Race Face Turbine Dropper Post - Review

Jun 29, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
Race Face Turbine dropper review

Dropper posts have rapidly become a necessity rather than an accessory for many mountain bikers, and the number of options on the market continues to climb. Race Face decided to join the fray late last summer with the announcement of their Turbine dropper post, a cable-actuated affair that uses technology licensed from 9Point8, the small Canadian company best known for their Fall Line dropper post. That technology, called DropLoc, involves the use of an expanding brake to hold the moveable portion of the post at any point in its 100, 125, or 150mm of travel, and there's a version with 175mm of drop scheduled to arrive later this summer.

Turbine Dropper Details
• Size: 30.9, 31.6mm
• Length: 350, 375, 415, 440mm
• Travel: 100, 125, 150mm
• Lever actuation: mechanical
• Weight: 520 grams w/o lever or cable (150mm)
• Price: $469.99 USD
www.raceface.com

The Turbine post ships with a paddle-shaped thumb lever that can run on either side of the handlebar, but a shift lever-style remote is available as a $60 upgrade in a wide range of anodized colors. With the standard remote, the Turbine post retails for $469.99 USD.

Race Face Turbine dropper post review
Numbered lines on the post's body make it easy to ensure that it's at the right height in the frame.
Race Face Turbine dropper post review
The air valve is hidden inside the top of the post, under the seat clamp.

Turbine Details

Inside the Turbine's stanchion there's a spring-loaded, fluid-filled brake that expands against the side of the tube to hold it into place. Depressing the handlebar mounted lever sets off a chain of events that results in a decrease in the pressure inside the brake, allowing the post to move downwards under a rider's weight. When there isn't any weight on the seat and the lever is depressed, an air spring provides the force necessary to return the post back to full extension. Air pressure (between 20-40psi) is added via a Shrader valve hidden under a rubber cap at the top of the post, under the seat clamp.

The beauty of the Turbine's design is that even if all of that air somehow leaked out the expanding brake should keep the post in place, allowing riders to make it home without needing to pedal with their knees up around their ears.

Race Face Turbine dropper post review
This is the tricky part of the installation process - getting the cable trimmed and tensioned to just the right amount.
Race Face Turbine dropper post review
No tools are required to remove the actuator mechanism from the bottom of the post.

Installation

Installation of the Turbine dropper post doesn't require any special tools, just a few allen wrenches and set of cable cutters, but it is a bit more time consuming than other posts. It's worth taking the time to look over the illustrated instructions that are included with the post, and watching the instructional video that Race Face have created wouldn't be a bad idea either.

The key point to remember is that the two set screws that clamp down on the cable need to be equally tightened so that they end up flush with the sides of the activation mechanism. It's also important to remember to line up the t-shaped piece that the housing threads into with the mark on the outer cylinder before cutting the cable, or you'll needing to repeat the whole process. I'd also recommend saving a little patience for when it's time to install the seat - there's a very, very generous amount of Loctite on the two bolts that clamp the seat into place, which makes it slow going loosening and then tightening everything down.

Once the post is installed it's an easy procedure to unscrew it from the cable mechanism. It's not something I'd want to do all the time, but since it doesn't require any tools and only takes a couple of minutes, it is feasible that you could buy two actuator mechanisms and swap the post between two different bikes.


Performance

Out of the box, the Turbine dropper return speed was a little too violent for my liking, so to ease my castration anxiety I dropped the air pressure down to 22 psi. At this pressure the post still returned quickly, but not fast enough that I had to worry about any soft tissue damage. There's a slight 'thwunk' when it reaches the top of it' travel, just enough to let you know it's in the full upright and locked position.

On the trail, the shifter-style lever was easy to reach without a second thought, although I wouldn't mind if it required a little less force to push it through its stroke. It works well, but it's not quite as easy to activate as Specialized's category-leading Command Post remote. Releasing the lever stops the post at any point in its 150mm of travel, and for the first three months of use the post worked flawlessly, with no cable adjustments or fiddling required. The post felt satisfyingly solid, with very smooth action and minimal side to side play. There were never any unwanted creaks or groans from the seat clamp, even after multiple muddy rides in a row.

Race Face Turbine dropper post review
The 1x lever upgrade sits where a front shifter used to, and is available in six color options.
Race Face Turbine dropper review
A simple but effective two bolt clamp system holds the seat in place.

Issues

After about three months of use the mechanical brake began slipping intermittently, causing the seat to move downwards underneath my body weight. After consulting Race Face, they recommended resetting the brake, which involves setting the post to the top of its travel, and then taking any slack out of the cable with the barrel adjuster. The next step is to depress the lever fully for three seconds, release it, and then back off the cable tension until there is 1-2 millimeters of free play in the lever.

This procedure worked, but for a couple of weeks I had to perform it a handful of additional times to prevent the post from slipping downwards. Sometimes the reset worked for multiple rides in a row, while other times the issue returned the next day. I checked and double-checked the cable tension and actuator positioning, and everything was correct - there seemed to be something going on with the brake that was more than a setup issue, although a visit to Race Face's headquarters didn't reveal any glaring problems. They did recommend performing the brake reset before each ride, since it only takes three seconds, and it helps to ensure that the brake is fully expanded and much less likely to slip. Another technique is to perform the brake equalization procedure with the seat height set to the area where any slippage is occurring, which helps to compensate for any potential differences in the thickness of the tube that the brake is housed in. This procedure did the trick, and the post has been trouble free for the last month of use.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWhen it comes to dropper posts, the number of options is higher than ever, which makes it even more important that a post work perfectly in order for it to stand out from the crowd. The Turbine's performance has been a little finicky, and there's also the fact that its price is on the high side of the scale, even before you factor in the $60 required for the shifter-style lever, a part that I think should be included in the stock configuration. The design does have potential, but at the end of the day, there a few issues that hold the Turbine back from being a truly great dropper post.- Mike Kazimer



Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review





181 Comments

  • + 152
 If you're reading this raceface please respond to my dealer's (Northwest Bicycle) request to warranty my dropper.
  • + 35
 "The air valve is hidden inside the top of the post, under the seat clamp."
Are you kidding me? What a nightmare but I guess it needs to go somewhere.
RACEFACE---Help out @DirtyHal!
  • + 19
 Their customer service is terrible. Hope you can get your dropper post replaced or repaired under warranty. I really like RF products but the recent experience with them has left a bad taste in my mouth.
  • + 13
 @richierocket: that's the same place the air valve is in for Rock Shox Reverb posts as well. Not really a big deal as you don't need to check them very often.
  • + 6
 @ScandiumRider: I am on my second post sent to Raceface warranty you can read about all the issues on this MTBR post: forums.mtbr.com/components/easton-haven-dropper-post-thread-1009674-2.html
  • + 13
 This post looks like a real pain in the ass.
  • + 6
 @fecalmaster: They really are. The review goes really lightly on them on the install and maintenance part. My friend has one and I have to work on his bike. It's the most mind blowingly complicated dropper I have ever dealt with. Seriously, just pass on this post. I love RF stuff. I have a lot on my own bike. But not this nightmare.
  • + 3
 We also had a bad experience replacing/repairing a post. I had to send pictures go through a whole list of questions, and the whole process took weeks. Say what you will about the Reverb but I have never had any issues with a warranty replacement and for this reason I will continue to recommend it. Albeit the KS warranty process has gotten better as well.
  • + 4
 unfortunately RF now is not the RF we grow up with - I have to image with the bankruptcy and change of ownership(s) it will not ever be what is was once
  • + 6
 RF licenses the technology from 9.8, charges $100 more than 9.8 and is less reliable than 9.8. Better to get the 9.8 is the simple logic. Probably better warranty as well.
  • + 2
 @jaydawg69: I've had a 9.8 for a couple of months. It was recommended by PB and my preferred bike shop mechanics (who also own them). So far flawless, but the position of the lever means you can get a lot of friction from the housing, so invest in the good stuff.
  • + 6
 UPDATE: Raceface emailed my dealer telling me to check my pressure and adjust the brake. I'll check when I get home tonight to see if this fixes the issue (It doesn't go all the way up anymore).
  • + 8
 Man if this doesn’t say it all. The world is too small and social media too powerful to have crappy customer service.
  • + 3
 Hahaha! Sounds like we're not the only ones to deal with poor service and issues from the inside guys at RF. It's laughable it's so bad! Having said that our outside RaceFace rep is super cool...too bad he can't be on the road and answer phones at RF all at once. We called up RF with a couple of problematic posts regarding slow leaks from the air charge side of things and the inside phone guy accused my colleague of not knowing how to use a suspension pump. Could have rebuilt a Reverb in the time we've sank into trying to get our posts warrantied.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: not only that but I'm pretty sure Fox owns RF and their cheaper better Transfer post is about to own the sector.
  • + 2
 @Grmasterd: Really? I have been using RF products for 20 years and have never had a good warranty experience. Ever since isis their BB's have sucked. Their stuff is overpriced. All of their pf stuff wears out in a few months, no warranty on that.
But they come as OE on a lot of bikes and they are way cool.
  • + 3
 Just in case anyone is still reading this, the RF department had me "reset" my dropper and add more air. Seems to be working again. Besides this it's been great.
  • + 1
 @ryanholio: I also have a lot of RF stuff on my bikes. I wonder if this has anything to do with Easton's purchase of Raceface? The only thing Easton I have is a carbon Haven wheel set. These are 26" . I can't with words, say how well these have worked for me. I weigh 195 200 riding with my camel-back.
When you see stuff like these posts sold by companies with great reputations. You have to wonder who is boss. Certainly not mtn. bikers. How ever. Many name brand and others have dropped the ball with dropper posts.
I'm eager to see how foxes new post stands up. We may finally have a winner.
  • + 1
 @ScandiumRider: not in cold weather.. I feel it leaks too much and the posts return is too slow
  • + 1
 They're still not responding to my warranty.
  • + 1
 Write a letter to upper management, after locating the name, CEO, COO, someone like that and send it certified with manditory response , meaning USPS will notify you when it hits his actual hands, or her.
  • + 91
 I appreciate the honest review pb!
  • + 19
 This. I completely agree, almost seems like a breath of fresh air amoungst the sea of reviews that attempt to use clever wording to mask any short comings in a product.
  • + 15
 PB, your honest review is much appreciated. I'm pretty sure RF is a big sponsor of yours but we still want the truth and we got it in this review. This post looks like a great idea once the rough edges are polished out and the price is re-worked.
  • + 1
 Yes, good review. Thanks!
  • + 5
 Yes, as soon as a review is critical it sounds honest. Take McLaren p1 or V10cc with ENVE kit and add at least a pinch of salt and quite a big chunk of population will believe anything you wrote. But be so amazed that you are willing to skip minor issues and they will say you're full of crap. Human beings simply don't care as much for being effectively manipulated, they hate feeling manipulated Big Grin consciusness is the key here.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: That's very true. I think though if you begin to trust a media outlet you accept the good and the bad as truth. I begin to trust when their opinions and experiences align with my own. I think Pinkbike is a little soft, and therefore it's refreshing to see this - it also would then seem to me this post is pretty much a nightmare. It's no longer too much to ask for a dropper to function without issue - so what we have here is a fail.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Honest question WAKI, since you do seem to have some engineering expertise: why do all these droppers need to be so complicated? I'm no engineer but it sure seems like it would be easy enough to design a very simple, coil spring loaded dropper with a cable actuated quick release. It could be infinitely adjustable with no need for finicky seals or air valves or anything. Basically an old hite-rite with a cable (which i vaguely remember seeing once - it used 2 cables to loosen/tighten the seat post collar.) In my mind, the only difference from a hite-rite is it would just be a thin coil spring wrapping around the post instead of poking out the back.
  • + 1
 @gtill9000: I don't know. Actually my Reverb dropper post is the only thing I don't service myself and give it to qualified people for TLC.
  • + 60
 So essentially its a lower quality overpriced 9point8 fall line
  • + 7
 On which note, what is the difference between the two other than branding? If I remember correctly the 9point8 was praised for its reliability, so this seems a little odd?
  • + 6
 @slimboyjim: execution? quality control?
  • + 8
 Proves that these big companies are a rip off. Raceface decides to use fall lines tech, makes a less reliable dropper, and charges $100 more. And btw I have a fall line dropper(by far the best dropper I've had, super sturdy and smooth, never had any play or movement)
  • + 4
 @pigit77: absolutely no reason to get a RaceFace post.
  • + 2
 @jaydawg69: 9point8 seems to be always out of stock. Maybe fox transfer for me.
  • + 2
 @sutter2k: just put your name on the list and theyll email you in a month or two. thats what i did. my FallLine has been rock solid for 3 months now.
  • + 41
 Just a friendly reminder that Gravity Dropper is still making inexpensive light weight posts in the USA that don't have any seals and can be rebuilt with a multi tool on the trail. You won't need to though- their durability is unmatched. People say they're ugly, but good design is beautiful.
  • + 7
 Honest question: do they offer a 31.6 150mm drop post? Waiting for my KS to shit the bed and if it does, i'm going straight to them.
  • + 2
 @defineindecline: yes, they do. Look for the Gravity Dropper Turbo LP.
  • + 2
 @defineindecline: Not (yet) in 150mm drop, 127mm/5inch maximum. But you will need a very low frame for more drop, the cable control unit takes away some useful drop length.
The 5 inch version is the maximum i can use on my Flux, otherwise the seat will be too high in fully extended mode.

I hope some day GD makes a full mechanical internally routed version ...
The 4 inch version on my hardtail is still going strong after 6 years of use and abuse.
  • + 1
 @aresiusbe: FWIW you can purchase the inner shaft from GD for 40$ to make a 4" post a 5". Swapping them only requires a 4mm allen to swap your saddle.
  • + 4
 @scottzg: is it really their ugliness that keeps gravity droppers from being the number 1 dropper? People make them sound indestructible.
  • + 5
 @JesseE: yes. Small stanchion size with holes in it looks funny, boot looks ridiculous and cable port looks dated. Ive long been saying that a mechanical (spring instead of air) dropper with internal brake would be awesome.
  • + 3
 @JesseE: There's a bunch of things. They've been around 15 years, so not cool any more. They're ugly. The lever is not 'nice' to touch. There's no advertising to speak of. The original doesn't pop up without tapping it (which is nice on the trail). Only available with 5" drop or less. Only 27.2 or 30.9 for many years- gotta run a shim.

Seems like most folk buying a dropper also get a new bike every other year, so who cares that the dropper will last forever? Don't wanna uggle up the new whip.
  • + 4
 @JesseE: Yeah, they are ugly but I don't look at my seatpost while ridingSmile . I guess I'm getting older and wiser because reliability is the first thing on my list and aesthetics last when it comes to dropper post. All my buddies that have the fancy hydraulic post had issues. Some of them during a race. My Gravity dropper is 6 years old and works flawlessly. Parts are super cheap like a couple of bucks and takes minutes to install. BTW 3 of my riding buddies have converted to Gravity Droppers because they don't want to be 600 miles away from home and be stuck with a non functional dropper. Yeah we do lots of bike trips.
  • + 4
 Been on my GD for about 6 years now. No issues whatsoever. Sure, it ain't the purtiest out there, that accordion boot looks dumb, but the thing just works... every time.
  • - 1
 @scottzg - not a good enough reason to use the word shaft
  • + 1
 @aresiusbe: You're right, I was sure they made a 6" version but I just checked and it's 6" max.
  • + 1
 @scottzg: Indeed, easy to convert to 5 inch. But with time I might go for a brand new GD. The cable control unit on my old 4 inch dropper is tiewrapped :-) www.pinkbike.com/photo/13515267
Indeed they are fugly 90s looking with the rubber boot and the lever can improve but they work.
I just ordered a Fox Transfer control unit to replace the GD lever on my new dropper, the old dropper has already a KS lever.
  • + 1
 I don't consider them exactly inexpensive, otherwise I would already own one on my winter bike. My summer trail bike has 2016 Giant Switch which at $229 was way cheaper than any new GD I can get here. Works flawlessly so far which can't be said about the Reverb it replaced.
  • + 21
 Its funny how this has the same technology that the 9point8 has, it comes from a huge factory with everything at their disposal, and yet 9point8 seem to do a better job at it than RF who has more experience in the bike industry. I wanted to buy one of these, but then read the reviews on CRC and they were horrible, so I didn't.
  • + 5
 A switch to mass production often means loss of quality control. It's always been this way.
  • + 10
 @justwan-naride: ...But shouldn't it also come with a price drop...?
  • + 2
 @scottzg: It should. But hey.... MONEY!
  • + 17
 This is a refreshingly candid review. Strong work. And unfortunately, I agree wi th Senor. Kazimer. my turbine dropper worked for the first 2 rides then it stopped holding position when I would start the fun part of the ride...was not fun having the turbine fail on the descent. Sent it to Rf for warranty , got sent back in same shape....I sent it back and they sent me a new one. So far so good with this one. But I hear this is not a unique story so I'd stay clear from this dropper for now.
  • + 18
 The Giant Contact works very well, and is one of the best bargains on the market. 150mm of travel, too. Not sure why it never gets reviewed.
  • + 7
 Agree .. 150mm now available, no offset and better seat post clamping (vs the original design). Best of all a new cartridge is cheap when it needs one and the original cost is almost HALF of what other brands are.
  • + 4
 bought one a month ago and confuses the hell out of me that I don't see more of them out on the trail
  • + 4
 Bought a contact dropper and i couldn't be happier about it. Easy to setup, little to no maintenance and no fiddling with air pressure.
  • + 4
 @pav4: I have a 150mm Giant on the way. Glad to hear people are having good luck with them!
  • + 4
 True story. Had 2 of them, great improvemet in 2016 model.
  • + 1
 Interesting, going to look into this!
  • + 3
 I totally agree, why does this post not get much press.
I've been on the updated (2016) post riding hard for months now and all it needs is to be wiped clean after you are done with it.
I've tried the reverb and KS which kept failing on my. Sending them in time and time again. Finally had someone recommend the revised Giant Contact, although heavier, has a cheaper cartridge to replace that can be done by anyone that can tighten an allen bolt. Even though its a giant branded post it is all blacked out and has a nice finish to it.
  • + 1
 Agree, I have the 2016 125mm version - its not perfect - a bit of up down play but 100% reliable and looks great. And its stealth, or not - your choice.
  • + 1
 The first generation needed Loctite on the bottom plate, but every one of the other generations I've had have been flawless. I've had four or five of them.
  • + 12
 "They did recommend performing the brake reset before each ride" -- This is unacceptable. Mike K., you should have been harsher in your review. (The castration comment is spot on and I smashed my nuts a few times even though my pressure is also set to low 20's.) I currently own one of these posts and I have to do this "reset adjustment". It's b.s., plus I now don't trust it to not raise up in the middle of a descent and cause me to crash. Another thing I didn't see mentioned in the review is that the post becomes much more difficult to compress near the very bottom. I have owned 6 posts from 4 different manufacturers and there is no perfect post. If this post was reliable and not difficult to compress near the bottom it would be the perfect post, but the flaws are big enough to put it behind KS and Fox.
  • + 0
 What about Gravity Dropper Turbo?
  • + 1
 @dirtspanker: I don't see that they offer an internal version. As far as external, my external KS has been phenomenal. It's easy to actuate, reliable, smooth, etc. It's basically perfect. My internal KS is good but just not the same as my external hence why I've tried other brands.
  • + 1
 @kdiff: my KS is a POS. i think it made it a few months before i needed to replace the cable and housing. even with better housing, the spring that is supposed to retract the cable after you let go of the button isn't really strong enough to do the job. id say i get a 50% success rate when i use it. even at $150, its not worth it. that being said, if we're talking about a product that doesn't work well, id take the KS over the race face anyday...
  • + 1
 you do realize that "performing the brake reset before each ride" is the same as pulling your brake lever to make sure your brakes work. It's just pushing down the lever all the way and holding for 3 seconds. That's it.
  • + 1
 @SCLuke: You do realize that it costs $400+? (You want to buy mine off me for what I paid plus shipping? I'll tell the shop I found a sucker..er buyer and no need to return it.) If the cost were at the lower end of the scale, then fine, but this is at the premium end at it doesn't perform as good as cheaper models. I've had mine start creeping in the middle of a ride. The increase in resistance as it nears bottom is also not good. It's deceiving. I don't thrash my equipment unnecessarily and I don't like having to slam my taint extra hard against the post to make sure it' small the way down. I really don't get your point. If it's not a big deal then buy mine off me.
  • + 1
 @kdiff: Thats your argument? if he don't think it's a big deal to pull the lever all the way down for 3 seconds before the ride he has to buy your post? I'm all for calling things out that are out of normal expectations but this doesn't sound like a big deal. I check my tires before a ride, and make sure my suspension works, pushing the lever down for 3 seconds would take less time that all of those things.
  • + 10
 I have two turbine dropper posts, one on my fatbike and one on my mountain bike; so I've ridden it in the cold as well as in the heat. The only times I have experienced the post slipping were when it was below -25 degrees Celsius and when I initially had the cable tension set too tight: you need to have ~2mm of free play in the lever at every point of the post's travel because the tension in the cable usually seems to be higher when the post is anyway but at full extension.

I do like this post and would recommend it, and I have no issues with the feel of the post (speed of return, lever feel etc.), although it does feel quite difficult to depress the post all the way on one of mine (ramps up pretty hard), however my other post feels very linear. They are both, funnily enough, at the same pressure, but feel quite different. One is 30.9mm and the other is 31.6mm, so that may have something to do with it perhaps. Honestly I don't prefer one feel over the other. One is easier to depress all the way but the other cushions the last inch of travel so that your body weight does not cause a harsh clunk when you drop the post all the way down.

My only problem is that the post on my fatbike developed a creak, more like a ticking noise actually, that became very annoying. I troubleshooted the noise to find it wasn't the saddle rails, frame-post interface etc., and was definitely coming from the post because when I stood up the noise went away. I even put the post in another frame with a new saddle and the sound persisted, so I sent it back to Raceface under warranty. A few weeks had gone by, and the same problem developed on my other bike, so I scoured the Internet for people who have had similar issues, and yet I couldn't find anything. I did find a thread about 9point8's fall line post, and they recommended lubricating the main nut seal. I could not find any service instructions provided by Raceface so I followed the instructions from 9point8 to remove the cap with the seal just below the stanchion to get at the foam ring that lubricates the post. Basically you use a strap wrench to unscrew the main but. However, I found that the foam ring was completely bone dry!!!! Raceface had not bothered to lubricate the post at all during assembly. The entire purpose of a foam ring is to hold a lubricant (P10L grease as recommended by 9point8, although I used slick honey) and yet they hadn't lubricated it. After lubricting the whole assembly the problem instantly went away and I found the post required much less air pressure for the same return speed, which meant I could use the recommended 20-40 psi, I ended up using around 30-35 in the end.

I did the same procedure on my other post, which was returned to me from Raceface after they told me they couldn't find a problem with it. They used one of their own saddles and could not replicate the noise, in their own words. Every one of my colleagues at the bike shop I work at agrees with me that that level of noise is unacceptable, and Raceface denies the probem even existed and did nothing to solve it or to recommend a solution. To no surprise I found the foam ring in that post had no form of lubrication either.

To date I have installed 6 or 7 turbine posts fresh out of the box and not one of them had any lubrication at the main nut seal to keep them operating smoothly and silently.

I am very happy with my purchase however, and believe this is one of the more durable posts on the market, in terms of the droploc mechanism, even if it requires a little more maintenance than others at the seal, which is actually a very easy service to carry out yourself. Just make sure you let the air out first.

My name is Dan and I am the warehouse manager at Revolution Cycle in Edmonton. If you have any questions you want me to answer, you can contact me at the shop at 780-996-1890.
  • + 1
 Thank you for your post Dan. I Thin I have same problem. The creaking noise drove me nuts! Before I knew what the problem was I changed the bearings, pivot bolts, greased the suspension bolts, shorten the cable (thought cable was hitting inside down tube), cracked frame. I installed my old non dropper seat post and the noise went away! I will work on the post as what you recommend and hopefully it will work. Apart from the noise the post is really good.
  • + 1
 @Satn69: I'll bet you have the same problem, it should go away with a little lube. Cheers.
  • + 8
 Sounds like Raceface couldn't hold the tolerance tight enough on the internal diameter of the tube the brake works on while 9point8 has no problem doing that. However, 9point8's superior manufacturing takes more time so there's a wait list for their posts. My advice: Plan in advance and get on that wait list. My two 9point8s have been faultless for 7 months now.
  • + 2
 You can buy it from the germans (Bike24), it's in stock.
  • + 6
 Wish Pinkbike would start reviewing products more professional - that means, review more than one product at once, review products by the same rider and under the same conditions, instead of having some dude riding a part for 3 months in the woods. My turbine post works just fine!
  • + 5
 I supposedly have a 9point8 on order but waiting over 2 months and now its the middle of summer so I am not holding my breath for it. It would appear that although RF licensed the design from 9Point8, they went and used their own materials, different manufacturer, etc. Can anyone confirm if that is indeed true? seems a bit backwards that a major brand cant get the details sorted better then the small outfit. It frustrating because I want a dropper (I wear my Chromag seat QR out!) but not willing to pay a ton of money for something that seems pretty much guaranteed to break
  • + 1
 I waited and waited, about 2 months, and they finally called and said my post was ready. I had the air pressure to high on the first ride and it came up to quick and slipped down a few times. I lowered the pressure and it seems to work well now. However it does slide down every once in a while. I just fully extend then it starts to work well again. Squeaks every up and down though. A little annoying, but works better than my old reverb. Have to wait and see how it holds up in the long run. The seat rail attachment on the 9point8 is really great and looks much better than this.
  • + 3
 @Telebikes: Gotta adjust your cable at the set screw thing. Plus/Minus 1 millimeter makes all the difference. I had same issue until i did this, now the 9point8 is simple out of this world.
  • + 3
 @CantClimb: agreed. That initial setup for the 9point8 is key
  • + 2
 @CantClimb: totally. I adjusted my seat by a few mm and it started dropping on it's own. Barrel adjuster fixed it quick.
  • + 6
 You are better off getting the 9point8 unit. It can be ordered with whatever remote you want, and it has better reliability / quality control.

It doesn't have the righteous dude factor of raceface though.
  • + 4
 When I bought my bike, I asked if they could put the Raceface on it cause I wanted the newest greatest of course. He strongly advised me against it and pointed me towards the Thompson instead. After reading this review, it makes me thankful. Also makes me more wary of getting anything from that whole conglomerate.
  • + 4
 You usually dont need to ride with knees at ear level because u can just raise the post in the seattube if u have enough cable. Believe me i have gotten used to it with my reverb (#7 now).
  • + 3
 The RaceFace and Easton that I owned both failed within 2 weeks of use. I know we give Crankbrothers a lot of crap for their terribly low quality products on Pinkbike, but holy cow these things have been finicky garbage. I don't even think I'll be able to sell them successfully after getting the warranties back.
  • + 0
 I will give ya $75usd for your raceface/easton dropper warranty return.

If ya give my $25 I will take your crank bros stuff to the recycling bin for ya.
  • + 1
 @onemind123: Haha, I'll consider it.
  • + 3
 LOL so my $530 dropper (with the right remote that should have been the standard from the beginning) requires an adjustment before every ride per the manufacturer? That's insane, I'll go ahead and pay half the price for a Fox Transition and save exactly $200 for a more reliable, better dropper.
  • + 3
 I've had my RF Turbine post for 6 months now, and so far so good. I initially ran it with a KS Southpaw lever, and whilst it worked ok, it didnt quite have the correct cable pull ratio so was a bit stiff. I too dropped the air pressure to around 20-25, and so far its been absolutely faultless. Could not recommend this post enough!
  • + 2
 I was so happy to ditch the Reverb that I bought a Turbine for each of two bikes. One has been flawless for 6 months, haven't touched it and I love it. The other has been nothing but problems. I finally sent it back because it won't hold air. It's been a month and I haven't heard anything. The aftermarket lever should be stock, it is far superior ergonomically.
  • + 2
 I've had one for about 3 months now. Initial set up requires detail, which is fine. It's actually a little counter intuitive to deliberately have slight play in the cable, but that's actually what allows the brake to engage. So set up cable slacker than shift cables and it works fine. However, just this week I have noticed the pressure/weight required to drop post has increased. Return has slowed down too, which makes me think there is some sort of stiction issue? Anyone else experiencing this. Resistance up and down, but full extension still ok, no slipping though.
  • + 1
 Had mine for 2 months now, and works great. Solid with no play. Agreed you just need to set the slack in the cable and all's good.
  • + 3
 I noticed the action on mine did change a bit after the first few rides. Like stated in the article it started off with a very very fast return, so I lowered the air pressure. After the post seemed to settle into its mechanical action, I imagine from break in etc, it slowed down a bit. So I added a couple of PSI to it, I think I'm running about 25 PSI? After that no issues at all! I think that some people have a problem reading directions. Having a little bit of cable slack is key to getting the post to work properly. Im guessing the break is sensitive and needs to have that bit of wiggle room to work properly. So far so good for me! And the remote!!!!!! So much better than anything else out there! People gripe about a $60 remote?! Are you freaking kidding me?! Thats less than most parts you can add on to a mountain bike these days. Its also something you use many many times throughout a ride so why not spend the money on it?! I went to the RF dropper mostly for the remote, I cannot stand Rock Shocks offering. Looks like a ball point pen clicker.
  • + 2
 @JDFF I wonder if the brake isn't fully disengaging? that might be an explanation for why they work fine out of the box, but start having issues, if the brake is dragging on every drop, that's going to increase wear quite a bit.

Maybe try adding a couple of clicks of cable tension via the barrel adjust & see if it gets easier? report back here if you do, I'm super curious if that's what's going on.
  • + 1
 With out seeing the post this sounds like the bushings might be getting dry, try dripping some light oil or chain lube past the upper lip seal and see if that improve the performance.
  • + 2
 @groghunter: will report back. Riding now. Post working. Report to follow.
  • + 3
 Just throw a lick of slick honey (or some other light grease) on the post and push down, this drags some lube past the dust seal. Wipe off excess and you're good to go!
  • + 2
 @raceface: Yep that worked like a charm. I used a little Tri Flow and wiped off excess. Thanks.
  • + 2
 I also figured out that I had a bunch of dry soil packed in the barrel adjuster at the noodle. The cable was moving freely, but adjustment on barrel adjuster was limited. Got that cleaned out and now have 75% adjustability at barrel. Which helps dial in the perfect amount of "slack" cable tension. This with a little Tri-Flow on post/dust seal has it working as good as new. Completely acceptable amount of minor maintenance for 3 months of use. Thank goodness!
  • + 1
 *75% more adjustability, which is now 100%.
  • + 1
 @JDFF: Just to confirm, did you do a brake reset, or no?
  • + 3
 @raceface: This is EXACTLY what 9point8 tells you NOT to do as the oil might get into the brake assembly. Their own website says if you have to use something in a pinch use wax lube.
  • + 1
 @cogsci: Well we'll see what happens. It is plausible that 9point8 uses different materials that have a more adverse reaction to oils. I'm not say that is the case, but it's plausible. I know the parts are the same configuration , I'm just talking materials. If it works out to be fine, then we'll know what justifies the retail price differenceWink
  • + 2
 Had my Easton post for 2 months. No problems so far and I'm very pleased with it. Yes the initial set up was a touch tricky, but their YouTube video explains it all really well. In my experience all dropper posts are a gamble. So I'll just wait and see how long this one lasts.
  • + 3
 Mine lasted about 4 months.. Was losing air from the onset. They have warrantied it with a brand new one. Probably just gonna sell it. WTF is this such a difficult technology to master?
  • + 1
 I've found that buying spare schrader valve cores from auto stores and replacing them has solved air loss issues in one of my forks ('08 reba with the separate pos-neg schrader valves) and my x-fusion hilo sl dropper (slow air leak from day one). Always worth a try, and valve core tool is always worth having around for tubeless tire setups. Sometimes you can just tighten the valve a little bit and not even replace it.
  • + 6
 Exactly. As I write this, I'm sitting in a once fancy, 17 year old La-Z-Boy office chair that has a pneumatic lift that's never failed. Might even be hydraulic, but I do know, it needs no maintenance or attention. Granted, I'm not sitting out in a rainy jungle or riding it down a mountain but it shouldn't be too hard to design a dropper post that's reliable.
  • + 1
 @eric-t-rudd: The air leak wasn't the only issue..( And not one I want to fix myself on a new product( I put up with it until the actuation/locking in position started to get shitty. The post would not stay down at the worst times. I've got a fox Transition on order, hopefully its better than my reverb and the turbine.
  • + 1
 @kingsx: that's why i'm leaning toward the thomson offering for my next dropper, uses a fully sealed cartridge unit like an office chair. giant does too, maybe others idk
  • + 0
 They rely on tighter tolerance stack ups than most bike companies are used to dealing with. Send the request to UTAS or M-B-D and get a $5k post that will never fail because nobody understands this sort of technology better. But when it comes to bike component companies, they aren't at the leading edge of manufacturing my any measurable metric. 9.8 is a local outfit that does it all in house, in smaller quantities, and as such has better quality control and process control. Start outsourcing everything and relying on your tolerance stacks and this is what you get.
  • + 1
 Good honest review! For this price point you'd expect better! Raceface has to do some fine tuning to make this post perfect and to really let it stand out from the rest of market. I'll be sticking with my tried and true 9point8. Can't go wrong with the genius guys that gave Raceface their patented technology Wink
  • + 1
 Same thing happened to the first turbine we got. What even more funny is I sent it in for warranty and they said there was nothing wrong and sent it back after 3 weeks. Told me I had the tension wrong which is weird because when it was away I ordered another hooked it up to old lever and cable that was still in bike and it works fine.
  • + 1
 I've had this dropper for a few months now and I also started to noticed it slipping when the seat was raised only a few inches. I took it apart an adjusted the cable (maybe it stretched a little?) and also adjusted the air pressure while I was at it. After that it has been functioning great again. Overall I'm satisfied so far but will be saving this article in case I need to reset the brake or do the equalization thing.
  • + 1
 The details on the reset procedure were good, but the equalization procedure was just a mention? What are the steps on that? UPDATE: NM, just figured it out.

Clearly this seat post does this for everyone.

Don't you just love paying for expensive junk? I'm look at you, SRAM Eagle Drive Train.
  • + 5
 Us$479...no thanks...prefer 2 gravity droppers for this price.
  • + 1
 Gawdayum...!
I believe this is the first time I've read a Pinkbike review(especially on a heavy-advertising client) that called it the way they actually saw it, i.e. the product had problems and it was called out for it.
FWIW, PB, I wholeheartedly agree. A part should work without the need to perform maintenance on it before EVERY ride.
Ever since the first dropper I bought(actually came with a Trek Slash)- SRAM Reverb- took a dump for no reason necessitating replacement, I've been using KS Levs on all my bikes and haven't had any problems whatsoever. I don't even remember having to add or remove air. Heck, I don't even know if they use air, I'm just assuming it because of the mechanical cable.
Anyway, Race Face owes it to their customers who've purchased their -first run- dropper to do a voluntary recall to sort out the problem. They[sure as hell better] know what the problem is, and one would think they'd want all of their products out in the world performing as they should. After all, the best/worst kind of marketing is how your products work in the real world.
  • + 1
 Dropper posts. Every company is jumping on the latest trend to make some money. Companies R+D and long term testing is appalling! Just about every post on the market is failing and sounds like some warranties aren't being met either. Sure they're fantastic when working but the price they cost is rediculous when compared to other components. Ive said it before that a top shelf dropper costs roughly 2/3 price of latest suspension forks! Ive had a reverb sh@t itself. Ive had a Lev sh@t itself. I usually have praise for race face on a whole but it sounds like its overpriced non reliable and not long term tested enough. Surprise surprise. Looks suspiciously like the easton dropper too so is it generic to both companies? (Dont know if both companies are tied in together!?!)
On a positive note i do hear many good things about the 9point8! ..........might be worth a look. ?
  • + 6
 Raaceface bought Easton cycling in 2014, not long after that the two where purchased by FOX. The Turbine post and the Haven post are the same unit with different branding, IF YOU want to try a 9point8 this raceface/easton offering uses the same internals inside which means you'd likely encounter the same issues with either,

I handle the warranty at my local shop and see countless dropper isssues. So far (knock on wood) I have yet to see any of the raceface/easton/9point8 posts that we've come back with problems. ALL of the ones that have been returned to us have been home-installations. I suspect that incorrect initial set up results in the brake not functioning as designed after a period of time leading to problems like the reviewer encountered.

I recently got off the reverb train and BOUGHT a giant conect post (I do NOT work for a giant dealer). I did so because it is teh least expensive post available & it is dirt simple to maintain. There is no need to send it in to a service center when it stops working. One simply removes a cartridge and installs a new one. When the bontrager post is released I'll likely get one of those (I suspect it will be very similar in design to giant based on info / pictured released).
  • + 1
 @ajax-ripper: now thats some great information mate. Thankyou. Ive been interested in the giant post too as I've heard about the easy fix solution! I assumed there was a connection between race face and easton. I didnt know bontrager were doing one. You sounded like it was worth looking at . Thanks eh!
  • + 1
 I’ve read through all these comments and problems and I’ve come up with a solution that might work for some people who are having problems with their dropper post. Having used some uplift I discovered that the seat would not stay up or down. I tried doing a re-set, slackened off the cable, even took the cable out of the trigger unit but the seat would not lock in any position. I had to do the descent with the saddle fully up, which was quite disconcerting, unless I actually sat on it. When I got home and removed the seat post I realised that the post had been pushed too far down the seat tube (on a medium YT capra the Seat post cannot go all the way down), and had kinked the cable which had to go up the seat tube to exit out of the frame. Thus the friction was preventing the brake from engaging. This was all fairly obvious and not a fault of the tube but of installation. I had to replace both inner and outer cables and carefully followed the video instructions on the race face site. After this, the seat post works perfectly. Then after a few weeks another more subtle problem arrived: the seat was fine fully extended (although this is too tall for me to pedal comfortably), but would slip in any other position. Neither would it stay down but gradually come up. When I removed the post I could see the cable was slightly twisted and bent. I refitted the post, pushing it down to the point when the cable comes out of the frame, held the cable and then pulled the post up a bit to give a bit of tension on ththe cable and make sure there were no kinks or bends as it went into the frame and up to the post. On my bike this means the collar on the tube is a couple of centimetres above the top of the seat tube. After this, the seat post worked perfectly. It seems that any friction caused by the cable routing, causing any tension on the inner cable will mean that the brake cannot engage properly, causing all sort of problems. I have seen nothing from raceface about this, which may explain why posts have been returned having found nothing wrong. This is a problem of internal routing of cables, which may look neat, but one has no idea what is going on inside the frame. I hope this may help some folk resolve the problems they have been having.
  • + 1
 I have a TMars (Quattro Sports) dropper post. It was £60, and i have been running it for 2 years. In that time i have replaced the cable and rebuilt it myself once using basic tools. It works all the time, everytime. It's a bit ugly, and is limited with its 90mm drop but i'd rather have that than pay £200-£300 for a post that is going to spend most it's time broken or breaking. If mine did break, i can get spares online or just replace it for another one for the same cost as a Reverb service.
  • + 1
 It'd be hard to be a constant early adopter especially in MTB. Justifying money spent on components not yet tested in the open market. I would usually make a point to never buy the first of anything. Sounds like RF is most of the way there just some minor tweaking needed.
  • + 2
 It uses technology thats been used for a while in the 9point8 dropper so it should be functioning well by now. I know droppers all seem to have their issues but this seems like a glaring concern
  • + 5
 Raceface has been in the game for 20 some years now.

9point8 is the new guy.

I love RF gear, but this sounds like a miss.

And BTW, Raceface has a big name backer (owner) called Easton.
  • + 2
 @ecrider: he means with dropper posts.. this is RF/ easton first go.. 9.8 have had heirs out for a bit and has a great reputation..
  • + 2
 @ecrider: Easton does not own race face. Fox (well Fox's parent company) owns RaceFace and Easton.

Race Face's owners bought Easton's cycling division and then Fox bought RaceFace and Easton.
  • + 6
 $600.00 CDN.
holy fak
  • + 1
 Funny that Race Face finally decided to leave me a message yesterday to check in with me about my warrantied post! First time throughout the 8 week warranty process they made any attempt to contact me. Wonder if this article had anything to do with it? haha
  • + 1
 The 1st Haven failed on me after two weeks of riding (sudden loss of air and brake malfunction). After ~6 weeks of warranty process, they sent me a replacement. The 2nd Haven failed less than 2 months later (sudden loss of air and brake malfunction). It is going back again. This time, UC is sending me a replacement instantly - a Fox Transfer. RF know they have a dud on their hands.

The post is quite nice when it works even if the access to the air valve is a total PITA (it's too deep, I cannot remove the cap without pliers), the saddle clamp still sheds metal shavings when tightening the bolts, and saddle has been slipping back in the clamp. No fore/aft play, no creaking. The remote is a total PITA though and I used a Southpaw instead. The required slack in the cable makes the remote rattle a lot - not for the OCD people among us.
  • + 0
 Stay away from this post. Check out the MTBR thread (this is the same model as the Easton Haven). I sent mine back after it started losing pressure... 4 weeks later I receive the replacement and they sent me the wrong length post (I had a 150 and they sent me a 125). Not sure when I'll get the right post back.

I'm really not sure what's going on with Easton/Race Face right now but it doesn't appear to be good. I'm hoping they turn it around.
  • + 1
 Mine has worked great so far! With heavy use for 3 months! Feels better than the reverb it replaced, with a much more user friendly lever and the setup was pretty straightforward as well.
  • + 3
 My 3 week old post doesn't keep it's pressure longer then 3 days . Not impressed
  • + 0
 Sorry you are having issues. Please have your shop contact our customer service and we will get you sorted out.
  • + 0
 Finicky set up and reset before every ride? No one needs or wants that. Get it right before you put it out there if you want people to take a chance on it. If the few that go out to experienced reviewers how bad will it be when they go to mass market?
  • + 1
 Purchased a Turbine post, spent a frustrating amount of hours getting it to work properly on initial instal, and then within a week it wouldn't hold air pressure. Right back to the KS and Reverb standbys.
  • + 2
 Well crap. Now what do I get?
KS: randomly reliable
RS: don't like it


I need 150mm, so that excludes quite a few options.
  • + 5
 fox transfer
  • + 7
 What about 9point8? Don't they have a 150 option?
  • + 2
 9point8 Fox Thompson Giant
  • + 4
 @Yuley95:
9.8: same thing as this and harder to get
Thomson, Giant, Crankbrothers: not avail in 150mm

Thinking I'll take a gamble with the Fox. Priced better. Are they available yet?
  • + 7
 9point8 Fall Line, no brainer
  • + 1
 @IamZOSO: there back-ordered everywhere, but the factory one is mint in person, and so far, far better than my old reverb. RF is overpriced
  • + 2
 YEP Components Uptimizer. Seriously nice dropper. It's basically a Reverb done right and packaged in Swiss precision. Oh, and it comes without a stupid hydraulic remote.
  • + 1
 @IamZOSO: I just got an email from UniversalCycles.com, they have 2. And with the vip15 coupon its only $322.15 with remote. Go man go!
  • + 1
 @SteveDekker: Thanks but guess I was just barely too late. Good Karma points for you regardless.
  • + 2
 @raceface if you can hear me! 200mm dropper posts are a thing! I know you can do it!
  • + 1
 You must be tall!
  • + 0
 Absolute fucking GARBAGE. KS Integra all day. The valve is frustrating inaccessible. The cable attachment is difficult to replace. Noodle is always in the way. Srsly don't buy this POS.
  • + 1
 Nice review! Too bad that it's not at 100% as I like raceface. Dropper posts seem to be a very hard technology to master, I wonder why?
  • + 1
 I had suspicions right from the start that friction-based actuation of the post would be prone to issues. Kronolog, anyone?

Holding my breath for long-term Highline reviews.
  • + 2
 ehhhh, that's a little unfair, mechanical brakes like these use are a fairly proven concept, used in other industries. This is an implementation problem(which is why the 9point8 made ones aren't having issues.)

The kronolog, OTOH, had the brilliant concept of using a sharp steel piece against an aluminum post... & expecting no wear. I'm actually surprised nobody snapped a kronolog due to weakness from wear, though maybe none of them kept working long enough for that to happen.
  • + 3
 Can you show a pic of the stock remote on the handlebar?
  • + 1
 I have one since march and actually had no reliability problems with it. The only annoyance is that it's finicky when it comes to cable tension.
  • + 2
 Again ! 9.8 fall line FTW..
  • + 1
 Good read for a laugh. ill never own one. But all the failures from every brand is very amusing!
  • + 1
 Agreed, thank you for the honest review PB! glad to see that these reviews are really not just masked adverts.
  • + 1
 Great review. I've had issues in the beginning but did the reset thing 5 times and it is working. Not 100% maybe 98%
  • + 1
 "We reviewed a post that is the exact same as two others on the market; only different!"
  • + 0
 My RASE seat post has worked perfect for 5 years . Up to 9" of travel .

The head moves so they went out of business .

That movement has no effect on riding .
  • + 2
 This is actually a 9.8 fall line dropper post, isn't it?
  • + 2
 Dammnn that's a lot of soft serve icecreams right there
  • + 1
 Is that Australia's new monetary system? Are you guys still using dollarydoos?
  • + 1
 9.8 is made in Canada, RF and Easton clones are made in Asia probably with inferior materials and quality control.
  • + 1
 My post lasted three rides until it lost air pressure and the brake started acting up.
  • + 1
 i have already sent the $460.00 easton version of this dropper off for service. It has had issues since day one..
  • + 1
 This might be their tipping point..
  • + 0
 Well if its Raceface you know its trash! Very sad; they used to make such nice stuff.
  • + 0
 This review really highlights the ups and downs
  • + 1
 They need to raise the quality and drop the price before I'd consider racing to the store to buy one
  • + 0
 My opinion of Race Face is slipping.
  • + 1
 I think they might be Facing some quality issues on their Racing products.
  • + 2
 @preston67: Punny because the post slips if you don't reset it every ride! Big Grin
  • + 0
 No puns?
  • + 0
 It would appear this post doesn't have any fans.
  • - 1
 Would ya look at that..... It's a Rubber Boobie!!!!!
  • - 2
 Thanks for posting.

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.108111
Mobile Version of Website