Staff Rides: Mike Kazimer's ‘Foxzocchi’ Equipped Scott Ransom

Apr 9, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  


STAFF RIDES

Mike Kazimer's Scott Ransom



The new Scott Ransom was one of the standouts in the long-travel category during the Pinkbike Field Test, but I felt like there were a few tweaks and modifications that could make even better, at least for me. The end result of my tinkering isn't quite as out-there as Mike Levy's abomination, but it's also not quite as straightforward of a build as it might appear at first glance.


Scott Ransom staff ride

Frame

It was the overall chassis feel of the Ransom that persuaded me to spend more time on this carbon-framed big wheeler – it hits the sweet spot when it comes to balancing frame weight, stiffness, and the ability the smooth out unwanted trail chatter. I'd usually gravitate towards something with a little less travel to be my daily driver, but the Ransom carries that 170mm of travel very well. It's light and manageable enough that it's easy to justify taking it out for everything from long days with lots of pedaling to shuttle laps on DH trails.

Of course, with a pile of parts that needed to be tested, and a distaste for overly-crowded handlebars, it wasn't long before the Ransom began to morph from its stock configuration into something a little different.



Scott Ransom staff ride

Deconstruction

The first step was to de-clutter the Ransom's cockpit, but even before that, I swapped out the Hixon integrated bar / stem for a 780mm Race Face Next R handlebar and a 40mm stem. The Hixon is a well executed, lightweight component, but the roll of the bars wasn't quite where I wanted it to be, and the one-piece design meant there was no way to adjust that position.

Next, I removed the TwinLoc remote entirely. I'm not opposed to the TwinLoc concept – it's a handlebar mounted lever that firms up the shock and fork to help the bike climb better, but I think there's a cleaner and simpler way to accomplish the same thing. A single button or lever that firms up just the rear suspension would be nice; there's really no need to involve the fork. Plus, the only Fox 36 that can be used with a remote has a FIT 4 damper, rather than the superior GRIP2 damper.


Scott Ransom staff ride
Meet the Foxzocchi. Marzocchi Z1 stanchions and air spring, Fox 36 lowers and GRIP2 damper.


Suspension

I could have swapped out the 36's FIT4 damper for a GRIP 2 and called it good, but I decided to take a slightly more complicated route. After an extended late night workshop session, I ended up with a 170mm Foxzocchi. The uppers and the air spring are from a Marzocchi Z1, while the lowers and the GRIP2 damper came from a Fox 36. In theory, the fork should be a little stiffer thanks to the thicker stanchion tubes, although I can't say I noticed the difference. The colors do match the Ransom's frame nicely, though, and the ultra-adjustable GRIP2 damper is an upgrade over the stock fork.

I have the fork set up with two volume spacers, and 72 psi. The high-speed compression and low-speed compression are almost all the way open, although I'll add a few clicks of each on more hardpacked trails.

The tune on the Ransom's stock Fox Nude TR Evol shock is excellent, and the little lever that can be used to increase the amount of end-stroke ramp up is extra clever. However, once you take off the remote, the shock ends up in the fully open position with no easy way to adjust the amount of compression. The Ransom doesn't have a ton of anti-squat, which means it's fairly active in that setting.
I didn't mind it at all on more technical climbs, but I found myself wishing for a firmer platform on the long logging road grinds that are necessary to access some of my favorite trails. Yes, I know that was the whole point of the TwinLoc remote, but stick with me here...

I replaced the Fox shock with a RockShox Super Deluxe that has a two position lever – open and locked out. There was only one problem – because of the shock's upside-down orientation the lockout lever hit the frame. After a little quality time with the bench grinder, that problem was solved. I can't reach the lever on the fly, but it's only semi-inconvenient to get off and flip the lever to the fully locked position before heading up a mega-climb.

Scott Ransom staff ride
A little trimming allowed the lockout lever to fit, and a layer of electrical tape on the frame keeps the bottom bracket shell from filling up with pine needles.


Scott Ransom staff ride

Scott Ransom staff ride

Tires / Wheels

I've had mixed luck with carbon rims over the years, but I can also say the same thing about aluminum rims – some have been absolutely trouble free, while others have had very short lifespans. So far, the Roval Traverse carbon wheels fall into the former category. I reviewed them earlier this year, and they're still rolling right along without any issues. The 30mm internal width works well with the 2.4 – 2.5” tires that I prefer, and the DT 350 hubs are relatively quiet and require minimal maintenance.

My favorite trails are steep and often slippery, which is why I prefer tires with plenty of tread and sticky rubber. At the moment, there's an unmarked EXO+ casing 2.5” Maxxis Assegai up front, inflated to 20 psi, and a 2.4” DHR II in the rear at 22 psi. I've also installed a Nukeproof ARD insert in that DHR II for a little extra tire and rim protection. The ARD strikes a nice middle ground between something like CushCore, which works well but can be a royal pain to install, and Huck Norris, which doesn't provide quite as much protection.


Scott Ransom staff ride


Brakes

SRAM's Code RSC brakes have proved their worth over the last couple of years, and they've become my go-to option for a bike of this nature. I run metallic pads all year round – organic pads are borderline ineffective in wet conditions, and they're not nearly as resistant to fading during extended sections of braking.

Drivetrain

I'd originally hoped to spend the winter testing Shimano's new XTR drivetrain, but production delays put a damper on that plan. That meant SRAM's X01 drivetrain remained in place, although I did spend time pedaling around on a set of carbon cranks from a different manufacturer that will be announced in the near future. Otherwise, there's not much to mention – the drivetrain has been completely trouble-free.


Scott Ransom staff ride
DMR Deathgrip
Scott Ransom staff ride
Prologo Dimension NDR


Contact Points

Grips, pedals, and saddles can make a big difference in how a bike feels, which is why I'm currently running some of my favorite products in those areas. DMR's Deathgrips are thin and comfortable, and the same can be said for the Prologo Dimension NDR saddle I'm running. There's one part of the saddle that could use some refinement, though; the hard plastic center portion at the back. If you're riding down something steep and stop suddenly there's a chance that part will contact your most sensitive bits. I don't typically wear a chamois either, which makes that situation even more painful. I've been risking it lately simply because of how comfortable the saddle is otherwise, but I might get creative with some mastic tape, or switch for a different saddle all together.

That saddle is mounted to a 170mm Bontrager Line Elite Pro dropper post. Might as well keep the 170mm theme going, right? I like the shape of the remote lever, although the post doesn't go up or down quite as easily as a Fox Transfer post.

I switch back and forth between flat and clipless pedals depending on my mood and what I have in for testing. I was wrapping up testing on the Anvl Tilt pedals when these photos were taken, and as you'll see in the video, I'm starting to put time in on the new Shimano XTR pedals.


Scott Ransom staff ride


How's It Ride?

I'm not one to get too hung up on weight – you're not going to find me removing rotor bolts, or running silly slip-on grips to shed a few grams. All the same, if I had to choose between a 30-pound bike or a 33-pound bike, I'm going to pick the lighter one. That's part of the appeal of the Ransom – as it sits, it's only 30.2 pounds, which is extremely impressive considering that it has big wheels and 170mm of travel.

Even with all that travel it doesn't feel like a singleminded downhill smasher – its handling is zippy enough that it's still engaging to ride on trails that are less-than-vertical, and that lighter weight makes it easy to whip around and navigate through the tight stuff. The geometry is modern without getting too wild, and the fit of the size large is close to perfect for my 5'11” height.

As you'd expect, it's on the descents where the Ransom really shines. It has an uncanny ability to find traction in the nastiest, greasiest conditions, which is one of the reasons I've been spending so much time on it. The 64.5-degree head angle isn't DH-bike slack, but it also helps keep the front end from washing out on flatter turns, and I haven't encountered any situations out on the trail where I felt like something slacker would have made a drastic difference.

The upper shock bolt likes to loosen up every once in a while, and the orange paint seems to chip easier than I'd like, but those are the only two issue I've run into over the last few months of riding.

Overall, the Ransom is one very impressive ride, and while I'd love to see a TwinLoc-free, or maybe a TwinLoc light version hit the market, this modified trail monster will do the trick in the meantime.









152 Comments

  • + 75
 I dream of the day Scott offer a Ransom without the twin loc, How hard would it be to offer an option most people seem to want!
  • + 15
 Other than pure xc who the heck ever locks out their fork on a climb/trail? A remote lever for longer travel rear suspension is a good idea. Just don't mount the lever where real estate is needed for a dropper. I'd be fine with mounting it closer midline to the stem.
  • + 4
 @MikerJ: I use the LSC on my Pike on any technical climb. Not so much for pedal bob, but rather so that the fork doesn't dive and keep the front higher when transferring weight. Wouldn't use a remote tho.
  • + 10
 Exactly. How can't manufacturers (not just Scott) learn that front lockouts are not beneficial on climbs. How come XC racers run their stems slammed. It's to get the weight down low far forwards. Other than stand up grinding I've never seen the need for a front lockout.
  • + 7
 Twinloc is actually really neat. I had it on my Spark and I used it on every ride, both on the climb and on the descent. Being able to shorten the rear wheel travel and put the fork in threshold mode on the fly is a really neat feature.
  • + 4
 @Loche: on the other end of the spectrum, I keep my 36 fully open on technical climbs so I can hit bigger roots and rocks faster to clear them, w/o my front end wandering from the grade.
  • + 13
 Why must a bike weigh without pedals on?
  • + 8
 @chyu: it keeps things consistent, because there's such a wide variety of pedal weights.
  • + 53
 @mikekazimer: There's also a wide variety of tire weights. Why not weigh the bikes without tires too?
  • + 5
 @mikekazimer: I’ve heard tire weights differ quite a bit, too. As do fork weights. And SRAM or Shimano plays a role. And there’s so many different preferences for dampers. And...
  • + 12
 @lazarus2405: Because complete bikes always sold with tires, and rarely with pedals, homie.
  • + 1
 I have a Genius from last year with TwinLoc still onboard, but weak performing Fox 34 makes me really angry on trail. I struggle with arm and wrist pump and can't get over that with any type of tune on that fork. But all things have been said by Mike here, I just need another fork and forget about TwinLoc. Also they could work better with shock's bottom mounts or leave more room to fit different types of shocks, but I guess it's the way to force people to stick with original parts. I tried with Super Deluxe RTR and it ALMOST worked.
  • + 3
 @MikerJ: I had an old Yeti with Manitou Shermans that benefitted from the fork lock-out big time. Those things were so supple that fire road climbs were awful. That said, that fork is now something like 16 years old, so that might have had something to do with it. Also the part where it said Manitou on it...
  • + 2
 @lazarus2405: You buy the bike without pedals, but you buy the bike with tires. Companies that put weights on their bikes weigh without pedals, so his weight without pedals is easy to compare to stock to see the weight difference.
  • + 7
 @look-out:please don't take this the wrong way, but some skills coaching would be a much better way to spend your money if you are struggling with arm pump. the main problem is 95-100% of your Weight should be on your pedals.
  • + 1
 @rifrafi: while not disagreeing, please note a ctd is harsh in trail mode, and mush in decending mode. Pathetic cartridges really.
  • + 1
 @seraph: locking a fork does nothing good really.
  • + 1
 @rifrafi: please take note I have an opportunity to ride test bikes during the season and compare different suspension setups. Obviously you are right, and the proper training is very important, there are issues with my current fork I'm aware of. It's something I have to do at the workshop, the rest is done at the gym.
  • + 4
 I have a Genius with twinloc and I've removed the front cable because i agree the front is better without it BUT the rear lockout is brilliant, the fact Scott is one of the few brands that offers a remote is great, i don't understand why reaching down constantly when riding undulating trails is still acceptable, its so useful and convenient having it on the bar, it means you make more use of it too, its like dropper levers, very few of us accept levers on the seat, its a given they are bar mounted. Also in reply to the bar clutter argument, my dropper, rear shock and rear brake all go from the left side of the bar to the same internal routing hole so they are wrapped together in a handy spiral wrap that Scott supplies so it just looks like one larger cable, its surprisingly tidy!
  • + 1
 @ the pedal discussion:

It makes sense that the weights are stated "as sold". It does not make sense tho that bikes come without pedals. I mean come on, the argument "everyone likes different ones" counts to literally every component as well. Sure you got the difference between flats/clicks but that's something the manufacturers could easily count in on price and let the bike shop handle. No one would complain about some standard *insert any known good pedal model here* coming with their bikes.
  • + 0
 @daweil: But what pedal would you spec? you couldn't assume a clip especially as there many different versions, shimano, crankbrothers, time etc. so it would have to be a flat pedal right? cheap flats would likely get thrown away for better ones anyway and a good quality flat would probably add like £50 to price which as a clip rider i would begrudge paying more for the bike to have pedals i'm just going to throw away.

I would actually be happy to have builds that are between a full bike and a frame only, Frame, shock, fork, wheels (without tryes), drive train groupset, dropper, bars and brakes then you add your choice of tyres, grips, seat and pedals, maybe even choose brakes too, that way you get a combination of full bike value and custom build personalisation.
  • + 2
 And why would bike spec'd without pedals?

I don't think anyone would complain with a CB Stamp or Deity Tmac spec on their bikes.
  • + 2
 @chyu: And even if someone wasn’t happy with those specs, they would simply change them, as everybody already does with grips, saddle, and tires.
  • + 1
 @lazarus2405: this and that
  • + 1
 @maglor: idk, for the cheaper variants RF Chester, wellgo,... more expensive use Sixpack Millenium/Kamikaze/ whatever I dont know about the pedal market. Like the other replies said, the differences between pedals of a certain Quality aren't necessarily bigger than between grips/saddles/tires etc. so why are they treated as some Kind of specialty component just so manufacturers can save some 30$
  • + 1
 @daweil: According to pinkbikes poll from a little while back nearly 30% of us ride clips and another 25% swap between both so at least 30% don't need a stock flat pedal, then there's the question of how may people will be happy with the stock flat that's included?
  • + 1
 @chyu: Bikes are sold without pedals so they are spec'd from the shop without. This is done so we don't have to deal with the safety police B/S that regulate that bikes in complete form must have reflecters everywhere including up the riders backside.

This is how shops get around such stupid legislation selling incomplete bikes to the public by omitting the pedals.

Maybe Motorcycle shops and manufacturers could take a leaf out of the cycle industry book and sell motorcycles without mufflers......
At least Suzuki now sells their top sports bikes with all the Euro crap in the can so for racing purposes all you need to do is pull the can and not the complete exhaust system and replace. The crap Lawyers, Politicians and Bureaucrats put us through.
  • + 2
 @MikerJ: I own a Ransom and do use the lock option to get to the trail head thats a 5 Kms uphill climb on a asphalt road from my house. Could live with out it , but have experimented and it saves me like 3 to 4 mins compared to unlocked ( its steep).
Got a float x2 and a 36 grip 2 also to see how much better it can descends.
  • + 26
 Nice bike, Mike!
  • + 12
 @SCOTT-Sports so what's the deal with the TwinLoc? People seem to love the NUDE shock idea, but why such insistence on controlling the fork simultaneously? Why not offer the TwinLoc as an aftermarket option rather than the OEM stock configuration?
  • - 8
flag Mtmw (Apr 9, 2019 at 10:06) (Below Threshold)
 @TerrapinBen: You're asking a bike company why they sell a rigid mountain bike, a 140mm trail 29er, and a 170mm Enduro bike? It's because that's what everyone is selling! Don't hate Scott just for putting it all in one bike.

Might as well ask them why they made this bike future compatible with Fox Live Valve. It's because they're a really intelligent Swiss company.
  • + 7
 @Mtmw: Read that comment again... I'm pretty sure the intent when right over your head...
  • + 1
 Having a Spark I've put 3000+ trail miles on. Meh on the fork remote, i'd rather have a proper fork with adjustments sans remote. However after swapping out the ol DT Swiss shock after it stopped holding air for non-remote CTD, I miss the remote for the shock. It's just too much fun and awesome.
  • + 24
 This is how the bike should come out of the factory!
  • + 18
 With a shock lever that has been taken to with an angle grinder? Not sure Scott would let that fly.
  • + 13
 We need voice activated shock lockouts.
  • + 14
 @JohanG: going off of my "hey Google" experience, I look forward to all the on-trail yelling
  • + 38
 @JohanG: Haha- "Stiffen suspension!"... "googling Mitten Inventions"..."NO STIFFEN...STIFFEN!"...."Calling your Mom"...
  • + 3
 @oldfaith: i know of a guy working in the Scott HQ who grinded the frame out slightly to make a bigger shock fit. the Scott engineers regularly visit his office to see if he is still alive. maybe just maybe they should have designed it with a bit more space around the shock
  • + 14
 Fake news, not enough pivots for a PB employee's ride
  • + 10
 Mike,
Interested in your opinion of the bike magazine review of the Ransom which praises the climbing switch as one of the greatest features of the bike, instantly transforming it into a rigid bike or a 140mm trail bike to suit terrain. The bike magazine review is consonant with all the other public reviews of the bike. Yet here on pinkbike, the climbing switch is seen pretty universally as a disease that needs to be cleansed.

What do you think accounts for the difference? Terrain, riding style, culture or preference?

Thanks for any thoughts on this.
  • + 17
 I think all of the factors you mentioned play a role. Terrain is the biggest one - where I live my favorite rides start with a big logging road grind to the top, and then the trail plunges back down on steep terrain. There's not much need to keep switching suspension settings in that scenario - if I can firm the back end up for the climb I'm a happy camper. I can see the appeal of TwinLoc in more rolling terrain, but in those instances I'd rather just have a shorter travel bike instead of pushing levers all the time. Also, in a racing scenario I don't want to try an remember what setting my suspension is in - the less thinking required the better.
  • + 8
 @Mtmw Bike's take isn't crazy, the Ransom's shock tune is excellent, and firming up the back end is great for a lot of places. That said, I think our criticism of the system are still true: firming up the front end is rarely beneficial on an enduro bike, and given the choice we'd rather have the best dampers from suspension brands rather than something proprietary. And on the 170mm Ransom specifically I think not having a piggyback shock is an issue—our testers noticed some inconsistent performance on top to bottom runs, which they suspect is due to the shock getting pretty hot.
  • - 9
flag billreilly (Apr 9, 2019 at 13:52) (Below Threshold)
 The average PB reader doesn't climb, that's the problem... They drive to the top or take the lift and then barrel downhill... They don't need anything that makes the bike easier to climb because then they wouldn't have an excuse!
  • + 2
 @billreilly: i climb a lot(most rides averaging 1000m +, yesterday did 30km with 1500m) on my 29er enduro bike with 15.7kg, and i don't even lock my rear shock .
i find that seated the bike doesn't bob that much witch is the way you climb most of the time and if um pedal out of the saddle you also can do it in a way that doesn't bob that much .

a ransom like that with the grip 2 and a dhx2 air (or a ext storia) would be the dream
  • - 1
 @billreilly: you must shave your legs
  • + 0
 @brianpark: Yeah, how the heck do they get away without at least a DPX2 or Monarch Plus? Bigger riders will be overhauling that shock at least every season.
  • + 1
 I've only had a demo on a Ransom and I have to say I used the lever constantly. What's the drama? If you don't like don't use it, if you do, then do. It's a clever idea, and depending on where you climb (Swiss, steep rocky climbs for example), the taller BB by not being sagged into the fork as much could be useful. I would prefer that on a lot of climbs here (Perth, WA) but not all. On those climbs I could just leave it open.

Would people not be better choosing a bike with similar Geo & sizing from another manufacturer if they don't want the Twinloc? Just reach down and flick the climb switch on a Firebird 29 for example?
  • + 9
 This article makes me feel good about purchasing my own Ransom this year. Been pretty happy with it ! I've never liked or used lockouts or compression switches even though I've always ridden Horst link bikes, but have to admit I've used the lockout a few times on fire roads and it is kind of nice. I would never use it if I had to reach down and flip it on the shock. I wish I could add one click of compression damping to the Nude shock though.
  • + 12
 Petition for Fox to offer Orange on their Performance Elite Forks
  • + 1
 Just paint it when you get it serviced Smile
  • + 9
 @mikekazimer I am disappointed Big Grin The orange Z1 Eta from 2007 was the all time best Z1. How could you not pay respect to it by using adequate stickers given the occasion Big Grin Shaaaaame shaaaame!
  • + 1
 ETA, that was to drop the fork down to 30mm travel, wasn't it? I thought people didn't like travel adjust anymore on their forks. I've got no experience with ETA but I don't recall that was the Z1 model people were particularly excited about back then.

That said, I still don't understand why and how @mikekazimer managed to mix Marzocchi and Fox forks. If Marzocchi uses thicker walled stanchions than Fox, how did he manage to fit the Fox grip2 damper inside Marzocchi stanchions? Or is it a completely contained damper cartridge that, despite the different stanchions, still uses the same thread? And if so, wouldn't it be so much easier then to just get a complete Marzocchi fork and only get a different damper cartridge, so why swap the lowers too? Finally, would the grip2 damper be the damper cartridge of choice for this fork or would Marzocchi owners be even better off with a damper from Push, Vorsprung or another aftermarket/tuning company?

No criticism, just curious Smile .
  • + 1
 @vinay: ETA was something like a rebound damper with on/off function. The more you pushed it down the lower it stayed. What someone in my hometwon did, they were buying RC2X damper from 66, stuffing it into eta side and changing top caps which was easy. But if you simply didn't use ETA, you had a good fork. At the time. Also if ETA went to sht (which it often did) the fork would simply stay up. Unlike every other travel adjust, save coil Uturn which was the most reliable travel adjust ever and I often wonder why nobody wants to bring it backl
  • + 7
 I'm all for making a bike your own and all that but sheesh; that's a lot of faffing to get a suspension platform dialed in.
  • + 26
 Suspension Faffer is a good job title for Kaz’s next run of business cards.
  • + 10
 If you like play with suspension like Mike clearly does, then why not? I think it’s awesome.
  • + 5
 playing with it that much makes you a "suspension fluffer"
  • + 3
 Ok @mikekazimer I've got an important question. Please describe your undergarment setup, the fit of your riding shorts, etc. Do you wear compression shorts, just not padded ones?

When I read you don't typically wear a chamois I couldn't help but cringe - every time I've gone for an impromptu ride sans-chamois I've had several very close calls with the ol' frank and beans and some part of my saddle or rear tire, and I have a couple bad memories of pretty heinous "pinches".

All that said, not sure if the padding in my chamois really helps me or not. So interested to hear your preferences / reasoning.
  • + 3
 @keillor, ha, who knew that someday I'd be answering questions about my underwear on the internet?

I wear Saxx Kinetic boxer briefs underneath my baggy riding shorts. They have a semi-compression fit, which helps keep everything in place. The key to going sans-chamois is having a good saddle - it can take a little experimentation to find what works best for you.

www.saxxunderwear.com/products/sxbb27_bel
  • + 2
 Nice ride Mike. You got all the travel and none of the weight penalty. Just curious... Most of the reviews said this rig was a little "skittish" in the rough stuff stock. This is probably mostly due to the stiff carbon frame, but how does your custom setup ride in the chunk @mikekazimer ?
  • + 2
 'Skittish' makes it seem like it handles poorly, so that's not the word I'd choose. It does have a more nimble, maneuverable feel than what you'd typically expect from a 170mm bike, but I've been very happy with how it handles rough terrain. It's actually not a super stiff feeling frame, and that combined with the suspension design gives it tons of traction in the slippery stuff.
  • + 3
 Scott should only put the dropper lever below the bar and a lock-out lever above the bar that only activates the rear shock. No need for a front lock-out because when you climb, compressing the front fork steepens the geo.
  • + 1
 Smart people know that, suckers thing the twin lock gimic is great
  • + 1
 Yeah but you're not sagged into the rear as much either. So they claim it actually steepens the angles not slackened them. If you haven't tried one it's quite an interesting experience. I really didn't find the middle setting detrimental on techy stuff. Only had a 15km ride but did some awkward climbs and it felt great in most situations. I have a Foxy 29 and it's got me thinking about changing
  • + 2
 Totally support changing that rear shock: I really can’t understand how Scott doesn’t understand a piggy back shock should be required on any bike over 140 travel.

BTW, you can run a lever with a Grip damper just not a Grip 2. I’d take the original grip over a fit4 any day. I have to admit, I like the idea of stiffening the front for climbs. I spent enough time with a Scalpel with a front only lockout and that just makes sense after using it for some time. When you stand, you put the weight over the front of the bike and it’s the fork that bobs more than the rear. You may not have the rolling climbs we have in CO, but in those stand to sprint over a steep crest moments, that support on a 170 travel fork could be particularly handy.
  • + 2
 Rear Suspension Kinematics like the Ransom, or the Spesh bikes as another example, work really well in locales where you lock out the rear suspension, and pedal up for 45 minutes, then you unlock and ride back down for a period of time.

However in locations like mine where the trail constantly switches from climbing to descending every 25' you need a bike that gives up some plushness and instead has lots of AS without the need to be throwing a switch 350x/ ride.
This is really something to consider when shopping for a bike, how the suspension will operate on your main trails, and it's a point missed by most bike reviews.
  • + 3
 " The Ransom has the uncanny ability to find traction in the nastiest of places" I'm sure that's the only bike that has this "uncanny ability". How do other mountain bikes even live with themselves?
  • + 1
 Awesome ride! Looks about how I'd set up a Ransom too. Makes me also really want to try a new Super Deluxe! I used to ride a Monarch Plus which was absolutely garbage, but everyone I've talked to riding Super Deluxes love them, I even had a buddy switch his to a DVO after having previous experience with the Monarch Plus, and he actually switched back to the Super Deluxe.
  • + 1
 Great build, Love the tire choice, Ive been running Assegai front and rear you should give it a go. Tried the DMR grips after 2 months they did't gel with me. Went to the Sensus Swayze. Fabric and WTB saddles have treated me well. New Codes are the best brakes I've had yet. Can't wait for my new Megatower to pull in. hope to pedal with you soon!
  • + 1
 nice built, makes sense, yeah the bloody twin lock, every better rider gets rid of it, there is no reason to lock-out fork in climb and honestly, option without it, with shock remote would be just fine. Did they finaly avoid those shitty head sets on top models?
  • + 4
 A bit surprised to see the Assegai up front. I found it really packs up on the wetter days in Bellingham.
  • + 1
 Assegai packing up and no mention of fudge. Missed opportunity.
  • + 1
 My riding terrain is similar, long climb, sustained downhill. I use the climbing switch not because the suspension design needs it, but because the bike sits higher in the travel and therefore gives me a steeper seat tube angle.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer It will be intresting to see what you think of the ARD's longterm, both of mine actually stretched in the wheel making a really odd rattling noise, i had to cut and remove around 2" to get them back to normal size. I certinaly dont think they clamp under pressure like they claim thats for sure, Cushcore awaits me!
  • + 1
 Hey @mikekazimer! Very nice build! But I'm wondering : why chose a Scott Ransom without the Twinlock instead of another enduro bike designed to work without remotes like the Yeti SB150? I'm personnaly hesitating between both bikes! Thanks!
  • + 1
 20 and 22 PSI F+R, flip me that is low! I am really light and a few inches smaller than you and wouldn't even run that on a DH bike with DH casing tyres, never mind one I had to pedal about a fair bit. Do they not squirm on you?
  • + 2
 Maybe you should experiment with dropping pressures to that range baud...don't knock it till ya try it
  • + 2
 @mnorris122: I have tried it, and got punctures and tyres popping off the rims in corners, with DH tyres. Hence the question.
  • + 1
 So you took off twinloc because you hate clutter and then had to replace the shock with one where you can switch from lockout to open. So you would rather get off the bike to reach somewhere underneath the shock to access the switch when twinloc in not only more convenient, but makes much more sense, since it doesn't just lockout the fork and shock, but actually firms up suspension and raises the BB for better climbing. Much facempalm?
  • + 1
 Super Deluxe lockout does not raise the BB. You still sit and pedal at 30%sag but heavier damping.
Nude fox increases the air pressure and actually reduces sag.
Which is preferred. Not to mention the awesome Ramp switch!!!!
  • + 5
 nice shoes mike
  • + 4
 Thanks. They’re comfy.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: What shoes?
  • + 1
 Should do a review of those XTR pedals. The seals on mine have given me nothing but trouble. Shimano warranty covered the first set of spindles and I am now on the second set and the seals will not stay in.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer, out of curiosity: what's your pump/tool solution? Given the tube strapped to the frame and the bottle cage, it seems something like a Oneup EDC would let you forgo a fanny pack/backpack for the daily rides.
  • + 6
 It usually looks something like this: www.pinkbike.com/photo/15527050, but without the water bottle, unless I'm heading out for a really big ride.

I like the EDC solution, but I usually have a phone with me, and I don't like carrying it in my pocket.
  • + 0
 OOOHHhhh the Agony! how could someone possibly use SRAM brakes on a bike for longer than a minute?? /Sarcasm

Beautiful bike there. Seems like everyone loves that thing. Fwiw those Codes are awesome aren't they? What sized rotors? I run that same Cockpit too, it certainly looks cool!
  • + 2
 I'm pretty much a DH race/Freeride kind of dude, but this bike and the foxy are the only bikes that would make me play for the other team.
  • + 1
 Those Nukeproof inserts are intriguing, and significantly cheaper to get into than Airliner, etc. I'd love a good review on them!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer Curious about your nested stem spacers. Do those serve a function? Looks like they mate with your stem, but I can't think of why you'd need that.
  • + 1
 These are the stock Scott spacers, you kind of have to use them because of the cover over the top headset bearing has the flange built in. They are made to make the headset, spacers, stem seem more flush and integrated.
  • + 1
 @coppellstereo: got it. thanks
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer are you planning on releasing anything in depth about the Assegai? Seriously considering one but would like some real world feedback.
  • + 0
 Just buy one. Then ride it. If you like it but another. Are you going to get a guy that butchers shock levers and uses thin grips even though he had Silverback hands grafted on as a child give you feedback on a tyre when he probably doesn't even ride on similar trails to you. Apologies for lack of punctuation. And content.
  • + 1
 @danlovesbikes: meh, no matter the conditions the general tendencies of the tire will still show up.
  • + 3
 It's actually Marfoxy common misconception.
  • + 2
 So you got a Scott and removed the two features that distinctly make it a Scott Wink
  • + 0
 Dogshit features dont make a bike
  • + 1
 So instead of just disconcerting the cable to the fork like most. You now have to get off the bike and flip the shock switch.

UM.....???? Smile
  • + 3
 My Huck Norris is useless
  • + 1
 I’m on FlatTireDefender now but my HuckNorris must have worked pretty cut up from impacts only carbon rim fail was without hucknorris installed trying to save weight but 16psi rear may been the result of the fail on a blind drop.
  • + 2
 Why not put the shock in the upright position? Because of the bottlecage?
  • + 4
 It's a trunnion mount shock, so that's the only possible orientation.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: The metric shock, I see. Sweet Ride though!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Where does one find an aftermarket super deluxe in trunnion mount?
  • + 2
 Wait, there is a Assegai in EXO+ ?
  • + 1
 It's not yet available for purchase but it's been on their website for about a month now. Don't get sucked into the trend though... it's not that great of a tread design. the syndicate never did well on assegai tires. If you like some transition zone coverage then stick with dhr2 or better yet stick with the fast rolling dhf.
  • + 1
 @thesharkman: so you are saying greg minnaar is full of shit?
  • + 1
 im still waiting on Assegai in EXO+ as well!!
  • + 1
 Looks good!!
Have a look at my funds draining machine...
www.pinkbike.com/photo/17049558
  • + 1
 Damn, fund's draining for sure. Looks great though!
  • + 2
 looks good, like the hixon bars alot
  • + 1
 Hi Mike - what is the shock size used and is it any good for coil shock?
  • + 1
 I know right
  • + 1
 To each his own... no problems with tbe twin lock bs.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer Put a DC on it next and let us know Smile
  • + 1
 if Fox doesn't make that orange/ black colorway, they should....
  • + 1
 All this for that??!! ZZZZZzzzzzzzz
  • + 1
 Sweet ride mike!!!!! My buddy as one but yours looks ????????
  • + 1
 Meant to write extra sweet!!
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer when you are ready to sell this bike can I call dibs? Smile
  • + 1
 Absolutely SICK bike and build! Nicely done!
  • + 1
 My kind of bike , be interesting to see how a coil over would work.
  • + 0
 The original brake sides were switched. Must be a Euro thing.
  • + 1
 Let's see your E-bike!
  • + 2
 It has all the levers and cables removed so you have to get off the bike to activate it!! Smile
  • - 3
 How Tall is @mikekazimer and what size frame is this Ransom?
  • + 2
 I'm 5'11" and this is a size large.
  • + 8
 Read the article, or watch the video... It's listed in both.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: How much do you weigh? Thanks!
  • + 3
 @TheJD, I weigh 160 pounds.
  • + 10
 @mikekazimer: what's your favorite color?
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