SRAM X01 Drivetrain - Review

Apr 16, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Magura TS8 eLECT
Our X01 review group has seen snow, mud, rain, dust, and loads of miles, all aboard our Rocky Mountain Element rolling test bed.


SRAM's 11 speed, single ring X01 drivetrain starts at $1,273 USD for a complete group, which makes its advertised catalog price just a few hundred dollars less than the top tier XX1 group, a fact that's hard to make sense of until you consider how that savings is multiplied at the OEM level. Simply put, an X01 spec'd bike is going to be appreciably less expensive than a comparable machine equipped with XX1, and that could add up to either quite a bit more savings on the retail price of the complete bike, or mean that said bike comes equipped with noticeable upgrades like a dropper post or better tires as stock equipment. But how does X01 differ from XX1? The answer lies in streamlined manufacturing processes that save time, and we all know that time is money. Machining and finishing details throughout the group add up to only the slightest of weight penalties, with the cassette weighing just fifteen grams more, the derailleur ten grams, and the cranks only five. All told, there is only 30 - 40 gram difference between the two groups. Regardless of the minor weight differences in the individual components, all of the same technology employed in XX1 has been put to use in X01. Both the chain rings and pulley wheels feature X-Sync teeth, the $269 USD derailleur is an X-Horizon unit that sees a carbon cage and Type 2 clutch, and the same 'Zero Loss Engagement' cable pull system is used within the $139 USD shifter, albeit finished off with an aluminum cover instead of the carbon piece on XX1. The biggest visual difference is found at the $399 USD cassette, with it sporting a black finish compared to the silver XX1 block. SRAM has said that going with this finish has allowed them to save money during manufacturing, and the cassette is otherwise exactly the same as the XX1 unit. The other point to keep in mind is that the carbon X01 crankset uses a 94mm BCD spider that allows for 'ring sizes down to 30 teeth to be used, unlike the 76mm BCD spider on the XX1 crank that allows a smaller 28 tooth ring to be fitted. While the carbon crank arms themselves are identical, there are machining differences in the spider and 'rings, as well as in the crank's finish, which set it apart. A ceramic bottom bracket also comes stock with XX1, while X01 gets a stainless steel unit, and a narrower Q-factor is possible with the XX1 arms as well. An aluminum X01 crankset could be an aftermarket option in the future, with it being initially offered only as original equipment on complete bikes.

Mondraker Dune Photo by Colin Meagher
We've sampled the X01 drivetrain on at least a dozen different test bikes by now, including Mondraker's Dune XR while in Sedona, Arizona.


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesSo, now that we've put eight months worth of riding on a single X01 drivetrain, as well as a countless miles on test bikes that are spec'd with SRAM's lower priced 11 speed group, it's fair to say that we've got a good understanding of how the system performs. The time has shown that it would be quite difficult, maybe even near impossible, to tell the difference between XX1 and X01 in a blind test. ''Lever action is crisp and positive, just as we've come to expect from SRAM, with a very tactile feel to the shifter that leaves no doubt as to what just happened at the back of the bike,'' were our exact words in the May, 2013, review of XX1, and those also ring very true with X01. Shift action feels identical to our thumbs, as does shift speed across the cassette, and reliability has also been up to par. Having said that, we did have an X01 derailleur's clutch fail on a test bike, but our go-to drivetrain for review purposes has given us nary a hint of trouble. Chain retention has been impressive, with just two dropped chains over the last eight months that we put down to excessively muddy conditions and insanely sticky goop that managed to pack into every nook and cranny - we would have likely had to stop to clean out the mud from any drivetrain, it was that bad. The basis for getting the most from both XX1 and X01 will be choosing the correct chain ring to use - be honest with your abilities while picking a chain ring size that makes sense for both how you ride and the terrain that you spend most of their time on. Too big of a ring will result in tired legs, but going too small will have you spinning circles while you go nowhere slowly.

Given how close XX1 and X01 are when talking details, it's no surprise that the few complaints that we have about the higher priced group are also present with X01. This includes how the X-Sync tooth profile used on both the chain ring and the pulley wheels is prone to picking up more trail debris than a traditional design, and it wasn't uncommon to see more gunk than usual packed onto on both during a wet ride. We also experienced the same odd popping noise that would occur intermittently and only during high torque scenarios, once or twice a ride at most. The sound only occurs when the chain is on the large 42 tooth cog and while powering up a steep incline, something that has us thinking that it's a result of the chain interfacing with the thicker and heavily stepped X-Sync chain ring teeth while at the acute range of the chain line. There were, however, no mechanical issues related to it. While the previous two complaints are minor in the grand scheme of things, we also had issues with the chain staying in time with derailleur's X-Sync upper pulley, and the result of its alternating narrow and wide teeth not meshing with the chain being a rough, grinding feeling through the pedals. The reason for this isn't 100 percent clear, but the size of the gap between the upper pulley and the cassette is likely a factor, as is how a bike's suspension reacts to inputs, but the bottom line is that we had it happen to us on the large majority of both XX1 and X01 equipped machines. It's a quick fix: shifting to a smaller cog and then back up to an easier gear solves the issue in a few seconds, but it's strange nonetheless.

SRAM's 11 speed XX1 and X01 groups are, as of right, the only purpose built single chain ring groups on the market, and the two drivetrains do a lot of things very well. As we talked about above, it's vital to choose the chain ring that best suits your fitness, terrain, and riding style, and doing that will allow you to climb and descend pretty much anything with ease. The bottom line is that X01 works every bit as well as XX1, and while it might only appear to be only marginally less expensive on paper, you have to remember that the newest 11 speed group is really intended to save money at the manufacturing level, which is then hopefully passed on to the consumer in the form of either a lower price tag on the complete bike or add-ons like a dropper seat post or nicer wheels.
- Mike Levy



196 Comments

  • 162 13
 Wow only $1,273 for a drive train? Ill stick to my 10 speed with the narrow wide. Thanks though, nice try.
  • 92 7
 Agreed. 1x10, clutch RD, and narrow-wide is the way to go. Save your hard earned money for bike trips!
  • 49 1
 And you can even get a 42t cog for that 1x10 for $100 if you wanted
  • 17 3
 Don't forget your 42t wolftooth.
  • 9 2
 Yep. XO type 2 RD and a RaceFace narrow wide ring on Atlas cranks for my bike. had one dropped chain in 2 years, and only after getting banged up in a rock garden.
  • 15 63
flag Im-not-very-clever (Apr 16, 2014 at 22:37) (Below Threshold)
 1x11 making weak riders, one bike at a time
  • 17 5
 Hoping shimano Sees the 1up and wolf tooth options and just makes a wide range 10 speed cassette so we don't see a new standard of 1x11. SRAM needs to dial it back a cog.
  • 11 11
 Accidental + prop on the 1x11 weak rider comment. 1x for life! Man up!!!!
  • 24 1
 So, you could spend £1200 on a 1x11 drivetrain, or around £200 (maybe a bit less or more) on a good 1x10 system w/42t cog, and then have £1000 to spend on something else, you could buy a good wheel set and a set of Pikes for that?!
  • 1 0
 Agree in principle @Joshirwin1406, I too run 1x10 with 42t ring but think you may have your numbers wrong based upon $ £ currency difference
  • 3 0
 I got xx1 and set of dp pikes for £1200
  • 1 1
 Ahh, yeah. Would probably be a noticeable difference in currency change! Funny thing is, the 11spd cassettes costs around £269ish for the cheapest model, that would fund a whole Shimano Zee drivetrain, and a 40/42t cog!
  • 2 0
 I think 11 speed XTR is hinting that won't happen, @taletotell. Frown
  • 18 0
 Wow!, some people was running raceface narrow wide for years!, even before it was released...
  • 2 0
 xtr 1x11 fits on a ten speed free hub body! but I'm rocking a narrow wide 1 x 10 and hope makes a 40t adapter for high end cassettes. might be my next purchase.
  • 3 3
 Yeah, the price is overkill I think we can all agree to that. They are making these for the elite as well as the rich to make up a pretty penny before the price for it gets lower in the years to come.

Yes, you can get a 42T cog for $80-$100 from different companies but you're still at a 1x10 system. Not 1x11 which is what the SRAM does. Shimano having released their 1x11, 2x11, and even 3x11 is super expensive as well and also is proprietary.

So do what I do and wait. For now my 1x10 drivetrain (Raceface NW) is perfect for me so I don't see a desperate need to get to a 1x11 any time soon.
  • 6 0
 @LiquidSpin, what on the Shimano DT is proprietary, other than the chainrings? You can just run it with any crank other than the XTR one (your current crank with a RF or wolftooth) and then nothing is proprietary. At least Shimano kept the cassette on the same freehub body. That's the extra piece of the cost picture that's not included in the insane $1300 SRAM pricetag. IMO the shimano will start to become a much more viable aftermarket option for that reason.
  • 8 1
 If you had to a buy a XO 2x drivetrain group minus brakes you would still be spending 800+ so considering the xo1 group could be had for $900 it a amazing price.

You guys are comparing the fact that you can go 1x with just about anything x5,x7 slx zee. Xo1 it a high level group and should really only be compared to competitive groups . Xo 2x , xtr and possibly xt .

It's also easier and "cheaper " to go 1x if you already own a 2x10 drivetrain . Most guy just added a clutch ( if they didn't already have one ) and a NW chainring .
  • 17 1
 You guys are too funny!!! About 7 years ago, people were saying there is no reason for 9 speed, as 8 speed was good enough. Then 10 speed came along and people complained about it as 9 speed was plenty of gears. Now that 11 speed is coming along, everyone is saying the 10 speed is all we need. Drivetrains are not meant to be an upgrade. Its not money well spent. They make sense when building a new bike, or buying a complete bike.
  • 4 1
 The argument isn't that people don't want an 1x11 setup. The argument is that people don't want to spend what Sram is charging for a 1x11 drivetrain. People are willing to go without the extra gear when they can use their existing components and pay less than $200 to upgrade. Just look at the comments waiting for Shimano to release a cheaper solution to compete with Sram. The market is there, but for the average person the components will need to be cheaper first.
  • 6 0
 Willie1 - I rode a hardtail last summer with 8 speed gearing and thought the range was plenty (when used with an FD). 9 speed is fine too. The only reason most people add more gears in back is because the bike industry comes out with some new feature that's actually useful (like a clutch mechanism) and holds us hostage to the larger gearing range by not offering it for perfectly functional 8 or 9 speed systems.

The same is now happening with wide range cassettes for 1x drivetrains. I think it's pretty neat to see these big cogs coming out, allowing consumers to opt against SRAM and Shimano's notion that we need to spend $1000 for this useful feature.

I agree that 1x11 makes sense for OEM sales and the price for the groupset is not that different than high-end 2x10 grouppos. But for people who already have 9 or 10 speed drivetrains, having more gears in back is not a compelling reason to upgrade.
  • 3 0
 I have no problems with the cheaper solutions. XTR is expensive, as is Chorus, XX, and Red. Really, the performance difference between SLX and XTR is quite small, as is the difference between X9 and XX. Its possible to make a watered down 1x11 with a conventional cassette in 10 speed, but the cost to manufacture the current cassette can't be scaled down. Apples to oranges again. Maybe in a couple years with 3d printing, but not with current tools. I am still running some Truvativ Noir cranks and it makes no sense to change them to current XO, or XX. I may get a narrow/wide for them and try it out. If I did a new build, I would use my existing crank, and go with the 11 speed in the rear. I still have a few bikes running 2x9 and it would be a waste of money to upgrade them. This level of upgrade is really meant for OEM, or affluent people doing full bling builds.
  • 1 0
 There is a cheaper solution .

One up makes one so does
Wolfstooth ,E13 etc...

The new xtr and x01/ xx1 were designed for racers in mind . Which is why they were applied to the higher end groups .

They're both hitting their target audience .
  • 1 0
 I have the One Up and I'm running an XX rear mech , they said I didn't need the longer limit screw but I'm not having luck
setting it up , it's hitting the inside edge of the cage , I think I can file down the edge but don't really want to modify it if I don't have to
Anyone else had this problem ????
  • 1 0
 Chuckbike - I had that problem with my XT setup and 42t cog. The longer b-limit screw did the trick. You need a 25 mm M4 screw. I got one locally at a specialty fastener store. Whether you need the longer b-limit screw or not likely depends somewhat on the geometry of your derailleur hanger. Some bikes will need it while others won't.
  • 1 0
 Do think the brand of the new gear makes a difference? I asked a race face guy on face book when they posted their new stuff yesterday and he said the XX wouldn't work with theirs for some reason , I would assume they're all kinda the same
Thanks for the heads up , much appreciated
  • 1 0
 I think the issue with the XX cassette is that the smaller 9 cogs are machined from a single piece of steel, similar to how the XX1 and X01 cassettes are made. As a result, you can't pull out a cog from the middle of the cassette to make room for the big cog. This has some compatibility info that likely applies to big cogs from any manufacturer: www.oneupcomponents.com/pages/compatibility. There may be some variance between brands though so do your homework.
  • 1 0
 I'm running a pg-1050 with the XX rear mech.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303 Hmmm, I thought there were more proprietary parts. I remember reading something about you having to use a special type of chain as well. You couldn't just use an old XTR or XT rear derailleur with the new cassette as well. I could be wrong though.
  • 1 0
 @LiquidSpin well drivetrain components are never compatible across different speeds (at least not without some fudging)... 8sp, 9sp, and 10sp already have all their own chains, shifters, and derailleurs because pull ratios and cassette spacings have to match. But they're not 'proprietary' cuz you can just bolt them onto any frame/hub hardware. The Shimano DT can be used with all standard frame and hub parts, whereas the SRAM requires a specific hub. In a few years you'll be able to mix and match XTR, XT, and SLX 11sp hardware (probably), and you'll be able to do it all on your current wheelset.
  • 2 0
 I was a pooh pooh-er as well. Until I bought a 2014 bike model and decided to give the 1x11 a shot. It really does shift better and work well. And yes, it is super tempermental. I wouldn't go so far as to retrofit other bikes with the whole set up, but I do enjoy 1x11 and would probably seek the drivetrain out on future models... BIG CAVEAT As long as the bike doesn't come equipped with avid's complete shitbag elixir brake system.
  • 46 2
 Having run XX1 for a year and then recently a narrow wide and big cog combo on a different bike I see no reason to spend an obscene amount of money on a 1x11 ever again.
  • 4 1
 Good to hear. I am glad at the number of other options that are now becoming available for cheaper, and since the 1x11 isn't worth it maune companies will reign in the silly ideas and actually innovate.
  • 3 0
 Same here, run one bike with XX1 and one with sram 10speed with hope 40 tooth and raceface fat thin, the 10 speed runs better in mud and generally changes as well as the XX1.
  • 4 0
 Got to agree with you mikekay. XX1 is okay but far from perfect. The cable tension is very fickle, needing constant adjustment and the performance in the mud is nothing on my XTR 10 speed
  • 6 0
 It's amazing how many people run their own customised setup and like it more than XX1 / X01. The big companies need to listen to the people!
My trail bike setup is:
Zee shadow + rear mech, race face wide narrow chainring bolted to XT Cranks, 11-36 XT Cassette, XT shifter.
It climbs, it decends, It's light, it shifts perfectly, it looks clean, I've dropped one chain in 12 months.
Oh and it's $800 cheaper ............
  • 2 0
 I did the same cept i have a saint shifter and it shifts faster than xx1, i think 1x10 is def better then 1x11 i might move the rear mech to my dh bike and get xt so i could add a big ring but for most stuff there 11-36 cassette works fine with a 32 t narrow wide ring
  • 1 0
 Cool to hear from people who have tried both XX1 and a 1x10 NW/clutch setup. I'm running Zee mech and shifters w/ 11-36 and 23T RFNW, but never had the chance to ride XX1/XO1. So far any shortcomings in climbing can be chalked up to my fitness, and I only spin out of buffed-out downhills, which I don't care about. Can't say I haven't thought it would be nice to have that one extra low gear when my legs are on fire though...

It'll be interesting to see if the Shimano 1x11 can keep current XTR's solid mud performance with the reduced cog spacing and tighter tolerances. I'd have thought SRAM's system would have dealt with gunk better than it does, having gone to the larger freehub interface and keeping the cog spacing slightly bigger.
  • 2 0
 My exact set up is a '14 Saint rear D, Saint shifter, XT cassette, Hope 40t cog, Race Face 32t narrow wide and XT cranks

This system shifts more accurately and more reliably than my XX1 did - fact. Both were set up by the same professional mechanic.

XX1(XO1) isn't bad by any stretch, but it is cost prohibitive in the face of the many other customizable options there are now with the 40/42 cogs plus narrow wides with a clutch d and they offer as good, if not better shifting performance. I also have not missed the loss of the little cog I had on the XX1. And no need for a custom hub!
  • 2 0
 As jimeg points out: you can use a 40t with a zee or saint derailleur, provided it's the wide range model zee, or has the wide range adapter installed on the saint. I'm not running the 40t yet, but am running a zee der + saint shifter, and I won't go back until sram offers double shift in both directions like Shimano does: that capability is a real game changer, that no-one seems to talk about.
  • 1 0
 i love that machine gun like click it does to jump down a few gears at a time.. literally its like comparing a fully automatic(shimano) to a semi-automatic(sram), the saint shifter is so crisp.. and i was wondering if the zee mech for the 11-36 would be compatible with a 40t.. maybe the e 13 which will come with a longer b limit screw, may do the job but if not itll go on my dh rig and ill grab an xt if i need more range but as of now im cleaning pretty decent climbs in the 32- 36 granny gear i got on my 1x10.. a 40t or 42 might be nice but idk..
  • 1 0
 Bike geometry is an important consideration. I haven't gotten a 40t yet because I have to fight the front wheel enough on 32x36 that I'm not sure that 32x40 will even be usable. Of course, if that ends up true, I can just go to a 34 or 36 in front and gain some top end, so it wouldn't be the end of the world. as for whether the 40t works with a zee, one of the smaller brands, either wolf tooth or one-up, (can't remember) specifically made and tested their 40t for usage with a zee der.
  • 46 2
 So when's X91 coming out?
  • 23 1
 Once XX1 and X01 get some competition.
  • 29 0
 It would only be $50 cheaper than X01...
  • 7 0
 Pretty much, SRAM said until they figure out how to make the cassette cheaper, they won't be duplicated the technology at lower group levels. They've basically shot themselves in the foot with the way they did the freehub body interface, yes it allows them to use a 10T cog but no it doesn't allow for cheap cassette construction. The retail price on the cassette alone is about $400. Hope you don't need to replace them too often.
  • 3 2
 With a 9 and 10 tooth as your highest gear, one could easily burn through a cassette every season! As much as I hate the limited gearing of the new XTR 11 speed, it makes sense longevity wise.
  • 1 0
 Why is the cassette 4 times the price of an X9 10speed cassette? Maybe twice the price, but 400 bucks??
  • 3 0
 Because they cost a lot of time to make due to their construction and the fact they need to work with the XD freehub bodies. They're not simply a bunch of stamped steel cogs held together with spacers and screws that slide over a series of splines on the freehub bodies. The only splines on the XD bodies are about a 1cm thick section close to the hub flange that carries the load of all the cogs via the largest alloy cog alone. The rest of the cogs are fixed to that cog and machined as a 1-piece block of steel, and the lockring that holds it all on is an extra deep unit that resembles a large deep-channel socket (for a socket wrench) that has to reach the external threaded section of the XD body.

Either SRAM is going to have to admit they screwed up and just copy shimano's 11 speed in using the standard freehub bodies (and forego the 10T cog) or they're going to lose out on sales as Shimano trickles the new 11 speed tech down from XTR probably starting with the 2016 update to Deore XT and SLX (they are usually a year behind any XTR updates).
  • 2 1
 1x10 11/36 for years now.. pedal harder
  • 1 0
 @deeeight, you're answer just has me asking the same question but for a new reason. Why is (it designed in such a way) it costs4 times the price??? Kudos to SRAM for bringing 1x setups to the mainstream, but after seeing Shimanos's new 11spd regular old hub cassette I can't give XX1 no love. Too bad, cause I like SRAM X-9 a lot, and would love to just see it have a bigger cassette.

@manchvegas, why don't you just ditch gears altogether and just pedal even harder?
  • 2 0
 You'd have to ask a SRAM rep that question.
  • 1 0
 Maybe if they got rid of x-dome and went back to using spiders in their cassette in the mid range of the line up. I mean whats another 500g, just go to the washroom before riding or something if one is that anal about weight.
  • 1 2
 kinda tough to run singlespeed on a 6" bike... I just can't see going backwards after working myself up to 1x10.. once you have the fitness, it's hard to wanna let it go.. 11 speed is just silly, the same ratios can be had with 10 spds.. I however don't feel the need to do a 40/42t.. don't need it..
  • 1 0
 Their justification for only doing x-dome for the wide range cassettes is that 42t cogs increase cassette weight significantly, and that it's not worthwhile to go bigger if the weight gets too high. Their claim is that x-dome counteracts this problem. You can argue if that's true or not, but they do have a point: the whole rear drivetrain is unsprung weight, so every gram shaved there improves suspension performance. In an ideal world, we'd have all transmission stuff in the middle of the frame, where the weight is an advantage. Even the freewheel could go there with some clever engineering, though the constantly moving chain, even during coasting, would freak people out at first.
  • 1 0
 jesseE the cost of the cassette is due largely to the fact that its a whole piece of aluminum thats machined to have that kind of range and also its designed for the xd driver... thats mainly it..
  • 1 1
 The X-Dome cassettes, except for the largest cog are steel... 1 piece milled block of steel for 10 of the cogs, and only the 11th 42T cog is aluminium. I looked in the norco parts catalog thursday, the SRP for canada for the cassettes are $550 for the XX1 version and $525 for the XO1 version. Dealer Wholesale up here is 50% of retail. A Recon Mixed 10 speed 11-40 cassette which works on any shimano 8speed (or more) sized freehub body is $400US off ebay. I'd rather have a 10 that's 11-40 and works on virtually every wheel I already own.
  • 40 3
 Shimano - please read above review and act like a competing corporation is supposed to
  • 15 6
 It's almost like they're trying to assert dominance and remind us that they're "in control" of this market by refusing to compete. But they aren't. Not anymore.

They had a very narrow window and they missed it - now they have to play a very hard catching-up game, much as Chicago will have to in electronic drivetrains. SRAM's been losing a lot of market share to Shimano and Campagnolo on road bikes because of this, but they've made that up in leaps and bounds in mountain tech - against Fox, too. M9000 is an update and nothing more. In the context of mountain biking pre-2012, it would probably be the high-end king, but in the context of XX1, it is practically a fallacy. I consider Shimano's failure to release a dedicated 1x11 drivetrain a severe oversight, and I predict that (given X91 and X71 drivetrains) the release of XTR M9000 - precise as it is - will someday be looked back upon as the beginning of the end of Shimano's dual-market drivetrain dominance.

(Weirdly, this line of thought brings me to a possible future in which road bikes all have Shimano drivetrains and mountain bikes all run SRAM. I love specialization, but I hope that won't happen. Competition drives progress - it's this that allowed Shimano to be upstaged in the first place. I don't think they really thought they had any, and they CONTINUE to rest on their laurels, more or less.)
  • 6 1
 @ bluefire, I literally just wrote a marketing report about shimanos inability to understand its own market.... They made assumptions about the rider and what they prefer to ride. Oem has turned heavily in favor towards SRAM and it's tech, shimano is going to playing catchup and it's going to have to be something bigger than XX1 to pull back up.
  • 19 0
 If shimano wants to kick sram where it hurts they will make a 11-42 cassette for the 1x10. That would basically say "SRAM has gone to far and we want to pull back and keep things sane."
Then we could keep our current setups and simply buy a cassette, killing sram's profit margin and getting a piece of the pie.
  • 6 2
 As an added note, I don't see added cogs as progress. I see it as the cop out the use to sell kids bikes at Walmart. "Mine is an 18speed. How many gears does yours have?" Suddenly feeling like i'm in 5th grade again...
  • 6 2
 I've been saying this for a while now, 11-40 ten speed cassette would literally kill X1. So obviously Sram and Shimano are talking, possibly exchanging dollars. It's hard to believe Shimano is not answering the bell with so much money just sitting there, and companies like Wolftooth/ One up etc cashing in huge.
  • 9 2
 What will kill X1 and drivetrains as we know them is the company who makes a light, reliable, high performance gear box that integrates smoothly into future frame designs. Something hub based or in the bottom bracket. Lots of engineering challenges but what will eventually be the death of traditional drivetrains, I'm sure both Sram and Shimano have looked into it.
  • 12 2
 poozank - there is a hub based reliable, excellent gearbox - it is called Rolhoff. 8 speed Shimano Alfine is also great. Then there is Pinion which is excellent as well. I really don't know why nearly EVERYONE on Pinkbike is still using derailleurs despite being so enlightened and looking through the hype. Bejesus, if Pinkbikers would really buy what they claim they want to buy, by the 2015 latest 2016 the Zerode should be the best selling downhill bike in the history.

Vast majority of mountain bikers still want to use front derailleurs, what Shimano did, is simply that they invested everything in the evolution of the front mech and give a side option for those who want to use single ring setup. For me personally 11-36 cassette works great and I could give a less damn for 11-40, 10-42, or 5-59 Hey it's space, it's vast, nobody can hear you scream one ex teeeeeeeeen for liiiiiife, single riiing FytyWyyyyyyy

Disclaimer: Some sentences might include bitter cynicism
  • 5 0
 Shimano have just announced an 11-40 with the new XTR launch, that will obviously filter down. As to SRAM being market leaders, maybe in the short term. Shimano still shifts and lasts much better than SRAM, standard upgrade on my bikes is to change stuff out for Shimano as the SRAM tut fails or narks me off to much. Immediate improvement.
  • 3 0
 +@WAKIdesigns most of the hate is oriented towards super high price and to be honest, rolhoff costs as much as xx1 and you still need chain and crankset... But I agree its great product, reliable yet expensive. Pinion requires specific frame and tbh there are not many available. And are again expensive. Alfine is again not mtb specific, dont even know at what size it comes and if it fits MTB frames, from google search it doesnt look like 142/through axle compatible (and again costs ~400$). Zerode proves it is usable but it is not used as rear hub. What we want is something with decent performance/price/weight ratio and right now 1x10 speed with possible 40-42 aftermarket kog appers to be way to go. I ride 1x10 with 32:11-36 and it gets job done, no need to spend fortune on it.
  • 1 1
 winko - that is exactly what I meant. People shout gearbox, it's there and they still don't buy it... because of all that you described. And they more or less consciously aware of it. They just think that with a touch of a magic hand or by a fall of some SRAM/Shimano conspiracy, the gearboxes will get lighter, more reliable and cheaper. I'll sooner see a colony on Mars.
buspilot - it will never work for people with ADD...
  • 2 0
 On the contrary.. ADD'ers will be forced to focus on a single purpose with a clear and immediate reward! So Jedi!
  • 3 0
 Hub based is only good in that it is easily interchangeable. It is heavier, and limits your wheel build options. As long as we are dreaming I'd like a bb based option that gives more than 2 gears and doesn't sound broken.
  • 2 0
 I really don't understand why people think Shimano went so wrong here. It's a 1x11 product that (supposedly) chooses Shimano's smooth shifting and reliability over pure cassette range, and you don't really lose that much in the way of range anyway. They lose nothing by including the option for a FD and 2x, 3x, and it's no doubt a good choice for the OE market. Their system doesn't affect anyone's ability to run it 1x AT ALL, and the best part is they kept standard hub spacing, which I think will make it a much more friendly aftermarket option. Plus, it's going to be WAY more affordable (even without considering the hub) once it trickles down, and as people have noted, SRAM's tech won't trickle down for some time due to their insane (though gorgeous) machined cassette. The only places where they DID screw up, IMO, are the fugly cranks and proprietary chainrings.

And honestly, if they really have engineered a smoother-shifting FD that's less of a hassle to keep trimmed, I might even consider going back to 2x one day. If I wasn't having to curse at my FD out on the trail every 4 rides I wouldn't have had any problems with it... aside from cockpit aesthetics, maybe.
  • 1 0
 Pinion is still huge and doesn't integrate into conventional designs and its shifter is clunky. Alfine leaves some to be desired, the owner of Zerode said that himself. THose are options but like i said more is needed until they overtake traditional designs.
  • 1 2
 gearbox bikes will never fly for pedaly bikes. Weight and internal drag will kill the concept.
  • 4 0
 big number for Shimano is in the road bike market, specifically OE spec of Claris, Sora, Tiagra, 105, Ultegra, Dura Ace and Di2 groupsets

the mountain bike market, including the high-end XTR is very small volume compared to the huge volume of OE business in road bikes and even hybrids

personally I think Shimano got it right with the new XTR groupset, they took a good step back, did their R&D, and industry-leading real world testing, and then released it when they were ready

if you've been involved working in the industry, with the large number of recalls and failures on SRAM products over the past years, Shimano's "late to the party" caution makes complete sense. Shimano have always had the best engineering and production quality, if lacking in innovation compared to SRAM.

However, innovation means nothing when your customer's end up doing your "product testing" at their cost in terms of time lost off the bike waiting for warranty support. I've personally been through this with SRAM, AVID and ROCKSHOX products on my own bikes

Most recently for SRAM their disc brake recall on road bikes was a huge f*ck off for both bike stores and customers.

I warranty very few Shimano products compared to SRAM products in my workshop
  • 3 0
 Awesome comment, and egg-fukkin-zak-ly why I'd love to see a Shimano offering of the 1-11 drivetrain. Shimano gear just plain works, and is crazy reliable. Brakes, derailleurs, chains, pedals, shifter and cranks...Shimano for me please.
  • 34 3
 $399 cassette. Ha ha ha ah ahaah aha haah ahah aa
  • 12 2
 It's a LOT of dough. the thing is beautifully machined though.. Check out this internal view.. That's machinist/ bike porn.
media.chopmtb.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/12j220066.jpg
  • 5 0
 Don't tell me that's all once piece cnc... That's a thing of beauty. But I wouldn't pay $400
  • 6 5
 wallheater - you are poor Ha ha ha ah ahaah aha haah ahah aa
  • 2 0
 Ha very true. I also agree that it looks amazing. As mentioned by people elsewhere, it's a fundamentally flawed design though in terms of trickling down technology to lower pricepoints.
  • 11 0
 @Mike Levy - how many chainrings did you go thru in your 8 month test

If I had a dollar for every person who'd said "I haven't dropped my chain on my xo1/xx1 - oh except for once/twice, oh and it was in a race." *facepalm* - I'd half fill my beer fridge with craft beers
  • 8 0
 When are both Sram and Shimano going realise that the average rider can't afford and doesn't need 1x11. All we need is an affordable 10 speed cassette with a nice 11-40 or 11-42 spread. It really can't be that hard! For the sake of everyone's wallet please just do it!
  • 11 0
 Review: It's awesome. Obviously.
  • 11 1
 Would be very cool to see an X9 pricepoint 1x11
  • 6 0
 If what everybody is saying about 1x drivetrains being the future, then it will come
  • 4 2
 Yeah and eventually 1x27. And it will be super cool.
  • 11 1
 Still enjoying my 20th anniversary 9 speed XO on my dh bike.
  • 13 2
 Many price
  • 9 1
 Such money
  • 9 1
 Very marketing
  • 6 9
 Much shitty old meme.
  • 7 8
 Anyone who writes like that is a bell end
  • 8 2
 Why you no
  • 6 0
 Hahah Wow. I just know this drive train would improve my ride so much it would be worth the dialisis I would need after selling my kidneys! If you are rich enough that this is no big deal then cool for you. As for me, I will someday get a 1x10 with a 1up and feel both smart and rich. Then my neighbor will look at me and think I'm dumb for spending so much on a toy, so I guess it is all perspective.
  • 1 1
 Heh, and look at the chain, gets rusty even in Arizona. Worthless!
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure that's red dust, we have it up here in Utah too.
  • 2 1
 Me joking Smile
  • 9 0
 Mike - what's chain stretch on the Park Tool chain checker after the 8 months? Same as the XX 1 group chain stretch?
  • 2 0
 I have 0.5 stretch on my XX1 after 50 hours use (21 XC rides). I'd be surprised if the chain had not been changed several times in 8 months, otherwise you'd imagine the cassette won't be too happy...
  • 7 2
 As many other people have already said using any crank with a thick/ thin bolted on and a (Shimano) clutch derallieur will give you the same if not better results for way, way less dollar. If you really need to then you can bastardise your cassette but personally I think Sram is guilty of making problems where they don't exist with the 'wide range' cassette. With that range you should be running a 36t up front but people don't, they run a 32t cus now it's ok to be a fat and lazy. I don't know how people ride such low gears without toppling over.
Go the DIY 10spd route and choose your own crank, from a range of derailiuers, a range of c/rings (Works Componenets ahem) and still have some pennies left to pay the parking at your trails.
If you're buying bikes off the peg then you're crazy and none of the above applies.
  • 1 0
 Best comment here. Shimano+any brand thick thin chainring is clearly the way to go. Works for me, 36t+11-36 cassette, plenty of range for anything
  • 1 0
 Well said!
  • 1 3
 People have died to give you the freedom of speech, don't waste it by talking utter bollocks. 36t front on XX1, yeah right o.
  • 2 0
 ThomDawson: Have you looked at 1x11 ratios? Even with a 30t up front xo1 low end is a bit taller than most 2x9 and 2x10 set ups. For example, to match the low end of a 2x10 with a 24t granny you would need a 28t! The facts are even with a monster range cassette, you will have to compromise on your low or high end.

Gear ratio chart:

docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqCMFwBoZnLPdExRdDItZ2dEYWRoUXF6Tmx2dENPVFE#gid=0
  • 1 0
 Why not? You gonna tell me that your terrain is steeper than mine?
If I was daft enough to buy sram that's exactly the set up I'd use.
  • 1 1
 I seen the ratios ta. Didn't realise anyone still used any more than 1 cog at the front.
  • 2 2
 I run 36t on my xx1/xo1 setup with no problems. May even go to a 38t. SRAM 1x10 works at least as good as a shimano.
  • 2 1
 Ok maybe a bit harsh there on sram it's just a personal pref thing. Glad to hear somebody using reasonable gearing dualsusdave!
  • 3 1
 I always thought trail riding was about the fun part of rolling through the trail and coming down, the 25 minutes it takes to climb up there at my home trails may as well be as easy as possible! I'm not 'fat and lazy' I'm as fit as I've ever been at 42 and that includes 15 years senior rugby, being tough or cool or both because you can ride a 36 chainring is bullocks, mtb is fun not a chore, I'll happily keep riding my xx1 with a 32 tooth ring, and use the 42 at the back. On a slightly different note my wife runs a One Up 42 tooth cog with x9 type2 and x9 cranks, I'd have that and save the money next time.
  • 1 0
 You must never climb owt steep.
  • 1 0
 Nobody said that anybody was cool or tough. Funny that one can't admit their own fitness level. I climb everything on a 36t with no problems. Who cares? Climb away on your 32t. Nobody is better than another, fitness levels vary. Look past the ego.
  • 1 0
 You are right, sorry, they didn't, just fat and lazy! This 'one' can, and kind of the point of the post! As I said it's about fun not fitness level, certainly not ego, although I do love you having to mention climbing everything with the 36t 'no problems'. (But of course you may go to a 38t ) Good laugh for the start of my day, thanks. Lets no forget all the roadies, fat and skinny climbing everywhere on 39t, 'no problems' (I just laughed again!)
  • 1 0
 I agree with you to an extent, I'm no XC, super fit rider; my riding is all about getting to the top so I can hammer it back down (whose isn't?). But I do enjoy the climb as well. I enjoy overtaking people on ridiculously expensive bikes who're trying to get up there with their reverbs set way too low, spinning their 32x42 struggling to stay upright on a fire road and sweating out a weeks coffee and subway. I don't mean to sound bitchy (much) - if they're having fun then that's all that matters. I just think that a lot of people are missing a good chunk of the fun you can get out of the sport because the bike isn't set up right and because of that they think they need this gear ratio that barely gets you anywhere.
If you genuinely need a 32x42 and there's nothing that can be done to improve bike setup then, in my opinion, you guessed it...
  • 9 1
 Save 1,273$...go with single speed :/
  • 2 0
 You could walk and not have to buy a bike at all!! What a great point!
  • 4 0
 I just feel like such a yesterday man with my 2x10 gears and 26" wheels. The things is I can spin out my 40x12 gear ratio downhill and I sure as hell need at least my 28x 36 for going up so what could a more limited 1x11 ratio offer me, except more freewheeling?
  • 1 0
 A 10t high gear, that's what.
  • 3 0
 I run 40/28 up front currently with 12-36 out back.
A 10-42 on the back with a 33 up front would give me the same spin out at max rpm and lose me 12% on the steep climbs.

That's hardly a win.
  • 5 2
 I have an XX1 equipped Cannondale. And it is nothing short of fantastic. I've never ridden such a flawless drivetrain. I must say one thing though. XX1 commands extreme leg strength. Possess that and it'll take you anywhere. . . FAST. If you can afford it, do it. You won't regret it.
  • 4 1
 Seems like extreme leg strength would mean you can just go ss. . .
  • 2 2
 Is the low gear low enough for someone who possess so much leg power?
  • 2 0
 ...
  • 1 0
 Glad you like your setup, that's what matters most.

I don't think anyone questions if xo1 is fantastic, but sram hasn't explained why it's $800 more fantastic then a wide-narrow, shadow plus set up. Especially for components that wear out, break and need replacing.
  • 1 1
 They actually have explained it, but no one is listening. The cassette is a one piece thing of beauty, really expensive to manufacture. The derailleur pulleys also have a narrow-wide profile. The derailleur itself does not move laterally at all, only up and down. Anyone else with a 10t high gear? Nope. It is an expensive setup, but people still pay big dollars for a seat post that costs the same or more than a rear shock. 1x10 would be awesome with a 10t high gear.
  • 1 0
 No guys, I think you have me wrong.

The 1x11 is great, and I can pedal it anywhere I choose - with factory gearing. I will not go back to a 2x10 setup.

@taletotell Don't be stupid, There is no way a SS will ever take you the places even a standard 10 speed single ring setup ever will.

What I mean.... Is my wife will not ride anything but a 2x10 Shadow plus setup, because she loves the wide range of gear ratios.

1x11 does not offer the ultimate versatility that the 2x10 does.
But for those who do not need the wide range of gearing, it is a damn slick setup. The crispest shifts you could ever imagine, seamless integration between your tallest and smallest ring. Impressive weight savings over 2x10... it's awesome.

If you are a conditioned rider - and you can afford it... Just do it. You'll love it.
  • 1 1
 That's more of an explanation of why it costs more to make, not an explanation of the trail benefits. An frame made of rhino horn would also cost a fortune, but that doesn't mean it would ride better.
  • 1 0
 Why does it cost more? Simple.

Commonality, exclusivity and quantity sold.
  • 4 1
 I love my xo1 drive train and now has become a standard for medium to high end builds. Cant tell the difference between the too performance wise nor the 80 grams or whatever it is.
  • 2 0
 I like my X01, only complaint is that it's not made by Shimano - that would solve the rough and inconsistent shifts, and I think poor lever feel. The 4.2 gear span (42/10) really is key because I use the 42 a lot for climbing and the 10t a lot on flats. The new XTR is a failure for 1x with a 40/11 cassette - the range (3.6) not quite enough - there is a 1 gear compromise - that's why they had to market/justify the 2x (and 3x). Although I'm sure it will be a killer 2x system. I would much prefer yet another freehub body so Shimano could do 10t.

My backup bike is Shimano 1x9 with RF N/W ring. Shifts awesome, so smooth and sure, but gear span (36/11) is NOT enough in my mountainous area. If I rode it more I'd add a cassette expander.
  • 3 1
 It must be frustrating for PB staffers to read the incessant whining and bitching on every single story written. Just wanted to let you guys know some of us out here appreciate the work. Thanks.

As for XX1/XO1, I imagine most of you folks stating your "insert cheap option here" drivetrain works just as well probably haven't actually, you know, ridden an XX1 bike. If you're on the fence and can swing it, XX1 is an incredible upgrade.
  • 2 0
 I have a question about the clutch derailleur (I've never ridden one). From what I understand, it keeps the pulley from moving forward unless there is a shifting event. However, rear suspension designs require some chain growth. How does the clutch allow it to move for a big suspension event?
  • 4 0
 Love my Xo1, haven't had any issues at all. It gets me up the hill and down the hill and does it well.
  • 10 1
 Cool. I have had similar experience with an x9 set up.
  • 2 1
 Haha, me too actually, and X7 as well. I would not have Xo1 on my bike if it didn't come stock.
  • 3 0
 they should sell the complete group with three sizes of chain ring (30/32/34)! so u could choose the best one for each one fitness, terrain, and riding style.
  • 1 1
 Still 1 by 11 but you get to choose your chain ring. You are a genius!
  • 3 0
 They'll ask you for another grand to do that, are you crazy? Smile
  • 1 0
 I don't want to pay for the two I'm not using. This is the same reason bikes don't come with pedals. Why pay for something that you aren't going to use? They aren't going to give something for free. If you think they should, then you are delusional.
  • 2 0
 Shimano XT/SLX 2x10: Perfect! Gears went from 18 to 24, then to 27 and then 30. Suddenly, 11 is enough? So, the industry was screwing us then or is screwing us now? Stick with Shimano, 20 ratios and you'll be fine.
  • 1 0
 I had an XT 2x10 but changed to a RaceFace narrow wide and won't go back. Canberra area is not too hilly so 1x is perfect. If I still lived in California it may be a different story, though.
  • 3 1
 Very steep hills here, coastal southern Thailand, so I need a 26/36 front. One guy rides a Sram 1x11, runs a 30 at the front to deal with the hills and then spins out on the flat. He tried a 32 on the front but the hills were killing him. He is keen to switch to the new XTR 2x11. He has the choice of anything as he is the manager of the local bike shop. Anyway, I'm no expert so probably best to ignore my ramblings in the PB comments....
  • 1 0
 X01 actually has MORE gear spread unless you have an 11-36 cassette with 26t/36t rings. If you've got an 11-32 cassette, X01 could actually give you same climbing gear and more top end.
  • 1 0
 36 on the rear, and sorry but I had a typo there, should read 24/36 on the front - actually had 26/36 when I first changed to 2x10 but changed out the 26 for a 24 - so for where I ride it's fine. I still wonder though, why suddenly is 11 gears enough? ; two years ago 30 was the way to go.
  • 1 0
 Due to overlap, your drivetrain really only has 12 gears, not 20.

Let's compare my X01 setup to your 2x10 setup.

Low is exactly the same:
28/42 = 0.67
24/36 = 0.67

High, you have 1 more gear:
28/10 = 2.8
36/11 = 3.3
Each gear is ~12%, so 3.3 - 12% = 2.9, compared to 2.8 on my X01 means you have slightly more than 1 extra gear on the top end.
So, what you said originally about your buddy is correct.

My previous bike was XT 2x10 with exactly same gearing as yours, but I wanted to try X01 for lower weight and simplicity. On my trails, I don't miss the 12th gear. I do miss Shimano shift quality.

If I built another bike today … it's a tough call, but I think I'd go back to Shimano because although X01 works for me, I find that SRAM ergonomics and shift quality detracts from my enjoyment of riding. When the new XTR trickles down to XT, that could be a nice setup as 2x11, but as 1x11 (11-40 cassette) is too narrow range for me.
  • 1 0
 Good info, appreciated. I used the Sheldon Brown gear ratio calculator to help when I switched from 3x9 to 2x10, I was looking to ensure a gear low enough for those (damn) hills. At the same time I was changing to a 29er, so Sheldon helped out a lot. Admittedly, the cost of the SRAM puts me off a bit, my three sons ride junior series and it would get expensive to convert at least 4 of our bikes to 1x11. My eldest son is stronger than me, he is local junior champion this year, so my question would be: Is SRAM worth it for a strong junior racer?
  • 3 2
 All this technology and expense just to avoid using a chain guide that weighs very little, helps keep chain growth down and protects your sprocket seems a little crazy, I appreciate the marvel of innovation, but sometimes the simpler, more reliable designs are the true design master pieces, a chain guide basically never fails... ever... no matter what cassette or chainring you use...
  • 2 1
 My chain guides failed several times, maybe 15-20 times in total but still. Gamut P30, MRP G2 Mini SL, Blackspire, Hope. Not only chain drops, jockey wheels seizing, falling off, or chain getting sucked between the plate and chainring. Right now I am riding a narrow wide chain ring and so far no chain drops, even on a hardtail, with no chain device what so ever.
  • 1 0
 But with XX1 and N/W type rings, for most trail applications, all you really need is a simple upper guide Waki. I've never dropped a chain with my MRP AMg guide and standard ring - so at best your experience with N/W performs the same, but my setup offers chainring protection. Furthermore your experience is on a hardtail and mine on a FS trail bike - your setup doesn't have to deal with chain-growth or suspension movement.

All weekend at Sea Otter I had people coming to our booth looking for guides after their first chain-drop experience (and for a few that was in a race run). Get a basic guide and you'll never have to worry about it.

Have a look at what most people in the EWS are running - and keep in mind a lot of them get fresh drivetrains for big races BUT still opt for some sort of guide.

Reports of the death of the chainguide are greatly exaggerated.
  • 1 1
 I just said that there are issues with chainguides. As to chaingrowth I assume that it is actualy better because it stretches the chain more thus better retention. I use narrow-wide with MRP G2 Mini SL from which I cut out everything but taco for chain ring protection as my trails are very rocky. But I do not race like a pro so I may not need chain guide. therefore I also don't mind a few drops if I can skip lower roller and rubbing on upper guide. With my 34t Absolute Black NW chainring I havent even dropped a chain with Zee rear mech after I forgot to turn on the clutch
  • 1 0
 Yes, chain-growth on compression may indeed help retention, but it does the opposite on the rebound stroke.

We've done a considerable amount of testing with N/W rings, and their Achilles heel is not their retention performance on rough trails, but on big, single g-out style hits and braking bumps. Deep, low frequency hits coupled with low chain tension (when you're in your smaller cassette cogs) are problematic.

Just as drivetrain technology has improved, so have chainguides. Our G2sl was a great guide, but our new G3 - and in this context - AMG and 1x guides are the best we've ever made. These in conjunction with a N/W-style ring make for a bombproof, never-drop setup.

Cheers
  • 1 1
 Heheh, upu got my attention, If I drop the chain too often then I'll check AMG in the first place. How's chain guide future looking for Workd Cup DH? Is the lower roller going to extinct?

Cheers!
  • 1 0
 Sorry I've used mrp, truvativ and e-13 guides for years and never had a single chain drop or jockey wheel seize, and that was living in England with lots of rain and mud... have no idea what you must be doing to make tour guides fail, or just not setting them up properly
  • 1 0
 ... also lived in Queenstown for a couple of years riding downhill, jumps and rockgardens every day, drives me crazy the bull crap you hear spurted on Pb sometimes, as the Mrp guy said, if chainguides didn't work why would they still use them even in enduro!? It is basically impossible for your chain to come off unless you break the guide. Eg. Josh Bryceland at Pmb
  • 1 0
 I don't know man, I am just telling you my experience. Three friends of mine had issues with G2 SL with lower assembly falling off. Then other guys had issues with tacos falling off both on Mrp and on E13, Do you think I am an idiot making this all up?! Its parts exposed to hits they will fail eventualy. You are one lucky man or you are changing guides every year. I cut away the lower guide part because it fell off and I lost it, then I took off the upper guide after I crashed and the boomerang got bent and I bever managed to straighten it to get it rub free. My chain hasnt fallen off nw chainrings both on my HT and 125mm FS - Jesus... it works for me on my bikes here in Gothenburg Sweden. It may not work in Queenstown . and several Sram sponsored enduro riders like clementz ride without any guide Iehat so ever. I am not telling anyone to throw away their guides, I was replying to your comment according to which chain guides were perfect. No they have never been nor will they ever be, just like NW and anything else. I freaking DEPENDS Jesus Easter Christ!
  • 1 0
 Then you must agree that a narrow wide chainring isn't exactly the most advanced piece of technology and doesn't take more effort to make than a regular DH ring and definitely less than a simpliest shift ring. It is definitely less complicated than for instance E13 SRS+ chain guide
  • 1 0
 Clementz uses a guide for almost every race. I think everyone in the top ten in Chile used a guide. Smile
  • 1 0
 Review: It looks the same as XX1, it functions the same as XX1, XX1 is 30-40g lighter, XO1 is about £40 cheaper for the customer but makes SRAM more pennies because it is cheaper to manufacture. Summary, come on cheapskate, why didn't you pony up the extra for XX1 Wink

PS: XX1 isn't as perfect as we first claimed (chain drops, occasional grinding feeling, poor chainline) but we'll hide the points to be improved upon in an XO1 review. Wink
  • 2 0
 I'm running a Wolf Tooth 36t direct mount thick/thin ring and a Wolf Tooth 42t giant cog on the back with an X9 type mech on my Blur LTC and it's been awesome. Fraction of the cost!
  • 1 0
 Im running shimano 11-36 cassette with wolf tooth 32T up front and its been ace but would like a bigger spread of gears so looking at oneup 42T which includes 16T replacement ring. Probably move upto a 36T wide narrorw on the front for more top end and prevent spinning out as i do at the moment. Probably look at a saint short cage rear deralliuer once i damage current medium xt one. All a lot cheaper than X01!
  • 1 0
 "we also had issues with the chain staying in time with derailleur's X-Sync upper pulley"

My xx1 has about 400 miles on it and has started to do this on big drops, when rear shock is fully compressed. could this be from chain growth? is it time to replace? 6 months is this a reasonable life span for this $$ chain?
  • 2 0
 I've been very happy with XO1 since running it starting in Jan. It came with the bike so I paid less than the MSRP. As much as I love 1x11 I still dig Shimano 2x10. Happy riding to all.
  • 1 0
 The review is great - a bit more glowing than my experience - I love the concept but the implementation needs another iteration of improvement. I didn't know that grinding was from mis-meshing of the jockey wheel - makes sense now! Can a non N/W wheel be used? I need to play a bit more with the b-tension to adjust that gap as I've noticed shift quality depends on that.

Please update the review to note that XX1 shifters come with housing, but X01 doesn't - therefore on this component XX1 is actually cheaper.
  • 1 0
 No mention of wear? i have xx1 on 2 bikes one has lasted 8 months with all original components and the other needs a new front ring every 3 months and a cassette after 6 months..... wears too fast but i am curious why the difference in wear time? the longer lasting drive train is on a Santa Cruz blur XC (100mm) and the fast wearing drive train is on a Santa Cruz Solo (125mm)???????
  • 1 0
 A lot of you make me laugh reading the reviews on here. What do I mean by this, well 1st no one is telling you to upgrade what you have on your bike right now if you don't want to. 2nd if you go buy Shimano XTR group set it can cost the same or more than the XO1 group set. I just built a new bike and went with full XO1 except for the crank went with Race Face. By the way it didn't cost me anymore to go XO1 than it would have to XTR on my bike. Also everyone wants to compare XO1 and XX1 to X7 and X9 so lets compare SLX to XTR as well, didn't think so. If you are still running 9 speed and looking to upgrade then go with XO1 because going with XO (10 speed) and then buying a 42t cog for the back and then buying a N/W for up front well if you shop around you can get the XO1 for around the same price, e-Bay is amazing.
  • 1 0
 First off your article stinks you need to compare the 1X11 with 1X10 options and how you can get alomost the same thing in a 1X10 for a lot less dough. Second you should address the wear factor that has not been touched. My XX1 chainring was good for about 500 miles before it started showing severe signs of wear and I hand to chang it. Also I notice when my bike was in a stand using a chain cleaner system rotating the crankset in a counter clock wise motion the chain if up in the largest cassette would drop several gears all the time while I was cleaning the chain. I have since went back to a 1X10 system and I am running the Race Face Next SL crankset with a 26t in the front because I am fat and slow. You can also buy the xx1 and xo1 on ebay for a lot less then $1300 I purchased my xx1 drive train for $950 shipped.
  • 1 0
 Yep my X01 is starting to wear out after 600 miles, the softer alloy 42T sprocket won't run with a new chain up steep hills without jumping off, but 2nd gear (steel) runs fine. I have had to put my old chain back on (just on 0.5 wear) to get it to run smoothly again. I now have a choice of running the old chain and see how long it runs before it starts to fail or stick with the new chain but not using 1st gear while I wait for the new chain to stretch. Think I will just run it until it dies then replace it all with Shimano 10sp with a new 42t adaptor, cassette ,rear mech and shifter, comes to a similar cost of an X0 cassette, although I will have the additional cost of changing the freewheel on the wheel from xd to a standard driver, what a load of crap!
  • 1 0
 Luckily, I got an X01 included on my new slacker rig. It simplifies the cockpit and yes the 42 is nice for climbing stuff that is steeper than a cow's face. However, the spinout issue on some trails forces me to be down one more cog. I'm torn between which is generally better, SRAM or Shimano. It seems to me that Shimano is smoother operating. I'm also part of the spandex roadie "trash" and have the SRAM setup there, so I have more than one reference point. Ultimately, it still comes down to what you are happy with and of course YMMV.
  • 1 0
 WOW! Everyone has an opinion on this! Me too! Regarding f/d trim, which seems to be a huge part of tbe issue: My solution, I run a cheap old school f/d and get NO rub, because l use a 1990 Delore thumb shifter ( infinite trim = ZERO chain rub) Rarely drop a chain, due to narrow deraileur, I don't go huge, but I do ride like how a bear runs, not a cougar. Second part here: Why skinny ass (chain and cogs) 11spds? SRAM can't make a 10spd 11 - 42 on a standard cassette? BULL PUCKS! There are at least 2 ALU 42 tooth add on rear cogs available. Hey SRAM, using standard alu spider construction for ten speeds, heres the spacing BTW 11-13-15-18-21-24-30-34-38-42, you are welcome. Anyhow, WE HAVE ALL been arguing a first world problem if I've ever heard one.
  • 1 0
 Seriously though would love to see the development of a viable gearbox with 10 - 12 gears giving a high gear = to 11/36 (could do an OD of some type for racer Bob and his buddies) and a low of 34/22. THAT would be ALL mountain! No deraileurs, a tensioner to account for chain growth on fulI sus, and way wider spacing on hub flange for increased wheel strength. I think the key is moving the cranks to the other side. Just saying.
  • 1 0
 X0 11 is great, it came on my new bike, I have been riding it 4 days a week in all types of weather and it has not put a foot wrong. I don't think I would buy it after market as it is to costly, 1x10 with a clutch mech and short a long ring will do almost the same job for way less cash, and if i break a mech it would cost me 230 euro to replace
  • 1 0
 Just rode my 1x9 set up with a 30t NarrowWide. Epic. No tensioner, no clutch RD. I put this thing through hell yesterday, almost resigning myself to the fact that I'd drop my chain. Jumps, curbs, loading dock, rutted out hardpack = Zero problems. Not bad for 1/30th the price. Yes, its a tad spinny for downhills, but big dudes like me (er um...200+lbs) shouldnt have a problem maintaining speed.
  • 1 0
 My goodness. Quit all the whining about price. Listen, if you are on this site you are an enthusiast- not a hobbyist or recreational rider. Therefore i imagine all of you (like me) enjoy mountain bike riding more than any other sport in the world. Like any passionate enthusiast you SHOULD dream about and sacrifice to get the best equipment possible for your chosen activity.
I see all the comments here from the retro grouches and armchair engineers. Well, I've ridden mountain bikes for 25 years and almost everything new is better than the stuff before. Suntour XC pro top shifters - had em. Shimano XT and then XTRwas better. ROCKSHOX Mag21 fork -had it. Judy was better. OK Dual control levers sucked but the corresponding cranks and derraileurs were a step ahead. Same story year after year- time after time.
And guess what folks. - here is a free business tip for you- wait for it.......companies are in business to make money. So yes they innovate to sell more but in a product based biz like cycling it seems to me your stuff had better perform or your company will go away. Guess what we get when these companies focus on innovation? We get better goodies. Competition is good because we all benefit. Duh.
So - get out of your armchairs, spend some money and get back to me with your opinion on how this new stuff works.
Thank you - I will now go ride my new 1x11 drivetrain. (After years of riding Shimano XO is the best product on the market and worth every penny).
  • 1 0
 34t Narrow wide up front, 11sp on the rear is the bomb! Ok a bit pricey but we'll worth it, The amount of 10sp, 42t big ring setups i've seen since 11sp has been released proves how good the 11sp single ring setup is when the majority of riders with older bikes and outdated drivetrains are trying to run a wallet friendly version!
  • 5 2
 I would use next generation XT and XTR. Double or single front depending on a bike.
  • 4 1
 no thx!, still having a blast with my sram 970 dh cogs, 991 chain, and raceface n/w single.LOL.
  • 2 0
 Wolftooth direct mount n/w chainring: $75. Hope 40T cog $90. $1100 saved to go to Gwindom in Aug. for the World Cup and watch Aaron kick ass live. Hell2thayeah!!!!
  • 2 0
 And here's me happy with my 2x9 and 3x8 setups cuz they work pretty decent and i don't really want to drop the $ to go 10 speed and wide range....
  • 1 0
 After looking at the cost of XO1 I decided just to go all out and get XX1. There isn't enough of a savings. Might as well have the top of the line, and I like the option of going to a 28 tooth ring.
  • 7 5
 sram 1x11 is the future! sorry shimano, and thanks for my past drive trains...
  • 2 0
 I'm in north GA and run a 1x9 old school setup with 36t ring and 11-34 cassette with no problems. I'll keep my money.
  • 3 0
 When did it become okay to drop chains?
  • 2 0
 My biggest question is what is the wear on the 10 tooth cog, and is it individually replaceable?
  • 1 0
 yeah, that's a worry of mine too. It is not replaceable. I would prefer a design like canfield bros 9t where the tallest few gears are replaceable independent of the rest of the cassette. I'm on my first chain close to .75 stretch without too much wear on the 10t. We'll see how long it lasts? That will determine whether or not I buy another one or try something else.
  • 1 1
 Couldn't give a flyf*ck. It's a load of shit compared to a decent gearbox. f*ck off $PAM & take $hitmano with ya.

Anyone else think with that shock on there like that the Rocky looks like it has a lil' boner?
  • 2 0
 "Just a few hundred less..."

Inflammatory!
  • 2 0
 less tooth and more money
  • 1 1
 Ye type 2 xo rear mech, woolftooth 30t direct mount chain ring and a 42 cog at the back. And with the saving going to get myself some new fox 36 talas!!!
  • 3 1
 RIP front derailleur. you will not be missed.
  • 1 0
 cheers to that
  • 1 0
 Sram how bout a ten speed with a 12/ 40 tooth gearing? No fancy one off cog or free wheel needed.
  • 1 0
 Just go buy a narrow/wide chain ring and a 40t-rex from hope, and your done for just 120 euros, it's the same thing
  • 1 0
 woh! i´d never buy this, but my new bike comes with it so... Too expensive, it really is. Hopefully it is very good anyhow.
  • 1 0
 No chainstay/Tensioner??
  • 1 0
 sram = garbage!!!!!

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