Tech Tuesday - Bleed RockShox Reverb Remote Lines

Dec 27, 2011 at 0:10
Dec 27, 2011
by Richard Cunningham  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login

Two sounds reverberated around the world when RockShox announced that it was making a dropper post with a hydraulic remote control: the first was a round of applause in the great hope that someone would finally produce a reliable dropper post; the second sound was a great wailing and gnashing of teeth from riders who imagined yet another salad-oil wrestling match with an inanimate object when the time came to bleed the system. Pinkbike's forums and comments are peppered with both positive and negative experiences bleeding the Reverb seatpost control line, so I thought I give it a go and see for myself.

Turns out that the job is pretty easy, and quick too. After the first run-through, I can get 'er done in about 20 minutes. The instructions are available on SRAM's RockShox website as well. The only hassle is finding the 2.5-weight shock fluid required to make the remote work smoothly (RockShox sells it). In this Tech Tuesday, we go through the simple bleeding process. If you want to shorten or replace the hose, you'll need to buy Reverb-specific screw-on replacement hose fittings to finish the job. If you simply need to unhook one end of the hose to reroute it through the frame or linkage, then the following steps are all you need.

What you ll need

What You'll Need:
• 2.5-weight suspension fluid
• Avid/RockShox bleed kit
• Isopropyl alcohol (Windex or Simple Green)
• 6-millimeter open-end wrench
• Torx bits and driver (T10 and T20)
• lint-free rags
• Bike stand is a great help
• bungee or rope to keep front wheel straight

Tips
Tips that will make the job go smoothly:
The first and most expensive mistake that most Reverb owners make is clamping the hose, hose fitting and upper slider part of the Reverb in the bike stand. If you've wrecked a Reverb post like this, you are a member of a sizable club. We'd advise the rest of you to loosen the frame clamp and slide the post up as high as you need to clamp the fat part of the Reverb below the seal-head in the bike stand. Also remember to move the hose from harm's way before you swing the clamp shut. You'll get best results with the bike angled so that the remote lever is higher or at least level with the bleed port on the seatpost. Keep the front wheel in place with a bungee cord or a length of rope between the rim and frame.


How To Bleed a RockShox Reverb Seatpost Remote Control System


If you are only going to remove one side of the hose unscrew the seatpost end because you won t have to mess with the speed control valve at the remote side.
Step 1 - Begin with the post at full extension. If you are only going to remove one side of the hose, unscrew the seatpost end because you won't have to mess with the speed control valve at the remote side.

Loosen the remote control clamp with a T20 Torx wrench enough so it will slide around the handlebar.
Step 2 - Loosen the remote control clamp with a T20 Torx wrench enough so it will slide around the handlebar.

Level remote control so that the bleed port at the elbow is at a high point.
Step 3 - Level remote control so that the bleed port (at the elbow) is at a high point.

Evacuate air from syringe by pushing the bubbles and fluid into an absorbent cloth. Wear eye protection to prevent fluid spew from ruining your day.
Step 4 - Fill one syringe about half to two-thirds full with fluid. Evacuate air from syringe by pushing the bubbles and fluid into an absorbent cloth. Wear eye protection to prevent fluid spew from ruining your day.

Remove bleed plug from seatpost with a T10 Torx wrench.
Step 5 - Remove bleed plug from seatpost with a T10 Torx wrench.

Screw in empty syringe into seatpost bleed port.
Step 6 - Screw in empty syringe into seatpost bleed port.

Remove remote control bleed plug
Step 7 - Remove remote control bleed plug.

Screw in full syringe to remote control bleed port
Step 8 - Screw in full syringe to remote control bleed port.

The two bleed plugs are different the pointed one goes in the remote module and the one with the O-ring fits the seatpost bleed port.
Step 9 - The two bleed plugs are different: the pointed one goes in the remote module and the one with the O-ring fits the seatpost bleed port.

RockShox says to bleed the system with the speed control in the slow position. I found it works better to bleed the system turned in full fast.
Step 10 - RockShox says to bleed the system with the speed control in the slow position. I found it works better to bleed the system turned in full fast.

Be sure to keep the syringes upright so the air pockets stay above the fluid stream. Pull a vacuum on the seatpost side while pushing fluid into the remote control side. Watch for bubbles on the vacuum end. When the bubbles stop - or you get down to the last half an inch of fluid on the pressure side stop.
Step 11 - Be sure to keep the syringes upright so the air pockets stay above the fluid stream. Pull a vacuum on the seatpost side while pushing fluid into the remote control side. Watch for bubbles on the vacuum end. When the bubbles stop - or you get down to the last half an inch of fluid on the pressure side, stop.

Reverse the pressure vacuum cycle until you don t see bubbles evacuating from the system. This should only take a couple of sessions.
Step 12 - Reverse the pressure/vacuum cycle until you don't see bubbles evacuating from the system. This should only take a couple of sessions.

Give the remote syringe a strong push and then unscrew the seatpost syringe and screw in the proper plug. It has an O-ring so the plug only needs to be tightened to a snug fit. A little fluid will escape.
Step 13 - Give the remote syringe a strong push and then unscrew the seatpost syringe and screw in the proper plug. It has an O-ring, so the plug only needs to be tightened to a snug fit. A little fluid will escape.

With the seatpost side buttoned up move to the remote control. Pull a vacuum while you push the button all the way in and then pressurize the button with the syringe to return it. Then use constant pressure and pump the button a handful of times. No bubbles Great
Step 14 - With the seatpost side buttoned up, move to the remote control. Pull a vacuum while you push the button all the way in and then pressurize the button with the syringe to return it. Then use constant pressure and pump the button a handful of times. No bubbles? Great!

Step 15 - Pull a vacuum with the syringe while you cycle the speed control from fast to slow a few times to get any trapped air from that little space. Now, pressurize the syringe and unscrew the dial to full slow. While you have the pressure on, push the control button a couple of times just for good luck.

Give the remote control syringe a hard pump and then remove it and screw in the proper bleed plug. It is pointed so it only takes a snug fit to seal. Wipe off the remote control and seatpost with a clean rag and some alcohol and give the post a test. It should react quickly to a push on the button. If you have to push the button all the way in or pump it to get the post to slide you ve got air in the line and it s probably in the button. Redo the vacuum pressure steps on the button and speed dial and try again. If all is well reset the angle of the remote tighten the clamp and then zip-tie your remote hose in place. Bam Job well done.
Step 16 - Give the remote control syringe a hard pump and then remove it and screw in the proper bleed plug. It is pointed, so it only takes a snug fit to seal. Wipe off the remote control and seatpost with a clean rag and some alcohol and give the post a test. It should react quickly to a push on the button. If you have to push the button all the way in or pump it to get the post to slide, you've got air in the line and it's probably in the button. Redo the vacuum/pressure steps on the button and speed dial and try again. If all is well, reset the angle of the remote, tighten the clamp and then zip-tie your remote hose in place. Bam! Job well done.



I found this Tech Tuesday...





Past Tech Tuesdays:
TT #1 - How to change a tube.
TT #2 - How to set up your SRAM rear derailleur
TT #3 - How to remove and install pedals
T #4 - How To Bleed Your Avid Elixir Brakes
TT #5 - How To Check And Adjust Your Headset
TT #6 - How To Fix A Broken Chain
TT #7 - Tubeless Conversion
TT #8 - Chain Wear
TT #9 - SRAM Shift Cable Replacement
TT #10 - Removing And Installing a Headset
TT #11 - Chain Lube Explained
TT #12 - RockShox Totem and Lyric Mission Control Damper Mod
TT #13 - Shimano XT Crank and Bottom Bracket Installation
TT #14 - Straightening Your Derailleur Hanger
TT #15 - Setting Up Your Front Derailleur
TT #16 - Setting Up Your Cockpit
TT #17 - Suspension Basics
TT #18 - Adjusting The Fox DHX 5.0
TT #19 - Adjusting The RockShox BoXXer World Cup
TT #20 - Servicing Your Fox Float Shock
TT #21 - Wheel Truing Basics
TT #22 - Shimano Brake Pad Replacement
TT #23 - Shimano brake bleed
TT #24 - Fox Lower Leg Removal And Service
TT #25 - RockShox Motion Control Service
TT #26 - Avid BB7 Cable Disk Brake Setup
TT #27 - Manitou Dorado Fork Rebuild
TT #28 - Manitou Circus Fork Rebuild
TT #29 - MRP G2 SL Chain Guide Install
TT #30 - Cane Creek Angleset Installation
TT #31 - RockShox Maxle Lite DH
TT #32 - Find Your Tire Pressure Sweet Spot
TT #33 - Three Minute Bike Preflight Check
TT #34 - MRP XCG Install
TT #35 - Stem Choice and Cockpit Setup
TT #36 - Handlebars - How Wide Affects Your Ride
TT #37 - Repairing A Torn Tire
TT #38 - Coil spring swap
TT #39 - Trailside help: Broken Shift Cable
TT #40 - Installing a Fox Float Air-Volume Spacer
TT #41 - Replace the Seals on Your 2011 RockShox Boxxer World Cup Fork
TT #42 - Clean and Lubricate Your Fox F32 Dust Wiper Seals
TT #43 - Thread Locker Basics
TT #44 - Install a SRAM X.0 Two-By-Ten Crankset
TT #45 - VPP Suspension Bearing Service
TT #46 - Rotor Straightening
TeT #47 - Finding and fixing that creak
TT #48 - Bleed and Service Magura Marta Disc Brakes
TT #49 - Cup and Cone Hub Basics
TT #50 - Install and Adjust Pedal Cleats
TT #51 - Cup and Cone Hub Rebuild
TT #52 - Converting Mavic Crossmax SX Axles
TT #53 - Cassette Removal and Installation
TT #54 - Cane Creek AngleSet Installation
TT #55 Wider Rims Are Better and Why Tubeless Tires Burp Air

Visit Parktool.com to see their entire lineup of tools and lubes
Must Read This Week






51 Comments

  • + 18
 RC, this is a really well done tech tuesday (I hope there's going to be more like this one) I just feel a little left out because I'm too poor to get one of these fancy seat posts :p.
  • + 5
 A lot of people asked for this in the reverb review article, I'm glad they did the tech tuesday for it.
  • + 5
 good work RC !

can I add to this information:- its important to wear PPE (personal protective equipment) i.e. gloves (you did mention glasses in the article) when working with substances like suspension fluids and DOT brake fluids

these substances do your skin no end of harm, especially if regularly working on bikes

you can easily get good thin latex or butyl gloves from a local drugstore (chemist for UK reader), on-line tool suppliers or companies like Park Tools through your local bike shop
  • + 2
 You meant Nitrile gloves, didn't you? Latex and butyl gloves will just dissolve when faced with brake fluid.

You're welcome.
  • + 11
 DO NOT bleed while in full FAST mode . ONLY BLEED IN SLOW MODE If you bleed it in fast mode it screws it up . You will find that fast mode is now slow and slow mode will not work at all soooooo BLEED IN SLOW MODE LIKE SRAM SAY IN THE VID
  • + 0
 NO. he stated in step 15 to turn it to slow... so its ok actually.
  • + 2
 Read step 10
  • + 3
 I followed RC's instructions to the letter every time I have needed a bleed.... with steadily deteriorating results. The first bleed went slow because I keep going from the bike stand to the computer to check if I was doing everything as instructed, but I got awesome results: the post extended very quickly with only a slight push of the button and I enjoyed a high level of performance for quite a while.

With every successive bleed the post moved slower and slower and I tried to bleed it more frequently to achieve the same speeds that I was getting before. I tried twice this morning, certain that I was doing something wrong. I saw superbikes comment and did a quick re-bleed with the system on full slow without all those steps at the remote end and now my post is lightning fast again, I will have to turn the speed down a bit when I go ride because it's so damn fast.

Someone should move superbikes' note to the top so that other users can save some trouble and stress.
  • + 2
 Thank you .
  • + 2
 2 things not covered:
1. It helps to have syringe tubing locks (like the type found on brake bleed kits) to keep that elusive 2.5 wt fluid from dribbling out.
2. Lube the seals of the syringe plunger (w/ a wipe of 2.5 wt) to get smoother action and less resistance
  • + 2
 Curious if there is some logic behind why in Step 10 you found it to work better in full fast? To me that does seem to make more sense; wonder why RockShox says to bleed the system with the speed control in the slow position?
  • + 2
 Nice write up I cut my hose down last month and bled it without instructions lol. Good to see its pretty straight forward and common sense its exactly how I did it. Great write up very helpful and pictures are priceless for tutorials way. To go.
  • + 1
 the new ones use a similar fitting to goodridge hoses on the post end, its well worth lookin at goodridge fitting intructions allong with the rs tech section to shorten the hose, if you cant make sence of the instrutions i urge you take it to a bike shop for the job as it can go horribly wrong also
  • + 1
 Actually, when I shortened the hose on my reverb i just pulled the cable off the connector, cut it with a paper knife, and reinstalled. No bleed needed if you keep everything upright, 2.5wt fluid is quite viscous and does not flow out unless forced.

I suggest most of you guys reading this try this first, if it works, don`t fix it.
  • + 1
 Step 6 is screw in an empty syringe to the seatpost bleed port... In the pic there seems to be a bit of oil in the tube leading up to the syringe - has this come out of the seatpost bleed port or do you need to put a bit of oil into the syringe tube to avoid contaminating the system with air?

Thanks for all the tech tuesdays BTW; they're great!
  • + 1
 No need to put oil in the empty syringe. What you observed was left over fluid from a recent hose shortening session. RC
  • + 1
 Thanks
  • + 1
 Nice writeup, RC. I'm a bit late to the game on this, but I was having trouble purging air at the remote. Using your slightly tweaked process compared to RS's I was able to get all the air out of the remote and now my Reverb is good as new. Thank you.
  • + 1
 Key item here, you are probably bleeding your system because there is something wrong with it. I was in that boat, seat went down, did not come up all the way (in the middle of my ride this morning). I went through the whole process, much better than the instructions given by Rock Shox, so super appreciate it. When I was all done, still that same issue. Read some more online posts and decided to check the air cartridge that rockshox says "don't mess with". It was way under the 250 psi on the cap (60 psi). Puled out the shock pump, pressurized it, works like a champ. So, I have a nicely bleed and pressurized Reverb ready to close out the summer with. Thanks Pink Bike, you guys totally rock.
Reverb Troubleshooting tips from Ted
1. Check the seat clamp (some people say over-tightened clamps keep the post from coming up)
2. Check the air pressure in the cartridge (Again, Rock Shox said not to mess with it, but whatever)
3. Bleed the system.
I am going to put this out there, if the cartridge is getting soft, you may need to replace the seals.
  • + 3
 sram has a heap of tech vids such as the breed procedure above www.youtube.com/user/SRAMtech?feature=watch
  • + 3
 you dont need to replace the fittings if you shorten the hose , its only a pushfit at the remote end
  • + 1
 It's easy to bleed takes about 5 to do it, but my reverb has poped air seals, leaked oil and has needed to be sent back to Sram 3 times in the last year which has ment it's been of the bike for 9 weeks total so far.
  • + 1
 there a great post. just make sure you buy one with full warranty, imports or 2nd hand ones i would steer clear of them. the damper costs over £200 to replace and can fail.
  • + 3
 People, please don't ask for a video. This was plenty helpful.
  • + 9
 Sometimes a video can be a lot more helpful for some one with dyslexia to follow than a series of pieces of text - the pictures are helpful put don't spell out the full instructions. Plus some of us miss Mike Levy's still screen face.... just sayin'
  • + 1
 I got a reverb for xmas ... on the remote i have it on fast but its SO slow when i want it to rise :/ iv bleed it and theres no air in there, can anyone give me some advice??
  • + 1
 There is an air valve in the seat tube
  • + 1
 One thing I will add is check your bleed kit for any holes or defects before bleeding. Or else you will end of up with oil in your eyes
  • + 2
 i thought there should have been a " i don't own a telescoping seat post " option.
  • + 1
 Seriously, when i first read the tittle of the article i thought: Bleeding your seatpost??? Shit! how far have we come that now our seatposts (once just a tube of aluminum) are hydraulic. I can't really tell if that's a good or bad thing.
  • + 1
 Tried this 5 times with my new Reverb without any effect. It came stuck in the up position, can I return it?
  • + 2
 Sounds like a warranty to me. Take it in to your LBS with proof of purchase. I don't know if Fisher distributes SRAM in the ROI but they do in the UK and they're always reasonable.

Bear in mind that if there's any reason that you could have caused the fault then obviously the distributor is fully within their rights to turn you away for a free repair or replacement - that reminds me if they can fix the problem as opposed to replacing the unit they almost always will; but for that reason you should keep hold of ALL of your receipts and records of repair; i.e. if the problem persists you will be able to return with a record to say that they've already tried to fix the problem and it has not been sorted.
  • + 1
 Thanks. Do you know if I can return it to any Sram dealer or does it have to be where I bought it?
  • + 1
 You should be fine with any Sram dealer as long as you have proof of purchase. Not to knock small bike shops, but I guess larger dealerships will be better to go for this kind of thing - partly because they will have more logistics already in place to deal with this quicker and will be higher in the pecking order with regards to the distributor - not that it should be like that but with money comes power...
  • + 1
 Thanks, I'll take it up to chain reaction and see if they'll replace it.
  • + 2
 any SRAM dealer will help, as Fisher Outdoor Leisure has become very effective at handling SRAM warranties in recent seasons, with super quick turnaround

I snapped the remote trigger on my Reverb in November (completely my fault), posted it to Fishers and it was replaced FOC and back in my bike shop in 3 DAYS = awesome service
  • + 1
 I believe there is a typo. I think step 13 should read "Give the SEATPOST syringe a strong push"

Otherwise, nicely done.
  • + 1
 No, it is saying that because you want the fluid to flow into the seatpost syringe so that it the cable is full of oil, and no air, when you unthread it.
  • + 1
 Nope, wrong. RC messaged me that he is going to correct it.
  • + 1
 No you.
  • + 1
 It will work either way. I assumed that the last pump would be from the seatpost to the lever so the cleanest fluid would be at the remote end and there would be less chance of pushing the last bit of bubbles from the short syringe into the system. Carpy98's way is more logical, it just requires a bit more attention. RC
  • + 1
 awesome since I just got one from the best girlfriend ever for Christmas that needs installing. Impeccable timing pb
  • + 1
 i can't believe people are so stupid to clamp seatpost hose so there is a "sizeable club" already....
  • + 1
 Great information. Some day soon I'll get a Reverb. Mr. Joplin works fine for now.
  • + 1
 The less than obvious problem for a slow return is that your air spring is not fully charged. Pull out your post and use a shock pump to pressurize it to 250psi. Some are under pressured out of the box. RC
  • + 1
 Great instructions...I got a used Reverb that quit working a few rides in. This fixed it right up Thanks.
  • + 1
 Im confused about Step 1? Why would you un screw the hose?
  • + 1
 to shorten it
  • + 1
 This worked great! Totally fixed my post. Thanks for the instructions.
  • + 1
 Nice writeup
  • + 1
 get it

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.085505
Mobile Version of Website