Antidote Lifeline DH - Review

Dec 29, 2014
by Mike Levy  



Looking for some exotica? Want to be the only person on the mountain, or maybe in your country, with your bike? Then you might want to take a look at what Antidote have been cooking up in their factory in Krakow, Poland, where each and every one of their frames are manufactured. Antidote combines carbon fiber with vectran, a material that's known for its abrasion and puncture resistance - and also its relatively high cost - to create the 205mm travel Lifeline DH frame that you see here. The finished product sports some very unique diamond shaped tubing up front, a matching carbon fiber swing arm, aluminum suspension links that can be anodized in a number of different colours, and it's all joined together with titanium pivot hardware. The 6.6lb frame (without shock) retails for 2,999 EUR, which converts to $3,653.69 USD at today's exchange rate, and another 400 EUR gets you the Cane Creek DBair that you ours came with. Exotic equals expensive, right? Other shock options include BOS and DVO, with pricing for those TBA.

Lifeline DH Details

• Intended use: downhill
• Travel: 205mm
• Wheel size: 26''
• Material: carbon fiber, vectran
• Aluminum links, titanium hardware
• Hub spacing: 150mm
• Bottom bracket: 73mm, threaded
• Head tube: 1.5'', semi-integrated
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• Frame weight: 6.6lb (w/o shock)
• Complete weight: 34lb (custom build)
• MSRP: 2999 EUR (w/o shock)


Antidote Lifeline DH geometry


Frame Details

The Lifeline DH's front triangle is manufactured as a single piece rather than different sections that are cooked up and then bonded together, and Antidote has combined the carbon material with vectran during the process. The result should be tubing that's more resistant to rock strikes than if they had left the vectran out (and likely more expensive), but it also makes for a lightweight finished product that comes in at just 6.6lb without a shock, an impressive number considering that there are some mid-travel frames out there with similar weights. Weight aside, Antidote is confident enough in the frame's ability to shrug off abuse that you won't even find any of the down tube protection that's pretty much par for the course on carbon downhill bikes these days, although I suspect that some owners might add their own stick-on solutions. And speaking of down tubes, that's where you'll find the Lifeline's cables to be externally routed, which isn't ideal for over-the-tailgate shuttling.

There's a 1.5'' head tube up front, and Antidote has stuck with a threaded 73mm bottom bracket shell rather than going for a pressed-in job, while a set of ISCG 05 chain guide tabs are located on the lower suspension link. The carbon swing arm matches the front end in beauty, and there's both plenty of tire clearance on hand and an international standard brake mount to be found. Given the (good) decision to stay with a threaded bottom bracket, it's not surprising to see that Antidote has also gone with a 12 x 150mm rear end, complete with their own lightweight aluminum axle, rather than jump up to a 157mm width. A plastic shock guard that's held in place with zip-ties, much like the now common front fenders that you see everywhere, is included with the frame, although it's not pictured here. Given how amazing the frame looks, I feel like there should be some sort of bespoke carbon fender included.


Antidote Lifeline DH review test Photo by Mike Kazimer
  The Lifeline DH's 205mm of travel is controlled by their FDS suspension design, and you can choose either a Cane Creek, BOS, or DVO shock.


The Lifeline DH's Suspension Explained

The 205mm travel Lifeline DH uses Antidote's FDS linkage layout, which is an acronym for 'Floating Damping System'. As the name suggests, the bike's shock is attached to both the upper and lower rocker links rather than bolted to the frame, which isn't a new concept by any means, but it is one that is said to allow for a lighter weight front triangle due to it not needing to deal with having one end of the shock attached to it. With the ability to tweak the pivot locations of both the upper and lower links, it also gives Antidote another variable to play with when it comes to tuning the bike's kinematics to their liking. The two CNC machined 7075 T6 aluminum links are counter-rotating, compressing the shock from both ends rather than the lower link moving away from the upper as found on some other similar looking designs. The bottom link actually rotates concentrically around the bike's threaded bottom bracket, with a massive set of sealed bearings located outside the shell, and a set of ISCG 05 chain guide tabs are found on the drive side of the link that allow the chain guide to move with the bike's travel.

Antidote Lifeline DH review test Photo by Mike Kazimer
  Stout counter-rotating links compress the shock from both ends. A mud guard is included with the frame, but not shown here.








Suspension

It took a bit to get the Lifeline's rear end close to where I wanted it, with the Cane Creek shock requiring lower air pressure than I would have first assumed, and I therefore found myself backing out the shock's adjusters to avoid an over-damped feel. While there are bikes that come off as being very coil-like with an air shock, the Lifeline isn't one of them. The level of forgiveness on small, fast repeated impacts was just a touch harsher than I would have expected, even when running around 35% sag and with relatively open shock settings settings. It was also hard to use all of the bike's travel, despite running quite a bit of sag, although the flip side is that it swallowed up flat landings and massive impacts like that were nothing more than another bump on the ground. I suspect that it would be a different story had the bike been running a coil-sprung shock that would provide a more linear stroke and possibly a more active ride. It was also very difficult to get at the Cane Creek shock's adjustments, which is something that made the tuning process a bit more frustrating than it should be.
bigquotesIt just goes forward, plain and simple, with none of that wishy-washy suspension action that usually seems par for the course when travel numbers get this high.
That supple, active feel might not be there, but the rear end did sit somewhat high in its travel, which allowed the bike to not feel bogged down in its own suspension on faster, smoother trails. This was true even when running the shock too soft in an effort to see what it would take to reach the end of the bike's travel, with the Lifeline being one of the few downhill bikes that doesn't present slow and sloppy handling at such times. While I never felt like I got the back of the Lifeline as active as I should have been able to, I also believe that there are few, if any, downhill bikes that can pedal as well. It just goes forward, plain and simple, with none of that wishy-washy suspension action that usually seems par for the course when travel numbers get this high. And what happens when you get on the brakes? Essentially nothing, as there was no noticeable difference in how the suspension behaved or a change in the bike's attitude.



Handling

The Lifeline felt like it was going to be a lot of bike when I first threw a leg over it, but that initial impression turned out to be about as wrong as I could get. There are a number of downhill bikes that have a tendency to lose their shine when you're not wringing their neck or on ground that would make a lot of riders nervous, yet Antidote has managed to inject their 205mm travel machine with enough life that it was a joy to ride in places that it simply shouldn't be. Numbers aside, it can be darted around tight switchbacks with relative ease and without asking too much of the rider, and unlike a lot of long-travel sleds that have had me feeling like I'm leg pressing a small hatchback when I try to put the power down, the Lifeline almost jumps out of the corners. That combination - the speed that the bike can carry through tight corners that double back, and the exceptional pedalling - makes it one of the quicker downhill bikes that I've spent time on when the trail closes up. That impressions was only backed up further when I took two other bikes (GT's Fury and an NS) down the same trail back-to-back and found that they both took more steering input and body English to get through the same sections, and there was no doubt in my mind that I was slower on them than when I was on the Antidote.

Antidote Lifeline DH review test Photo by Mike Kazimer
  The Lifeline is, quite literally, full of life on the trail, which is something that makes it a blast to ride at full gas.


That lively personality makes itself even more obvious when you stop trying to race the clock and instead focus on just having a hell of a good time. This is a bike that loves to go inside and for you to take your foot off and let it slide, and it was pretty obvious after a few runs of being clipped in that I'd be far better off (otherwise known as having more fun) with a set of platform pedals installed and a disregard for the lifespan on the rear tire. And the manuals! Those who have struggled to keep the front of their downhill bike up in the air for any length of time will feel like a superstar when on the Lifeline. Just in case you haven't gotten the picture yet, the Lifeline poses that rare-for-a-DH-bike attitude that will allow you to have fun in places where riding other downhill bikes can feel like a chore. As far as chassis rigidity goes, I never took note of any unwarranted flex at any point during my time on the bike, which is impressive given the frame's light weight.

Does that Lifeline's frisky ride have it giving up anything when it comes time to put your balls on the handlebar and see how fast you can really go? Not in my books, with it feeling every bit as confident inspiring as a true downhill race bike should. Traction was near endless up front, thanks to the tacky Bontrager G5 rubber and supple Marzocchi fork, and while I could feel the back end moving when things got slippery, it never came around on me. There was also none of the nervousness at speed that sometimes comes from a bike that's so agile, making me think that Antidote have really done well to balance the best of both a bruiser and a nimble package.



Technical Report

• You'll be able to read a full review of SRAM's X01 DH drivetrain in the near future, but the gist of it is that it performs exactly how you'd hope a downhill-specific group should. Less gears but the right gears, and less shifting because of that. There's no chain guide pictured on the bike because I chose not to mount one, although the Lifeline does sport ISCG tabs for exactly that, and I didn't drop a chain once. I was impressed with that, but I'd still not recommend forgoing a chain guide, especially if you're paying money to race or spend time in the bike park.

SRAM X01 DH
  The Lifeline DH does have ISCG 05 chain guide tabs, but I ran the X01 DH group without a guide. I didn't drop the chain once, although that doesn't mean you should go guide-less.

• Bontrager's G5 is among the best downhill tire that I've ever used. Great braking traction, even when leaned over, and their wet weather performance has me recommending them as top notch all-rounders for someone who's looking for a set of do-it-all rubber. Don't expect them to last too long, though, as their predictability comes at the price of durability.

• I used ENVE's 800mm wide DH bar on a shorter-travel bike earlier in the season and found it too stiff and unforgiving in that environment, but it felt ideal on the front of the Antidote. I guess that makes sense given that it's a relatively burly handlebar designed for downhill use. The carbon bar, in combination with the company's carbon fiber Direct Mount 50 stem, made for a cockpit setup that had more than a few onlookers drooling, but it also felt bang-on and gave me no troubles.

• The long awaited review of Marzocchi's 380 C2R2 Titanium will go live next week, but here's the gist of it in the meantime: the new 380 isn't just a viable option when compared to the best from Marzocchi's competitors, it's arguably better when talking about small bump compliance and smoothness, while also offering more adjustments and a coil-sprung feel at a weight that's still extremely competitive. That makes it sound pretty damn good, doesn't it? And it is a top performer, no doubt about it, but the overall feel is still very unique compared to a BoXXer, 40, or anything else out there, and is still very much Marzocchi-esque. That's to say that it's quite active and isn't shy about using its stroke, but downhillers who are after that, and those who aren't afraid of knobs and know what to do with them, are going to love Marzocchi's new 380.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesAntidote has created a downhill bike with a very unique personality, and unique is probably what a potential Lifeline DH owner will be looking for if they're considering the Polish-made machine. It manages to make some bikes with two inches less travel feel uninspiring, which is quite a feat these days, and it wouldn't take much to have a complete build sitting close to 30lb flat. Exotic is the name of the game with the Antidote, but with a switch to Cane Creek's coil-sprung shock, it also has the performance to back up its unconventional pedigree. - Mike Levy


www.antidotebikes.com


244 Comments

  • + 275
 Just a general request: please start including metric weights. I'm sure that would be much appreciated (Especially since Antidote is European) Smile
  • - 184
flag bulldog6485 (Dec 29, 2014 at 1:58) (Below Threshold)
 OMG , it's not that hard to find out the weight .15.4221 kgs custom weight according to Google. Took all of 2 seconds so it's hard to see why it wasn't included really. And that's only relevant if you build it to the same spec. Just under 3kg for the frame alone is a better start point.
  • + 62
 It's also equally not that hard to include the conversion... you know, instead of making hundreds of individuals waste time. Makes a lot of sense, but then again, this is the internet
  • - 10
flag gabriel-mission9 (Dec 29, 2014 at 6:07) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah, could you also give the price in yen, lira and deutschmarks? Failing to do so is just bloody lazy reviewing if you ask me. Bah humbug!
  • + 36
 In Canada we are officially metric, but we unofficially use both sometimes.
  • + 32
 How can you compare two standards to hundreds of currencies... The Internet Prevails!
  • + 10
 It was a joke. And also a little hint that it isn't too hard to convert to whatever is relevant to you.
  • - 4
flag gabriel-mission9 (Dec 29, 2014 at 6:19) (Below Threshold)
 Also I didnt know Bearclaw was from Germany? :p
  • + 40
 MMMMERRRIICCAAAA! WE FOUGHT A WAR IN 1812 OVER STANDARD MEASURES!! JK it is confusing when we say a bike has 205mm travel and weights 34 pounds.
  • + 186
 We can use banana for scale: the bike has one banana and a half of travel and weight 102 bananas.
  • + 30
 yeah, its stems that get me 1 1/8" at one end and 31.8mm at the other. Wtf?

and I am proud to say Faul, my banana is clearly longer than yours Razz
  • + 15
 And if you buy a Giant, you can have a stem that is 31.8mm at one end and 1 1/4" at the other, which are both exactly the same size! lol
  • + 3
 Yeah, Canada tends to use metric for distance and the 'murica method for weight.
  • + 3
 Deutsch Marks? It ceased to exist some time ago
  • + 23
 Please start writing if it's an Enduro bike or notEnduro bike. Finding out takes hell lot of time.
  • - 20
flag Maverickdh00 (Dec 29, 2014 at 11:40) (Below Threshold)
 Bikes should stay imperial, weve been metric here since the 60s but I like my bike measurements in Imperial, but always good to provide both so comaprisons are easily made. Cable routing could be a bit tidier not just bad for tail gate shuttling, its a DH bike, cables exposed to rocks logs etc not good execution, find this strange in the era of carbon, make a beautiful frame and ruin it with small details, but at the high end its about little details, Id lower the top tube angle, seems a bit old school high, shock tunning would worry me a bit, these days theyre are allot of versatile frames that make tunning easier, to me the competitiveness of DH bikes has never been hihger and small makers like this need to make theyre bike designs cover more bases finish better, its just to tight at the top, even weight if I ran Enves on my alloy rig Id be down into the 32lb area, but looks good otherwise. Keen to try the new Zocchi out the coffee one this is last years model 380 C2R2 TITANIUM and moto shock
  • - 4
flag seraph (Dec 29, 2014 at 11:49) (Below Threshold)
 454 grams to a pound. 1 kg = 2.2 lbs. You should be able to do that kind of math in your head. Don't rely so much on others.
  • + 17
 We have been metric here since the 60s for a reason. Why measure bikes in hands, feet and back yards?
  • + 3
 sure we can all google it and we all know how to look up what is not written in the text or review. But in case Pinkbike would like to improve its reviews. Metric and imperial numbers. This is not a big deal for the reviewer but it would increase the "like" factor a lot.
So please have a look that is wider than just the Staates as your customers are global based... sincerly an earthling
  • - 12
flag hamncheez (Dec 29, 2014 at 13:19) (Below Threshold)
  • + 1
 @ theminsta: Exactly.
  • + 6
 none of you have something to say about this fricken beautiful bike?
  • + 7
 Shit Hamncheez, I seriously hope that was some sort of attempt at irony, cos if not you're a fucking racist. Not cool man.
  • + 8
 @gabriel-mission9 its in reply to Sethimus; its an internet joke, specifically a long-running 4chan joke. The context is that its poking fun at certain extreme american political groups who believe in the "new world order" "Bilderberg" stuff-- essentially that the world is being controlled by Jews still. Its political satire.
  • + 6
 Thank f*ck for that. I was unsure, I could see how it could be taken either way.

I am doubly glad as it not only means you aren't an idiot, but also means I don't have to feel guilty about usually finding most of your comments pretty entertaining.

Sorry if I caused any offence. Smile
  • + 1
 what was the name of that space shuttle which was destroyed becuase of metric/imperial conversion??? ye well anyway that was a big deal when it happened. #Metric #Enduro
  • + 5
 wasn't a shuttle was the Mars Climate Orbiter i think
  • + 1
 Ha! A guy at my church growing up was an engineer at JPL and worked on that mars thing that failed because they forgot to convert metric/imperial. His excuse was that they didn't have enough funding.
  • + 5
 Not enough funding? As in a multi billion dollar project went up in flames cos they couldn't afford a calculator? Bloody hell, they coulda borrowed mine if they'd asked.
  • + 1
 In his defense, those engineers work like 80 hours a week and are vastly underpaid compared to their private-sector counterparts. Not excusing it, just giving their side.
  • + 3
 It looks like only US is imperial. i.imgur.com/s31PfWb.jpg
  • + 4
 And Antarctica. Apparently.
  • + 103
 as a drunk man, i find this bike very sexy
  • + 6
 I concur...sir
  • + 43
 As a sober man, I still find this bike damn sexy.
  • + 31
 as a barely-awake-at-work man, i find this bike very sexy
  • + 18
 as a man who has a blizard outside his house, I find this bike insanely sexy
  • - 1
 looks sick and rides like the devils bike... super fast ride, super "über" machine
  • + 23
 as a man not wearing pants, I agree wholeheartedly
  • + 2
 As a Man who has one Lifeline, its Awesome
  • + 2
 As a man with a pineapple in one hand and a flower pot in the other, I find this bike sexually attractive, and myself very awkward.
  • + 87
 hats off to them for producing it in their own country
  • + 103
 Yeah, it's really complicated but gives us even more proud and happiness Smile
  • + 9
 Why the 73mm shell and not 83?
  • + 3
 I wondered this also....
  • + 5
 reduced q factor maybe? 83mm exists purely to support chainlines that need it, so if you can manage to get a proper chainline without it, it's probably the way to go.
  • + 6
 paired with a 150mm rear end its hard to understand how it wouldn't be needed
  • + 3
 agreed, but maybe they made a little compromise on the chain line to achieve it? X01 does bias the gears out toward the rear dropout, but on the flipside, with only 7 gears, there's less total deflection going on from one end to the other.

Of course, than means it may not play too nicely with a full cassette, which would be a deal breaker for me: I ride DH in the woods, not the park or race courses, so I need a least a little bit of uphill gearing.
  • + 1
 Maybe something to do with how the suspension pivots on the bottom bracket?
  • + 3
 I'd think 83 mm would only serve their interests there, as you'd gain stiffness by spacing the pivots farther apart. You could be on to something though.
  • + 1
 It's easy enough to run the Race Face spacer kit on some 83mm cranks to get a wider chainline if it's needed....
  • + 1
 X01 direct mount rings come in zero or 6 mm offset. Chainline for 135 is 51mm from center. Chainline for 150 is 57 from center. Some combination will definitely work.
  • + 1
 ...If they're willing to require chainring offset at the crank, which takes things even a step further than the AM bikes having no FD mounting option. After all, you can get a 1x crank from anybody, even using a triple with a single ring mounted. cranks that offer offset rings, on the other hand, are not nearly so common...
  • + 2
 A better question is why they didn't go 12 x 157 and make life easier installing the wheel into the swingarm.
  • + 2
 Mondraker summum uses this system 73mm bb 150mm rear
  • + 2
 Foes also use 73/150, or at least used to
  • + 10
 Hello, we always put set of spacers to fit 83 crank aswell. Please wait for our new frames which will be available with all new standards, until LifeLine isn't our newest model... Wink In new Enduro 650b frame you will have an option to put even 2 different BB standards because of removable BB insert Smile
  • + 38
 Awesome! It is always heart warming to see a Polish bike in the test. I've been a fan of theirs since the first prototypes, I hope and wish for them to succeed as a business so we see only more of their bikes in the future. Guys from Antidote also helped to make a truly beautiful looking XC bike for Sikorski Cycles (available even in 26") that uses "the same" suspension system.

www.facebook.com/pages/Sikorski-Cycles/172683486099068?fref=photo

Huge props for making this in Poland! Polak Potrafi!
  • + 19
 Thank yo uvery much for these good words! (new SuperEnnuro 650b and 4x is almost ready to run! Smile )
  • + 9
 You Poles make damn fine bikes. NS and Dartmoor are both sick, and according to this review, Antidotes are sick as well.
  • + 5
 And don't forget Zumbi, their F11 is pretty sweet...
  • + 1
 Pretty sure dartmoor isn't made in poland.
  • + 2
 So isn't NSbikes, but they are designed by smart and passionate people in this country being one of Gods best geopolitical jokes
  • + 1
 Norcos and rocky mountains aren't made in canada. Specialized and (most) Treks aren't made in the US. What's your point?
  • + 1
 "huge props for making this in Poland" the bikes are made and designed there. not just designed there is what Waki meant. Then you went on to say a few brands that were not made in Poland.

Thats the point in saying props for making this in poland, NS Dartmoor are both made in Taiwan which anyone could contract out to. I own a Dartmoor shine and I'm sure it would be much better quality if it was made in Poland like Antidote.
  • + 1
 My point is Poles make/design great bikes
  • + 13
 Is there as little clearance between the tire and shock as it looks like? I think the review should have included detail on the plastic fender because there's no way I'd let that exposed shock stanchion sit right next to the tire without substantial protection.
  • + 5
 The shock will take a beating for sure. poor stanchions. digging the carbon and vectran combo though.
  • + 1
 How about a full guide, will it interfered by the lower linkage.?
  • + 9
 "A plastic shock guard that's held in place with zip-ties, much like the now common front fenders that you see everywhere, is included with the frame, although it's not pictured here"
  • + 1
 chyu, doubt it seeing that the iscg mount itself is sticking out from the side of the lower link.

Endurorider, that doesn't really say much. Does it mount securely and sturdily? Fit well? Big enough to protect the shock? Reduce tire clearance? Ugly? Pretty? Given that there isn't even any cable guides for the rear brake, I'm presuming it's an afterthought.
  • + 22
 1. Rear mudguard is fitted perfectly and directly to the swingarm using special 3M automotive double side tape. Please check attached photo p.vitalmtb.com/photos/users/30813/setup_checks/27553/photos/32470/s1600_Antrieb_Profil.jpg?1417978387
2. LifeLine has dedicated cable routing for brake, but Mike (tester) doesn't use it.
  • + 15
 Not gonna lie: that picture is sex.
  • + 2
 Glad to see an answer about the brake routing, as it was the first thing I came down to the comments to ask about. Any pictures of what it' supposed to look like? BTW, bike looks very good visually, & sounds like exactly what I want out of a DH bike, good job fellas.
  • + 1
 Please check for example this gallery :http://www.antidotebikes.com/#lifeline-nano-dh.gallery
  • + 3
 I have some close up pictures in my gallery here: www.pinkbike.com/u/morewhitenoise/album/Antidote-Lifeline-2014
  • + 1
 ah, I see why he rerouted it now. Certainly something I'd look at revising, but it's a personal pet peeve for me, so that probably has more to do with it. I'd probably compromise between the two & run it along the top of the chainstay. Since there's nothing in the front triangle to prevent it, I'd probably put some bottle bosses on the top of the downtube, some cable spacers on either side, then an aluminum piece that screws down on the bottle bosses with wings that go out over the cable spacers to attach the cables.

But like I said, cable routing is a pet peeve of mine. I hate using zip ties or cable clips, & care about it far more than is reasonable. Specialized has been using downtube routing for years, & far less people have problems than you might expect.
  • + 2
 Myself and two buddies with Specializeds have had our brake hoses severed on the downtube. Retarded place to route hydraulics in my opinion.
  • + 1
 While I sympathize, lots of other people haven't had a problem with it. If the routing was as problematic as some people maintain, it would be a far more common problem(though I do think it's more acceptable on XC bikes than DH.)
  • + 16
 They just know that 27.5 is BS
  • + 17
 I'm really happy to see that not everyone has killed 26" wheels. THANK YOU ANTIDOTE!! Now let's show these business suits that their business marketing ploy is wasted, by posting faster times with normal-sized wheels and tires! Go!
  • + 11
 im sick.i need the antidote.
  • + 1
 Luckily now u can have one but it comes with the price though.
  • + 10
 Made in Poland! With pride Smile
  • + 9
 sexy as polish girls and strong as their vodka. this is one hell of a ride!
  • + 4
 i'm intruiged. Running normal sag levels the bike sits high in its travel, is harsh on small bumps, pedals like a hardtail and never bottoms out? Surely this is simply a case of too much compression damping? Not picking fault with the review, I am genuinely interested. It says the shock was run with the compression settings nearly all the way open, which confuses me. If it blew through mid travel it would make more sense as that could be caused by a crazy lever curve. As is, it kinda sounds like there is resistance coming from elsewhere, like a tight bearing or something?

Would be very interested to hear how the bike rides with a coil shock or a more linear air shock like a Vivid. I can kinda see how that would help, but at the same time it seems odd that the issue can be felt all throughout the stroke, suggesting its not an issue with the progressiveness of the lever ratio. It cant be that it is just a low ratio throughout either, as that would be solved by simply dropping the air pressure. I really would love to know more as the bike seems pretty cool (as long as you protect the shock from the rear tyre well).
  • + 1
 I have spent 2 years on a lifeline now, it takes some time to get the beginning stroke suppleness dialled, but it is there. I run way lower air pressure in my DBAir than I would on any other bike and run my compression very low. The leverage curve works well so the damping on the shock is hardly needed. I do agree with the review though, the faster you go the more active the suspension becomes.
  • + 1
 how much sag do you run. %wise?
  • + 2
 I've had mine for 2 years as well - I run it with a CCDB coil which works absolutely perfectly, never felt dead and always been super supple - I run it with around 15%-20% sag and it's perfect, 100x more traction than my old m9 had at 35% sag and just springs out of corners - the bike is just a rocket everywhere
  • + 3
 15% sag? And its still super supple? Now I'm even more confused :S
  • + 2
 Yeah - the review is like 1/2 what I experience and then 1/2 what? - it pedals great and the suspension is crazy active, never numb or dead feeling. I started with more sag and the gradually made it stiffer until I had the right mixture of traction and rolling speed - the rear end is insane, it tracks so well that you have to tune the shock way differently to other counter rotating link bikes that I've ridden. I'm on the CCDB coil and not the air so I can't really comment on the tuning with the air but the coil mates perfectly - with how stiff I run my bike, it still has more traction than any other bike I've ever ridden
  • + 1
 morewhitenoise has it pretty spot on - the faster you go, the better the bike feels and the more it pushes it you to keep accelerating - you go into things way faster than normal and it just hooks up and saves you - definitely in a different league
  • + 1
 I run around 35% maybe a bit more.

Thats more down to the shock than anything i think (as Chup eludes to)
  • + 0
 I'm pretty sure manufacturers leverage curves don't tell the full story, the work by calculating the ratio of wheel travel to shock travel, but in reality you have direction of forces to incorporate, I think to the term is mechanical efficiency. The whole swingarm exerts a ton of force on the upper link as it has to pull itself and the lower link upward under compression, the motion is very unnatural and essentially dampens natural movement, its called an in built mechanical pedal platform and the reason why the bike pedals very well is the same reason its suspension is dull and unresponsive in its first part of travel, the linkage essentially doesn't want to move - this design practise is very common with lots of manufacturers, yt bikes linkage is also quite 'extreme' in its angles.
  • + 2
 (apologies for my typos) - also, stating the suspension becomes more 'active' when you go faster is like saying a cars wheels spin faster the quicker it goes... Obviously at higher speeds impact and compression forces are greater and therefore the suspension moves more.... Kinda obvious!
  • + 1
 Bikes with the shock mounted to two floating ends are hard to get working well. Twice the variables to nail down.
  • + 1
 A linkage with "extreme angles" essentially just causes an extreme lever curve. The only thing applying any mechanical resistance to wheel travel should be the shock, with some incidental impact from the chain and brakes. For this bike to feel overdamped throughout its entire range of travel, with the dials fully open and running a lot of sag, it seems to me like something else must be wrong.
  • + 1
 Gabriel9, its basic engineering principles, pull a lever at 90 degrees and it will move easily, pull whilst standing near-parallel and it will take more effort - try opening your fridge door by pulling towards you whilst standing at the side near the hinge - the angle forces are applied to a pivot cause energy loss, the same principle applies in differentials and 4wd systems etc. Learn the basics bro
  • + 1
 Yep, i get that. Its all to do with lever ratos. When pulling at close to 90 degrees, you get a close to 1:1 ratio. If pulling at a little under 180 degrees, you get a huge amount of movement at 90 degrees, while only achieving a very small movement in the direction you are pulling in. in fact as you approach 180 degrees, the lever ratio approaches infinity, which is why nothing happens when you pull at exactly 180 degrees. I know the basics bro. Smile
  • + 1
 There is a lot of armchair engineering going on here guys. All i can say is the reviewer has it pretty much spot on. I disagree with the sentiment about the beginning stroke, I find it very supple and active (at speed). Save your bickering and try one, the bike speaks for itself. Its not for everyone (especially single pivot fans) but coming from VPP i think this is much better. Im happy for anyone in the UK to get in touch with me and talk more and even let you throw a leg over mine if you're local.
  • + 9
 Best looking bike ever!
  • + 5
 Just got a brand new 380 c2r2
Super excited
But the high speed rebound and compression adjusters are frozen solid .
And no ones home at Marzocchi :-(
Happy Hollidays .
  • + 3
 I´ve seen this lovely beast riding Spicak bikepark, with mud guard is the shock in a clean place. Maybe it is not the best place when you think about mud, but forget about that and think about the weight and gravity center, then it makes sense. And the front triangle....damn so hot! www.pinkbike.com/photo/11579152/?s5
  • + 7
 can i have the wheel travel dimensions in nautical miles please?
  • + 1
 0.00011069114470842333 Razz
  • + 2
 light years?
  • + 1
 nautical miles it's true Razz I didn't just make that up, check it out Smile
  • + 3
 Wonder how many racers with be brave enough not to run a chain guide in 2015. The bike looks so much better without them. Only dropped my chain once in 18 months using narrow/wide but it's it a risk worth taking?
  • + 10
 Matter of taste. I like how bikes looks with chain guides a lot more.
  • + 2
 Ever hit a nasty root section or a gnarly rock gardan. Just curious how the norrow wide actually does hold up in those conditions. Ive been thinking of switching over I just trust my guide to much to let it go
  • + 2
 If I was a very serious racer I probably wouldn't risk it but for us mere mortals, paired with a clutch I'd say its pretty much worry free. Made the switch last year and never looked back.
  • + 1
 mhoshal. Try one you'll be amazed. Make sure it's paired to a clutch mech thought
  • + 6
 I've been dropping my chain a lot with mud and grit getting between my chain ring and chain. I would never not use a chain guide in a dh race
  • + 1
 Thanks for the input guys I appreciate it I think im gonna have to try it out most of the reviews seem to be very positive
  • + 1
 Beautiful bike, ingenious and unique. Sadly, little details like proper cable routing and integrated frame stops for the fork may hurt the uptake at this price. Zip ties right over their Antidote logo on the swingarm... Congrats on a beautiful bike and much success regardless!
  • + 5
 wah, i have a lot of space to put my bottle on the down tube
  • + 1
 never realized till i read your comment. indeed, its spacious enough
  • + 1
 regardless of the controversy of the bike, this is a direct quote from the article,"Does that Lifeline's frisky ride have it giving up anything when it comes time to put your balls on the handlebar and see how fast you can really go?"

Is that how to see how fast you can really go, Mike?

:-)
  • + 1
 How many times do we have to read the following about X0DH:

"I ran it without a chainguide, it never dropped the chain once, oh but you should totally run it with one".

I've read that a lot. I've also ridden X0DH without a chainguide a lot. It is time that someone stepped up and said it, you don't need a chainguide with that drivetrain. Save the weight, save the drag, try it.

Cool looking bike, suspension design looks... complex.
  • + 1
 Just read up on Vectran a bit, nasty processing to create it "Vectran is a manufactured fiber, spun from a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) created by Celanese Acetate LLC and now manufactured by Kuraray Co., Ltd. Chemically it is an aromatic polyester produced by the polycondensation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 6-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid" (from wiki). Has some strange applications and properties too. Still a wicked bike, I LIKE IT.
  • + 1
 Although I love too see reviews on new, expensive super awesome bikes that I will probably never have a chance to have I would also love too see reviews on bikes that appeal more to the standard enduro/downhill rider, I don't mean the £99 specal bikes either. Thanks for reading Smile
  • + 0
 bike looks alright but seems to lack alot of rear support and might be weak if it we're taken out for freeride just my opinion just looks weak in the rear that's all..And tire size and winning races really come on build those girly legs and pedal harder plain and simple as that grow some leg muscle if you want to go faster i can get my dh up to 50 - 60 kmh on flat road imagine on a downhill course
  • + 1
 Do u know Jaws rides Lifeline? Is it a proper pressure test in freeride 4 u ? Wink
  • + 2
 2.2046 is a number all should remember. It's easy. Easier maybe than hitting your head against the wall that is 'Merica and their useless imperial lbs
  • + 1
 Yeah you could get it near 30# flat, but how? Run a Monarch and a Pike? I don't see much room for improvement on that. Then again, this build is already lighter than my 6" bike...
  • + 1
 Half a plastic bottle of soda or milk cut to size will protect well enough against mud and rocks. Worked for years on my Cortina. Even passed the "October at Plattekill" test.
  • + 0
 What's people's opinions on the bikes geometry? ? It claims to be a big bike, but to me it seems to have a small cockpit, with the bike getting a lot of its length from the chain stay... in fact the chain stay is longer than the reach measurement for the large size bike which is fairly uncommon compared to goes on other dh bikes....
  • + 10
 Best option will be to check the bike under your own a** Smile We follow our way, but most customers really aprreciate the geometry of LifeLine in DH and NanoDH aswell.
  • + 1
 Seems an educated reply...... "Most customers" will say their happy with the geometry, seeing as they have just spent a small fortune on the frame, it's not like they are going to turn around and say "actually this is pretty poor" is it????
I am fortunate enough to be getting a sit on one of these as my friend has just got his frame, so I'm looking forward to that....
The frame does look stunning in the flesh, the high gloss finish is sweet and really shows off the carbon....
  • + 5
 Hi Alan, You are welcome to have a chat with me about the geo or even ride my bike. Im 6'4 and ride a large Smile
  • + 1
 I'm on a large and it's perfect - fits almost exactly like a large m9 - for people taller than 6'3 it might feel a little small but Jan and the guys nailed it with the geo and sizing - slack and low and long
  • + 1
 @antidotebikes What's the idea behind having the reach shorter on the DH than the Nano?
  • + 1
 @sam-rodda - the effective toptube is 10mm longer on the large lifeline compared to the Nano. The stack and reach calculation throws the numbers off for some reason (not very useful on a bike like the nano). If you want to talk about geo I know a guy in the UK on a large Nano
  • + 1
 The idea with a dh bike is you're standing up nearly all the time, you can create your own longer reach just by leaning back more, reach is a more useful figure for bikes where you're sitting down, wheelbase is more pertinent for downhill bikes
  • + 0
 How do you create longer reach by leaning back? You would be compressing rear suspension more so you would actually make it shorter.
  • + 1
 So pedals well, no brake jack, doesn't feel supple. Sounds like a good bike for racing with. One question... how does it pedal when the going gets rough? Is it hard to keep the wheels planted due to poor feel?
  • + 4
 Hello, please check more opinion from other racers in USA (for example on our FB site). IMHO is really good! Smile
  • - 7
flag banjberra (Dec 29, 2014 at 8:07) (Below Threshold)
 But I've analysed the linkage on linkage software and it has extremely low anti-squat. This bike is not one you can pedal, and it is one of the most active suspension designs on the market. I don't understand why pinkbike reviews are always full of outright lies. Probably because they are paid reviews and the whole MTB industry is objectively full of marketing lies. Every single suspension design is told to be far greater than it actually is, with characteristics it doesn't actually possess. It's so bad that I am going to make a blog that exposes all these obscene lies. Anyway it is a good bike. Not really built for racing so much as enjoyment. I just wish that it was portrayed for how it truly is, in this review, rather than how pinkbike and mike levy wanted to market it. Pretty unacceptable state of affairs in this industry that I love so much.
  • - 5
flag banjberra (Dec 29, 2014 at 8:11) (Below Threshold)
 Also, it has 80% brake squat at sag. It is quite well managed, but that is not an outstanding number. You would likely notice it if you knew what brake squat felt like.
  • - 5
flag banjberra (Dec 29, 2014 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 The other funny thing about this review is that the linkage favours a coil shock. But that seems to be the decision of antidote rather than pinkbike. The anti-squat levels would be better with the 34t or whatever was used with x01, but I would never ever spend that much money on a drivetrain and I think most of the dh community agrees with that sentiment. But then again, this bike's target demographic may be in alignment with the demographic for x01. At any rate. This review was really poor and I am extremely disappointed with pinkbike. But, Antidote, you are a great company and I bet this bike probably feels at least as good as it should. It's too bad pinkbike is so dishonest and manipulative with their marketing.
  • - 5
flag banjberra (Dec 29, 2014 at 8:47) (Below Threshold)
 Another extremely interesting trait of the bike that was unrecognised in this review is how low the pedal kickback is: effectively nonexistant.
  • + 17
 Your armchair must be gold plated, for the amount of criticism you offer is truly impressive.
  • + 8
 Some people ride bikes and review them. Others sit behind a computer and spout characteristics that they have never ridden. Your comments are as boring as your oversized sense of self worth by plugging numbers into computer programs instead of getting out there and living life & trying things. Unplug Banjberra and go try riding a bike for a change of pace.
  • + 3
 banjberra - yes, you can initially check some numbers using linkage ..... but in contructions like single pivots! I checked a lot of bikes I have ridden on linkage so I know what I'm saying.
  • - 7
flag banjberra (Dec 29, 2014 at 10:37) (Below Threshold)
 I never criticised the linkage. I even said it was likely a great bike. I said that pinkbike's review was bullshit. It is winter and I can't ride my bike because it is snowy. I have no ego, I am just stating physical truths, raw data. I am upset with the industry for being so dishonest. That's all. You can have whatever opinion you want but linkage programs are how engineers engineer mountain bikes. I never claimed to be experienced either, it is just that the review said that the bike was the opposite of how it actually is and didn't truly express what makes the bike special. It is a disservice to the consumers AND antidote bikes to give misleading and dishonest reviews.
  • + 7
 I read all this review and Mr Mike described what I felt when I rode this frame for the first time! I feel it every time I'm back on my lifeline after bike switch with my friends so banjberra, chill out Smile
  • - 6
flag banjberra (Dec 29, 2014 at 11:18) (Below Threshold)
 Okay whatever. The review is contradictory. Bikes do not have magical traits that enable them to bypass the compromises all bike designers face in bike engineering. The raw numbers define how the bike feels. You can't have it all. This is the third time I am saying that I believe the antidote lifeline is a sick bike. I do not have the experience riding it but I have the knowledge to know that this review is full of bullshit. I'm not saying there isn't truth to the review either. I am just saying that there is a lot of lying in it.
  • + 3
 banjberra isnt completely outta line, somethings askew for sure, most likely the shock, even atidote is saying the bike is normally very active. Though I don't think Levy is bullshitting us, I just think somethings causing an anomaly here.
  • + 3
 @banjberra

I hear ya man! I personally appreciate your input.

some people don't like differing opinions or even facts...they just want to drink the kool-aid.
  • - 4
flag guataisi (Dec 29, 2014 at 14:20) (Below Threshold)
 @banjberra
"... this review is full of bullshit."

This and all ones actually. I personally gave up reading them some time ago. They all are the same at heart. They have the same structure and use a repetitive and stereotyped language.
For example, I find it difficult to understand why they don't carry out an in-depth analysis of the linkage, one of the most important elements, even more when reviewing bikes which cost almost as much as cars.
I am more interested in what people are saying in the comment section. They are independent views after all.
  • - 5
flag bishopsmike (Dec 29, 2014 at 14:27) (Below Threshold)
 You guys are mixing up features vs benefits. The design of the linkage is not important in the least, other than for something pretty to look at and talk about over beers. The only important thing is how the bike rides.
  • + 7
 After linkage-analysing that rear suspension too I'm also not surprised that it might have problems using it's full travel. Suspension design that progressive doesn't go well with an air shock and it should be ridden with a coil over to get best out of it. Also, since that 380 seemingly has very active, Marzocchi-esque characteristics, I wonder how well front- and back-end work together there (also considering coil front, air rear). How's the overall balance of that bikes suspension?
And as @banjberra said, what got my attention considering this bikes characteristics was as well that lack of pedal kickback, but that area wasn't mentioned anywhere in this review, what???

Interesting is that they went with 73/150 transmission for both frames they make. If that rear triagle isn't off-center to the brake-side to counteract that miss-alignment this brings, I can see challenges with chainline. And as told by someone here, that would also most probably add to the strength of that lower link too.

BTW it seems that this analysed suspension data is uploaded there by Jan Kiefer, so it should be accurate since it comes straight from the source Smile Thanks and hats off to Jan and Antidote there, if this is true! Since every frame manufacture should provide us with this ACCURATE info, if that suspension truly is as good as they advertise it to beWink
  • + 1
 @banjberra - Have you actually ridden this bike? Despite your claim that "The raw numbers define how the bike feels," I'd argue otherwise. It's how a bike feels on the trail that matters, not the opinion of someone who's never thrown a leg over it, and instead relies on computer calculations as the basis of their unfounded arguments. I know it's winter, but c'mon, you must have something better to do than trying to claim that this bike is "not one you can pedal."
  • + 3
 @slumgullion - That was an exaggeration due to me being so appalled by mike levy saying that there are few if any dh bikes that pedal as well as this.

As @corneringknobs pointed out, the designer of the bike itself uses and believes in linkage software and was the one who uploaded the file to the public library.

Is that not substantial enough evidence that maybe the raw numbers actually do mean what they mean?
  • + 2
 I agree that I shouldn't have said it can not be pedaled. However. The anti-squat(pedaling efficiency) was compromised in the linkage in order to create a more sensitive and active design that has less pedal kickback with a mere 2 degrees at full travel. Insanely low. Like among the best out of every dh bike.

It is a smart decision based on the way antidote bikes feels they want bikes to feel. That is their idea of the ideal compromise. Just like every other linkage design ever made.
  • + 1
 @banjberra - Obviously a bike designer is going to use linkage software, but my question still stands: Have you ridden this bike? Real ride impression are more important to me than theoretical ones.
  • + 2
 @slumgullion - how do you think linkage works? Do you think it is like black magic?

Really what likely happened here is mike levy couldn't get his shock set up properly and gave up because it was a hassle to keep removing the shock to adjust it. Probably got to a point where it felt kinda alright after much frustration and settled.
  • + 4
 And it's not theoretical, it's physics. Aluminium doesn't bend magically through the travel to produce magical characteristics that defy the laws of physics. It takes a bit of studying to get how all the kinematics relate to and effect each other, but once you do your homework it makes sense.
  • + 0
 @banjberra: It's a 'yes' or 'no' question - have you ridden this bike? Two or three letters is all it takes to gain or lose credibility in this discussion.
  • + 0
 @slumgullion
I trust "the raw numbers" much more than Mr Levy's arguments (or any other bike reviewer). And do you know why? Because numbers don't lie. And do you know why numbers dont lie? Because they don't have to make happy their advertisers or future advertisers. As you should know, at the end of the day, in the review business the only thing that matters is the income statement.
  • + 2
 @banjberra : The linkage software isn't 100% accurate on anti squat things. Because the center of gravity position changes from a rider to another, and the way mass accelerate during pedaling isn't accurately modeled. It can be used for an XC or enduro bike because you sit when pedaling, but for a DH bike chain growth or kickback values are more predictive.
And, geometry and stiffness of the frame can change the way the bike react under pedaling, without changing antisquat values.
  • + 2
 Okay. Buy into whatever hype you want. Bikes do have magic properties if you believe in them. It's true. Your bike can have every desirable suspension characteristic if you only believe.
  • + 2
 suspensions don't have magic properties, but neither have softwares. If you look at antisquat values, you can't say if the bike will pedal well or not. antisquat is exact for Cars, it works for motorbikes, but it is a little random when talking about bikes. Because the pedaling movement and the mass acceleration of the rider don't happen in the same time. So antisquat as "linkage" shows values isn't predictive about pedaling efficiency.
But others values like leverage rate, axle path and chain growth can be trust.
For pedalling, I look at chain growth and kickback values, and reach&chainstay lengh. I'ts more acurate but you have to think a little more. and leverage rate&sag has to be looked, too.
And don't forget to use the exact size of chainrings because result may vary.
  • + 1
 Let me make myself clear. There is no way in hell mike levy should have said this bike pedals better than maybe any dh bike out there. The suspension design IS one of the most active designs. Someone in the comments of this review has said that it is the most active bike they have ever ridden and they are likely using a coil shock that was set up appropriately for the bike and rider. I do not get why pinkbike posters are so defensive of shitty reviews. It only enables pinkbike continue doing a poor job. You are not helping antidote bikes by defending misinformation.
  • + 0
 If you want a good opinion try the bike. Mike Levy says what he felt when it's positive, and I think he don't say everything when something don't work. But I don't think he's lying. The bike is a L sized bike with nearly 440mm of reach and 440mm of chainstays. It's quite long. And The CCDB can be run with LSR and LSC as you want. If Mike is'n a tall man, or if the previous bikes were shorter, or the shock is set with adequate cliks, it will pedal better than others.
  • + 3
 Amazing looking frame.....WOW!!!!!!
  • + 2
 this bike is 9 out of 10. loss a point for that damn shifter cable on the down tube.
  • + 2
 Ah counter-rotating links, watch...santa cruz will attempt to sue for a violation of the VPP patent.
  • + 0
 I think it's definitely a violation (SC is one of the few companies to actually own a patent that names the FORM as opposed to function of the suspension scheme) however, If I understand correctly the VPP patent only holds true for the U.S. Unless Antidote has begun importing bikes stateside, there's no issue.
  • + 6
 Hello, FDS suspension is patented, so don't have any connection with VPP in its original form.
  • + 2
 The problem is that VPP's original form matters not since Santa Cruz didn't just buy the original VPP patent, they also changed the design and filed a new patentwhich is why they went after Yeti for their Switch link design, with its contra-rotating links AS well as they filed a patent in 2005 (granted in 2009) for a linkage WITH a floating shock incorporated to achieve the same shock rates as they get on their VPP bikes. So not only do bike companies go around patenting basic things like axle paths, pivot locations and how much anti-squat there is, but now they're getting patents for tuning the shock rate as well. And that comes out to how much money for lawyers do you have to bankrupt your competitors instead of out selling them.

www.santacruzbicycles.com/en/us/news/349
  • + 1
 Antidotebikes: Thanks for clearing that up!

Deeeight: Hmm, I hadn't realized that actually was granted... Seems like we haven't seen any production action from there, though SC did dabble in APP for a short time (guessing that's the shock-rate characteristic pattern?)
  • + 2
 I wish more manus would run their cables along the top of the downtube. And please no internal cable routing.
  • - 1
 I mean... what couple possibly go wrong with putting the rear shock in the most exposed area for getting hit by rocks and clogging up with dirt and shit... I mean I guess they could have put it on the underside of the down tube... I guess that would have been worse....
  • + 1
 I have older Aluminum alloy version Lifeline and it is great, like Mike mentioned the faster you go the better it feels. Very responsive and lively for a DH bike.
  • + 1
 I smashed down the midlevels on an old Lifeline in Hong Kong, it was fun! But a bit heavily built. Wonder how the new one would go.
  • + 3
 what a rad review. Damn I love mountain bikes, thank you pink bike !!
  • + 2
 Bloody foreigners smashing epic bikes now? I should move back to Poland then...
  • + 1
 cool bike my polish friends. Love the exotic'ness of it. Never seen Vectran used before. Can't wait to see your whole line up!
  • + 1
 i imagine that rear shock to need lots off attention considering all the grit and shit that will get thrown at it from where it sits with no guards or anythin
  • + 1
 looks good. but where are all the immense rants about price? did peeps get big fat Christmas cards full of cash?
  • + 1
 It's a similar bike to my Solstice. Does suck big time if you encounter mud.
  • + 1
 Absolutely beautiful. I'd seriously consider one of these if I ever entertained the idea of racing downhill again...
  • + 5
 It's not only option to ride Antidote until we will push 2 new frames on market really soon! Smile
  • + 2
 Doesn't look much room for a coil?
  • + 1
 Nah, I bet there's plenty of room for a coil considering they have a DBAir in there. It's not a skinny shock either. Maybe more relevant is how accessible the adjustment knobs are. The upper link is blocking them as they are on the front triangle facing side.

Once you've got it set, it shouldn't be a problem, but just giving either low speed dial a "click" seems challenging without removing the shock.
  • + 4
 CCDB in coil version fits well. So, don't worry Wink
  • + 1
 Was just looking at my bike while reading this and I am still not convinced my Fox DHX RC4 piggyback would have to be shoehorned in there!
  • + 1
 Been watching Antidote for a few years now,i saw this coming,what a stunner!!
  • + 3
 this must be my next one
  • + 2
 Cables mounted under the frame though..not a fan of that
  • + 1
 If you want tout but one in north america, I sell them (better price than the MSRP), go check my adds
  • + 2
 Good review. Sounds like a fun bike.
  • + 2
 please do a review of the lifeline nano!!!
  • + 1
 Good god that color combination is horrible. But still 10/10 would ride.
  • + 1
 Does anyone know what pedals are fitted to this bike?
  • + 1
 This isn't a new bike , late on the marketing?
  • + 1
 I pretty much can't handle how god damn sexy that bike is, I just can't.
  • + 1
 Nice looking frame, but 2999 euro without shock?
Okay.
Fine.
Thanks.
  • + 1
 They build bike for us which we can't afford xD Bravo poland !
  • + 1
 With that money i can get canyon torque dhx flashzone.
  • + 3
 Haha PaTis
My Polish ex-girlfriend was always counting the pennies.

She never seemed to mind spending my money tho Razz
  • + 4
 So .... you want to have the same price for a great looking, made of carbon&vectran, light, unique, agile frame with suspension that works really sweet and "average aluminum frame"? What the f*ck is this nonsense? Big Grin
  • - 4
flag PaTis (Dec 29, 2014 at 11:32) (Below Threshold)
 For this price you can have any other good stuff from branch with years of experience for example, will se is this frame is good after few years. By the way this frame is NOT unique, you don't know how it working (or you do?) and it's definitely not looking good. And do you think that for example glory, intense, v10, summun or any other frames are "average aluminum frame" ? You said its light (about 15Kg is it?) How heavy is mondraker summun? oh sorry its just "average aluminum frame".... which in fact is more durability than carbo. And the fork.... we have 2014 and people still using soviet technology, DVO CC or BOS shock and soviet technology on front, but we polish like that i du no why, but in fact it depend of liking.

Guys dont understand me wrong i like idea of this bike and i'm glad that my country made something like that, but i think its just another really good stuff, which i never afford because is too expensive. But im realy surprise how people are interested about this bike, thats positive ^^
  • + 1
 No offense dude.
Indeed, that bike is nice looking carbon bike.
But, look at the rear shock.
Installed in areas which are often exposed rocks, and similiar things.

Okay, my bad if i compare this bike with your "average aluminium frame" category.
How about, phoenix DH carbon?
You can have it for $3.2k-ish and you can get DHX RC4.

CMIIW.
  • + 0
 And i dont mind to offend nobody Smile I just think all new stuff is just simply good and compare to each other, all new and old branches before release new frame making a LOT of tests, in factory, laboratory and at last in practice. To be honest in this days when you looking for new frame, appearance is the most important thing. But its just mine private opinion.
  • + 1
 @PaTis I agree with you.
IMHO, sometimes appearance is a mental game.
When you have the "Dream Build" bike, somehow it can makes somebody out there has more self confidence.

PS : The comment that i wrote after yours is not for you dude, it's for @czlenson
  • + 2
 Want
  • + 1
 Looks like the old Chumba Zulu. Same design.
  • + 0
 Looks awful, but seems to perform good. At last my country do sometyhing good Big Grin
  • + 1
 26 inch? I tought they were extinct already...
  • + 0
 Just yesterday at the trails I was saying to my mates that I would love to see a review on this bike !
  • + 1
 that geometry cool af
  • + 1
 sexy
  • + 1
 Tidy
  • + 0
 Really bad spot for the rear shock. ..just my opinion!
  • - 3
 let's throw a lot of rocks and dirt at that shock at really high speeds.
  • - 5
flag Bikerguy13 (Dec 29, 2014 at 0:28) (Below Threshold)
 Couldn't agree with you more. As soon as you hit some mud it's practically game over trying to keep that shock clean.
  • + 18
 "A plastic shock guard that's held in place with zip-ties, much like the now common front fenders that you see everywhere, is included with the frame, although it's not pictured here"
  • + 1
 I'm pretty sure they had a carbon mudguard on their facebook page
  • - 1
 Hey fair enough. ..but still a bad design to place the shock IMO. Why didn't they run the mid guard in the review? You can see in the 4th picture down mud on the stanchion...and doesn't look like a whole lot of clearance at the back tire.
  • + 12
 I'm having fun on this bike for like 4 years now and I really don't see any problem with shock position. I used a custom rubber fender I did myself. It took me 15 minutes to make one. Lasted for seasons and my shock was always the cleariest thing in my bike. Now U have this official carbon fender. If you want to adjust shock, just release upper bolt and pull suspension (like in V-10 when crashing). Your shock will be in service position and bike will not fold too ! Great thing because U can take out shock and your bike is still standing, waiting for a heart change Smile
  • - 1
 bah wet mud will make the shox move better
  • + 1
 hell yes
  • - 1
 That air shock is gonna need a rebuild after ever ride with it sitting like that.
  • + 1
 Work of art
  • + 1
 Snappy!
  • + 1
 I like it!
  • + 1
 What pedals are they ???
  • + 1
 NS Bikes
  • + 0
 *geo's
  • - 2
 What a sexy bike. even ole waki would #agree.
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