GT Fury Review

Jul 1, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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TESTED
GT Fury


WORDS Mike Levy
PHOTOS Bryce Piwek

GT couldn't have written a better script if they tried. After a year of the Atherton siblings racing on the original carbon fiber Fury, with admittedly dated geometry, the company debuted a completely new version of the bike last off-season. Slightly more travel, a revised Independent Drivetrain and, most importantly, drastically evolved geometry that better suits today's racers and tracks. Jump forward a few months and Gee and Rachel have won both of the first two World Cup races of the 2013 season, which has to be the most stunning debut of a new downhill bike to date. While there can be no arguing that GT has left the gate on a flyer, and that their World Cup racers are clearly fond of the new Fury, just how well does the 220mm travel bike perform under riders who don't have the DNA or skill set of the Athertons? Our exclusive test of the new Fury came aboard a bare frame that we assembled with a mix of SRAM, Avid, RockShox, FOX and Spank components, a build kit that had our test bike weighing in at a very respectable 36.9lb. GT will offer four different versions of the Fury, all assembled around the same aluminum frame, that range from $3,099.00 for the Elite model to $8,140 USD for the World Cup build, as well as a frame only option (price to be announced) for those who want to build up their Fury with parts of their choice.


GT Fury Details

• Intended use: Downhill racing
• Rear wheel travel: 220mm/8.6''
• Aluminum front and rear triangles
• Uses revised Independent Drivetrain suspension
• Single pivot suspension w/ stiffening link
• FOX DHX RC4 shock
• Slacker, lower, and longer than previous Fury
• Full length 1.5'' head tube
• 12 x 150mm axle spacing
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• Weight: 36.9lb as tested (as tested)
• Frame weight: 7.72lb (Claimed, w/o shock)
• Availability: Sept/Oct, 2013
• MSRP: $3,099.00 - $8,140 USD


Unconventional Numbers

Geometry has moved along quite a ways since the original Fury was designed in 2008/2009, and the old bike's 65° head angle was looking dated, so it comes as no surprise that GT went with a much slacker front end that puts the front wheel further out ahead of the rider, with the bike employing a 63° head angle. What did come as a shock to us, though, was the 657mm top tube length for our medium sized test bike. For reference, a medium Trek Session sits
at 582mm and a Santa Cruz V10 at 594mm. Top tube measurements only tell part of the story, with reach (the position of the handlebar relative to the bottom bracket) revealing the rest: 398mm for the medium Session and 383mm for the V10. The Fury? A whopping 438mm. So, it's long, but why? GT's Gee Atherton explains that, ''You can make a mistake and as the front end jumps from under you you've got space to move and correct before you're in that danger zone of your weight being over the front axle.'' The other, more obvious benefit is that having the front end further out there makes for a much more competent feeling bike when pointing down steep sections of trail. The concept isn't new, with Mondraker's ''Forward Geometry'' using the same basic principles, and one or two other manufacturers explored the idea in the past, but the difference is that GT intends the new Fury to be used with a stubby 30mm stem instead of the drastically short 10mm unit that Mondraker uses.

That long front end makes for an equally long wheelbase, with the bike measuring in at 1231mm overall. That is 50mm longer than the Session and 86mm longer than the V10, all despite the new Fury's rear end being 10mm shorter than the old bike. Again, this fact highlights just how long the front of the bike is compared to some of the competition. The bike's bottom bracket height is also quite low, although at 349mm it isn't the lowest when it comes to production downhill bikes.


GT Fury Photo by Bryce Piwek
  The Fury sports a mighty looking swingarm (left), and the bike's axle is clamped in place on both the drive and non-drive side (right).

Fury Construction Details

There is no carbon to be found on the new Fury frame, with GT choosing to debut an aluminum version of the bike before making the anticipated leap to carbon fiber in the future. Regardless, GT says that the bare frame weighs 300 grams less than the previous carbon version, as well as sporting significantly improved rigidity all around, no doubt a byproduct of the frame's massive aluminum tubing and clever construction. The top tube is large enough in size to look as if it would pass as a down tube on many other bikes, and it drops down sharply from the full length 1.5'' head tube while becoming more ovalized as it nears the seat tube. That same theme continues out back, with GT manufacturing a solid looking swingarm that offers a curiously large amount of tire clearance. The bike's 12 x 150mm axle threads in from the non-drive side, and GT uses pinch bolts on both sides of the swingarm to keep it from shifting in its home.

GT Fury Photo by Bryce Piwek
  A huge pivot axle and bearings, as well as the swingarm being captured between spars on the front triangle (left), all allude to GT's quest for chassis rigidity. The same can be said for the stabilizing 'scissor linkage' that pivots off of the rear shock mounting point (right).

GT has been clear about their desire to create a chassis that is leaps and bounds stiffer than their previous designs, and they boast about some serious improvements in that department: 26% at the front of the bike and 38% at the bottom bracket. Those are some big numbers, but they are entirely believable given just how burly the frame looks in person. The bike's swingarm uses a massive diameter aluminum pivot axle that turns on equally large sealed bearings, and the swingarm itself is captured within twin spars welded to the down tube and upright junction. The whole arrangement not only looks impressive, it also allows GT to space the main pivot bearings out as widely as possible, adding further stiffness.

The rearward shock mount is also home to a compact linkage, with the shock mounting hardware also acting as the pivot assembly. While it may look like the shock is controlled via the linkage, it is in fact a pair of interconnected links used to arrest lateral movement of the swingarm, without affecting the suspension's action.

GT Fury Photo by Bryce Piwek
  The Fury's revised Independent Drivetrain suspension has been designed specifically for downhill racing, with both a new main pivot location and a much more compact linkage at its bottom end.

The Fury's Independent Drivetrain Suspension Explained

GT has long been known for their I-Drive suspension layout, referred to as 'Independent Drivetrain' on more recent models, that utilizes a ''floating'' bottom bracket unit. This single pivot suspension configuration has been designed to allow for a relatively high main pivot without the drawbacks that are usually associated with it - excessive chain growth. The high pivot helps the bike to swallow up hard, direct impacts thanks to the rearward axle path that it affords, but it is the floating bottom bracket that lets such a design work without the massive chain growth (tugging on the chain as the bike goes through its travel) that would usually be associated with such a layout. GT's Independent Drivetrain does this by letting the bottom bracket move in approximately the same plane as the rear axle by locating it on a separate element that pivots off of the swingarm, all while being attached to the front triangle by a short link, essentially creating a four-bar linkage layout. In the simplest of terms, the bottom bracket moves rearward slightly to mitigate the chain growth of the bike's high pivot. GT's approach has been around for awhile in a few different executions, all having great success on the race circuit, including Gee and Rachel's dominance of the first two World Cup stops of 2013.


How is the Fury's Suspension Different From the Old Design?

While both the new Fury shown here and the previous generation may use a similar looking layout, GT has made some very important changes on this latest iteration. The most obvious distinction between the two is the location of the main pivot, with it positioned much lower on the new bike. GT's Etienne Warnery, the engineer behind the new Fury, told us that this gives the bike ''better pedalling performance when you sprint on rough terrain''. How so? The lower pivot should be less affected by chain tension and therefore stay in contact with the ground instead of losing traction due to it firming up. The other major difference is the much shorter length of the dog bone link, the short connecting rod that ties the floating bottom bracket unit to the front triangle. This small piece determines how much the bottom bracket unit moves as the bike goes through its travel, with it having about 10mm of total motion, and that lowering that figure relative to the old bike was an important byproduct of ''having the force coming from the bottom bracket to the swingarm being directed closer to the main pivot in order to remove its consequences,'' Warnery explains. The new pivot location, the much more compact Independent Drivetrain suspension, and the lower shock position in the front triangle all work together to create a lower center of gravity compared to the previous design.




Riding the
Fury


bigquotesWhile the GT may have felt long and unwieldy when sitting on it at a standstill, it comes alive when dropped into the environment it was intended for: steep, fast, and rough trails.

Handling: Sitting on the Fury leaves one wondering if the bike will only perform on big-boy tracks or under riders who hold a pro license, but that isn't the case. Somewhat surprisingly, the long GT feels very practicable and surprisingly agile, but without that flightly personality that can plague a downhill bike with a relatively short wheelbase. Getting the bike around tight corners wasn't an issue whatsoever, so long as the speeds didn't dip down too low or the terrain didn't level out, and we found ourselves actually carrying more momentum through sharp direction changes than on shorter bikes, possibly because the long front end allowed us to move our weight farther forward without feeling as if we were going to high-side if it all went south - much like Gee's description of why he liked the updated geometry. The balance is there as well, especially on loose over hard-pack ground that leaves many bikes searching for traction as one end of the machine gives away before the other - likely an attribute of the Fury's 1231mm/48.4'' overall length and balanced feeling rider-weight distribution. Getting the bike sliding over such ground left us far less panicky than on any other bike we've ridden, with the Fury feeling at ease with a bit of sideways action when it was called for. That stability makes for some seriously fun moments on the trail - squaring off corners with long counter steer slides may not be the fastest way down a trail, but it sure is a hell of a lot of fun aboard the GT.

Quick left to right direction changes didn't take a lot of effort, so long as some momentum was on tap, and we would have guessed that the bike's head angle was slightly steeper than its 63° advertised figure. We mean that last point in a good way, though, because the Fury also manages to remain incredibly composed on the steepest, hairiest of sections. The best of both worlds? It looks to be so. Confidence is the name of the game when it comes to going fast on a downhill track, and we had it in spades when aboard the GT.
bigquotesThe GT's rangy cockpit had us feeling as if it was the first downhill bike that has fit us properly. This view was only cemented by back to back laps on machines with more conventional geometry numbers, with the Fury's roomy front end making those other bikes feel a touch awkward.
We can't recall feeling so comfortable so quickly when hitting jumps aboard a foreign bike that we had barely put any time on, and it took only a few big lips until we were completely confident in the Fury's ability to fly without any unexpected quirks. The suspension setup that we settled on employed slightly slower rebound speeds (read: more controlled) and the result was a bike that didn't have as much ''pop'' as some might prefer, but that is a setup point that boils down to personal preference in the end.

As you might expect, there are drawbacks to the relatively long wheelbase, namely how the bike behaves when speeds fall into the single digits and the corners get ultra-tight. Sure, this could be said of most of the downhill bikes on the market, but the Fury certainly punishes a rider who doesn't carry momentum when speed is the answer. This is obviously not a problem for the Atherton siblings, but putting a real-world, average rider on the GT and asking him or her to thread the gauntlet through turns that ask for lock-to-lock steering won't result in anything pretty. This fact would be a deal breaker for anything but a true downhill race bike, but it can be pardoned given the Fury's intentions. We also continually struggled to bring the front of the bike up in situations that required a manual, with the GT asking its rider to use more body English to do so than other bikes require. It took four full days at Whistler before we could manual the bike with any amount of confidence.

GT Fury Photo by Bryce Piwek
  The big GT really can corner, but pointing at some rough terrain is its specialty.


Suspension: With 220mm of travel and a revised version of GT's Independent Drivetrain, there were many questions to answer about how the Fury would perform on the hill. Would the bike pedal as well as its predecessor, a machine that was renowned for its acceleration? With 20mm more travel than the majority of other downhill bikes on the market, would its suspension simply feel too deep and forgiving? Would wearing the latest One Industries gear and a garage-painted Red Bull helmet while aboard the Fury at Whistler allow us to channel any of Gee's skills? Okay, that last one is a definite no, but the rest deserved looking into.

The Fury offers a deep feel that you'd expect given how much travel it has, even relative to bikes with just 20mm less suspension on hand. That, along with its long wheelbase, allows the big GT to provide a supremely confident ride on serious terrain, especially on hard, medium sized impacts that litter a proper downhill track. It simply always felt as if the bike's Independent Drivetrain suspension had loads of capability at its disposal, with a bottomless and controlled feel to it. And while we began the test with the bike's FOX DHX RC4 shock's blue bottom out adjuster turned half way in, we quickly realized that that wasn't needed, with the design offering more than enough ramp-up for our expert-level skills. We managed to feel only a single hard bottoming moment with the said adjuster turned completely out and the pressure set low, and this came only when coming up so short on a rock to rock gap that we expected to get thrown over the front of the bike. We're relatively sure that making the same mistake on a number of other DH bikes would have seen us get pitched off like we deserved to, but the Fury didn't so much as give us a hint of coming to a stop.

GT Fury Photo by Bryce Piwek
  We had more confidence on the Fury when things got hairy than when on any other downhill bike we can recall testing.

The bike's mid-stroke offers a quite a supportive feel that doesn't leave you wondering where it's sitting in its travel, and we'd go so far as to describe it as lively, not a sensation that we were expecting to feel. In the same breath, the rear wheel gets out of the way in a hurry on chunky terrain with as little fuss as possible. GT's Etienne Warnery, one of the main minds behind the new design, told us that the floating bottom bracket unit moves back roughly 10mm as the bike goes through its travel, and we have to admit to not being able to feel that movement when in action. That's not to say that no one out there will be able to pick it up, just that it is a pretty small amount given that it is happening while the rider is busy concentrating on what is coming up next on the trail. There was also no perceptible firming up when standing, a foible that some riders of the previous design sometimes mentioned.

How well do you expect a downhill bike to pedal? How about one with 220mm of travel? While we admit that previous trail time on GT's Independent Drivetrain had us expecting class-leading pedalling performance, we were still astounded by just how much ''jump'' the bike had to it when putting some muscle into the pedals. We kicked off testing with a modest amount of low-speed compression set on the bike's FOX shock, but found ourselves backing it out even farther as it became clear that the bike didn't require such a crutch. This left the rear end free to deal with the ground under it rather than the squares that we were turning with the pedals. For a bike as big feeling as it is, the Fury's relatively light 36.9lb weight and notably good pedalling gave it quite manageable feeling on tame trails.

The Fury's 220mm travel Independent Drivetrain did have one peculiarity that we weren't able to tune out, with high-speed chatter seeming to be transmitted through the bike much more than we would have expected. Riding the same sections back to back on two other bikes (a Nukeproof Pulse with a Cane Creek Double Barrel, and a Banshee Legend with a Manitou Revox) showed that they did much better at muting such terrain. The sensation was present regardless of if we were standing or sitting, thereby ruling out any firming up of the Fury's Independent Drivetrain when out of the saddle, and no amount of tinkering with the bike's DHX RC4 shock led to any improvement. We have to wonder if the frame's tremendous lateral rigidity played a part, especially when cornering on such terrain.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesAfter countless runs on both our home mountain and the hairiest terrain that Whistler has to offer, we are positive that GT has hit a home run with their new Fury. And we're not just talking about the bike being for World Cup-level racers, but also for the everyday competitor who doesn't have any illusions of racing in the pro class. The comparatively long front end and wheelbase felt like home after only a few minutes aboard the bike, and we are certain that it had a positive impact on our riding - we not only felt fast, but also comfortable. It has been a long time since we have been this excited about a new aluminum bike with what is essentially a single pivot suspension layout, but the big GT has shot to the top of our short list of preeminent downhill bikes.- Mike Levy


www.gtbicycles.com
Must Read This Week

258 Comments

  • + 220
 "We test GT's 2014 Fury to find out if their already successful design makes sense for riders who don't sport the Atherton surname." and Beaumont is left out again... poor guy
  • + 90
 Fair enough, but it is also pretty clear that Gee is much faster aboard the new Fury so far. Don't get me wrong, I'd love to see Beaumont take some wins.
  • + 35
 true, I think Beaumont still has a few more wins left in him, I just find it funny how Beaumont, Vernon and Maes get crowded out so badly from the Athertons
  • + 97
 Maybe because Gee is 2 for 2?
If Beaumont was 2 for 2 it would be the same story for him.
What do you expect
  • - 13
flag mate1998 (Jul 1, 2013 at 1:59) (Below Threshold)
 same happened with Brendog.
  • - 45
flag lukegriffiths (Jul 1, 2013 at 2:43) (Below Threshold)
 Boxxers do NOT belong on this bicycle.
  • + 18
 Ur a fool ...
  • - 23
flag wildwestjake77 (Jul 1, 2013 at 4:39) (Below Threshold)
 @lukegriffiths: Agreed, fox 40.
  • + 40
 after 7 years on 40's and constantly arguing their defense i recently went back to Boxxer this year, couldn't be happier....
  • + 20
 5 years on boxxer's and i've decided to test dorado......: burn ur boxxers and buy normal fork.
  • + 1
 Mike, how much sag were you running on the rear?
  • + 18
 Mike, I'm wondering if you can ask GT a question for me, I owned a GT fury in 2011, at that time there was no Canadian support for the brand, no hangers, no bearings, nothing. GT/Cannondale Canada told me to order parts to the closest shop in Bellingham to pick it up. The new bike looks great but with out customer support in Canada I'm not interested and would strongly suggest against the bike.
  • + 17
 @knopf - Great questions. Let me look into it.
  • + 5
 lukegriffiths is right though... it's gees bike and he runs 40s
  • + 25
 i run dj 1's on mine for the win
  • - 32
flag Lilshredman (Jul 1, 2013 at 14:08) (Below Threshold)
 This bike doesn't look like a Trek Session, more like a Specialized Demo 8!
  • - 11
flag Bikeordeath (Jul 1, 2013 at 14:30) (Below Threshold)
 Just got the new 40 float and by far the best fork on the market!
  • + 17
 hey guys is this a review on a frame or on forks?
  • - 7
flag lukegriffiths (Jul 1, 2013 at 15:37) (Below Threshold)
 I was just saying it's a much nicer bike with pimp 40's on. I run world cup boxxers, and i prefer rockshox any day. I just think this bike belongs with Fox/shimanio not Sram.
  • + 10
 380, jus sayin'...
  • - 8
flag Rockurshoxoff95 (Jul 1, 2013 at 16:48) (Below Threshold)
 Fox 40 rad is THE lightest fork on the market, and it performs better than boxxer considering the quality of internals and tech and hard work gone into building and testing it. boxxer has all kinds of plastic in it.
  • - 2
 foxshocks rocks more then rockshocks (if that makes sense)
  • + 12
 way too many fox haters, they probably havent even tried fox yet they have completely biased opinions that boxxers are better because that's all they've ridden.
  • + 17
 I've demo'd both, and they are all way better then my suntours, I'll take either!
  • + 2
 @knopf now with sportcheck being a huge gt dealer im sure you could get anything you need from them
  • + 6
 no one noticed the bontrager tires?
  • + 2
 To this day the Shiver is the best fork I've ever ridden...
  • + 4
 @thekayo H
ave you ever actually talked to a sales associate at sportchek? I've worked there before and i was the only person on staff who knew Left from Right
  • + 2
 @sask lol i know that im just saying they have direct access to the company
  • + 1
 They do have direct access so you could order parts from sportchek.
  • + 1
 Comparing the geometry charts, it seems as though the medium Fury is comparable in size to the XL Wilson. Does that mean we could soon see Steve Smith going up a size in search of another few tenths?

It worked for Gwin, going from 20th to 6th or whatever it was. Perhaps we should all give it a try with a 30mm stem and a bike one size up from the norm.
  • - 4
flag dirtworks911 (Sep 19, 2013 at 21:33) (Below Threshold)
  • + 1
 wow, most biased comment ever ?? dude, Lorenzo was going 40km/hr and CASED and the drop is 25feet long and 15 feet down, what did u think ? other frames could have done the same thing.
  • + 2
 lots of other riders cased it and didn't blow their bike up..
  • + 2
 I doubt it was the GT's fault, that's one bitch of a case and I doubt the other riders cased as hard, just bad luck really, I bet if you did the same thing with a session 9.9, wilson carbon, commencal v3 etc. you'd still end up with a broken frame
  • + 1
 dirtworks: If you read the comments on that page you linked to, you'll see that his frame was damaged prior to that race, and that he was on a pre-production model. Any pre-damaged frame is going to break with that sort of a case.
  • + 73
 GeeT
  • + 16
 I like what you did there
  • - 27
flag motown (Jul 1, 2013 at 10:26) (Below Threshold)
 That's what she said ^
  • + 10
 ^wat?
  • + 58
 Man that rear dropout looks t i n y !
  • + 2
 Ye I agree.
  • + 3
 so does the single pivot axle..
  • + 14
 Seems to work though...
  • + 6
 @cyberhawk: are you sure you've been watching the right axle? Main pivot is about 2 cm in diameter!
  • - 3
 its more the flimsy clamping arc.. that pivot will endure a lot of stress and flexing.. i dont have much trust seeing it like this. for life span./
  • + 2
 HA! I said that weeks ago and noone gave me +signs. Germans get all the luck!
  • + 2
 @cyberhawk how does one ride downhill in the Netherlands?
  • + 6
 there are no stupid questions... Only stupid........ But to answer..Small self made lines.. stairs.. or just travel to other countries
  • - 1
 the dropouts are like @turquoise you know wheres!
  • + 3
 shut up
  • + 1
 It's not that the dropouts are tiny, it's that the rear triangle is HUGE.
  • + 42
 This bike is the reason I wish there was a bike hire place at, say, Whistler that had a multitide of brands of bikes for hire. On the same day you could session a Session, demo a Demo, seek glory on a Glory, unleash fury on a... you get the picture. And you could have some crazy bikes like that ugly Swiss thing with the high pivot [edit Redalp].

I would pay top dollar for that. And you could save money buy testing something before you paid "over nine thousand" for your next bike.
  • + 4
 I'm pretty sure most resorts offer rentals and demos. Between the resort and local bikes shops I'm pretty confident you could find and test the majority of bikes you're interested in for a day.
  • + 10
 You can hire an awful lot of bikes in Whistler. When I was there there were Santa Cruz, KHS, Norco, Trek, Rocky Mountain, Spesh Demos or Statuses, Lapierre, Giant, Kona, Knolly, Banshee, Devinci and probably more that i cant remember. How may more bikes do you really need to try?
  • + 9
 I think he means Pay Once (at One Place) - Demo Several Bikes rather than doing it over a few days at different shops. But that's not too realistic due to shop territories and brand conflicts. Whistler could do a 2-3 day demo event similar to Outerbike where participants could pay a fee and have full access to all the brands there, that would be pretty amazing.
  • + 23
 It is frustrating this. Every article/piece of advice on buying a bike says you should try it first. Which of course is true.

Whistler is 3000 miles away for me, quite a long way to go to test a bike. Anywhere in the UK a proper test on a demo fleet is not really an option. Maybe you have a quick go on a mate/random rider's one - you know that guy who is 2 stone lighter & six inches shorter than you and has his controls setup all weird. And that's about it, if you're lucky.

No wonder there is so much interest in bike's visual appearance and what the pros are riding. Cos most of us end up buying blind IMO. The only good thing is that at least all the top end bikes are damn good nowadays.
  • + 8
 @iamamodel....Highland is doing exactly that... Come visit New Hampshire. You may never want to leave.
  • + 1
 @psyickphuk I have the exact same problem, bike distributers/shops aren't very "active" here. Sometimes if you're lucky, you will have a trek/spesh demo day but it's mostly XC bikes. The local dh mountain only rents 3 years old flatlines so when you end up buying something, it's mostly "pay and pray". I can't say I've been disappointed so far but on a few occasions I've been left wondering if I could have bought a bike that was better suited to me for that kind of money...
  • + 2
 iamamodel: It would be near impossible for one shop to offer every single brand due to contracts and the like, but GBB at the base of the gondi offers a demo/rental service featuring: Santa Cruz, Commencal, KHS, Devinci, Cove, Norco, Giant and Scott. Not comprehensive, but a pretty decent list. Previous years they also had Trek, Kona and Lapierre, but you can't have them all. I will add that Evolution rent Specialized and GT.

The point of this slightly-more-expensive rental service is that you can go in after a couple runs and switch your bike for another one (if it's available). If you're thinking of throwing down anything up to $10K for a bike, it's worth the money to try a few out first. There's a few missing from their fleet but you can get those from other stores relatively cheaply and if you do end up buying they'll take the rental cost off the bike.

One of the other best ways to try out multiple bikes is during Crankworx. Most of the major manufs have a demo fleet and you can take them for a few laps for free (leaving a credit card) but it's fekkin busy during that week so a) getting a bike is hard, and then b) doing fast laps on trails is difficult with the crowds.
  • + 1
 Zarja Cernilogar smoked everyone on this rig.
  • + 3
 Can we just keep coming up with ridiculous plays on bike names? Get gnarly on a knolly, operate an operator, gamble with a gambler, drake with a mondraker.... Nevermind.
  • + 0
 Great replies!
  • + 4
 You don't buy a car without test driving it first. Same should be with bikes considering how much they're going for now.
  • + 1
 @PLC07: you're in a city of 3 million people, 30 mins from Bromont or Ste-Anne and 2 hours from Kingdom Trails...surely you can find a demo bike somewhere? KT has their new Norco demo centre that was recently renting Norco Aurum's for 4 hrs for $30!
  • + 2
 iamamodel is right, at many windsurfing resorts you are able to test out any combination of sails and boards in one day. You can even test out combinations of different sized sails and boards once you figure out what you like, and what suits the changing conditions on the water. I would love to see the same system at mountain bike resorts!
  • + 2
 @bishopsmike Not really. Most shops who used to carry mountain bikes now strictly carry road bikes and some race xc bikes. 2 years ago I snapped a boxxer stem in bromont and the closest shop who carried some was 75km away. In a 125km radius, as far as I know, there is only 1 shop that is worth the trip to when it comes to DH. So yeah, it's hard enough to get a freaking stem, let alone a demo dh bike...
  • + 3
 Nukeproof chainstay protector on the bike?
  • + 15
 I too can ride like gee atherton..... No skill needed. Bike is everything..... Fact!
  • - 33
flag B3N1992 (Jul 1, 2013 at 4:05) (Below Threshold)
 I don't think anyone could ride that bike like the athertons man I'd love to see you try keep up with any of the pros! To a certain extent it is the bike but skill is most definitely involved in DH series so stop being daft man
  • + 60
 Good sarcasm detection skills.
  • - 23
flag B3N1992 (Jul 1, 2013 at 4:21) (Below Threshold)
 He just looked to be so serious lol oops
  • + 28
 I cant understand how anyone could fail to realise that was sarcasm.
  • + 7
 i laughed hard at your comment.............
  • - 1
 Aye
  • + 18
 You are so wrong! It is not just the bike! You need all the right logos on your clothes and helmet too - FACT2.
  • + 8
 Just like tuners. Decals add AT LEAST 20hp.
  • + 30
 I heard Gwin is struggling this year b/c he doesn't feel his sticker placement is dialed.

You gotta have dialed sticker placement to go fast...everybody knows that.
  • + 11
 Awesome! Feels great that despite ever present latest-greatest-plastig-bigger wheel size histeria an aluminium bike gets such appreciation. Hate me for that: just rode my first carbon bike and I have no bloody idea what that plastic fuzz is all about... Oh it is easier to put the bike in/out of the car and weight numbers under picture you post here make many boys wet - if that's what you are after.

Geometry and well damped suspension is what counts.
  • + 1
 Step in the right direction for GT. Still a huge mess in the BB aera. Big Bikes with long wheelbases, slack angles and suspension with low springrates are great. Suspension travel over 200mm feels plain right and long stroke dampers work better than the short vertical mess in most bikes. Single pivot are easy to maintain. No drawbacks. Comfy rides rules.
  • + 0
 Because that's a base rule in journalism.
  • + 5
 Oups... wrong post
  • + 4
 Short Vertical mess in most bikes? Lay off the cool aid. GT Fury has the same shock length as 90% of the market. Most of the current bikes have 241mm ITI bikes now.
  • + 1
 Wakaba - Single pivots are easy to maintain when there is only one pair of bearings, but this looks like there are 7 pairs (one looks like the shock bushing is mounted to bearings, whilst the other end of the shock is just a bushing). This means it has more bearing pairs to replace than my Socom. As someone who services their own bearings, I can tell you it gets really tedious by the time I'm onto the wheels as well O_o The advantage of this system is really just the very high pivot location.
  • + 3
 Wakaba will say anything to hype up his foes, even if that doesn't make sense Wink
  • + 1
 I don't know if its just me but I don't see the main pivot as very high, as advertised, if anything I think the Wilson has a higher pivot
  • + 1
 Willson has a fairly high pivot point for a single pivot. The one on the fury is rather standard height. Probably why it's not as good as some other bike on chattery stuff.
  • + 1
 If you isolate the pivot height issue that might be true @spaced, but I'd say that the shock tune and well designed frame rate is what really counts... put a RS Vivid on Wilson and you can throw that "pivot placement superiority" out of the window. And designing a frame is not only about: where will the pivot be? Otherwise all bikes would have it high.

Axle path? Wheel has to go up, to make away for the obstacle - that movement is hindered by the shock so the input it gets through linkage design and how it reacts to it through damping is far more important. Even geometry and the way it influences riders balance, probably has more to do with that.
  • + 1
 "And designing a frame is not only about: where will the pivot be? Otherwise all bikes would have it high." Not true. A high pivot has its drawbacks. Yes designing the susp is not only about the pivot but the bike feeling rough on the small stuff is 1 of 2 things. It's either not rearward enough or too progressive (session 8.8 vs 9.9 is a good example here).

Also no axle path in terms of how much momentum the bike looses on hsc hits is more important than leverage curve. The reason why not everyone goes very rearward is there are other qualities in the bike than being super stable over the rough. Remember that axle path also has influence how the bike reacts in corners and usually rearward bikes require a different cornering style.
  • - 7
flag wakaba (Jul 1, 2013 at 5:34) (Below Threshold)
 @bluechair: Absolutely. Single pivot refers to the big bearings that govern axlepath. With socom, do you refer to 951?

@spaced: not really.

Apart from the messy BB - this bike is a blatant chinese ripoff of a Foes. The rattle over obstacles has probably to do with the rear shock linkage standing at 2 clock instead 4 clock.
  • + 3
 @Wakaba say what? how is this even close to foes. Point out what is similar in this bike to the foes.


Also can you please coment on what bikes have sub 241mm shocks? You claim so many of them have. Of the popular brands I know of 3.
  • - 7
flag wakaba (Jul 1, 2013 at 6:44) (Below Threshold)
 Frame dimension, angles, top tube length, pivot placement, exact copy of reartriangle. What puts me off is wrong placement of shock guide leg and shockend on bottomtube for cost cutting. That will definitely chatter a lot and the BB is really wrong. So while probably the best riding GT so far - it wont touch a Gambler, Foes, 951, M9.

Foes has 266mm shocklength or 8.3/210 travel. More if you want. So yes bikes with 241 or less are a thing of the past. Riding too high springrates degrades riding. 140lb rider weight equals 200lb spring. That is smooth.
  • + 3
 Wakaba - my point was not that the singlepivot has a certain axle path, you said they were easy to maintain (I assume you were referring to the GT and not all single pivots in general). This frame will be a nightmare to swap the bearings out because of the number of linkages. And by Socom, I don't mean the newer 951, I'm rocking the old school Socom. Two linkages, four bearing pairs.
And Slayde is right; I fell for the marketing there! It really isn't that high for a pivot location! Must stop reading things written by marketing before discuss a bike!
  • - 2
 My Wilson is Xtra Large and my wife loves it.
  • + 2
 My Wilson is 45 ACP.
  • - 3
 Is there some kind of social etiquette I'm not aware of on PB? Neg propped for two perfectly reasonable comments??
  • + 1
 Bluechair: must stoke more
  • + 7
 @Wakaba Foes has 1.9 INCH shorter reach. So no geo is not the same. Foes has different BB height. way longer chainstay length. No geo numbers on the GT Fury and Foes are even close to each other. You are insane. The other part of your post is just gibberish.


As for foes and 260mm shock. LOL. 241 is a thing of the past? Then why so many companies go for it? Riding to low leverage ratio means shock friction is a bigger problem, it also means it's harder to find proper springs for lighter riders and the springs need to be made more precisely as many steel springs have 15-20lbs margin of error, sometimes more. Please stop commenting when you have no clue about suspension and all you want to do is hype up your foes. At least try to understand why it's a good bike.
  • + 3
 @bluechair

it's just people disagreeing with you. Don't take it personally.
  • - 3
 @spaced:
Foes BB is adjustable. Mine is low. Reach - depends which framesize you compare, more reach - less pressure on the front wheel. Chainstay is long on both frames - compared to "short" on older frames. Moot.
Head angle and geometry on Foes is adjustable. Not on GT. Mine is set low, flat and long. Different pushrods, shock receptables. Good stuff.

Yep, 241 is short, longer is better. Plenty of springs for 260 shock available. Most springs are within 10% error marging. Fine with me.
Shockfriction higher when using a 260? WTF are you talking about? Friction and stiction is the same on a 241 or 260. Look ahead. Most frames on the market now are at least four years old and it shows. Foes and Scott already use 267mm. See the trend?

I dont hype my bike. Concept, engineering and execution is very advanced and that is why I ride one. And you need to control your jealousy thing, b&7%!
  • + 3
 @wakaba . The SAME Framesize. Also no chainstay isn't long on the fury. If you call something a copy and then claim it's a copy because both are "long" you must be joking. Compare numbers not claim something is a copy when you are flat out wrong.



Also no 241 is not short. And 10% margin of error on a 200lbs spring is 20lb. Given the fact that on a low leverage bike you need 25lb increments for different weight a spring that is 20lb may be for someone who is 10kg heavier. Fine by you?


As for friction and stiction yes they are the same but if you have lower leverage ratio it is harder to OVERCOME friction. You are 46 yet you don't understand the basic phisics of a lever. They teach that to 14 year olds.

As for seeing the Trend. Foes has been using the same shock for years, once a few years you have a 267mm shocked frame. It's no trend. 267mm shocks have been available for quite some time and they haven't been adopted. Trek session 10, Morewood makulu have used the same sized shock quite some time ago. Trek went back to a shorter shock. I see no trend. Unless more frame designers adopt it it's no trend. 2 frames don't make a trend. Also mfg's won't go for 2.3 leverage ratio because as mentioned before (and as many of them have also mentioned) it has many drawbacks.
  • + 1
 @spaced - maybe GT are placing their sticker better than Foess'? Smile seriously - don't be so serious about your bike (BTW you are wrong about what you are writing about the engineering parts but it really doesn't matter that much).
  • + 0
 GT is not my bike. I don't really care for either brand though I find the new geo on the GT interesting.


What is wrong that I'm writing? With a lower leverage you need more force on the wheel to have the same force act on the shock. Of course spring rates and damping are also important but that can be setup for a given leverage ratio. Friction in dampers can't be. Sorry I'm im not expressing myself clearly. I'm at work and after 5h of sleep.
  • + 4
 Guys... I learned something lately: once argument goes too deep, it gets completely irrelevant to anyonebut arguing sides. No one else gives a shit but most importantly, even if he did, you are so deep in personal thoughts that even if he wanted to get something out of it - he can't. And if it is meant to serve you only, then it really can't, a waste of time and energy... I am reaching WAKi 4.0 state: no one idea or design can be relevant to a larger group of people. We are too different from each other: too much arguing does not make anything. So just let it go, read someone's opinion and watch it as a try passing by - wait for another one - it might be a great colorful train and you might miss it while arguing! And there is nothing to gain in prooving someone wrong unless it is something of a real important matter. f*cking bikes as bikes themselves aren't.

Zen hmmmmmmmm
  • + 1
 And if you treat is a training in arguing - fk me - we are damn good at it already! It's time to train accepting someone elses opinion and allowing them to have one even if it's obviously a wrong one. I suck at it... and I am sure most people hate us for that. My wife hates me for that for instance...
  • + 2
 WAKI since when you are against arguing? You went to some zen meditation camp?
  • + 3
 Ahaha, no. But lately I contemplate human ego and it's environment a lot. I am coming to a conclusion that we are damn different and we agree in a true deep fulfilled manner very rarely. Too often we choose certain ideas as "most likely" rather than "definitely" because simply we can't know everything. Certainty is a slut - not only she can fall for a alternative attractive solution or a point of view, it may also fk you up as it might have been all wrong. So as one may assume I also got myself into a big shit in spiritual sphere... Anyway: biking is so dependent on human factor and that human takes so many irrational decisions that it just... and most of us here neither can ride bike on top level nor has any important experience with designing and building them... I decided to f*ck it - hence WAKi 4.0, sit back and enjoy, might release few occasional farts
  • + 2
 You Hippie!
  • + 11
 It's weird how much most comments here seem to be trying to find a way to doubt that this GT is good. The review says it is "at the top of our short list of pre-eminent downhill bikes". That means: it is in the conversation for the best downhill bike pinkbike has ever tested. So it seems pretty obvious to me that there is an anti-GT prejudice on this site, and I was trying to figure out why. It seems like older people (I am 32) remember when GT ruled the racing world and so we're not surprised that GT is again making amazing bikes. But younger people on this site (probably the majority?) don't remember that and only saw GT at its lowest.

Anyways, I've never ridden a Fury so can't defend it, but it seems pretty clear that GT doesn't get a fair shake in the comments section here.
  • + 1
 The last frame design was deemed ugly by most and if I remember correctly they've been making walmart bikes for a while and those two things often fuel the fire for the professional haters out there. My Pinkbike dynamics 101 predictions are since that Gee is winning these days, GT will most likely get some bandwagon jumpers to praise them for a while. Also, the once unique frame looks like pretty much any other frame now, so not much reason left to hate anymore anyway.
  • + 3
 I have never seen a GT in a Walmart/Target or any other store like that, Performace Bike yes but never walmart. People bash on them because they are owned by Dorel who MAKES walmart bikes (mongoose, pacific etc) they also own Cannondale and I don't see too much hate on them. I am only 24 but I saw when GT ruled and GT/Dyno were the IT bikes back when I was a kid.
  • - 10
flag wakaba (Jul 2, 2013 at 0:08) (Below Threshold)
 GT, Moongoose, Pacific are DIY-chainstore Dorel brands over here. It really is the bottom of the barrel chinese inc. catalog frames. Dorel is really sourcing the cheapest possible - that is where they excell. A Pacific bike is probably cheaper than the packaging and shipping...The Fury on test is using catalog hydroform parts - the PRC stuff - it looks rough, slapped together. So most likely you will massively overpay for that frame and I doubt that much thought went into it - its rip-off looks. So this is no resurgence of the GT brand. This brand is more likely on its deathbed. Slaughtered by corporate incompetence.
  • + 2
 @wakaba: That just seems like more of the same knee-jerk marxist anti-corporate nonsense. The more cheap, crappy bikes Dorel sells the more money it has for R&D for better models. You can almost always get a better product at a cheaper price from a big, scary corporation than a small-scale boutique manufacturer. It's just economies of scale. Plus, GT has the Athertons, Beaumont, Kyle Strait, Taylor McCaul, etc. And Mongoose has Chris Akrigg. You think all these guys are willing to ride crappy bikes? No, they ride the best of a big brand and these big brands have the money to make whatever kind of bike these guys want.
  • + 0
 @bassnotesteve: Maybe its not about price, maybe it is about value?

The more Dorel makes the more its shareholders make - and these guys would be seen dead on Dorel brand - they ride custom boutique bikes...So yes it is about class. And marxism is analysis of capitalism. Both are tools of understanding. You lack understanding and that is why you will ride Dorelbikes forever - so its about class again...hm.. not understanding capitalism makes you a bad capitalist and that is worse than beeing a communist?

Your racers ride whatever from whoever and promote anything. They get paid do that. It has no intrinsic quality value and is about retaining marketshare. Big brands dont R&D. They set a pricepoint and spec and invite offers. Cheapest gets it. It is altogether different with trendsetting small local manufacturers. Few of them left and worth supporting. Some have very good thinking going. For this I am willing to pay. I want value.
  • + 1
 @wakaba "The Fury on test is using catalog hydroform parts" Many companies that use tubes use "catalog parts". And everyone uses "catalog bolts" and "catalog bearing". Using "catalog parts" isn't a bad thing: you can do the best possible bike, but at a far lower cost (and you can save about six months of developing the tubing processes).
  • - 1
 @faul: All good and well - but you havent created knowledge and traded flexibility. Forming parts is as easy as design your part, cnc the mould and press the thin alloy sheets in a rather lowend press. Not complicated or expensive just takes a little bit of time and now you have the means to engineer fabulous looking parts. Press-business is an old cottage industry. Frames are a little bit different than nuts and bolts.

GT hydroformed parts dont look like they are from the better suppliers. Dorel probably sources them from some lowend sweatshop. Also the welding looks a bit iffy - many weldstops where there shouldn`t.
  • + 0
 I don't know if the hydroformed parts or the welding are good, because I don't have cut the bike to see how it looks inside.
  • + 0
 @faul You can usually spot a weldstop from the outside. The less weldstops, the better.

I always trust handmade bikes made in my area more but as bassnotesteve steve said, a worldcup winner can't be as bad as wakaba says...
  • - 1
 Not "bad", not "good" either. "Cheap" - yes.
  • + 1
 yeah well..you can't expect young guns to spend more time digging history AND ride?
  • + 8
 Doesn't look like a spaceship anymore. Really liked the previous design. But this is also pretty all time
  • + 5
 Mike, why are all PinkBike reviews written in the first person plural (we) instead of first person singular (I) when all evidence suggests that only one person tested the bike? For example, the reviews aren't written by Mike AND Matt AND Richard, they are just written by Mike or Matt etc.
  • + 7
 I assume it is written by one of them and that person puts in the most testing hours but they all do all the riding they can on all the bikes and pool their collective impressions.
  • + 4
 Because they are talking as PinkBike not as Mike/Matt. It is the same with MBR/MBUK/WHATMTB. They all use we unless they are talking about their own bikes.
  • + 3
 Also, I think it's a quirk of the bike industry. Plenty of 1-man companies (importers, shops, etc) will use 'we' rather than 'I'. I always guessed it's a modesty thing, accepting that other people have helped out and contributed along the way.

But in this example, Patrick9-32 is (presumably) right.
  • + 10
 Because that's a base rule in journalism.
  • + 3
 it is recommended that pronouns such as "you" or "I" are left out of business talks, whether like it or not, PB is a business website.
  • + 1
 3rd person past tense AKA Narrative mode,

I guess you never went to college / university and had to write a paper ?
  • + 4
 That's not 3rd person. 1st is 'I' 2nd is 'You' 3rd is 'They'
  • + 2
 I would think that more than one person tested the bike, but one person did the write up, which likely encompassed the overall thoughts of the group. Whats so hard about that?
  • + 3
 As said above, it is how it should be written. The more cynical part of me also thinks that even if the reality is one person just fucked about on it for a few days in Whistler, writing 'we' implies that it actually got a thorough test by a group of knowledgeable people...
  • + 4
 we are not amused
  • + 7
 @iamamodel - My words speak for Pinkbike as a whole, and the bikes are usually ridden by other riders as well.
  • + 1
 TBH I didn't even read it
  • + 4
 Probably a great bike. I think they really like it. I miss the days PB would call a dog a dog though. Haven't read any stories lately where Levy states, "this bike sucks!" Now we are left to parse superlatives to try and get an opinion. Is it really great? Or really really great? Or really really really great? Ad dollars talking I guess...
  • + 8
 Test the polygon dhx! Do it!
  • + 4
 Having seen the results of the first two WC rounds I did a little research on GT. It really does look like they have turned a corner with their designs. I've been riding larger bikes for years due to a larger cockpit feeling simply 'right'.
I've also been waiting for a manufacturer to come out and say "Y'know what? We don't need a carbon frame."
To this end I'm dropping one of the brands in my shop in favour of GT. Always liked their commitment to racing of all types (apart from road).
Hate GT all you want but it sounds like they are listening to what's being said and finally moving with the times, not all riders can't all afford 8K plus bikes!
Does it matter that they make cheaper bikes that allow more people to go out and have fun?
  • + 2
 Well after reading all these comments about forks, bike test riding and everything else other than the actual artical I have some responses, first of all fox 40s and the boxxer argument and all other forks. I don't believe in sticking to what people think, I will try and find what's best for me. Like tyres I listen to what people say I weigh it up and try it if need be. I had always ridden marz bombers on xc bike and loved them bombproof never serviced just got on with it, when I changed to DH I listened And followed the trend and tried fox 40s all I had was service service stanchion wear breaking down just absolute rubbish how people can say fox are worth £1400 is beyond. I decided to give them the boot and got converted to Bos and have to say I was blown away at how good they performed. However after a year decided to get them serviced well lets just say forget it absolutely shocking how bad their customer service is the importers myself and a further 4 registered Bos service centres still after 4 months can not get a reply. My fury came with a standard set of 888 RV on bottom of the range no adjustment nothing but run super smooth and very reliable. I then borrowed my mates YT industries bike with a set of boxers on for a month while he was away, I don't know much about boxers so can't say wich they are but they are 2012 coilspring setting on both tops. Hand on my heart wow what a set of forks they perform just as good as fox without a shadow of a doubt more reliable easy to look after less servicing and half the bloody price so I ask why? Why fox? Because everyone wants to look like their favourite DH rider and look pro. That's it simple fox are not worth what they are priced nowhere near. New 888 most beautiful fork out there half the price of fox and again a lot better on reliability and the same performance.
As for testing bikes will continue,
  • + 2
 "Riding the Fury" photo The quote below says "it comes alive when dropped into the environment it was intended for: steep, fast, and rough trails." But above there is a picture of a relativley flat (by DH standards), smooth flow trail, almost the exact opposite of the quote!
  • + 4
 I like how all of mike levys' articles, he replies and informs on the comments as well....good job mike, nice write up as well
  • + 2
 It's nice to see somebody do something drastically different - geometry wise. The high speed chatter issue is unfortunate, but I wonder if it has something to do with the spring rate curve/ramp up. When high speed damping adjustment doesn't alleviate high speed chatter, the curve may be too linear. I'm not saying I know more than the engineers, and this may have been done intentionally for the Athertons. Gwin's suspension settings made it clear that faster suspension isn't always the most forgiving for everyday folks... but for everyday folks who want less high speed chatter, I wonder how a more progressive double barrel air(with volume spacers) or Vivid air would make this bike feel in that respect.
  • + 1
 I get the feeling its's down to the suspension design as your weight is adding to the unsprung mass. It might not be an issue to get the rear suss moving in large impacts, but small repeated chatter might overwhelme the links which you are effectively standing on.
  • + 1
 Bluechair84, I think you right. See this link - www.mb1suspension.com/id102.html.
  • + 1
 It's not entirely a bad thing though as increasing the unsprung mass in this way increases pedal efficiency significantly. And when sat, bump compliance increases. It's just that, not many people attack the descents sat down... This design is great for xc lads who stand to power, and sit to descend.
  • + 1
 The other GT bikes (AOS) have a better claim to XC credentials than AM say. Still, I wouldn't overstate the case. I know one rider who likes that kind of bike (albeit a Mongoose) precisely because of the peculiarities of the design - Chris Akrigg. Of course he has very specific requirements. I think the new Fury, unlike the AOS bikes, is trying to be "normal" i.e. not noticeably affected by unsprung weight. It does a good job but can't finally quite get there. The reduced pedal feedback is a compensating benefit, though.
  • + 2
 What! No v brake mounts!!!...... Seriously though GT have done a good job here. They were at this height back in the day with the GT Dhi that peaty flew around courses and that sold like hot cakes so it'd be no surprise if this doesn't. I'm also happy manufacturers are making the geometry longer for folk like me who is on the long side. Pretty good review although it would of made sense to of done the test on a stock bike. Maybe in the future eh. Good stuff.
  • + 2
 Amazing bike... very nice to see geometry going back and foward after the decades of DH. This long frames throw away the myth that medium frames are ideal for big riders on tecnical tracks. mondraker using super long tt with 0 or 10mm stem and GT going that way using 30mm maybe will be the new standard. I always hated short toptube DH frames. What size should be this GT stem and cranckset size? Nice to see a brand new frame with amazing results..
  • + 1
 It looks to me that the pivot point is no higher than the new Scott or Nukeproof. Does it still need a floating BB at this point?

Also, something that no one has ever addressed with floating BB is that it negates nearly all the advantages of a high pivot point! Most of the mass is carried into the frame from the feet/pedals, and this moves rearward slightly as the rear wheel encounters a bump, meaning that most of the rider moves slightly rearward as well.

I really want to test ride this bike! If it rides so well without a linkage actuated shock, why mess with complicated suspension designs? The single pivot heckler I used to ride would bottom out too easy with a coil, but here they say bottoming out wasn't an issue. I wonder if its a custom tuned fox in the back. Wouldn't an air shock work great on this design and emulate a more progressive curve?
  • - 1
 Progressitivity can be tuned with the linkage. The old Fury was very linear but this one is much more progressive.
  • + 1
 But it doesn't use the linkage for actuating the shock; its there to provide rigidity
  • + 1
 Facepalm that's not relevant...
  • + 1
 The new "i drive" don't affect the suspension as much as on the old Fury, I think they keep it because GT=Idrive (like iphone but you can't phone with an idrive... you neither can drive). But this bike could be a single pivot like a morewood izimu or an other one as well.
  • + 1
 How is it not relevant? You say the new one is more progressive, but it is very difficult to get a progressive curve without a linkage
  • + 1
 Read up on the new frame. At least in many videos Gee said that the old fury was too linear and the new one is more progressive. 4.bp.blogspot.com/-_FKLWTyvXHA/Ucm451yExaI/AAAAAAAAOIA/4LRTG6eqUpo/s1600/GT+Fury+DH+2014_LevRatio.gif
  • + 1
 linkagedesign.blogspot.fr/2013/06/gt-fury-dh-2014.html
The new fury is more progressive than the previous one... but actually it's not very progressive.
  • + 1
 Could someone please rephrase this: "The Fury's 220mm travel Independent Drivetrain did have one peculiarity that we weren't able to tune out, with high-speed chatter seeming to be transmitted through the bike much more than we would have expected."

I simply dont get what the issue is. What does high-speed chatter mean?
  • + 2
 High speed chatter - small stones and bumps like under 5cm in size with sharp corners and sides which feel like washboard.
  • + 1
 thank you
  • + 31
 It is also a trait common to most women.
  • + 1
 Would brake bumps be a good example?
  • + 1
 Yes brake bumps is definitely high speed chatter.
  • + 1
 Oh my god, that was just down right hilarious. lol
  • + 1
 I think the moving BB may be the reason they couldn't dial the high speed chatter out. Because of the bb movement you would feel vibrations through the pedals even when the shock is soaking up the hits. Just a theory though....
  • + 2
 Staike, I think your intuition is more or less correct, but the role unsprung weight plays in creating these vibrations is also an important part of the picture. I went looking for a better explanation of all this and found this link - www.mb1suspension.com/id102.html. Its an amazing read. That it refers to motorcycle suspension does not diminish its relevance. It's undeniable, I think, that even the improved FBB mechanism on the 2014 Fury still introduces some unsprung weight into the operation of the suspension.
  • + 1
 I just thought I'd add to this post my first impressions of the 2015 GT Fury Team 650b, as I couldn't find a review of that bike and have just got hold of one. A bit of background, I'm moving to the GT after 2 years aboard a Labyrinth Minotaur. The Labyrinth is a beautiful handling bike with incredible cornering balance, feel, and really fun and poppy nature that works well on steep technical as well as flowy jump trails and flatter secitons. The bike also felt very easy to handle, at no point did it need muscling around the track... it preferred to flow with a light touch. I am 6 foot 3 and had the large size Labyrinth, and now have the large size GT.

After 2 weeks aboard the new GT, I have to say it is an incredibly single-minded bike. I have to reinforce that the big GT most certainly IS a handful when it gets tight. Picking tight lines in between roots or squaring off turns at lower speeds is an absolute no-go... this bike just wants to pick the straightest line possible in those situations, It takes some serious muscle to get this bike to turn. I'm sure the 650b wheelseize isn't doing much to help matters at low speed.

However, once you get this bike up to medium and high speeds, it really comes alive, with a surprisingly poppy nature. It really is like flicking a light switch... this bike goes from big dull unweildy beast to a pin-sharp weapon. The high speed handling really is great... you're stretched out and it just encourages you to attack everything in your path. The jumping is also very predictable and it's actually incredibly agile in the air.

I have to say that for the DH tracks I have so far ridden in the UK... this bike is 50% amazing and 50% complete disaster. Make sure if you get yourselves one of these, that you have the right terrain to ride it on because it sure as hell isn't going to suit everyone. That said, I can't wait to get the bike out to whistler in July so that it can be in it's element all week long :-)
  • + 1
 Good to see GT back on top of the podium, and this new frame looks great. Aluminum is fast and I understand why they chose it over carbon. 8.6" is nice, your almost up to my 9"er. 8" works good on some tracks but for real rough stuff better to be closer to 9". I been on 9" travel frame for 8 years now an no complaints.
  • + 3
 Hey Mike, quick question. Sounds like you were riding a medium frame but how tall are you and the other testers using that frame?
  • + 1
 There was a comment made by Gee at Fort William, just as he completed his race run for a win.... 'the GT just hung together' ???? Now, accepting that the Fort is one of the toughest courses in the world perhaps the abuse to the bike could be accepted, but ongoing especially for those without factory back-up i wonder what the life expectancy is for the new Fury ? A season will show im sure, im a little concerned for those flimsy looking axle clamps, the large number of pivot points requring bushing, and a super slack (63 degrees plus according to test) headangle asking a lot of the frame... are GT offering lifetime guarantees on the frames in the event of failure ? Its obviously doing the business race wise, especially in the hands of the Athertons... but long term in the hands of lesser mortals ?
  • + 3
 63 isn't "super slack", it's the industry standard. Maybe he said it just hung together (like it's no problem for the bike) instead of "it JUST hung together" like yo thought.
  • + 1
 Accept what your saying, 63 degrees plus is slack though no matter how you look at it.... my point is the longevity of the frame, are GT putting the money where their mouth is and offering lifetime warranty on frame failure ? no doubt time will tell... ;-)
  • + 1
 Pretty much no one are offering lifetime warranties on bicycle frames. Shit happens, stuff break.
  • + 1
 Mondraker ? but again accept what your saying.. shit happens and stuff breaks.. but will this new Fury be more prone than most ? its an alloy, but claims to have improved rigidity and be lighter than the earlier carbon model ? Clever design is one thing, but has there been any sacrifice in actual strength ?
  • + 1
 We can only speculate in that, time will show. The carbon fury was pretty massive though and not that light.
  • + 1
 Continued.
As for testing bikes when I brought my GT fury I wanted to test ride all the top bikes to see which I liked most I worked it out it would of cost me around £450 and a loss of £300 when I chose my bike as they didn't have one shop that did all. That is a joke territories mean shit we go to the shop we like just because I have a GT I do t take it to a GT shop I take it to the shop I deal with simple. Sorry rant over Wink haha
As for the new GT drop outs look shit bike looks awsome and the athertons are awsome good on them.
  • + 1
 Old review I know but..

Mike- What were the heights of the riders that tested this bike? I watched the video of the team and Rachel also is riding a large for some races. Noticed a lot of people were mentioning that GT had reverted to aluminium for this frame but the article does say that this is paving the way for the carbon version once the geometry is dialled. Maybe 2015 we will see a 650b carbon fury. Yes please (funds permitting)
  • + 1
 knopf, Sport Chek can get pivot kits and derailleur hangers for all the newer GT bikes including the Fury. If you ever need a specific part or advice it is best to call their customer service (1-877-977-CHEK) They will then direct you to their most knowledgalbe staff who can help you get what you need.
  • + 1
 The high-speed chatter being transmitted through the bike reported by the writer almost certainly is due to peculiarities of the ID suspension. Some rider weight always interferes in the operation of the rear suspension in designs of this sort i.e. becomes unsprung rather than sprung mass. In the past this has resulted in reports of riders being "beat up" while riding rough terrain (the Mongoose FreeDrive was supposedly worse than the GT ID bikes). It is a major achievement to have reduced this defect to a minor inconvenience while still offering the benefit of reduced pedal feedback.
  • + 2
 Slugga got second this weekend...I think he is now in tune with the bike and ready to come on....he is a late bloomer but he is as consistent as Gee when he is on.
  • + 1
 And here we officially have the largest DH bike on the market. To all the companies who offer an "XL" that's smaller than the Fury (Knolly, Canfield, Trek, Yeti, SC) please take note. Tall guys certainly are.
  • + 3
 For the price of the bike do they toss in a free falcon for falcon training?!
  • + 2
 I find it so funny that in a carbon era, the guy who won the 2 1st WC races is on an alu frame. Is this the beginning of the end for carbon?
  • + 1
 really like this bike but just dont have the money to pay for a $8000 bike so if this bike was on the cheaper side that wud b really cool
  • + 2
 Too bad the back of the seat tube where the top tube ends doesn't sport the GT emblem like the old days...
  • + 1
 the reach measurement isn't that unconventional if related to Specy Demo...438mm for GT in Medium size, 430mm for the Demo...but ok the wheelbase is way longer on the Fury!
  • + 2
 Even in a time when carbon rules supreme, that Fury sure looks the part. Nice work GT!
  • + 2
 pretty mint that there'll be a base model that only runs 3K. A WC level DH bike I might be able to afford!
  • + 2
 Exactly. We're waiting on the frame only price, but we expect it to be pretty competitive as well.
  • + 1
 This is the most amazing thing about it - you can buy a proper bike in a down to earth price. Its even nicer that we have a proper top tube length here - personally I never had any issue turning a long bikes even on a slow and technical turn and it does allow you to attack turn better when the bike is stable.
  • + 2
 Who do I know at GT? I need to pull some strings because right there is my new 2014 bike.
  • + 8
 We're making them right down to a XS size Si, should fit you perfectly Wink
  • + 2
 Nice Nukeproof chain stay protector in the rear end shot!
  • + 1
 That serie of numbers and the long front end aren't new things... take a look at Knolly's Podium.
  • + 1
 It may have an amazing performance... But I just don't like it's appearance
  • + 1
 love this bike. imho it looks way better than the old geo and layout. stoked to see some edits of Gee shredding
  • - 2
 "putting a real-world, average rider on the GT and asking him or her to thread the gauntlet through turns that ask for lock-to-lock steering won't result in anything pretty"
"also for the everyday competitor who doesn't have any illusions of racing in the pro class"

How do those two statements sit together? Also, doesn't putting the BB on the swingarm massively increase the unsprung mass?
  • + 2
 It kinda does, but the BB moves backwards and forwards, not up and down like on URT designs, so it isn't as affected by your body weight as much. Having said that, GTs and Mongoose (Mongeese?) of old were renown for having a slightly 'dead' feeling to the suspension for this very reason; you are partly stood on the swingarm. I had a Teocali which I had to get rid off after 6 months as I couldn't get over the way standing up muted the suspension feeling.
  • + 1
 Mongeese!
  • + 2
 when does this go on sale to the public?
  • + 4
 Sept/Oct.
  • + 1
 Yars!!!
  • + 1
 I have a hunch these will sell very well. But i can't wait to see how it actually does on the markets.
  • + 1
 factory bike and yet you space the caliper bolts .... attention to detail??..
  • + 1
 As mentioned in the review, the bike features a far from stock build. We received it as a bare frame and went from there. Also, have a look at the newest Avid hardware kits that come with the XO Trail brakes and get back to me...
  • + 1
 It's sad to know that in the name of marketing, they kept the I-Drive....
  • + 2
 Bontrager tires?
  • + 1
 fuck me that's a long bike
  • + 1
 anybody tried this bike vs an airbourne pathogen??? thoughts???
  • + 1
 Anyone know the model of pedals they have on there?
  • - 2
 spank spike maybe? if not spikes then something very similar
  • + 1
 they might be spank spikes but I'm not sure
  • + 4
 Look like the spesh prototype flats
  • + 0
 e13 the hive pedals
  • + 2
 The pedals are a set of prototypes from Specialized: www.pinkbike.com/news/Specialized-Prototype-Pedals-Crankworx.html
  • + 2
 Do they have the terrifying 8mm pins?
  • + 1
 It looks like the old alloy gt furys to me.
  • + 1
 i liked the previous model more, don't get me wrong. Just saying
  • - 3
 if one saw the bike, without knowing that this bike has 2 straight wins in the WC, he would say that the bike has the shock placed very high, which leads in a high center of gravity, imbalance etc... but now.....ohhhh that marketing!!!!!
  • + 2
 The shock position isn't any higher than many other bikes. One thing that we try to avoid is looking at any geometry numbers, even travel, before testing a bike. The bike is obviously fast for Gee and Rachel, but its four straight World Cup wins mean nothing to the everyday rider.
  • + 1
 i agree with you!!! what i mean, is that marketing thrives...you know what it involves...cs length, low shock placement, carbon frames, low bb... of course all of the above have advantages, that is why they became the rule... what is wrong is the extreme numbers of these, that some brands use and pass as superior characteristics!
  • + 2
 Wise tire choice.
  • + 2
 Thats what i was thinking. od to see them on somthing other that a trek. those bontrager tires are really amazing. I have had mine for exactly one year. I bought them right at the begining of chairlift season last year and havent (knock on wood) had a flat since then and only had to refill with sealant twice. and i ride about 5 times a week Smile
  • + 1
 I think i may have just popped my first boner over this bike.
  • + 1
 the bike looks way better under a rider in the woods charging
  • + 1
 GT's customer support is dogshit.
  • + 1
 I got a fury in my eyes...
  • + 1
 I spy a 4 piston XO brake !
  • + 1
 Awesome lunch time read.
  • + 1
 ill ride it first.
  • + 1
 still not on sale Wink
  • - 1
 Look at that linkage under the BB all exposed to the UK's dirt & crud to clog it up! Frown
  • + 0
 I wont ever buy a GT
  • - 1
 still a Dorel product. Not a fan
  • - 1
 sounds goood performance wise, but the look still need lots of work
  • + 0
 Have you even been watching the UCI downhill series man it's 4 out of 4 so far :/ where's your logic behind hat statement
  • + 10
 In other words, he thinks its ugly. You're not too good on reading man.
  • + 3
 Sorry that sounds like i'm being an arse. Ignore me.
  • - 1
 正在学习英文,,谷歌翻译的看的蛋疼
  • + 19
 I ran this through google translate. I am more confused: "Are learning English, Google Translate to see egg pain"
  • + 1
 ^^ I lol-ed at this ^^
  • + 2
 Same strange sentence in french
So :
你喝醉了吗?
  • - 3
 Nice but it should have fox sus.
  • - 3
 everything is amazing apart from the paint job and graphics.
  • - 2
 nice how much
  • - 1
 MSRP on frame? Is it 3099?
  • - 2
 That sounds right for a frame/shock.......
  • + 2
 Nope...3099 is for cheapest bike(Elite mode).
  • + 2
 Nice wonder what frame will be MID $2K?
  • + 1
 I hope so.
  • + 2
 Cool. If the frame is priced in the mid to low 2K range, then this really will be a hard bike to pass up.
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