• 2m duct tape
• 2x alcohol swabs
• 1x CPR barrier shield
• 2x plasters
• 5x 3M steri-strips
• 2x nitrile gloves
• 1x quick-reference guide
Alex with a booboo

Further specs:

Kit dimensions: 100x70x20mm
Kit weight: 55g

The first aid kit is proudly designed and tested in New Zealand, and retails for $35 NZD ($24 USD).


Neutron Components’ goal is to make sure every rider gets home after every ride, so we’ve made our quick-reference guide free to download. A first aid kit will always be your best option, but a bit of knowledge can make a world of difference.

For more information visit www.neutroncomponents.com


149 Comments

  • 184 4
 No chain tool? No thanks.
  • 14 0
 And no room for a water bottle? Absolutely un-first-aid-able.
  • 5 0
 @kinematix see you on the PB podcast next week.
  • 1 0
 I was somehow expecting to read this lol
  • 15 0
 @bonkmasterflex: It's first aid. Not thirst aid Smile
  • 4 1
 Bag isn't carbon fibre and tools aren't titanium. I am out, it will bring down the value of my $12,000 bike.
  • 9 5
 Looks like a session
  • 4 0
 @bike-lair: Will slaken my seatube angle by 0.0001 degrees from the extra weight on the seat, no way I could ride like that.

Not a frequent user of the up=down vote but had to upvote you back to zero... I want to coin a new one, " not a donut " to be used in every comment section of every PB reviews.
  • 110 2
 I think we’re quickly reaching the saturation point for strapping stuff all over your bike. It’ll be fun to watch the industry swing back to this great new innovation called a “backpack.”
  • 42 1
 I am going to consider myself one of the early adopters, maybe even influencer, of this "backpack" innovation, as I have been using one since 1994.
  • 24 0
 Then they'll realize that they can even put the water bottle there and add an easy access bladder to drink from. They'll call it 'hydration backpack' and it will start the new revolution.
  • 25 1
 I'll never understand the appeal of strapping stuff on your bike. Downtube snack box should be standard.
  • 23 0
 I just think its cool that you CAN strap so many things to your bike. Keep the options coming.
  • 14 1
 Back and hip packs are cool and all but I find it much more comfortable to ride without one. Water and tools ride on my bike if possible.
  • 14 0
 @Afterschoolsports: Agreed. The snarky remarks on this topic can be funny. However, bottom line for many is it's hot, uncomfortable and annoying to ride bikes with hydration packs/backpacks for many. I also welcome innovative ways to store tools and other kit on a bike instead on me.
  • 27 0
 @bman33: Riding in Wales for 20 years I never understood the need for a hip pack, let alone strapping stuff to your bike; my hydration pack did everything I needed it to do in a straight forward, comfortable manner.

However, after just two rides this past summer in Minnesota the humidity was almost unbearable and it quickly lead me to purchase a hip pack to reduce the heat from my torso. Fast forward to now, and ahead of next season I'm considering all options to make me as comfortable as possible and strapping stuff to my bike seems like a sensible solution.

It's easy for us all to think that "mountain biking is mountain biking" but different geographical locations require different bikes and different solutions to our on-trail needs.
  • 7 0
 @MumblesBarn: Agreed. Different areas, different climates, different terrain, different riders. No wrong way to do it, just the way the individual rider prefers. Cheers sir!
  • 2 1
 @MumblesBarn: I agree. I rode for 10 years with a hydration pack and never a ride without one. Borrowed a hip pack one day just to try it out and for the first time my outside three fingers on both hands didn't go numb. That whole time I thought that was normal.

So for me it's either bum bag or strapped to the frame.
  • 2 0
 I had my first Camelback in the mid 90s and it could carry my walkman and after that a diskman! (barely)
couldn't strap those to my bike;D

Now I use my EVOC only on big ones and ski, for under 3 hour rides near home a hip pack is much more easy to grab, clean and it's lighter.
  • 5 0
 @MumblesBarn: for reals. Hydration or cooling needs is significantly different from the desert Southwest versus the Pacific Northwest or England. Or here in the Rockies, the needs are different with in an hour drive from high alpine to high desert. I have three different hydration packs: a hip pack, a lighter weight hydration vest, and a big Evoc pack for really big days or bike packing. But, I still prefer no pack whenever I can get away with it.
  • 1 0
 People say that backpacks are uncomfortable. To me, that implies an awareness of the presence of said backpack. And that is why they lose me, because I am aware of very little when I'm rattling down the mountain, clinging onto my bike for dear life.
  • 2 0
 Backpacks make you sweat. They pull your top/jacket up. They push your shorts down. They bounce around. They hook on low branches.
They also carry more kit! +2 hour ride then it comes out. Nothing less.
  • 1 0
 @tmadison12: wow, I just realized that my hand numbness may have been my Camelback. I bought SQ Lab grips this year and was raving about them because no hand numbness, but I also used a bottle on the downturn for the first time in 12 years. Oh no, it may have been the Camelbak!
  • 1 0
 @Offrhodes: you are just a hipster!
  • 62 0
 These first aid kits are pointless. They will only deal with the smallest cuts. Something everyone here has had and not given a flying f about. Clean yourself up when you get back to the car/home.

That is not to say I don’t have a first aid kit. But I only care if it’s serious enough to call an ambulance/MRT. Especially calling out MRT as it can take them a while to mobilise and then find you. If it’s bad weather especially fog, it really could take a while.

Things you need, tourniquet, Israeli bandage, SAM splint, aluminium foil blanket, whistle, fully charged phone. All of which fit in my hip pack and still loads of room for all my other stuff.

I only care about the stuff that would actually save my life.
  • 19 0
 You can make a very good tourniquet out of a spare tube!
  • 10 4
 @bonkmasterflex:
I’m sure you can, but if I can spend x amount of £ on a bronson, I can afford to not be a tight arse and spend 20 quid on althe proper tool for the job. Then I can stay alive to watch my son grow up.
  • 15 0
 I was waiting for someone to make this point. Don’t forget a triangular bandage/cravat or 5.

This kit is borderline worthless in my opinion. Minus the CPR shield. But then you need to be trained on CPR. Training is really the critical component for people going to play on bikes in the woods. I recommend wilderness first aid.
  • 6 0
 @bonkmasterflex: Use whatever's on your buddy's bike. Spokes, chain, Stan's sealant. . .
  • 58 0
 While I understand that the problem is that, if we are honest, the amount of people who would know what to do with anything more than the average cut or gash is shockingly small.


Hey @pinkbikeoriginals , here is an idea for a series: What to do if you __________ on the trail. Example: You misjudged the gap between those trees and now you broke your collarbone. Here is what you can do to get you back to the car. If you have already done this, can you link to where it is?
  • 2 0
 @Small-Tales-Epic-Trails I have a life systems 1st aid kit I've pimped with the trauma bandage, quick clot, big low adherent dressings. There's some debate about bivvy bag Vs foil blanket. Admittedly I have neither, but keep meaning to get one... I'm not sure about a tourniquet - seems to be a total last resort job with significant risks. I've debated getting a Sam splint, but figured I could probably bodge a splint from something if it came down to it
  • 4 0
 @mountainsofsussex:

Good for you dude. I would get a blanket if it’s for first aid. Bivi if you want to do some bike packing and then it’s a better investment. But the blanket takes up next to no space and weighs nothing.

I terms of the way I think about things. I go in reverse. As I said I don’t care about cuts and bruises. I’ve got a tourniquet and I hope I never have to use it, it’s the one piece that would truly save your life. Next a splint and Israeli bandage. I’ve broken both wrists and my collar bone before (not that I could use a splint on a collar bone). And then anything else afterwards, blanket & whistle are are a bonus to keep you warm and aid help quicker. And then finally the first aid plasters for cuts and bruises.
  • 11 0
 Here’s my kit, doesn’t cost much and far more effective

www.pinkbike.com/photo/19748235
  • 9 0
 @jmhills: @pinkbikeoriginals: if someone could clear it with the lawyers, this could be a great little series. Maybe a link after every Friday Fails?!
  • 3 0
 Funny thing is, with the small/medium cuts & scrapes, infection can Eff you up royally. So the fact that this kit doesn't have a packet or two of Triple Antibiotic is just irresponsible. Taking a gash on the shin from a pedal, then having it fester for the rest of the ride, then ending up in ER with IV antibiotics in the desperate hope of saving a huge hunk of flesh or even your leg...not super fun.
  • 2 0
 @Small-Tales-Epic-Trails: Thanks for the info my dude, i've just ordered some of these items.
  • 4 0
 @Chuckolicious: Let us talk to Martin Maes about cuts becoming more than just a cut...
  • 2 0
 @bonkmasterflex:
Sorry dude, that sounded a bit passive aggressive. If my life was in danger I would use whatever I could. And an inner tube is a great idea.

When I was 23 I broke my collar bone on some DJs and my meditation was Mary j. Now I’m 41 with responsibilities I take things a little more serious haha
  • 2 0
 @jmhills: f*ck! Never knew about this. That they still dinged him is so utterly absurd I don't even know what to say. Hey, sorry you almost lost your leg, but we still gotta temp-ban you.
  • 4 0
 @mtbtacolover: lool. Wtf you need the cpr shield for? You going to do single provider cpr till help shows up, nope. If you think you are you have never done cpr. You are better off to not give breaths than worry about a face shield every time you come off the chest. The face shield is the dumbest thing in the kit. All you need are duct tape, a maxi pad and a tube. Maybe a splint if you have a pack, but you can do a lot w stix and tape.
  • 1 0
 I roll the same way, just carrying a solid trauma kit along. The one I have in my riding bag isn't much different than the one on my tree climbing harness. I as hoping that the bag would work as a frame bag but its just a little too big for that. It is a little light on some things like an emergency blanket or splint but its designed to keep you from dying in a tree during an emergency.
www.wesspur.com/items/saf540.html
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: topicals aren't going to make a difference in 45 min, spray some water and go home. Maybe a triangle bandage and a space blanket. Quick clot can be useful if you need it, but most of the time you don't need it and if you don't know how and when to use it you will do more harm than good.
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: I was taught it's a very low effort/cost first line of defense against an infection getting going. That's why many first aid kits have these. When you say it won't make a difference, how do you know that? Even if it provides a 5% better chance at staving something off, wouldn't it still be worth it? But as to clotters, I'm interested in learning more. I see there is the powder, and also clotting gauze. Any links you can recommend on how to use, which one, etc? Appreciate it!
  • 2 0
 Late to the party but came here to post the same thing, first responder in me cringed at the content this comes with. Carry things in your ifak (and know how to use them) that save lives, you don't need to stop the bleed on boo boos. As is, just another thing to strap to your bike to be endurbro
  • 3 0
 Just some tips for your own first aid kits:
A small airplane bottle/ shooter of grain alcohol is better for sterilization in the field than antibiotic creams. And grain alcohol also doubles as an effective pain med.

Believe it or not, pure honey works really well for a topical wound treatment, dehydrates the wound, preventing bacterial growth along with a natural antibiotic. Plus, a honey packet also doubles as backup sugar in case of hypoglycemia in case you or your buddy end up bonking and need a boost to get home.

Rubber gloves pack small and can double as quick warmth for cold hands and can be made into occlusive dressings with some tape.

A jacket can be converted into a shoulder sling.

Spine protectors and other armor can be good

Spare socks can work well for bleeding over a base bandage to provide more fluid absorption and create extra pressure when wrapped in the gauze wrap.

Quick clot is really light and can stop a major wound from bleeding out, sucks to clean out in the hospital, but can save a life in the field.

Spare tube and a stick would make an effective tourniquet.

Duct or medical tape around a pump is easy storage for your tape.

That said, an easy kit like this strapped to your seat isn’t a bad idea.
  • 2 0
 @whambat: So as luck would have it, I'm a long time beekeeper. The honey on wounds thing is not something I'd do if I had access to alcohol and antibiotic ointment. Unless you have a sealed pouch of medical grade honey (yea, that's a thing) Otherwise it can be contaminated, or worse, cause an allergic reaction. Sure, ancient Egyptian military field medics used it. But that was...ancient Egypt. :-D
  • 2 0
 @whambat: my concern with Gen pop and quick clot is it getting applied to anything that squirts (most of which can be fixed w point pressure and a bandage). Quick clot can for sure save a life, but imo unless you're have received specific eduction around use, ppl will likely do more harm than good.

Lol, a year ago I cut some arterioles in my knee. It was a gusher. I rode home with a bandage made out of my sock and an inner tube. It stopped the bleeding, but I was pretty shock when I got to hospital. Now I have a maxi pad and some duct tape.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: it really isn't. Its only effective on the surface where bacteria isn't a huge issue, needs to be not expired, and does not have any empirical evidence of benefit not in the context of established infection they I am aware of. Antibiotics are a scarce resource, like we don't prescribe them for abscesses any more once we have source control, using them on a skinned knee is not just ineffective, it is actively harmful (aka why polysporin doesn't work any more, and why we now have triple agent creams).

RE quick clot, it's simple to use, you put it on. The issue is what wounds need it. Sen with a tourniquet. Most things can be stopped with pressure. Even things that squirt. Quick clot needs to be cut out at the hospital, a tourniquet can cost you a limb.
  • 1 0
 @whambat: like what would you need quick clot or a tourniquet for on a bike. Maybe a femur fracture, but most severe bike related bleeds are going to be penetrating or internal. Leavinf the stick in Is the best option. Imo I don't see the use case for anything other than a pressure dressing.
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: Interesting. Now I'm going down the rabbit hole. I'm aware of antibiotic resistance and the overuse of antibiotics for both humans and animals, but was under the impression that wasn't as much of an issue for a temporary topical use like this. It seems Amerigel might be a better option than a triple, but maybe clean water and/or isopropyl really is the best option? Tourniquet use is above my pay grade and I wouldn't mess with that unless I had an EMT on the phone directing me. Coagulant seems like worthy of being in the kit at least, but I'm now definitely adding an Israeli Bandage to my stash!
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: been there done that, 2/10 do not reccomend.
  • 1 0
 MUST HAVE for those pesky but not critical cuts (like shin dings that won't stop bleeding) the next time you go through the toe of your socks cut the top off at the ankle and add it to your kit. Works great to stop dirt/dust from caking the wound and the blood from getting your new shoes messy.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: I agree. Last year a pretty harmless (but hard) frame hit on my shin put me in the hospital for 4 days with a run-away infection. And this happened at an indoor bike park! The problem with first-aid on the trail is it's almost impossible to keep these wounds clean until you get home. Cleaning it in the field helps but you're (literally and figuratively) not out of the woods...
  • 2 0
 @mgrantorser: www.vitalmtb.com/videos/member/WARNING-GRAPHIC-CONTENT-Cedric-Gracias-Reunion-Island-Crash,24315/iceman2058,94

Freak injuries happen more than you would think. Knowing how and when to safely use both a trauma dressing and tourniquet are great skills and equipment to possess.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: even granulated sugar has empirical data as an antibiotic. Several studies have been performed in India where antibiotics are expensive but sugar is readily available. Did just a quick google search for you, I don’t have access to the medical journals but this article seems well cited, and honey has shown similar efficacy.
www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2278942/Pouring-granulated-sugar-wounds-heal-faster-antibiotics.html
  • 1 0
 @HaggeredShins: I thought of this crash when reading the comments about carrying a tourniquet. I don't think I'm particularly squeamish but I had to have a little lay down after watching that video. Just shows how badly things can go wrong with even the most innocuous crash.
  • 1 0
 @whambat: Yea, like I said, medical grade or honey you know to be sterile has benefits. But just grabbing a packet of honey from any random off-the-shelf, or even your own hives, not the wise move unless you have nothing else. But hey, I'll happily sell you some of mine, do a brisk business in it to feed my MTB habit. :-D
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: ha.
The studies on sugar just used standard granulated sugar, you can just use sugar packets if that makes you feel better than honey.
www.bbc.com/future/article/20180328-how-sugar-could-help-heal-wounds
  • 2 0
 @HaggeredShins:

I'm not a trauma specialist, but I'm also not a layperson. This would was a pelvic fracture resulting in a fem artery lac. That's incompatible with life without rapid evac to a level 3 trauma center. They used point pressure, binders and O2 to keep him alive, not a tourniquet. There are absolutely situations where a tourniquet and a coagulant can save lives. Knowing how to use them is pretty simple. The issue is knowing when. They are good, but dangerous tools. With cg, if they'd packed the wound full of quick clot they may have killed him or cost him his leg due to the time needed to get past it to repair the fem artery lac.

I'm not saying they aren't useful, but the education needed to use them safely isn't a matter of reading a website or a half day course.

I'm also saying that in cycling In particular, the mechanisms of injury are such that an inreach is probably a better use of space than almost anything. Freak accidents do happen, but by and large the mechanism is either blunt force trauma or penetrating injury. There are lots of nasty bleeding cuts etc, but your chances of cutting something fatal coming off a bike are much Lower than your chances of loosing a limb because someone tourniquetted a Nasty shin lac that's squirting because a few arterioles are involved.

I'll stick with most ppl needing: heavy flow maxi pad, duct tape, a space blanket, an Inreach, and inner tube (which can be a tourniquet) . A razor blade is also good. Nada mass unless properly educated (aka enough knowledge of anatomy to know what vessels are likely involved).
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: chance of needing a tourniquet is low, that’s why I’m happy having a spare tube as my option on the bike. But I’ve seen a few open fractures that a tourniquet has worked on, rare, but they happen. Worth just knowing how to apply one. The quick clot lives in my pack for multi hour rides next to a space blanket. Weighs almost nothing. If I’m hours from cell coverage or a rescue, it’s worth having, IMO.
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: I'd say you're missing the point. You seemed earlier to be in disbelief that a tourniquet could be useful in mountain biking injuries. Obviously we're not going to roll around with junctional hemorrhage tools jic but if you think there are no biking injuries ever occurring where an extremity tourniquet would be life saving, I got a bridge to sell you... totally agree with you on knowing when and what you're doing with any tool, but like we've put it in the past, if it came to it I'd rather have a f*cked up limb than a lost life. Its also not quite rocket science to learn how to use a tq.

Honestly I've seen weirder injuries than cg's from less intense activities, sounds like you might be in a position to have as well.
  • 1 0
 @HaggeredShins: yup re the injuries. I know a tourniquet can save a life and My truck kit amd pack kit have quick clot haha. I just worry about folks advocating everyone out there go buy stuff at the pharmacy that can do real harm. Someone here said something along the lines of always get the education before the equipment.
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: 100% and fair. Apparently its a pretty common occurrence for people to freak out and try to shut someone's limb off when they don't understand what they're looking at. Never rolled up on one of those myself but plenty of stories!
  • 2 0
 @whambat: I had a wound on my forearm that was down to the muscle and a veterinarian friend suggested packing it with sugar then bandage so I did for a couple weeks, worked great. It also absorbs seepage so I didn’t have to swap my bandage every 20 mins.
  • 1 0
 @blevinci: I just looked up this kit, looks cool and super important for climbing with a saw! I would however reconsider the rats turnequet. To get proper tension you need a windlass. Don't have any brand preference, but CAT has been the standard, still light but takes up more volume in a kit.
FYI I am a medic and WEMT instructor
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: gauze is way better. Powder can blow away in wind and only clots the blood it contacts which right on the surface. A puncture may require you to pack the wound
  • 1 0
 @Small-Tales-Epic-Trails: if it can’t kill you then keep the appropriate first aid in the car. Blood sacrifice brings good riding fortune.
Snake bite bandage (Australia) quick clot blotter / bandage and phone. Snake bite bandage can do an ok tourniquet if needed.
But again it’s like picking a new bike - to each their own... Climate, experience, medical training all these things come into play.
  • 1 0
 @mgrantorser: if someone has a half face helmet and their lips and face have turned to red mush - a face shield might be nice...
  • 2 0
 @JosMaple: if their face is red mush, just worry about pumping the chest. The breathing portion of the cpr algorithm is now optional because chest rebound pulls air in, and blood to brain > air in lungs. Also, if the face is mush good luck getting air in lol.
  • 1 0
 @JosMaple:
Totally agree with what matches your needs. I used to live in the city and either ride local trails or go to well ridden spots in the country. Where there’s easy access for ambulances and it wouldn’t be too long before another rider came along the trail.

Now I live in a national park and if I go for a solo ride on a miserable wet day in November I won’t see another soul on the hill until I get back to the car. Which is what I’m about to do. Re my kit... to quote alien vs predator “ just like a condom, I would rather have it and not need it, than need it and not have it”.

My original post was that simply these small first aid kits are pretty pointless other than patching up a graze... I can live without
  • 1 0
 Totally agreed. This is pretty useless as a First Aid Kit...
  • 1 0
 @cranny: actually, no, it's a really useful first aid kit for taking the kids to the park. Just think how enduro your bugaboo stroller can look with one of these strapped to it. But for going into the mountains - nah...
  • 1 0
 @Small-Tales-Epic-Trails:
Solid! I’d say stage the tourniquet outside of the plastic.

m.pinkbike.com/photo/19753092

This is my kit. Plus or minus stuff depending on what I’m doing and the bag I’m rockin. Chem light for visibility, haven’t used it but from what I’ve seen is that you can spin it on the paracord for visibility. I will add a sam splint if I’m taking a full on back pack.

Also two tourniquets based on feedback. Sometimes one isn’t enough for a leg injury. Tourniquets aren’t in the bag, they are currently in two top pockets in my pack.

Ideally I’d carry more triangular bandages but between the paracord and tourniquets I’ll be okay, unless someone is bleeding and has a broken bone.
  • 3 0
 @mtbtacolover:
Hey man, nice kit, good to see someone else hoping for the best but prepared for the worst. I keep it in the plastic wrap not for sterile purposes or anything but just helps it keep contained. Your absolutely right about sometimes one not being enough. But alas I’m trying to keep to just a hip pack these days. But good to see you take it seriously like it deserves. And great idea on the glow sticks. Ordering right now!!!
  • 1 0
 buy.garmin.com/en-US/US/p/592606

When you need rescue this is invaluable.
  • 25 0
 I apparently carry everything else all my buddies need on their rides....might as well...
  • 7 0
 I know the feeling, I sometimes feel like I am their walking bike repair shop. LOL
  • 3 1
 @dv8416: yup. But the cost associated with it is worthwhile. I won't even open my pack up unless there is a six pack in it for me. Need a tube? That will be a six pack for me plus a $10 donation to the local trail builder (with receipt in my name).
  • 1 0
 Biggie Fries with that ? Self inflection HAHA
  • 2 0
 "Anybody got a pump?" "Anybody got a tube?" Sometimes I let them suffer and contemplate their fate for quite a few minutes before I give in with my stash. Thats the only reward. LOLOL
  • 1 0
 @dv8416: You wall when you're with your cycling buddies?
  • 1 0
 *walk
  • 16 2
 I’d personally rather carry a small first aid kit in my pocket where it’s not going to get covered in crap that will transfer to my hands and whatever is inside when I use it. I like the small waterproof ones from Lifesystems that easily fit into the pockets of my shorts. I usually add a couple of extras like a CPR barrier and some spare nitrile gloves.
  • 2 0
 You make a good point about the value of carrying this stuff in a pocket (or in a hydropack).
  • 15 1
 Only 2m of duct tape?! What problem am i supposed to solve with only 2m duct tape?!
  • 1 1
 @pperini: strap a splint?
  • 6 1
 @subwaypanda: Not a good idea to strap a splint with non elastic material (e.g. duct tape) in circular rounds around an injured extremity as circulation may be compromised in case of swelling (Which is common in incidences where a splint is needed)
  • 2 0
 @pperini: Honourary Canadian. Go online and look for Red Green video clips. You make us proud.
  • 1 0
 @rsbromley Lifesystems looks like a fantastic company! Wish they delivered to the US. I am sure we have something similar here.
  • 2 1
 @Costir: I disagree. For emergency first response just to get you off the hill (1 hr) a stiffer and non-elastic splint can be far better. Once your in the hospital it's all coming off anyways and they'll slap you in a molded splint for a few days. But you're right where prolonged restriction of swelling is definitely an issue.
  • 1 0
 @RBalicious: Try MyMedic. I’d really like one of their “The Solo” kits for skiing, but they don’t ship to the UK.
  • 5 0
 I carry a similar kit, and have for years. I think its a good idea. The most common things used have been:
1. Tweezers for pulling cactus
2. Duct tape for pulling cactus
3. Pain meds for old man joints
4. Alcohol wipes for poison ivy

Minor scrapes and wounds are mostly ignored.
  • 5 0
 Loving the feedback guys! Just to address the comments "why didn't you include XYZ": we worked with our local MTB first response team to build a kit that will work for everyone. Tourniquets, clotting agents, and medication can be very helpful, but they also have the potential to make a situation much, much worse when used incorrectly. If you're trained in how to use these things or have a specific medication that you rely on then we 100% encourage you to throw them into our first aid kit, or build your own!
  • 2 0
 In a life threatening situation, literally none of those items will make the situation worse though
  • 4 0
 for all the folks saying this is pointless I disagree. Yes if I get a scrape on my knee I'm not going to stop and bandage, even though I carry one. I do coach a high school mtb race team and they crash all the time. I envy their green bones that never seem to break, or ligaments that stretch for days without ripping off, but the sight of blood for some of them is a ride ender. I went through 6-7 bandages this season during practices, none of which were that bad, but all required something to make them "feel" better. Even if the kid was tough, their parents are less likely to yank them out of the sport if they return bandaged than if they crawl in their car dripping. I'll be looking out for one of these kits, if you're a bad ass and don't need it then good for you but one day you'll likely be ridding with someone else who will.
  • 3 0
 This kit might not include any life saving items, but it's honestly better than what most people currently carry (which is nothing). If everyone had this kit, the rest of us could cut down on the volume of adhesive bandages and swabs/ointments we carry so our trauma kits aren't gigantic.
  • 2 0
 It's a great concept but I think the size of it makes it a bit too limited to be of much use. The only injuries this will be of use for, you could get away without using it. I'd probably ditch most of the contents, except the alcohol swabs, medium dressing and duct tape and replace the rest with pain killers, triangular bandage, steri-strips and superglue.
  • 2 0
 strongly disagree with the last line in the post 'A first aid kit will always be your best option, but a bit of knowledge can make a world of difference'. I think they have those 2 mixed up. Knowledge first, tools next. Take a wilderness first aid course, consider it mandatory for the sport.
  • 4 1
 The paramedic in me loves the idea but there's no way I'll use it myself. I'll rather carry a backpack with my stuff. Your idea is great Neutron Comp.
  • 5 2
 No water bottle mount options, no thanks. Also, you could go the pharmacy and for the same amount of money buy enough to build about 30 of these kits.
  • 1 0
 I always carry one first aid kit in my backpack and a few pairs of gloves. Specialized could do one bag like this for the swat compartment(they could do a few more bag types like one for keys&wallet or even a emergency money thing stick to the plastic cover) .
It is a good idea,nice addition to any ride.
  • 8 0
 If Specialized sold you an emergency money thing, it would have $10 in it and cost $40.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: hahahahahaha
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: They made a cool little wallet that I bought and it showed up empty!
  • 1 0
 Looks great for something I’ll keep at my office desk in case I get a paper cut. If I’m a 4 hour hike away in the woods (with a fully functioning body), I’m not skimping on first aid in the name of being a weight weenie.
  • 1 0
 ¨Ehhh rub some dirt or spit on it youll be fine rinse it out when we get to the car¨
is the type of cut or scrape this would solve.
This stuff would instantly become useless if something really bad actually happened. plus for the cost of one of these you could make a legit first aid kit and throw it in your hydration pack if you actually cared that much about first aid.
  • 1 0
 In most cases a single triangle bandage is enough. You can tie off a flesh wound and it's long enough to serve as a sling. These are recommended tools in the industrial and outdoor first aid courses I've taken and yet you can't buy them at Shoppers Drug Mart. You have to get them at MEC.
  • 3 0
 Hey @NeutronComponents, if all the Kiwis will rock a Swiss flag under their saddles, can we get a version with the NZ flag here in Switzerland?
  • 2 0
 They seem to be in good company by mixing up different flags.
NeutronComponents do not know the difference between the Swiss flag and the Red Cross (ICRC)
Heiko Maas (German foreign minister) does not know the difference between the German flag and the Belgian flag.
www.thetimes.co.uk/article/merkel-minister-heiko-maas-mistook-belgian-troops-for-bundeswehr-in-tweet-hqqkddznx
  • 1 0
 This is actually a pretty sweet product. I know I don't carry proper med supplies when I ride most days. It would be nice to have some basics at hand in a small light package.
  • 2 0
 Tourniquet missing. Scratches are not the most dangerous thing, which happens on the trail...
  • 1 0
 A lot of stuff that we don't need. Its enough to cut a roll of cling fim, about 3 inches. Its clean, you can use it to compress and to use on wounds.
  • 1 0
 This needs some clotting powder, thats about all you really need. Gauze, steristrips, gloves tape and alcohol. If we need to perform CPR we are rawdogging.
  • 1 0
 Probably just gonna buy it for the 2m of duct tape, seems to help everywhere from mechanicals to a severed leg.
  • 1 0
 a severed leg needs duct tape + a zip tie - just as an FYI Smile
  • 2 0
 1. Crazy glue (for small cuts); 2. Paracord (for large cuts).
  • 2 0
 so everything to fix a tiny boo boo?
  • 2 1
 remember the ABC's of first aid. A. a B. bone sticking through the skin in very bad
  • 1 0
 This is awesome. I'm usually quite prepared on the trail, except for first aid
  • 2 0
 There should come with an AED for e-bikes.
  • 1 0
 Good luck getting that out in Yorkshire,be prepared to have the piss ripped out of you.
  • 1 0
 Thankfully my bike had the standover required to mount a small bathroom cabinet so my bandaids stay fresher longer
  • 1 0
 Clotting sponge, benadryl, and a fully charged phone w/ navigation will go a long way
  • 1 0
 the two only things that can save your life are an hemostatic cushion or a tourniquet.
  • 3 2
 this is the first time a heard of a CPR barrier shield. :o
  • 22 0
 Its basically a facemask that goes between you and the patient, to stop you from having to directly make mouth to mouth contact with them. Reduces the likelihood of any cross contamination and keeps you totally hetro.
  • 24 1
 @pbuser2299: It is also possible to achieve 50% of this effect with strategic use of a Nohomo.
  • 5 0
 @Patrick9-32: Hmmm, what if some of the bro's are out of earshot?
  • 2 0
 No one want a casualties vomit, saliva, blood etc. passed to them as reward for CPR.
Eek
  • 1 0
 @Patrick9-32: pure gold!
  • 1 0
 Only addition I'd put in as well is a tourniquet.
  • 8 1
 Its a good idea if you have the right training but tourniquets can do serious harm if used incorrectly or applied for too long and can even kill you. It would be a mistake to include one with an off the shelf medical kit that anyone can buy and carry.
  • 2 0
 Tourniquets are last resort. Probably not a good idea in a "lite" first aid kit
  • 1 4
 tourniquets are easily done with a shoe lace and a stick anyways…
  • 2 0
 @Patrick9-32:
I think you’re kinda of missing the point. If you need a tourniquet, you’re going to die very quickly without one. Especially if you are riding alone
  • 1 1
 @Small-Tales-Epic-Trails: If you are alone, have a femoral artery injury or similar that requires a tourniquet and try to use a tourniquet without training you are likely f*cked whether you have one or not unfortunately. If you have done the training and feel comfortable to use one safely there looks to be enough room in this kit to possibly add one yourself. Again, it would not be sensible to include one with the kit as standard.
  • 1 0
 There really isn’t much training to be had. Put it on as tight as possible, as high as possible and note the time. There used to be an argument for unwinding time to time to let the blood flow. But the build up of bad blood then circulating back to the heart can kill you. So now the advice is to simply leave it on. Yes if you’re in a war zone where an extraction might not be possible leaving it on for an extended period of time is bad. But we’re talking about until paramedics can get you to hospital. Which in England shouldn’t take that long.
  • 1 0
 Sweet. My rig will carry 3 of these, as I go more gonzo than you.
  • 1 0
 Sounds great but the delivery costs to UK are more than the product Frown
  • 1 0
 Still cheaper than the Pinkbike calendar...
  • 1 0
 Vet wrap, a few of my wife's feminine pads, zip lock and I'm good
  • 1 0
 Put a gas mask in there! It's 2020 FFS!
  • 1 0
 No mask or SARS-COV-2 test kit
  • 1 0
 i need at least 2 condoms
  • 1 0
 Need tourniquet in your med kit!
  • 1 0
 not even snake bite bandage or bear remover, phfft..
  • 1 1
 TVS could have used one of these on his case last week :-)
  • 3 4
 No face mask included? Come on, get with 2020 Neutron!
  • 5 0
 checked NZ status and their participation of global events lately? They are to pandemics what Switzerland is to War. (wait.. is everyone bringing their gold to NZ?)

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