REEB Cycles Officially Launches Steel Short Travel Trail Bike

Sep 27, 2022 at 20:37
by REEB Cycles  
Imagery of Michael Eldridge Emily Harris riding the REEB SST at Monarch Crest. Imagery to be used in marketing efforts of the REEB SST.

PRESS RELEASE: REEB Cycles

REEB Cycles is officially launching the steel short travel (120mm) “SST” trail bike for widespread availability, a development that relies heavily on exploring the limits of manufacturing technology to build a truly unique high performance mountain bike. The SST is the first trail ready indication of their investment in aerospace manufacturing experience, engineering and materials.

The SST trail bike blends the custom steel tubeset from Jeff Lenosky’s signature Redikyelous hardtail with the design, fabrication and abuse testing of Adam Prosise’s groundbreaking BREWser. Pairing the suspension technology design from the critically acclaimed Sqweeb and utilizing innovative aerospace-grade SLM 3D printed frame components, the SST embodies the rowdy and playful character of REEB’s proven steel hardtails while providing enough suspension to hit the big lines.


At the heart of the SST is a brand new, REEB exclusive 4-bar suspension system that combines the pedaling and braking performance of a Horst-link with the simplicity and low weight of a flex-stay. REEB uses custom formed steel stays, a hollow yoke and proprietary dropouts to precisely control suspension movement and increase lateral stiffness over a traditional steel frame. This design gives the SST incredible small bump sensitivity, supportive ramp throughout the travel, and a sublime balance of stiffness and compliance. Leverage ratio, kinematics and geometry are all tuned to create an ultra responsive chassis that jumps off the line, crushes climbs, slaps berms, launches gaps, and floats through chunder like a much bigger bike.

Essential to SST development was exploring the limits of manufacturing technology and applying it to build a light, stiff and strong steel bike. The SST features SLM 3D printed hollow stainless steel chainstay yoke, seatstay clevis, and rear dropouts. The result is a stronger, stiffer, lighter, and more elegant trail bike.


“Metal additive manufacturing (3D Printing) has intrigued us for a while, but until recently it was not a cost effective or accessible technology. Over the last couple of years 3D printing has become much more mainstream so we jumped at the opportunity to make some parts,” said the SST and Sqweeb design engineer and REEB Cycles President, Steve “Space Cowboy” Ziegler. Steve brings more than two decades of aerospace manufacturing, engineering, and operations experience paired with a lifelong addiction to fast bikes and a deep connection with the REEB brand.


REEB has been able to develop the lightweight steel full suspension frame by leveraging Selective Laser Melting 3D printing to create thin wall parts with internal structure that would be impossible to manufacture on any subtractive CNC machining process. REEB leveraged the process to develop the steel dropouts, main pivot yokes and seatstay clevis bosses that are lighter, and stronger than machined aluminum parts. Their appearance is also sleek and matches the aesthetics of steel tubing.

The REEB Cycling fabrication team (Adam Prosise and Robbie Jackson) also adds James Bridge, who has over 8 years of experience developing engineering concepts into reliable products for the aerospace industry. James has contributed to multiple successful spaceflight missions and shares the team’s love for precision fabrication and fast machines.

With these additions REEB plans to expand their scope of operations to focus on increasing manufacturing capability and reducing lead times while retaining the grassroots culture and exquisite craftsmanship that are synonymous with the brand. The company is committed to bringing people, technology, and culture together to develop and deliver extraordinary products to customers who share a passion for riding bikes and having fun.

Sqweeb aesthetics are visible via the in-house CNC machined rocker link, although with a reduced size and weight to match the SST’s intended use. All SST pivots have been extensively tested on the Sqweeb frame and paired with enduro bearings throughout.

Visit the NEW website at www.reebcycles.com to order any model of bike directly from REEB Cycles.

Current SST lead times are:

FRAME ONLY: December 1st, 2022

X01 AXS BUILD: January 1st, 2023

GX Build: February 1st, 2023


148 Comments

  • 161 4
 Everyone get out your press-release bingo cards. I've got 3D printing, aerospace, playful, and small bump sensitivity. Just missing 'quiver killer' for bingo. Does look like a cool bike though.
  • 30 1
 No high-pivot, no bingo Wink But they were close, I especially appreciate mentioning "aerospace", pitty no steel planes out there Wink
  • 27 0
 " This design gives the SST incredible small bump sensitivity, supportive ramp throughout the travel, and a sublime balance of stiffness and compliance. Leverage ratio, kinematics and geometry are all tuned to create an ultra responsive chassis that jumps off the line, crushes climbs, slaps berms, launches gaps, and floats through chunder like a much bigger bike"
I developed intestinal polyps just from reading that, thanks.
  • 9 0
 I got "stiffness", "compliance" and "ultra responsive". Good round, this!
  • 24 1
 At least they were smart enough to omit the price so the PB price police can't complain that it costs more than $10.
  • 28 0
 @Crossmaxx: I always get stiffness when I look at nice steel frames.
  • 19 1
 At least it is made in the US unlike most the bikes on here.
  • 12 0
 @number44: Would you describe your stiffness as ultra responsive?
  • 16 0
 @Crossmaxx: You mean like my issues with tubeless? Two pumps and there's sealant everywhere? Yeah.
  • 22 0
 Aerospace is too vague at this point of evolution in bullshitting. They need to be more specific, is the bike’s tech related to finding alien life, deviating asteroids, colonizing mars,… ? We need to know before we buy.
  • 8 1
 @foggnm: I think no one will complain about price when it's made in US. I get it when you make things locally and pay a fair wage to your workers. What pisses us off are brands which make frames overseas and charge like they would make it locally....
  • 9 1
 @powpowpow: Probing Uranus.
  • 6 0
 No F1 technology, no care.
  • 7 1
 @lkubica: or the ones that assemble in the states who try to spin that like it was made entirely here (looking at you yeti).
  • 4 0
 Rowdy. ROWDY! FFS, how could anyone miss rowdy?!
  • 5 0
 @number44: Like Disturbed, I'm down with the stiffness.
  • 2 0
 @foggnm: Don't you worry, I checked, and I'm angry!!
  • 2 0
 @Crossmaxx: What about "steed"?
  • 5 0
 @lkubica: What's ironic about this is that it's pretty well accepted amongst general aviation designers that a 4130 welded steel fuselage covered in fabric is the lightest and safest (although not most aerodynamic) construction method for aircraft.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: Price, and weight, too.
  • 1 0
 and doesn't go in the trash after a few years.
  • 2 0
 I'm disappointed I haven't got "steel is real" from the comments:-( .
  • 1 0
 @flattoflat: just wait for the Ra Press release haha
  • 2 0
 Missing:

"Large Water Bottle inside the Frame"
"Threaded BB"
"No cables routed through the headset"
"Adjustable geometry"

And then there are the acronyms. SST, SLM, CNC, etc...
  • 2 0
 @iamsx: Yep, was going to say that too. Plus there is a lot of other steel in an aircraft too. Strength to volume ratio may be lower compared to aluminium, but strength to weight ratio isn't. I wouldn't be surprised if my shifter cables are aerospace grade too (like the ones used for steering). Those with AXS are missing out on this.
  • 47 0
 Ordered mine in July. Easy decision for me. I justified the cost by making the assumption I'll have this bike until I'm collecting social security (not that far off). I hold onto steel bikes for a very long time (in other words, I don't part with them).

Hand made, short travel, aggressive geo, full squish, steel frame out of a small shop in Colorado where you get a reply to emails quickly from a rad crew of builders? Easy decision. I'm not much for assigning emotions to inanimate objects, but this thing is flat out sexy. While many riders in my area show up on trails with the latest carbon offerings every season, I'll be cranking out the miles on this bike for a very long time.
  • 7 0
 Hell yeah brother!!
  • 5 0
 Everyone was a pleasure to deal with when I was asking a bunch of questions!
  • 1 0
 2 questions - 1) have you received it yet and if so, how long did it take to get it? 2) How much (i couldn't easily find a price on the website.)
  • 3 0
 @gtill9000: Haven't yet received it. I ordered my frame in July and was recently told it will ship mid November. Since I ordered early I got the early bird price, so a little less than the current price (I think $3100). But according to the site the frame-only options are sold out, so you'd need to buy a complete build and I'm not sure what those are running.
  • 3 0
 @prosauce: I don't know how to say this any other way than:

I've never been more disappointed in myself that I'm not in a financial position to buy this over the Asian-made frame I ride today. And it's truly depressing knowing that won't change. It's a shame this bike is destined to be in the hands of so few. It looks perfect; I love the origin. Good work.
  • 4 0
 @hotpotato: Well, when I say it was an easy decision for me, I didn't mean it was easy on my pocket book. Let's just say I'm cutting back in numerous ways to cover the cost and I'm essentially screwing over my future self to have fun now. But I totally understand where you're coming from. The bike market in general has put even mid-level bikes out of range for most of the population. I have a 12 year old steel hardtail that finally broke after years of riding the piss out of it. I have my forever Ti hardtail bought 8 years ago I"ll never part with, and if my record holds up, the SST will remain in my possession until someone pries it free from my cold dead hands.
  • 2 0
 @gtill9000: My bad, I read the site wrong. It's not sold out.
  • 39 0
 That truly is a thing of beauty.
  • 25 0
 The FAQs section is spot on; "Why steel?" "Why are you here?"
  • 2 0
 Had a good belly chuckle when I read this.
  • 25 0
 Bike look good.
  • 18 2
 Wow, REEB coming in hot with the steel flex stays! Pretty incredible from such a small boutique brand.
  • 17 5
 Don't all steel bikes have "flex" stays?
  • 4 0
 @foggnm: Our chainstays have a dedicated, formed flexure to allow flex in a controlled area, creating a horst link style flex.
  • 2 4
 @prosauce: it was a joke about steel ...chill brother
  • 17 0
 REEB and DEEW go great with SEKIB.
  • 12 0
 "Yeah so my friends call me Steve 'Space Cowboy' Ziegler"
"Steve, only you call yourself that"
"My name is Space Cowboy. Spaaaaaaace Coooowboy"
"Less talking, more passing the joint Steve"
  • 13 0
 Coolest part : a 240mm dropper is specced on the L and XL, and a 210mm on the Medium. Love to see it.
  • 10 1
 Names bike SST yet doesn't bite the record label's logo or give a nod to Ginn. Reeb may not be as hardore as they seem. All kidding aside, a nice looking rig.
  • 1 0
 I believe they mentioned previously that the SST acronym they had in mind was SuperSonic Transport, like the Concorde and such.
  • 8 1
 Sticking with the backwards Beer theme they should have a Regal or Dub in the line up.
  • 10 0
 I own this bike. Love it. Couldn't be happier. If you are the type to swoon over a steel FS, you know what to do.
  • 5 0
 What does one of these weigh when fully built up?
  • 9 0
 @arrowheadrush: My large bike is under 30lbs without pedals. Fox34Factory/X01/DC type tires/Mara/misc bling. A reasonable but light trail bike build spec'd by me.

A steel frame is heavier than carbon, etc so there's a weight cost. I recommend contacting Reeb for a realistic estimate about their/your builds.

For comparison - PB's Tallboy 5 (large X01 AXS) test bike is 1lb lighter than mine: www.pinkbike.com/news/first-ride-the-2023-santa-cruz-tallboy-gets-updated-not-overhauled.html

^I spent less and think I have a better build and more capable platform. YMMV.
  • 3 0
 @arrowheadrush: Mine (L) weighs 33lbs with a bunch of heavier components on it (and some lighter to offset the weight where possible), like a coil shock. If you use a bunch of big bike stuff like burlier forks, wheels, tires, metal bars, etc, it'll be above 30, but if you can get by with lighter tires, "trail" wheels, carbon bars, and a Pike or 34, you could probably get it under 30.

I tend to break stuff, so weight was less of a factor unless I could shed it somewhere without compromising durability.
  • 8 0
 @arrowheadrush: Builds are 28-35 lbs. We have been building them on the heavier end to hold up to our terrain in Colorado. Cush Core front and rear, Lyrik forks, Strong rims, thick casing tires etc.
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: The best I could get my down-country Cotic at was around 27lbs... But, that's with a SID ultimate, NOX carbon wheels, Fox Float DPS, and some skimpy Maxxis Aspens. The ride wasn't the best... I quickly turned it back into a trail bike. As it sits now, with heavier wheels, more suspension, and inserts, I think it's like low/mid 30's.
  • 3 2
 @prosauce: A 35lb 120mm 29’er. sign me up
  • 2 0
 @arrowheadrush: mine is 31 lbs with XT, Pike, SuperDeluxe, Assegai/Aggressor tires. Only light-ish parts are Light Bicycles 30mm internal carbon wheels. Before weighing we all thought it was lighter—it climbs really well. My first ride on it was a 4 hour 4100’ death March, next day Snowmass bike park almost keeping up with MegaTowers.
The SST rips.
  • 9 1
 REEB? More like... NEED(!!!!!!).
  • 4 0
 Of all the non-carbon shorttravel trailbikes this is my favorite. Drooling over the bike since I signed the newsletter back in march. Unfortunately direct import from the states to Germany, with all the taxes and fees, makes it really expensive. Plus the price has gone up a bit since then, which doesn´t help either. Bummer. :-/
  • 4 0
 Met these dudes and got to ride a Sqweeb at the Sedona bike fest a few years back and out of the 8-10 bikes I rode that weekend it's the only one I remember. Rad bikes, good dudes, definitely on my short list for my next bike!!
  • 4 0
 The shreddy cousin of that elusive Swarf Contour from years back. Very stoked to build my own. Checks all the boxes. Not plastic, quiet, progressive layout, external cable routing, options for extra bosses wherever you want, threaded BB, room for big bottle, fits a 240mm dropper, MUSA by dudes who shred, coil compatible, cheaper than most fancy carbon bikes, will last forever. Seems like a no brainer.
  • 3 2
 So close, shame about the trunnion.
  • 1 0
 @Velocipedestrian: I’ve never had a trunnion. Are my hopes and dreams about to be ruined?
  • 1 0
 @ckohlmeier: trunnion makes the shock a rigid member of the frame, this means any side loading or twisting coming from the rear goes through the shock, and wears the sliding surfaces.
Steel frames are famous for the ride quality provided by the material flex...
  • 5 0
 Adam is a shredder and an absolute master fabricator. I've seen one of these things in person, and it's next-level. The want is STRONG with this one. Hoping to throw a leg over one at outerbike this weekend.
  • 5 0
 stoked on the updated wait time availability and the $100 deposit to reserve your spot. put my deposit down yesterday, can’t wait.
  • 2 0
 Is there any word on pricing? I did not see it on the website.
  • 2 0
 @Telebikes: i believe the frame only with no shock is 3150
  • 3 0
 I really want one of these , My Sqweeb has been the best bike I have owned. The only bike I have kept longer than two years, finishing up my fourth season on it and still running strong. And this thing is steel , its gonna ride forever ! Keep up the good work crew and @prosauce ! Hell ya brother !
  • 7 0
 Is raw a color option?
  • 5 0
 Nice, now they should incorporate that straight downtube on the rest of their squish frames.
  • 6 0
 Lets see Jeff Lenosky riding this beast!
  • 3 0
 Saw this back when it was teased. Incredibly excited to see the reviews, as it's definitely top on my list of desires. Hopefully I can justify it, hope It gets sent around for reviews
  • 4 0
 This is so cool to see. So many parts I have been designing myself for a similar bike. 3D printing. Damn, great minds
  • 6 0
 Nice work, friends!
  • 3 0
 I've seen a few Sqweebs in person. Sick bikes, this looks really good. Unique trail bike that seems to be fully thought out.
  • 2 0
 love my sqweeb and it always turns heads locally. practical bike that rips and American made.
  • 2 0
 One advantage of a steel FS bike like this is it can cost-effectively use different CS lengths. Wonder why they decided not to do so?
  • 1 0
 I suspect it's not that simple lengthening the rear triangle when the seat stays are flex stays.
  • 4 0
 @jdejace:

This is not your “typical” spindly seat stay flex design. This is a “Horst link” style chainstay flex stay. Higher torsional stiffness and much better braking characteristics. Lengthening/shortening the stays has not been on our list of improvements, everybody has been very happy with 435mm.
  • 2 0
 @prosauce: I only meant that there's more to it than making it longer and accounting for the different leverage ratio as with most manufacturers' Horst link size specific stays. You would have to design the stays to flex proportionally in every size too. It's more work.
  • 3 0
 Getting UK vibes from this rig.
Definitely my style, @REEBcycles you guys coming to Moab OB?
Sharp looking bike!
  • 1 0
 I believe they are. I think they posted it on social media not long ago or in a email. Talking about having the SST there.
  • 4 0
 Yep! Trailer is loaded with a full size run of demos!
  • 4 0
 Awesome! See you guys at Outerbike Moab this weekend!
  • 4 0
 Lovely. I want.
  • 2 0
 Ah steel full suspension, such a forbidden fruit. Gotta make an opportunity to throw a leg over this one!
  • 1 0
 @slippynicky: i bet you say that about all the bikes
  • 3 1
 Pricing would be nice to see before putting down a deposit. Never heard of taking a deposit for an unannounced price.
  • 8 0
 If you click the builds or frame only options, it gives pricing. $3150 frame / $6495 GX / $9850 X01 AXS
  • 2 0
 @noapathy: ah thanks, missed that
  • 3 0
 I've been riding mine for a couple weeks now. Hell of a bike!
  • 2 1
 Fairly similar to the Flaremax, geometry wise. Except this can take a coil, and has the flex stays instead of a drop link. Curious how they compare with such differences.
  • 3 0
 shorter stays and open front triangle on this as well. the chainstay length is what kept me from buying a flaremax. as well as the seat tube insertion length
  • 1 0
 @frigofff: I've got the Flaremax and I ride the seat forward for super steep climbs. The steeper seat angle would help with that but the longer stays would probably make it worse.
  • 2 0
 The Flaremax also has an aluminum rear end. My friend loves his, but this Reeb thing looks even better
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I do like the extra clearance (2mm) but would love to see them side by side. Maybe someday PB can do a shootout of steel FS.
  • 3 0
 Finally a FS bike that isn’t pig ugly,
  • 2 0
 Looks like the bikes Swarf used to make and that’s definitely a good thing. Love the HT silhouette.
  • 3 0
 skooL !looc
  • 3 0
 I want this
  • 2 0
 Is it me or there is no mention of wheel size?
  • 1 0
 If you scroll down the reeb website page, you eventually learn that it has clearance for 29 x 2.5” tire.
  • 6 0
 Are there wheel sizes beside 29er?
  • 4 6
 Light short travel…..with a rear coil?!

Coil shocks are awesome on big bikes for doing big-bike stuff. This seems like (heavy) overkill.

Would like to see what “light” actually means-in British Imperial or Metric units……
  • 3 0
 I have been running my SST with coil and it does great. I've had other 120-130mm bikes with a coil in the back and how they handle it varies, some handle it really well and others do not. The SST is progressive enough that it doesn't really have issues with bottoming out hard with a coil and doesn't wallow around or feel too dead.

I don't have a weight in KGs but mine comes in at 33lbs with heavy enduro wheels / tires, heavy bars, coil shock, and enduro fork. I think with a Pike, lighter wheels/tires, carbon bars, etc you could pretty easily get it under 30lbs.
  • 7 0
 coil is the best for lazy asses like me who can't be bothered with shock pumps. your suspension will always feel exactly the same. its the best. and coil sensitivity is unbeatable.
  • 1 2
 @adrennan: I agree on coil feel.

However, on a light short travel bike that’s a lot of extra weight.

But I also don’t get the whole heavy bike with short travel thing.

Good trail and enduro bikes are very efficient in terms of power transfer, and suspension can be set up/tuned to be as damp or lively as you’d want.
  • 2 2
 @shinook: At that weight I just don’t get the short travel thing.

Clanging off the bottom out bumper all day doesn’t seem worth whatever (marginal) efficiency gain there might be.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: i would imagine it is quite a bit more progressive than its longer travel brother and could make or a super poppy ride. but this is coming from a person who rides DJs on lift served trails and has owned a 35 pound hardtail so maybe i just don't know what i am talking about.
  • 7 0
 @wyorider: Travel isn't really the only part of the equation, even though a lot of riders focus on that entirely, the geometry and suspension performance are just as important. The bigger travel bikes I've had were longer wheelbase, slacker bikes that were more of a handful of some trails, even if they were more stable on bigger downhills. They also reduce your engagement with the trail, where a bigger bike feels more dead, short travel bikes feel more engaging to ride.

My last bike was a 2020 Enduro, for instance, which pedaled plenty well and was responsive despite it's geo and travel #s, but it made riding some trails more boring and less engaging. It was also a handful on tighter XC-type trails and the option of throwing some lighter/faster tires on it for that type of trail wasn't a thing. Both bikes had really good suspension performance IMO (they don't hang up on square edges, generally track well, etc), but the geo/kinematics/travel on the SST means it's more responsive to input regardless of weight. You feel the trail more, which is more to the point. The SST does climb better and is more efficient, but I've had short travel bikes I felt climbed poorly compared to my previous Enduro, hell I've ridden 130 bikes that were less efficient than it was climbing, so travel numbers does not always translate to efficiency. I doubt most people buying this bike are doing so to point and shoot down the hill during an enduro race, unless you are able to ride like @prosauce.

It's still lighter than most bikes I've had and I can lighten it up a few pounds if I wanted to do so, I just don't because riding 4-5 days a week here tends to wear on components and I'm more concerned about longevity. I find the way it rides more engaging and enjoyable day to day than a big bike which, while it may climb efficiently, is a little too dead and makes some trails a bit more boring. OTOH, I'm not out to just pin it to the bottom of the hill as fast as I can anymore, I'm out to enjoy the ride and take advantage of the features on the trail, which IMO shorter travel bikes (not just the SST) make more feasible than a big bike does.
  • 5 0
 Coil or air available, you pick. I pick coil. Sometimes, not all the time.
  • 1 2
 @wyorider: couldn't agree more
  • 1 1
 Bikes look amazing, albeit out of my price range. Wish there were far more steel options out there! No if only they would do something about those horrible names
  • 1 3
 $3,150.00 frame only, no shock. Holy cow my hopes that a steel bike might provide a lower price than a carbon frame are dead. It's about the same price as the US build Guerilla Gravity carbon Trail Pistol frame at $3,195. Definitely hoped that not having to cover the cost of mold tooling would be much more competitive against the GG. Maybe if it were titanium being the same price would put it at an advantage.
  • 2 0
 Titanium is not better than steel though and steel fabrication costs just as much as Titanium. It's a slightly lighter raw material but there are other design considerations that don't give it any advantage other than a slightly different ride feel. Production wise carbon moulds can be amortised over many units made where as metal fab'd frames don't get cheaper per unit the more you make.
  • 3 0
 id pay more for steel of carbon any day of the week
  • 2 0
 cant wait to see jeff lenosky climb horsethief bench on it!
  • 1 0
 Tony Ellsworth is going to file a lawsuit over the SST.
  • 1 0
 which part?
  • 2 0
 @devlincc: the name.
  • 1 0
 @gonzocycle: got you. I actually looked them up as I wasn't sure if they made bikes anymore. They have two frames showing but click on the models and '404'! Looks like they aren't using the SST moniker anymore either. Not sure what they trademark laws are. Interesting.
  • 1 0
 @devlincc: My post was sarcastic, sort of. Ellsworth sued Turner bikes back in the day for using a 4 bar chainstay pivot (which turner had been using for years before Ellsworth showed up) which Ellsworth stole from turner, claimed was a proprietary location for his bikes and then patented.
  • 2 0
 I need it
  • 1 0
 Why no pricing on their website?
  • 1 0
 Click an option and the price appears up above, I couldn't find it for a while either.
  • 1 0
 What does the frame weight with a rear air shock?
  • 1 0
 sweet bike!
  • 2 3
 Single pivot with very flexible chainstays ≠ four-bar suspension
  • 1 2
 $4k / frame? $$$
  • 2 0
 Happy I got in on that pre-order pricing!
  • 2 0
 Not a $4k frame.
  • 2 0
 $3,150 frame.
  • 2 0
 Not bad for a small shop
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