Huck Norris Tire Insert - Review

Feb 7, 2017
by Paul Aston  
Huck Norris


Huck Norris appeared out of the blue at Eurobike 2016 to much fanfare and attention, a closed-cell foam insert that is placed into tubeless tire and wheel combinations to help ward off hard impacts. It's intended to act as a cushion to help prevent rims from being dented or dinged, and it should also cushion the tire carcass between the rim and rock as they try to connect upon impact, hopefully avoiding splitting or damaging the sidewall.

When it debuted, there were plenty of "Why didn't I think of that?" and "Is that a piece of a yoga mat?" comments. Curious as to if Huck Norris was up to the task, over the last few months on various bikes, I have been trying to smash into obstacles to try and break him down.




Huck Norris Details

• Fits 27.5" and 29" tires.
• Three sizes to suit rim width
• 84 grams (actual) for 29" x 55mm size.
• Includes 'Face Kick Fender' packaging
• Patent Pending
• Made in Finland
• MSRP: €79 / $85 USD (approx.)
hucknorris.com


Huck Norris



Installation

The Huck Norris comes in a 29" length, with simple cutting guides for 27.5" wheels. If you have 26" wheels, then you can cut another 19cm off and voila, although you will need to be a little more creative to join the two ends together as there is no guide for this wheel size.

Use the velcro strip supplied to join the two ends together, place it inside your tubeless tire and Huck's your uncle.

There are three widths available depending on which size of tire and rim setup you have. The smallest 50mm Huck will suit 21-28mm rims; the 55mm insert works with 27-35mm rims and the largest 60mm will work with 34-45mm rims and plus sized tires.

Huck Norris Review
The only mechanical skill required to install Huck Norris is Velcro attachment.


Let's Play: Marketing Claims, True Or False?

There were a bunch of claims and hype at the Eurobike launch and in the press release, but does Huck step up to his plate of promise?

Material specially developed for MTB use with actual scientists. Three times the impact energy damping than anything commercially available.
Hmmm: Well, I have no way of proving that actual scientists were involved and how much energy this can truly absorb, so I guess we need to take Huck's word for it. It is harder than the average yoga mat, though.


No more punctures in tubeless MTB setup.
False: I haven't managed to get a single puncture using Huck Norris, but it doesn't remove the possibility of cutting tires on sharp objects. That being said, the risk of splitting the tire in between the rim and rock is massively reduced.


No more nasty dents in your rims.
True: Riding Huck Norris-less, using a SRAM Rail 50 wheelset I suffered a ride ending rim ding using a mid-weight E13 TRS tire inflated to 28psi. After some workshop time, the rim lived again and I installed the Huck. I then chose one of Finale Ligure's most rocky and treacherous trails, and starting at 26/28psi, I hit everything possible. I then dropped the tire pressure by two psi per run, eventually getting as low as 10/12psi. Not only was it incredibly scary and dangerous trying to stay on this high-speed trail at this pressure, it also ended happily with the rim damage free.

I checked the rim after riding and it had survived perfectly intact. Nearly every time I hit a square edge, I winced, awaiting the well-known rock to rim dinging noise, but it never came. Sometimes there was a noise, which could have been the rim connecting with a rock outside of the tire, or the noisy bladed spokes of the Rail wheelset.


Huck Norris Review
Even though Huck Norris is a closed cell foam, it will collect a coating of tubeless sealant, exactly how much depends on the viscosity of the fluid.


No more hassle with tubeless setup.
True and False: It does make mounting the tire a little more difficult; there is less space inside the tire than normal, and it does spread the tire sidewalls out towards the rim bead. This makes it more difficult to create slack in the tire to mount it on to the rim; it's still possible but takes more skill and precision to keep the bead in the middle of the rim.

Once the tire is mounted, though, it does spread the tire closer to the bead and helps with tubeless inflation.


No modification to your rim or glue needed.
True: Join the two ends with Velcro and throw it into the tire.


No need for compressor to install tubeless anymore.
True and False: The Huck does help a little by spreading the tire sidewalls, especially on lighter, more flimsy tires. But a particularly difficult rim/tire combination might still require a pressure boost, either from a compressor or an Air Shot style canister.


No need to over-inflate the tires to avoid punctures. Use the pressure you want!
True: Proven in my test riding, you can run much lower pressures without the risk of rim damage. Just the risk of poor handling from trying to ride such soft tires.


No more downhill tires on trail bikes
True and False: It depends on why you are using DH tires on your trail bike. If you are doing this simply for rim or puncture protection, you could move to a lighter tire. If you are doing this because you like the feel and support of a heavier casing tire, then no, Huck will not help you in this situation.


Huck Norris Weight 29 uncut


Thoughts

The Huck weighed 84 grams for a 29" tire. But, once coated in latex, this figure jumped to around 120 grams after I had removed it and let most of the fluid run off. The foam is closed cell, so won't absorb fluid, except where it has been cut into shape or damaged by hitting rocks, opening the cells and allowing fluid to enter. Also, the tubeless fluid has more surface area to cover compared to the inside of your tire; you will need some more fluid.

To some people, adding up to 240 grams to your total wheel weight will be sacrilege. But for people that err towards riding gnarly stuff, this won't be an issue. In comparison, Schwalbe's dual chamber ProCore system that offers some of the same benefits weighs around 440 grams in total.

€79 euros might sound like a lot of money, but if you are a regular rim smasher, then the Huck could save you money in the long run. It will wear out eventually and need replacing, or quickly if you manage to strike the rim in the same place repeatedly. The foam cells will break down upon impact.

The Huck Norris may be of most advantage to trials riders, where a very low tire pressure is a must and chances of pinch punctures are very high. People who ride choppy and greasy technical trails can gain an advantage by using lower pressures for grip. Bike park hooligans who ride smooth hardpack will be using higher tire pressures and have the least to gain from Huck's rim and tire protecting qualities.


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesHuck Norris lives up to most of his claims. An efficient way to add tire and rim protection with no added hassle. - Paul Aston



217 Comments

  • + 242
 Sorry, that's C$111.00?
It might be an awesome product, but F my A that's a lot of money for some cut out foam.
  • + 88
 you know those foam water noodles you use in swimming pools......
  • + 6
 @whistlerbound: does this really work? It seems like the benefit of this is the width out over the rim edge.
  • + 37
 I actually made one of these with a yoga matt, and it worked for a while. Then it disconnected at the join and rolled into a big ball in one section of my tyre! Some craic.
  • + 52
 There is a place on Boundary and 1st ave called the foam shop, they have great prices on closed cell foam and will cut it to your specifications. You could make this for a fraction of the cost.
  • + 21
 It's a great idea, it COULD work, too bad the review didn't do anything measurable. How hard is it, put a sharp edged rock on the ground, roll over it at X mph to cause a flat. Put the tire insert on, roll over the rock again, does it cause a flat??? Do this 5 times with and without the insert (maybe it was luck). Test a pool noodle, I would guess it does the same thing for $1, plus comes in cool colors. Test different PSI.
  • + 33
 @Rasterman: they did a pretty good job testing it with different PSI, they ran it with a low pressure from 28 to 10 PSI...
  • + 3
 @Rasterman: I believe Huck Norris have a video floating about somewhere. Don't quote me on that though.
  • + 3
 For that kind of scratch I can buy the materials to make several by hand, and sell them at $20 a wheel and still make money.

Though, I should probably charge $50 for a set.
  • + 3
 Overpriced... but you also get a fender with Huck's face on it!
  • + 1
 @Rasterman: i`m affraid the pool noodle material is too ridgid and after a few compressions it will suck in the sealant like a sponge?! what about a yoga mat?
  • + 0
 i have recently been messing around with a piece of small diameter pipe lagging in my tyre to see if i can run lower pressures. the pipe lagging cost £2 and weighs about a 1/3 (30g's when stuck into a loop with gorilla tape)of the huck norris ! I reckon it helps and a bit work testing with diameters and cutting to different shapes etc will only make it better. I must say this though and it applies to the huck norris, it might prevent dints to the rim but it will more likely cause flat spot.
  • + 1
 I did (diy) ghetto procore for $25 wheel and I love it. Lil bit of work but well worth it. Weighs less than a dh tube if you run dh tubes. Can run down to 0 psi. and due to the inner tire it actually handled just fine at sub 15 psi. Just look it up youtube ghetto procore
  • + 7
 If it hasn't already been mentioned. Go check out Ali C's (street trials rider) tubeless conversion. Nearly identical to Huck Norris but at a fraction of the price.
  • + 1
 @sicmoto: when I seen "some craic" I knew you were one of my people!
  • + 3
 @Rasterman: Exactly
But no PB "review" ever documented anything of any use. There is a policy about head-to-head reviews or something? Or some BS about appearing biased. Hence no shoot out results between bikes.
  • + 1
 @Protato: Do you have a link for this one?
  • + 2
 The price is a fucking piss take . They are some fat greedy basterds . I will pack my tyres with grass hahah
  • + 75
 My cheap bastard mind is considering which of my wife's unused yoga mats I will start with. If the price was less than 50 bucks I might consider, but wow, that is crazy expensive for foam strips.
  • + 8
 Give it time. Once the big retailers get hold of them in numbers, they'll be discounted to where they should be. Then the big brands will catch onto the idea and prices will fall.
  • + 9
 @iian: I hope your right, but if this industry has taught us anything it's that if you are willing to pay that price, that is where it will stay.
  • + 1
 @VwHarman: That's wrong. The introduction period on every part I've ever wanted to buy was pricey until consumers and retailers started buying in.

Like when Kashmoney RF parts were released they were spendy! A half year after release I was able to get the riser bars for $52usd from $74. The Kashmoney cranks were $178, but I got them at $128.
  • + 2
 @XCMark: Right. Retailers dropped prices on products to clear inventory. That happens in all aspects of a consumer driven industry. I am suggesting that the actual brands that set these "suggested" retail prices are not going to redistribute savings to the customer. I suppose my comment was not totally appropriate to the comment I replied to.
  • + 4
 If any of you are condering a ghetto Huck Norris, Ali Clarkson from YouTube made a video doing it on his wheels www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WUEZO2mPUo
  • + 6
 Your biggest problem isn't avoiding dented rims, it's trying to figure out how to get your wife using those yoga mats. . . Wink
  • + 1
 @VwHarman: This is about new parts decreasing in price after being released for so long. Not because a retailer wants to clear out their inventory. My parts were bought in the beginning of summer 2016. Do you know of retailers that are trying to clear their inventory a half year before the next years parts arrive?

The A727 Chrystler transmission, when it released in 1956 it was sold at $430. Now I can pick up a new high performance A727 from JEG Performance Parts for $940. If inflation were to play a role, I should be paying somewhere around $3873. Factoring in inflation to metal cost, it has gone down in price by 30%.

Bike parts don't have such longevity. Though, I just bought two DT Swiss FR 570's at $54 each(not including shipping), not advertised or listed as discounted. When the FR 570 released in mid 2014 it was $100 a hoop. If inflation were to play a role, I should be paying $103 a hoop. Since the release of the FR 570 it has gone down in price by 49%.
  • + 38
 I have Huck Norris in my rear tyre and so far I made 3 flat worthy boinks. It takes away this disgusting sound of tyre bottoming on the rim. But I run single ply Maxxis Minion SS. The true test would be running it with Schwalbe. I did find it rather hard to insert into the Minion on DT EX471 and I did need the compressor/ Bontrager charger pump to inflate it.
  • + 17
 props for the true test with Schwalbe!
  • + 1
 Do you think it helps prevent burps, and does it help keep your sidewall from folding at lower pressures?
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: i did burp a bit here and there but it is hard to say whether HN carries any responsibility for it since I run a single ply tyre with it. On a fricking 160 bike. I will be getting a Double Down Minion though for sidewall stability.
  • + 1
 Just curious, how thick is the material?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: So it doesn't affect sidewall stability?
  • + 3
 @sheldonuvic: it is about 1cm thick.

@hamncheez - It's hard for me to comment on that (unlike other topics I have no experience with, like economics...). I guess if you had a narrow rim it could theoretically be more likely for inside of the tyre contacting the ground to push the outside causing burping.

The thing is, guys at HN say you can run the pressures you want. And that's the only BS I found about their product. The thinner the sidewall, the more suitable their product is, but at the same time the more pressure you need to run for the sole purpose of bike handling. Even if a folding tyre wouldn't burp it would feel like crap (a similar case to ProCore - I spoke with two guys owning it, and they both hate the tyre roll and run normal pressures). I mean: my pressure providing tyre with enough stability for handling is already high enough to make it rather unlikely to puncture (unless I run Schwalbe Evo...)

I did puncture Schwalbe supergravity and spec grid tyres. For general riding the sidewall stability of these is enough for me. If Maxxis Double Down feels fine for me, I will still run Huck Norris as a form of insurance. I guess Huck Norris is a Godsend for folks running lightweight XC tyres with small knobbs on their short travel bikes that don't allow you to go fast anyways.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: What tire pressures are you running with the insert and what does your bathroom scale say?
  • + 1
 @acali: I weigh 170-176 pounds fully kitted for regular riding. With this setup I run 30 PSI. But with Double Down casing I would go to 26-28PSI. This is a preview of trails I ride in for most of the time. Rewind to at least half way, for more "regular" stuff:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAWAqxWtL8g

So it's rather small speeds but at least rocks are bigg-ish.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Thanks Waki. I'll be curious whether you think the DD casing is worth the weight penalty for the different feeling.
  • + 3
 @acali: I have a DD Shorty Max Grip and it feels amazing compared to Magic Marry SG. It has much more robust sidewalls and also much better protection under the knobs. I am 75 kg with gear on and ran them both as fronts - went from 23 psi to 20 psi. The DD Shorty absorbs small bumps amazing and this way I can happily run my fork a little bit stiffer which helps the general handling a lot. I am not able to corner aggressively though so cannot tell anything about risk of burping.

The DD has considerably more support compared to Highroller II 3C MaxxTerra foldable.

PS Most of the time I ride natural, fast trails with rocks all the way Smile
  • + 1
 @pr3dator: have you tried DD against DH casing?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:

I have tried both casings, i was running dd shorty front and back. I have changed to dual ply shorty on the back as the dd doesnt offer as much protection close to the bead. I pinch sliced the tyre twice. What i was wanting from the dd was a dual ply with a kevlar bead and although the dd is only 100gs lighter and has a kevlar bead i dont believe it offers as much protection.
  • + 2
 I wrote off a Rock Razor recently - SS variety. Punctured the tread and the bead in one go. I suspect the HN would have prevented this. The question then is - do you run a tougher casing eg a Super Gravity or run SS and a HN insert? I suspect the latter would be slightly lighter but not as resistant to cut side walls.
  • + 4
 @StraightLineJoe: Try the Michelin Advanced Reinforced sidewalls. Haven't had one pinch flat or puncture here in the Alps. Damn good, just wish they'd hurry up with a 2.5 Rock'R2.
  • + 6
 @pr3dator: Thanks for spreading the good word! The butyl inserts in our DoubleDown tires are designed to provide bottom-out rim protection like the Huck Norris but some people may need to run both. It's a great time for consumers to have so many options in between a lightweight tire and a full-on DH tire.
  • + 3
 Can i just say that its so refreshing to have 9 replies on my dashboard, and all the comments are about biking, and not politics?
  • + 1
 @headshot: I pinch punctured RR SG and ripped a center knob off. It offers more stability than SS but not much more durability. It will work better with HN but it will still loose knobs and the rate at which SG wear is terrifying.
  • + 1
 @Maxxis: Any chance you will be coming out with a 27.5+ with DD casing? Plus size tires seems to be a perfect use of the Huck Norris, but I worry about adding weight to an already heavy setup..
  • + 3
 @sheldonuvic: At Interbike we unveiled a reinforced 27.5+ casing on the Rekon+. This build adds our Silkworm bead-to-bead puncture protection to the standard EXO sidewalls for a similar affect to DD. If there is a need for even burlier plus tire casings we can definitely do that too but havent found that need yet from our athletes and industry partners.
  • + 1
 @Maxxis: Awesome, will keep an eye out!
  • + 1
 I have been running pipe insulation ($2 at your local hardware store rhymes with loam repot) i like the pipe insulation because it does lock the tire on the bead. Haven't tried hn and won't at that price. But pipe insulation worx great.
  • + 1
 @Gasket-Jeff:
are u sure? I already tryed 2 different foams. one absorbed the milk (like 150 ml) the other one was too soft and broke into 2 pieces and snagged in the tire.

now the commencal dh team is using it, and i think 50€ for 2 is a fair price.
  • + 35
 I don't understand why people get down so hard on these guys because the product is expensive. I dunno much about them, but chances are they're a bunch of mountain bikers that had a good idea, took the time to do some due diligence and then put it out on the market. Yeah, it's kinda pricey but when it comes to innovation in the mountain bike realm I'd rather see stuff like this than E-bikes, wider rims, new axle standards ect ect...
  • - 12
flag thegringo (Feb 7, 2017 at 11:06) (Below Threshold)
 Well your in a minority then. Defending this level of "f@#k you" is insane. When will it end. Just because people will buy it, doesn't mean you should charge through the nose. This should be 10 dollars, 15 max. Like I've said, with a craft knife and 20 dollars worth of this foam I could make about 50 of them. So why do these charge 85 dollars? It's because they know there is a minority who will drink the Koolaid.
  • + 26
 @thegringo: It is not cheap but:

Invent something new, manufacture something new and do marketing for the product. Then sell it for 10 € a piece and see if you can make a profit.
  • + 13
 @thegringo: Ah man, you could be right. My experience with it was that I have a good friend that came up with a pretty legit guard for dropper posts. They hang down from the seat and attach to the seat post collar. He did a real smart job of it, and he made dozens of them for all his friends. At one point we finally convinced him to look into making them to sell and after some cursory research to even cover his cost he would have had to sell them for $35 or something like that. He decided not to do it because it just seemed crazy to charge that much for some sewn cloth and brass grommets.

Maybe you're right and they are playing games, but I honestly don't think anybody goes into making mountain bike accessories thinking that they're going to get rich or something.
  • + 1
 sorry - double post
  • + 1
 Because people have no clue about what it costs to run a business and take some financial risks. Great in innovation / product and can be had on eBay for $30 from suppliers.
  • + 33
 I don't get the whole love affair with running stupidly low tire pressures. Whenever I try to go much below 26 psi or so I get tons of tire roll when making hard turns.
  • + 21
 Oh boy the feeling of hitting a decent double with too low pressures and having your tires burp at the lip.
  • + 24
 @kanioni: Reading your comment and thinking about that feeling just made two drops of pee come out.
  • + 1
 what width rims are you using? 30mm inner width rims pretty much fixed that issue for me
  • + 2
 @xeren: yeah, I am running bit narrower rims still.
  • + 0
 @xeren: what rim??
  • + 1
 @EvoRidge: DTS XM481 - pretty light for how strong they are - they're basically a wider version of the EX471
  • + 1
 I feel that under 28 psi the rear tyre feels too draggy. It's a DHR2 2.3, 27,5". And I'm a very light rider.
  • + 1
 Me neither! Every time I've tried it I get pinch punctures, regardless of whether with an inner tube or tubeless (which incidentally I've given up with - too much mess and faff). I ride rough trails with lots of rocks, but if I rode more bike park stuff or somewhere dry with lots of thorns it might be a different story.
  • + 23
 So wait...

You pay more for tubeless compatible rims and tires. Then you add the cost of this product.

Then you add the additional weight of said tubeless rim, tubeless tire, sealant, this product, and then more sealant to ensure everything holds.

I get the advantages of tubeless in a trail bike. But aren't we getting to the point where tubes make sense again at least for downhill/freeride bikes?
  • + 6
 And what about snake bites? Also, you dont need special tubless tires for downhill.
  • + 4
 Perhaps, however there's still the rolling resistance (less) and suppleness (more) factor that tubeless offers over tubed tires. Interesting question!
  • + 7
 @boxxerace: suppleness, I love it. I was just going to post how I like the added rigidity a tube provides to my DH set up.
  • + 11
 I think it's time we shake the notion that tubeless is to save weight, in most cases tubeless vs tubed setups the weight difference is negligible. I do tubeless because with tubes I would get a flat ever month. Since going tubeless I have gotten 3-4 flats over the course of 4 years. Since I've gotten huck norris strips I have had zero flats, but that's only been a few months.
  • + 2
 I never thought pinch flats made sense...
  • + 4
 You don't need tubeless compatible rims or tyres. You just need some gorilla tape which, a couple of valves and some sealant. Tubeless specific stuff is nice but not at all nessecary
  • + 1
 @cmcrawfo: I'm not worthy, I'm not worthy! / claw-hand-Boxxerace
  • + 1
 @Buggyr333: Where did you buy the HN from? I have not been able to find them in the US
  • + 18
 Yeah Seriously, 79 euro for closed cell foam. You can walk down to MEC and buy a closed cell sleeping pad for $50. There is enough foam in that pad to last you and your friends a lifetime of hucking. Total profiteering. I thought Mucky Nutz were bad, but at least they only inflated that tiny piece of plastic up to $25.....(BTW I made two out of a single plastic place-mat that was $2.00). At some point you have to draw a line and say, "NO."
  • + 2
 I think mucky nutz were only that much of a ripoff in Canada. Considering marsh guards are only 10 euros...
  • + 7
 They've done all the work to make cutouts and get it in the correct shape though...no shit it's gonna cost more than the raw material. Use your head.
  • + 3
 @powderturns: “only 10 euros“...
production costs less than 50 cents i guess
  • + 8
 mucky nutz are a complete rip off, sure you might have to wait a week, but you can get them for £2 from aliexpress, and even ass savers are $1 each.

it's almost like as soon as cycling is added to a use for something the price sky rockets
  • + 6
 @mnorris122: Even with the tooling and pr in mind. 85 dollars! Really? A pack of 4 craft knives; 5 dollars. The foam needed to make at least 50 of these; 20 dollars, give or take. Use your head.
  • + 7
 do you really not understand how small businesses work? every one is flipping shit over the price. this isn't maxxis making these, where they can throw 100k into manufacturing a large batch and eat the R&D and marketing costs. this is a small business, probably a few dudes just trying to make up for the thousands theyve sunk into the idea already. either buy the product, or dont. no need to let the world know you dont approve.
  • + 3
 Bleeep Bloop Blap.
  • + 1
 @lyophilization: No doubt. All businesses need to start somewhere. However, Ain't no one going to get rich of tyre inserts, especially when they are too expensive for any one to consider buying them.
  • + 6
 @thegringo: Tooling and PR are just a couple of the things they would have needed to do I'd imagine.

I have no experiance of this, but packaging, getting a website set up, trying to recoup initial investment, and all of the time they've spent on this must make up a massive percentage of the final cost.

And I mean, ffs, should they not get to make at least some money from this? Or do you expect for them to basically pay all of the costs and time themselves and then sell them to you at material cost?

Your attitude is basically:
"Cool, that's a good idea! What?! They want me to pay for it?! Just so that they can make there money back?! Well f**k them! I'm just going to steal the idea and make my own! Then they'll be stuck in a hole where they put a bunch of money into the idea and not be able to get that back! Hahahahaha!"

It's not like they're ever going to become millionaires off the back of this, it's a cool product that they probably just wanted to share with the community and make a bit of pocket money for a new bike. Stop drinking the 'everyone's out to screw me over' koolaid.
  • + 2
 @euan91m: I'm merely commenting on the 85 dollar price tag. I don't think they're justified in charging 85. If they were charging 50 and I had made the same comment, I'd understand. But 85 dollars is too much.
  • + 1
 @lyophilization: I have no idea how small businesses work but I'd have thought one of the things that's a "must" is to do some market research to see if the idea is viable. Bit late now but looks like there's enough feedback on this thread to suggest this one isn't. Having said that, innovation is great and I hope its a success for them.
  • + 1
 @euan91m: Don't forget litigation... both ways. As this company grows it will likely have to battle the real Chuck Norris in court. They will also have to defend their patent, as I bet it I won't take long before you could order a knock off, china direct.
  • + 20
 Chuck Norris lost virginity... Before his dad.
  • - 23
flag Grmasterd (Feb 7, 2017 at 8:15) (Below Threshold)
 what jack ass down voted that comment!
  • + 5
 Huck Norris does not wear a condom because there is no protection from Huck Norris.
  • + 4
 Chuck Norris doesn't need an uplift, the ground falls before him.
  • + 14
 It seems like the article steers clear of suggesting this product on downhill bikes. Why? Even at 30psi, I still have some pretty serious dings from impacts with rocks. This product seems perfect for the downhill world.
  • + 6
 My guess is the average DH run out hucks huck norris
  • + 1
 @larr: Makes sense. The foam would deteriorate too quickly. Seems logical! thanks!
  • + 10
 There´s a mexican brand called Sellamilk that has the same system for about $ 40 usd for both tires. They have a tubeless sealant aswell and no flats for me so far! Check them out www.facebook.com/sellaleche/?fref=ts
  • + 1
 Cannot find where to order it. ..some dealers in europe?
  • + 3
 @bansaiman: sellamilk5.webnode.es/productos-1/?_ga=1.182225959.1262363425.1483683226

Hope that works, to be honest I dont know if they can send to Europe but give it a try! Cheers
  • + 1
 @bansaiman: bike-components.de
Ordered one at ebay.de for €69.95 (size M)
  • + 1
 @Micc:

Then the better price of the milk Version would be gone ;-)
  • + 10
 their next product will the Bruce Lee fender defender
  • + 1
 No, it'll be motocross foam that you put in your frame to stop mud clogging your shock. 200 u.s. Wink
  • + 10
 Muy interesante pero muy pricey.
  • + 8
 My Bruce-Lessflats will be up soon...Oh wait that would be completely counter productive.
  • + 3
 Do you mean his nemesis, Bruce Leak?
  • + 7
 Add it to the back rim, that is where most rim failures (for me at least) occur.

Could let you run stupid low rear pressure for traction.
  • + 5
 I think this is a great idea. Way simpler and lighter and cheaper than ProCore.
However, slagging on the company for not providing scientific evidence to support their claims, then acting like the anecdotal experience of one rider in one location on one rim/tyre combo is in any way a "scientific" process shows a distinct lack of understanding of the scientific method. At the very least, I'm looking forward to a future when an N>1 is available for bike research.
  • + 1
 Only the guy who made the original comment mentioned nothing of the scientific method. He merely pointed out one scenario. But it is still scientific evidence, it was tested and observed. And where did you get anecdotal from? How do you know he wasn't their when this test went down. Just saying.
  • - 1
 @thegringo: Anecdotal Evidence does not mean hearsay. Per Wikipedia it is "...evidence collected in a casual or informal manner and relying heavily or entirely on personal testimony. When compared to other types of evidence, anecdotal evidence is generally regarded as limited in value...". One guy taking laps on his own and doing little to standardize the setting or compare it directly with a control group. Sort of like the American who gets sick after getting a Flu shot, therefore concludes that the Flu shot is bad.
FWIW, I'm pretty psyched about the product here. Just also being a self righteous dick about semantics and science. Wink
  • + 1
 @jm2e: Yeah I am aware of the meaning of anecdotal. It relies on what someone else says. You brought the word up, I mean how do you know he wasn't there. That was my point.
  • + 7
 Once these cost less than the tire they are being put into I will consider it.
  • + 1
 Wow, that's a great point! For as often as I get pinch flats, I'll just buy a new tire and know it's gonna work, versus buying a set of these and not being sure they'll work.
  • + 3
 The insert is not cheap, but a good investment in my opinion (and cheaper and lighter than Procore). I use it on my Deemax wheelset and I´m very happy with this gimmick. Usually I run my tires with 2bar, otherwise I damage the rims. Now I use a tire pressure down to 1,5 bar without any issues.
The installation was easy. To fit it for 26" needs just 5min more. Shorten the insert (-21cm), burn 2 holes with a hot skrewdriver in each end of every foam strip, and use a velcro strip for each hole.
I don´t care if the material is specially developed by scientists or not...it is working pretty good. And the guys from the company are very obligingly and supporting. I wish them much succes...
  • + 3
 Your weight calculation is in error. Assuming you plan to use tubeless sealant along with the Huck Norris, the weight of the sealant would not "add" to the weight as it's in the tire anyway. The weight would include Wheel @ x-grams, Tire @ x-grams, Huck Norris @ x-grams. That's the total weight. The amount of sealant that remains on the Huck Norris when removed is only an addition if you re-use it in another tire and add the same amount of sealant again.
  • + 3
 Some years back I looked into making a foam product for a totally different market sector. It turned out that the raw material was surprisingly expensive (two foams that look superficially identical can differ tenfold and more in price) and the foam conversion (i.e. the cost of making tooling and processing the foam into the shape you want) was really expensive.

And when I say really expensive, I mean so expensive that I can totally see why this is priced how it is and I doubt there's even that large a profit margin in there.

If you want to make them by hand, figure in how long it would take one person to perfectly cut one of these with a craft knife (and they have to be perfect - functional is not sufficient, they need to look like they're properly made), and don't forget the health and safety stuff, business overheads, pensions, insurance and so on.

And whilst you're at it, have a look into the cost of patent protection - that's thousands of pounds for every country you want to protect it in - so probably all of Europe and North America for starters.

So having spent maybe 50k-100k on getting things up and running, how many do you think you're going to sell, considering pinch flats are not that big a problem for a lot of riders since tubeless came along? Good luck making back that investment if you sell them for less than cost! ;-)
  • + 3
 I got Huck installed now for 4 months.
Im running two WS - 29 ZTR Flow Ex with Conti Der Baron Projekt front - Spec. Butcher Grid/Purgatory Grid rear and Spec. Roval Fattie 27.5 with Spec. Purgatory 3.0 front - WTB Bridger/Spec. Ground Control 3.0 rear.
Got no flats, no smashed rims and my home trails are very rocky, rooty, steep as f*ck and tehnical so I ride on low pressures (max 26/28 psi).
I have also made a ride with somewhere 14psi on back (WTB is loosing pressure all the time but I forgot to check it before shuttle and I was without a pump). No problems, no damage.
I was on EWS In La Thuile as Tech rider and destroyed (nasty 2cm+ holes) two 29 Minions EXO (new ones) in one day without Huck in it.
Some EWS riders showed me "hard beaten" Hucks in Finale Ligure and I decided to get it for me. From that time I dont now flats, destroyed tires and rims.
For me its worth it 50€ and as I heard they want to lower their price somehow.
Material isnt even slightly similar to some yoga mat or something but is much more compact/hard and hard to destroy it as easy as yoga mat material.
For me was also no problem to install the tires - only Baron needed some power with tire lever. I also tried to pump it with backpack pump and it worked out on ZTR and Spec. tire without any problem, normal as with compressor, only little longer. Wink
They got me and I wil keep riding it in all my wheelsets, bikes,...
  • + 3
 In Spain there is a brand selling the round closed cell foam version for 50€ both wheels, shipping included, and different widths to choose depending on your rim/tyre six, also 26, 27.5 and 29. People in the spanish forums talk very well about it (not tried myself). It is called the nube: www.facebook.com/Nube-Tubeless-450869395037503
  • + 5
 It's a great idea, and for half that price, you might see every second mtb running a set. For this price, you'll be lucky if you see 1 out of 100. ;(
  • + 6
 Pump your damn tires up to where they belong and you don't need this..... There, I saved you $90.
  • + 1
 Yes. And my next bike will be without suspension, to safe a few thousand bucks more. If you don´t care about traction, this would be another great idea ;-)
  • + 1
 @Zapzarap: If you're riding around with a contact patch all bulged out like a rock-crawler, then you're doing it wrong.... Just because some guy on the internet says he's 190lbs and rides with 16psi doesn't mean you should too.
  • + 1
 @DBone95: Yes I´m doing wrong > you are right ;-)
  • + 5
 if anyone wants to go splits on a set, I'd like one for the rear wheel. front never had an issue, rear is beat to crap each season.
  • + 2
 $85 HAHAHAHAHAHAHA! nope! probably costs less than a $1 to make, i won't be supporting that type of behavior, sorry. and not to mention this is more of a solution looking for a problem, i've been running tubeless for awhile now and I never had any of the problems this fixes.
  • + 2
 That price is insane, worse gouging than mud guards. I bet the R&D amounted to cutting a yoga mat with scissors so it fit in the tire. I dont know what they are thinking, it was a good idea but at that price people are just going to make their own because its so easy to copy.
  • + 5
 Something with 'Huck' in the name and it isnt made fo 26s?!!!! Yet tested on a 26er in the pics. Dumb. No sale
  • + 3
 Just buy a Quality Tire and know your air pressure. Check your PSI before every ride and you shouldn't have issues. I've never rode with Chuck Norris. But I do know he is a badass.
  • + 2
 I destroyed a rim last year because I got a very slow puncture on a 2000 foot descent (WTB Tough Breakout tire ) then went through a rock garden full bananas. I didn't realize I had the puncture until I heard the awful noise of my rim slapping a rock. In conclusion, I do all of those things you mentioned but sh$% still happens.
  • + 1
 @ryan83: sounds like you should go riding with Chuck
  • + 2
 "No more punctures in tubeless MTB setup.
False: I haven't managed to get a single puncture using Huck Norris, but it doesn't remove the possibility of cutting tires on sharp objects."

So that's more of a 'not proven' than 'false'.
  • + 4
 What I wanna know is if the foam material affects how a tire deforms when your really railing a turn. Does it alter the way a tire flexes?
  • + 1
 Got mine for £60 off of eBay. Mine weighed around 90g each, used a little extra sealant and were fine. I am 200+lbs in gear and not smooth, they do stop those scary dings against rocks etc. Running around 23-25lbs psi. No punctures and rims are fine, using lighter tyres so saved around 100g per wheel with these added. I think with carbon rims around the £2k mark it seems stupid not to.
  • + 0
 Commiserations.
  • + 2
 @thegringo: for what?
  • + 1
 @thedad71: Sorry I was just being a dick. It's the price I can't get my head round.
  • + 1
 I'm a 200lbs rider. only instead of getting my pants pulled down for 60 quid for some foam, I put some HR2 dual plies and some inner tubes on my wheels and inflated them properly. Funnily enough, no flats or damage either.
  • + 1
 @robhill: you got less grip as well, and you can have punctures
  • + 1
 @Fedeciapi: although I didn't get any punctures...
Been riding a steel rigid bike this season... Oh no punctures then either!
Whether I have less gripbor not is subjective, but I definitely had no punctures!
  • + 2
 8 riders, 2 rides, 1 puncture - pinched tubeless tyre leaving two holes. Guess which one was using Huck... yep the one with two holes in his tyre. Initial findings, complete waste of time. 7 riders without it = no punctures.
  • + 19
 That's some serious scientific evidence right there!
  • + 1
 was it a scwalbe?
  • + 3
 Is it April the 1st?
  • + 6
 Maybe the guy using Huck was more aggressive, hit corners and rocks harder than the rest of you softies... Or maybe it won't live up to the hype. Stay tuned to find out. I, for one, am going to keep riding my downhill tubed all mountain bike because I have a Vancouver mortgage and therefore can't afford a new set of rims and don't want a Ghetto Tubeless setup.
  • + 1
 @Muckal: It's as scientific as any review from personal experiance.
  • + 1
 @markg1150: No maxxis
  • + 2
 @Kolps: We are all similar riders at similar pace. I have doubts over the whole lower pressure thing. When tubeless got bit it was all 'lower pressure this and that' all a load of bollox. Run low pressure and hit sharp edges you will pinch the tyre. Run decent pressure you will get less punctures...
  • + 2
 The only thing (besides the high price) that would keep me from pulling the trigger is the tubless fluid buildup. If it was coated with something to help prevent it soaking up stans, that would rock.
  • + 1
 You could buy a super expensive can of that hydrophobic spray and hope it makes any difference whatsoever. I don't feel like the spray would want to stick to the foam though. Seems like cleaning the buildup off the foam over time would be a pain in the butt.
  • + 1
 @bikesoverbritches: The foam is 'closed cell', meaning it shouldn't initially be absorbent, but as you ride and shred it, any coating doesn't do much
  • + 1
 I got a good deal on one of these. I keep denting/killing my rear rim. I thought this would give me a little protection if I cut the tire or burped some pressure. No such luck, dented my rim again with 25 PSI in the rear...LAME!!!
  • + 1
 Yeah maybe for park or DH circuit, but that extra weight on your wheels is ridiculous. Carbon hoops are worth every penny. I've been running them tubeless for almost 5 years, 2 slash flats 3 broken spokes. And they're still true like new, dents no more!
  • + 1
 After two months of use my experience review goes like this. Tire and flat protection - yes Rim protection - only to a point. There were a few good impacts where I know the foam did it's job, but I did manage to destroy the rim on a crossmax xl on a fairly routine ride through some roots. YMMV
  • + 1
 So does Chuckles get a piece of the proceeds or what?
Seems like they're at least using his likeness, if not his whole damn identity.
I'd feel better buying one if I knew the Chuck-ster was getting a piece of the action
  • + 0
 It's a good product. No one is forcing you to buy it if you can't afford it. Everyone on pinkbike moans about the price of any new product :-(
If you want to ride faster with more grip, through lower pressure then it's a great product.
  • + 2
 No 26" of course... millions of 26 tyres rolling out there don't worth the insanely expensive process of cutting a few millimeters.
  • + 3
 By not making a 26" version they are able to keep the cost so low.
  • + 2
 @acali: they don't make a 26" version to keep cost low, but then a "face kick fender" is included to justify the 85$...
  • + 2
 I wish Pinkbike made such Marketing claims analysis when other components or bikes come along... like straight down-tube of Trek is stiffer than a bent one...
  • + 3
 Trials rider Ali Clarkson made his own and seemed to have pretty good results www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WUEZO2mPUo
  • + 2
 Yet another PB over priced piece of waste. I'd say this was a mediocre review at best. This thing would go well with that $600 Gore-Tex jacket no one is going to buy.
  • + 2
 Don't want to be that guy but cutting off an extra 19cm seems like a lot to get to 26" from 27.5",
Typo?
  • + 2
 by my math it should be closer to 6 cm.
  • + 3
 I come out to about 12 cm.

(27.5*pi-26*pi)*2.5..?
  • + 2
 @Babesquatch: oh, you are right I was doing (pi)r instead of (pi)d
  • + 3
 @iantmcg: Regardless, 19 cm sounds regretable
  • + 1
 Has anyone run one of these with a tube. The weight of the strip absorbing the stans might be the same as just running a tube with the strip in it.
  • + 9
 how. the. absolute. fuck.
  • + 1
 This would be ideal for cyclocross tubeless! Although closed foam from the hardware store would do the same thing ... Arts and craft time!
  • + 1
 well might have to try this next time i head down to mountain creek nj."land of the rock" last time i was there i blew a rim in the middle of a race.
  • + 0
 If pinch flats are your main enemy, save your time and money. In a hard hit, these things tore straight through the foam on many occasions.

Good idea? yes!

Pinch flat prevention? f__ no!
  • + 1
 Learn to ride better?
  • + 3
 sooooooooooo wheres the 26 in wheel option??
  • + 1
 Cool idea but it's not for me. Just like pro-core I don't see the gains from using this. Never have I had an issue with denting my rims and running my psi to low.
  • + 2
 for $8 one could just run a tube?
  • + 1
 Will it prevent the rim from getting flat spots by broadening the impact, or is it too flimsy for that?
  • + 1
 Can anybody answer this question, how thick are they? I'd rather cut out my own then drop $80.
  • + 1
 How many DH teams and enduro teams are secretly testing these right now to test legitimacy for the upcoming season....?
  • + 0
 Wish I had a these when I came off a drop at Snow Summit and cracked my carbon rims. Though the 26/28psi and the 190 pounds of flesh are more to blame.
  • + 2
 I made my own. Have managed to ding my rim, but no punctures yet...
  • + 1
 The ding happened at a bike park too. Shocker
  • + 1
 ....eighty-five USDs......What in the world.

What if I only want the Huck Norris mudguard?
  • + 2
 85 USD for this, for this??
  • + 2
 not making a 26" version is a massive mistake
  • + 1
 bothering to make 29 and 27.5 was not a mistake?
  • + 1
 These guys must be laughing their heads off, all the way to the bank.

£80 for a bit of foam? Suckers!!!!!
  • - 1
 Ikr
  • + 2
 I just made two for $6.00 got the stuff at kmart in the pool area .
  • + 2
 If it is BRUCE LEE's accessories maybe?
  • + 1
 Way of the Dragon - there's the scientific evidence.
  • + 1
 "If you have 26" wheels, then you can cut another 19cm off" - DON'T DO THIS!!!
  • + 3
 exactly. cut 29cm save additional weight!
  • + 1
 So where do you buy this in the US?
  • + 2
 Huck off
  • + 1
 What about if tires had those inserts built in? Hmm...
  • + 1
 Another useless innovation after the fan hand dryer and umbrella's.
  • + 1
 Will test EVA rings on my bike tires... I will call it Huck4EVA.
  • + 1
 So were making iPhone cases for our bikes now?
  • + 1
 The dents does not fear the biker but it fears Huck Norris.
  • + 1
 TRIALS?
Yes, they all use 29' wheels.
19'/20'/24' please?
  • + 1
 Is that just cut from a yoga mat??
  • + 2
 Have you not read the whole bleedin' thread?
  • + 1
 Do such cut from Yoga mat and come back to me. After the first successfully made one please. You may become dangerous to people by the time you are finishing the 3rd good piece...
  • - 1
 A good concept. But 85 dollars. Go to a fabric shop, show them this picture. 85 dollars would get you enough foam to make 100's yourself with a craft knife. Just saying.
  • + 2
 f*cking try it Big Grin
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Not you too Waki ;D I'm only knocking the price. I think it is an excellent piece of kit, and fair play to them, I hope they succeed. But I'll wait for a Chain Reaction sale. Wink
  • + 2
 Proceeds go to Chuck?
  • + 0
 For those complaining about the price, how much does a new rim or wheel cost???
  • + 2
 because every time i catch a flat, wheel tyre everything in the trash can.
  • + 1
 seem too nice to be true
  • + 1
 Bootleg Canyon
  • + 0
 I would buy these just for that mud guard
  • + 1
 bollocks
  • - 3
 Cant wait to try.....
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