First Ride: 2024 Canyon Lux Trail

Nov 6, 2023 at 13:29
by Dario DiGiulio  
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We last touched on the Canyon Lux Trail in last year's Downcountry Field Test, where it didn't fare as well as the competition. Held back by compromised geometry and a more XC-focused spec than others in the category, it irked some testers in the group. Canyon seems to have taken that feedback to heart, with the new Lux Trail sporting a host of changes that seem to address some of those problems. With revised sizing, kinematic, and categorization, the Lux feels a bit more at home in its skin. How'd that shake out on trail? Read on to find out.
Lux Trail Details

• Carbon frame
• 29" wheels
• 115mm travel, 120mm fork
• 67° head angle
• 76° seat angle
• 412-500mm reach, 480mm size L
• 435mm chainstay length
• Measured weight: 28.5 lb / 12.9 kg
• Price: €3,299 - €8,499
canyon.com

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Fully integrated.
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For better or worse.

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Geometry

In the name of keeping things quick (a theme with this bike), here are the beats: the seat tube angle is 1.5° steeper, landing at 76° across all sizes. The head tube angle of 67° is half a degree slacker than the prior generation, while the reach, stack, bottom bracket drop, and chainstay length remain essentially unchanged. This addresses a primary complaint about the prior gen bike, which was just how stretched out the seated position was, given the relatively long reach and slack seat tube angle.

The new Lux Trail's numbers are more in line with typical trail bike sizing, giving it both a more comfortable climbing position and confidant descending geometry. I've been riding a size Large, and found the seated position quite comfortable. The stock handlebar is a bit flat for my taste, but a little rise improved the ride quite a lot.

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Flat out front end.
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With a fairly upright seattube.

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Nice little details.
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And a fairly clean cockpit, from the right angle.

Frame Features

Canyon took the opportunity presented by reworking the Lux Trail's front triangle and really ran with it. The level of integration here is impressive, with in-frame storage, a hard-mounted multitool, and two water bottles to boot. The bike feels like it's been accessorized with long days in mind, and the quick-access tools and stashes make for a speedy fix should something go awry.

There are two frame trims to choose from, with the differences essentially coming down to weight. For an average size Medium frame, the CF models are claimed to weigh 2101 grams, with the more expensive CFR frames clocking in at 1936 grams. With equivalently light parts kits fit to each, there will definitely be some weight-weenie friendly builds in there.

The Lux now features a UDH rear end, making all your hard-shifting Transmission dreams come true. Front and rear lockout mean you can turn your mountain bike into a road bike at a moment's notice, and might make some post-ride pumptrack sessions more fun.

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Quickdraw CO2 holster.
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Quite a bit of cargo capacity down there.
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While the improvements are many and welcomed, there are still some vestiges of the compromised designs of prior generations still at play here. The main two that come to mind are the flat-mount rear brake (this is for road bikes, please keep it out of the MTB world), and our favorite enemy, the through-headset cable routing. Both details make for a bike that requires specialized components that usually don't perform at the level of equivalently light or convenient designs.

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Suspension Design

The Lux Trail retains the linkage-driven single pivot layout of the prior model, but implements a hanging rocker meant to improve the small-bump performance. The 115mm of rear suspension is much more progressive than the Lux World Cup, with a left-hand lockout setup that allows for quick changes in suspension characteristic. The Open mode is full fat, letting things move as much as your setup allows for; Pedal mode firms things up, and holds the suspension higher in travel; Locked means locked, expect no movement.

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Behold, chart.

Build Kits

There's some difference between the United States market and the rest of the world when it comes to the Lux Trail, but overall expect a wide product range with many build kit options to choose from. The CFR models are not available in the US market, and the CF6 will be available sometime next spring. Spec and pricing is as follows:

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Lux Trail CF6 // €3,299. Fox Performance suspension, Shimano Deore brakes and drivetrain, DT LN AM wheels, 13.1 kg.

CF7
Lux Trail CF7 // €3,699, $3,799 USD. Fox Performance suspension, Shimano SLX brakes and drivetrain, DT XRC1900 wheels, 12.9 kg.

CF8
Lux Trail CF8 // €4,699, $4,799 USD. Fox Performance Elite suspension, Shimano XT brakes and drivetrain, DT XRC1700 wheels, 12.48 kg.

CF9
Lux Trail CF9 // €5,699, $5,799 USD. RockShox Select+ suspension, SRAM GX Transmission, Level Silver brakes, DT XRC1501 wheels, 12.45 kg.

CFR
Lux Trail CFR // €6,999. Fox Factory suspension, Shimano XTR brakes and drivetrain, DT XRC1200 wheels, 11.25 kg.

CFR LTD
Lux Trail CFR LTD // €8,499. RockShox Ultimate suspension, SRAM XX AXS Transmission, Level Ultimate brakes, DT XRC1200 wheels, 11.66 kg.

Ride Impressions

So far, my time on the Lux Trail has been all about hard climbs, long rides, and mellow descents. Based on the nature of the bike, I think things are going to stay that way. The Lux Trail feels like a cross-country bike for the people, and won't easily be confused for a more capable trail bike. I was able to ride plenty of my go-to test tracks for more capable bikes, but not nearly at the pace or confidence I'm used to.

That said, don't take that less-capable claim as a demerit, as that's really not what this little Canyon is about. It feels like a bike made for very long days in the saddle, covering as much ground as possible at a quick clip. While you might have to skirt around some of the gnarlier features and trails, you'll probably make up for it when you're pinned on the road transfers, with the suspension fully locked out. The novelty of the grip-shift twin lockout quickly became a convenience, and something I was happy to rely on for punchy climbs and longer pedaling traverses.

The descending nature of the Lux Trail is sharp and a bit squirrelly, but with a higher-rise bar fitted things feel confidant enough to handle a wide variety of terrain. The suspension was predictable and supportive, with decent grip for a bike meant to maximize efficiency. The conveniences of the tool and spares storage baked into the frame are hard to overlook, and quite well integrated.


Build Notes

I had a couple weird build anomalies on my test bike, which Canyon says should be isolated to this pre-production batch, but things to look out for regardless. The suspension lockouts were routed through brake housing, as opposed to the correct shift housing, making the action feel spongy and imprecise at first. Once fixed, things felt much crisper. The lockout shifter was also using a cable guide that sent the cables out 90° from the bars, which works with the Shimano brakes on some spec levels, but looked a bit silly on the otherwise clean SRAM build. Nothing critical overall, but some small mistakes to keep an eye out for.




Stay tuned for the long term review on the Canyon Lux Trail in the near future.

For more pictures of Lux, head on over to the album here.




Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
168 articles

124 Comments
  • 128 7
 Can we please get an interview with people from the industry as to why cable tourism is trying to be a thing when it's so undesirable?

It's one of the main things that would stop me buying a bike even if it ticked all the other boxes I'm looking for
  • 32 1
 There is article about that. I think what they were saying was mostly: it looks good and saves weight
  • 97 3
 It's cheaper to manufacture and there are customers stupid enough to buy it for looks
  • 13 13
 It looks good and more premium than the more entry level models the showroom. That's the only reason.
  • 32 1
 I bought a new bike this year, and I passed on two out of my three top picks solely due to headset cable routing.
  • 10 0
 Wait till they start running them through the fork…
  • 30 17
 I also would like to hear about Presta valves. Another night, I dreamed everyone was using Schraders again. World was colorful and bikers were happier
  • 7 0
 @Rajis: *they SAY it looks good, and it "saves weight" (maybe a few grams) as a biproduct of making it cheaper to manufacture while making it less convenient (and worse) for the customer.
  • 4 1
 from the podcast interview with Scott:

Brian: How do you parse the various feedback that you get? When you read that all headset cable routing is just the marketing department's fault, is that hurtful? How do you take that on board? Does that affect decision making or is it a good thing?

Reto: I think you always have to be open-minded for feedback. And I think, you know, feedback comes from all different levels. Of course, consumers, at the end of the day really decide what they like and what they feel it is they're looking for. I mean, we get also a lot of really, really good feedback and they like to see that. For example, your suspension doesn't get dirty. It's really clean. It's covered. We also get a lot of feedback from retailers. We get feedback from the market, and from athletes. So, it's really kind of a big panel of people who give us feedback and we have a big team of engineers and designers. They're definitely looking at what is the best solution and what to do on products
  • 7 1
 The frames are cheaper to manufacture. Same reason frames went to internal cable routing.

And like tube in tube cable routing then expensively solved a simple problem, I’m sure the bike industry will “solve” the problems with cable tourism-wasting R&D money on an unnecessary problem. And driving up bike costs in the process.
  • 5 14
flag kntr (Nov 7, 2023 at 6:41) (Below Threshold)
 Why do you not like it? Im curious. Most people I know like internal routing. Yes its a pain to change but...
  • 5 0
 It’s because like any new thing, they don’t have to live with the consequences of the terrible design.
  • 16 0
 @kntr: talk to a high service volume bike shop. The bearings wear out way faster and take 2-3x as long to replace…….oh, and they’re proprietary to a given frame so harder to get as well.

Do you even wrench bro???
  • 15 0
 @misterha: That was epic levels of question dodging. Impressive, really.
  • 3 18
flag kntr (Nov 7, 2023 at 7:13) (Below Threshold)
 @wyorider: I do and that's the reason I I don't care how long it takes to change bearings. Shops shouldn't care either as they get paid for their time. I honestly don't care about the headset routing. I could take or leave it. It's not going to stop me from buying a bike. I rarely have a bike more than 2 years so that helps too.
  • 8 1
 @wyorider: my bro works in a fancy road bike shop - we were talking at the weekend about a build up for a tri bike with extra shifters on the aero bars. They had to build it up with all the pain of routing things inside handlebars, stem, frame. Then after the bike fit, they had to do it all again after cutting down the steerer and removing spacers! I guess they got paid lots for it, but I suppose it's not the done thing to drink beer on a 2 bottle task at work...
  • 11 0
 @mountainsofsussex: You get paid for the time, but it cuts into total available time. It's become common for shops to have a 1-2 week wait for service.......and overly complex designs like internal headset routing eat more of the available shop hours. And people don't want to pay more for shop service. And because of that, good luck finding a mechanic who can do all the things (suspension service, wheel builds, frame prep, gluing tires etc.). As for drinking on the job-that's a shop culture norm that's dying away-and good riddance. A brew or 2 at the end of the day with co-workers and friends is great, but not while wrenching on the clock.
  • 3 0
 @wyorider: I know you are talking about headset cable routing but why the community called it Cable tourism? I'm not english so I don't understand. haha
  • 6 0
 @grnmachine02: he's the Antony Blinken of cable tourism feedback evaluation
  • 3 0
 @CaSentLeTabarnakMonHomme: I would say because it is an unnecessary way of routing cables. In some way it takes detours to the most convenient path.
  • 5 0
 @CaSentLeTabarnakMonHomme: some guy typo'd it in a PB comments section and everyone jumped on it.

Now I'm spending my valuable work time trying find the original link, it's a good read!
  • 13 0
 Found it, here's the origin of Cable Tourism.

@Upduro is the hero we all deserve!

m.pinkbike.com/news/first-ride-propain-tyee-2023.html
  • 3 0
 wow! Unbelievable! When a typo makes so much sense! haha
  • 3 0
 @misterha: aka.....we'd love to get feedback but it's doubtful we'll do a damn thing with it.
  • 4 0
 @Rajis:
"...it looks good..."

IMO, it looks like an afterthought.
  • 1 0
 @misterha: "They're definitely looking at what is the best solution and what to do on products"

Who thinks those are the same thing?
  • 2 0
 @thomasjkenney1024: yeah, it seriously looks like shit.
  • 5 1
 People seem to forget that the majority of mountain bike riders have absolutely zero interest in maintaining or working on their own bike. Even more so, the sleeker the bike looks the more likely they are to buy it. This is how bike industry gets away with shitty "engineering" - as long as the bike is marketed right, it will sell.
  • 1 0
 @kntr: Yeah that's why.
  • 4 0
 @opignonlibre: it for sure will never look more premium, plastic headset and plastic spacers look like shit on any bike, even if you chuck trickstuff brakes, intend fork and all the baller parts you want, it will still look shit with plastic in the cockpit
  • 1 0
 @Ck7lOi: SHH! Don't give them ideas...
  • 2 0
 I've got a Commencal TEMPO and somehow it still seems to be rideable (& a ton of fun). This just isn't a life or death issue for most people.
  • 1 0
 And road bike flat caliper out back? No comments on how this has become bleeding edge high performance for MTB ?? Wtf?!!
  • 67 8
 Interesting that Canyon listened to the masses on the previous flaws, then proceeded to shoot themselves in the foot with the headset cable routing. I do like that they included frame storage. I hope that starts to become the norm. I'd like to here Henry's thoughts considering how much he disliked the previous generation.
  • 11 0
 My inner Liberace really wants the gold one.
  • 2 0
 @codypup: I clearly understand the attraction of the BLING, I like the look of it too , but it comes with a fox dropper and that's a No-No for me . A German brand like CANYON shall be able to put their hands on some good deal Bike Yoke posts .. if only they can listen and please for US offer the CFR with the CFR LTD components
  • 2 1
 I think the EU market is way more into the headset cable routing. Gonna be very hard for brands located and concentrated there to go against fashion...
  • 4 2
 The cables look horrendous from the front. In what way does this look cleaner? So dumb!
  • 1 0
 Cant see it on the picture.. its seems like its even worse now... i see a huge plastic in the headset right?
  • 1 0
 @codypup: so do I. It is real pretty.
  • 43 6
 Fuck off cable tourism
  • 28 0
 "confidant descending geometry" I prefer to have someone to talk to on the climbs, but whatever.
  • 25 3
 Good luck with that headset route and "special" headset bearings because you need to order from Canyon. The headset bearing(top) is not common and hard to find any local bike shop.
  • 15 2
 First thing I noticed - that headtube / headset makes me want to vomit.

I imagine though it is about cost - a less complex layup for the frame as the cable ports are gone and some cheap plastic shite for a headset.

The chances of maintaining this bike using that headset, bearings and plastic parts after 3-4 years of ownership are rather slim.
  • 6 0
 Yip, good enough reason NOT to buy it. BE WARNED! I have an old 2016 Spez Camber, which is now impossible to fix due to the proprietary rear sus linkage. Bike has many miles left in it but will end up cannibalized for a new build because the rear sus cannot be replaced or fixed. What a waste of a great bike.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: Yah i know right? I did the customer's bike last year similar to this bike(same brand tho) and the headset bearing lasted up to 3 months(he rarely go to trail and brand new) and the bearings is already f**ked up and needed to changed unfortunately the top bearings is not common and need to pair with the plastic shim thing(unless 3D print if you are smart to make one).

The cable route is so hassle to route and need to cut the brake hose in order to remove the top bearing and replaced brand new brake hose then replace brand new bearings etc(routing the cable is a bitch)...not forgetting the non common top bearing which is hard to find any local bike shop but need to order from Canyon(it took almost 2 months to arrive just for the top bearing). Crazy!

I don't think their bearings is top quality...worse than aliexpress shit.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: yep-just a way to make the bike cheaper masquerading as and “improvement”.
  • 6 0
 I've never had to replace a top headset bearing.
  • 6 1
 @happyboibike: So, you're saying that you cannot pass the hose thought the top cap with the barb/olive and nut installed? I supposed you could just trim the last 10mm of hose to remove the barb/olive and you probably should have enough slack to install a new one without a total hose replacement. Still seems dumb. The SRAM brakes should also allow you to unscrew the barb without effecting brake hose length.

The big deal for me is how ugly the headset routing is. It's very inelegant.

Tangentially, I had to install a new fork on a Specialized road bike since the original owner cut off the steerer too short and the new owner wanted to add 15mm of spacers. The customer brought the new fork to us. In order to add 15mm of bar height, I had to completely re-hose the bike (it had wireless shifting). A job, which typically would cost $75 labor at our shop (install new fork, which would have included the brake bleed, but no hoses) and be a $100-125 total with materials, cost the customer $325 for the materials and labor, since it took almost three hours to install the new fork. And because of the dumb integrated headset, spacers and stem cap, you are forced to cut the steerer to exactly the length you want it to be, and if you ever want to change stem height or length, you'd have to replace the fork, again, and re hose the bike again. Just a stem length change would require a re hose, which would require you pull the fork out of the bike again anyway. Another $200-250 to to make a stem change.
  • 3 0
 @SJP: have you ever ran a bike with a plastic bearing cover with holes in it for cables?
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: sram used to have - can't remember seeing one recently - a thing called connectamajig which allowed you to do just that, it was generally a calliper end fit.
Take a look at these though:
zenocycleparts.com/collections/q-connector-bicycle-hydraulic-quick-coupler
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Oh wait! I totally forgot...the brake hose was bend 90 degree like bad coz of the headset route was done by someone(i bet someone was super frustrated to route it). That's why have to replace the hose completely and yes it's sram but different olive insert(not the red thing), so yah it can remove without cutting it unless the insert is f**ked up.

Wow that road bike...that's a lot of work.
  • 22 0
 So wireless shifting is half a kilo more plus 1500€... I thought we were paying fortune for saved gram...
  • 9 0
 Yes it is barely lighter than my alu trail bike but with less suspension travel and single piston brakes. I don't really see the appeal here
  • 4 0
 Most of the weight is the dropper. Porky bike for being so xc focused.
  • 3 0
 @somebody-else: considering the spectral you can get it l in 13kg something with decent tires... but 11,25Kg with shimano XTR I would race this bike for marathons...
  • 1 0
 ....
  • 2 1
 @jokerusn: haha yess... it´s silence man!... space for you to breath and putting your thinking about what I am alluding too.................... Wink
  • 1 0
 even the xtr build is heavy af for a xc bike. seems to be a very heavy frame / cheap carbon.
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: (no comment) Big Grin
  • 16 2
 I like the fact that you changed the bars out. On previous field test, there’s always a mention of “if it had this, or that, it would have felt better.”
Then change it out and let us know. Bars and stems are usually easy to change and if it makes the bike better, then we’d like to know.

Hump
  • 13 0
 Legit question, and maybe a podcast topic: At what point is making the seat angle steeper compromising pedaling when not pointed uphill? An XC bike isn't an enduro bike which is optimized to go up and then down, XC trails are up, down and across, are we sacrificing performance on flatter trails? I'd be curious to hear from some experts on how these ever steepening seat tubes are changing how we pedal on the flats, if at all. How steep is too steep?
  • 2 0
 what's the seat angle on a road bike?
  • 4 0
 @MuddyFoxCourierComp: 73-74 degrees, typically.
  • 4 0
 Good question.I feel that the 76 degrees seat tube angle is about Goldilocks for full sus cross country bike at least for me. Once you start riding it, the seat angle would probably get slacker by a 1 degree which will put it around 75 degrees when riding on flats and then maybe will slack a touch more when climbing which is not ideal but not too bad either. Road bikes ST angles are around 74 degrees for good reason. I like long rides and I feel on my bike ( hardtail wit about 74.5 degrees when riding, saged) that it feels just about right on flat riding, any steeper ST angel would put too much pressure on my wrists especially on longer rides. All in all that geo makes sense for this kind of bike, great all around. I’d buy it probably, if I wanted to get one for long cross country trips.
  • 12 0
 OOPS, (Lux Trail CFR LTD vs Lux Trail CFR), add €1,500 to get almost half a kilo (one pound) extra weight, and a number of batteries you need to charge.
  • 14 0
 Ah yes, the Canyon Epic Supercaliber Lux Trail Ultimate
  • 9 0
 Bike looks good but after my Scott Spark I’ll never buy a bike with headset routing again. I gave it a try and it absolutely sucks.
  • 8 0
 28.5# with SID suspension... nope. That is not light enough for 115/120 travel. My newest gen top fuel with Pike/Ultimate at 120/130 is over 1# lighter (and thats still not reallly an xc racing weight at all)
  • 8 0
 Far too heavy for an XC bike. Not enough travel for a more all around bike that you would want to ride outside of a race. I don't get it.
  • 5 1
 I was excited to see what the redesign of the Lux would look like. The geometry changes were exactly what I hoped/wanted to see. And then Canyon put the cables on a vacation……ugh.

Silver lining-feedback in places like PB comments can make a difference. Press fit bottom brackets were largely adopted to reduce costs, and they’re going away based on consumer feedback. It’ll take several years, but hopefully cable tourism goes the way of chainstay mounted U-Brakes.
  • 8 0
 Death to flat mount in the MTB world!!
  • 9 3
 It’s pretty ballsy to put headset routing on bikes that get so heavily warrantied.
  • 5 0
 Canyon just warrantied a Neuron for me. They didn't locktite the suspension bolts and the main pivot bearing backed out. I rode it enough without knowing that it damaged the frame. They warrantied, allowed me to change from Neuron to Spectral, and are picking up $250 of the cost to migrate parts over. AND, they're sending a hat & t-shirt. They've always been very good to me.
  • 9 2
 Hot take, I have a Scott spark with headset cable routing and it’s fine
  • 4 1
 I have a Commencal Tempo & same
  • 3 0
 I just love the endless travel roulette. Take all the models, start increasing travel over the course of 5-8 years, then re-release a very short travel bike. We are going to see 120mm rear, 130mm front XC bikes, then someone will release and 80mm travel bike, and claim it as revolutionary, then over the course of the next 5 years bump up the travel on that one as well.
  • 5 1
 Looks like each model is 1kg heavier than the previous version which starts to detract from it's XC focus, wasn't expecting that
  • 4 2
 I don't know why but I "hate" gradients on bikes. I have a Trek Farley and the gradient bothers me I just want to repaint it. I guess my mind just not comprehend the arbitrary decision to start a gradient here and stop it there for no reason.
  • 5 0
 You bought a bike you don't like to look at?
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: Yeah it had a discount that made up for it^^. I wanted a fat but couldn't afford one when it was hyped everywhere and the Farley was pretty much the only one still for sale.
I quite like the fat for small rides around home, no big mountains or whatever but as a full rigid bike you get enough trail "feedback" to make the ride enjoyable, I'm even thinking about ordering a bespoke one now, with a single color :p
  • 6 0
 Why are you calling this obviously XC bike downcountry...
  • 3 0
 I don't understand this bike. Canyon already has the Lux World Cup for XC duty. Why is this "trail" version running short travel stepcast forks and 115mm rear travel with remote lockouts?
  • 1 0
 Because they have the Spectral, had to slot one in the middle.
  • 4 0
 Is there that much more additional support added to the down tube to accommodate the in frame storage or can I just take a sawzall to an older model? Asking for a friend
  • 2 0
 OK... I can't tell if Canyon is trying to aim at Marathon xc or trail riding with this. The riding position looks trail but the geo says xc to me? I'd be interested to hear how it does in long term testing including some XC races.
The sweet spot seems to be the CF8 with the performance elite Fox and XT drivetrain for $1000 less than the GX AXS Transmission and Select+ RS.
  • 4 0
 What's that thingie under the toptube? Something to do with the lockout? No, I don't mean the shock, silly.
  • 3 0
 Multitool
  • 2 0
 @laupe: Hm, thought it was somerhing cool
  • 1 0
 @Canyon-PureCycling Can anyone tell me where those images are taken? Appears to be a beach on Puget Sound in Washington State. I fly fish in the salt water and looks like a great spot for sea run cutthroat trout fishing. thanks!
  • 2 0
 I took these pictures in Bellingham.
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: Thanks a bunch! didn't expect a response.
  • 3 0
 Spot on bike for me, but headset routing is a dealbreaker. On some roadbikes the routing can at least look good, but at mtb's it always look like sh*t!
  • 2 0
 Read an article somewhere asserting that up forking the previous model to 130mm solved not niggles except for the flat mounts
  • 8 4
 Do NOT buy Canyon bikes!!! The after sales services sucks!
  • 5 1
 Was on board until the headset routing. Hard pass.
  • 1 1
 why?
  • 1 1
 "We last touched on the Canyon Lux Trail in last year's Downcountry Field Test"
Unless I can't find it I believe it was tested in 2021 vice last year?

Bike looks fast though - I'd like to try it out, but for that cable routing.
  • 2 0
 Flat mount brakes are awesome on road/gravel bikes but until good 4 piston brakes are available in flat mount it shouldn't be on a frame like this.
  • 4 1
 More brands out there every day and bikes looking more similar....
  • 7 5
 I don’t understand why 36t chainring is the maximum on XC bike. 38t should be the bare minimum.
  • 1 0
 38t may be a smart spec for some XCC and XCO courses, but given that weight, this bike was designed with something else in mind.
  • 3 1
 My thought process: "Thank goodness, they've finally updated that bike." ... Looks at head tube. ... "S**t."
  • 3 0
 Why is so heavy? On my xc/ down-country bike i don't want it to be 28 lbs.
  • 3 0
 Great review Big D
  • 2 0
 DAmnnnn, build to price ration is ON POINT. I feel robbed.
  • 2 0
 The finish on those GX transmission cranks looks terrible.
  • 1 0
 Probably the worst looking product SRAM has ever made
  • 1 0
 The whole Transmission line up looks rushed to market with no time for aesthetics/graphics.
  • 2 0
 Looks like that the Epic WC should have been…
  • 1 0
 "Canyon seems to have taken that feedback to heart"
Sure, they only have made it this far by reading PB articles!
  • 1 0
 This looks great! Who cares about headset routing when we finally have threaded bottom bracket again!
  • 1 0
 Does the frame construction allow to change rotor diameter from 160 to 180 mm?
  • 1 0
 Looks fast and sharp. Just needs some beefier enduro-country tires.
  • 1 0
 Dario, what's up with your saddle tilting backwards on this one?
  • 2 0
 Nothin' special, just hadn't dipped the nose yet.
  • 1 0
 Canyon is crap product plain and simple !
  • 2 2
 Canyon, great bikes, terrible paint schemes
  • 1 0
 In the US anyway. The ROW gets all the good paint.
  • 4 5
 What's with the flat-mount hate? On a rear brake, it is fundamentally better because there are no threads in the frame.
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