OneUp Announces EDC Lite, A 9-Function Steerer Tube Tool

Nov 16, 2020
by OneUp Components  



PRESS RELEASE: OneUp Components

EDC LITE ($40 USD, €40, £35, $53 CAD)
A stripped back version of the full EDC tool, containing a 9-function multi-tool conveniently stored in your steerer tube. Don't get stuck without a tool on your ride ever again.

Includes:

⬢ 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm
⁕ T25 Torx
▬ Flat Head Screwdriver


EDC Lite is easy to install in less than 5 minutes, without removing your star nut or threading your steerer tube. Your headset is still preloaded using your star nut in the traditional way.

EDC Lite adds just 75g to your bike weight and is perfect for carrying a tool on almost any bike with a star nut. See compatibility page for full details.

OneUp Components EDC Lite
OneUp Components EDC Lite

Available in 7 colours (Black, Red, Blue, Green, Orange, Purple, Turq)
Perfectly colour matched to OneUp Handlebar decals and Composite Pedals.
Extra carriers are available for $15 so you can run a single multi-tool on all your bikes.

OneUp Components EDC Lite Colours


The EDC Lite Kit includes the multi-tool and everything you need for installation in your steerer tube.

INSTALL
To install EDC Lite, simply set your star nut 75mm deeper into your steerer tube using the supplied setter bolt. Then replace your top cap with the EDC Lite Carrier, which is essentially a deep dished top cap with room for a tool. Full install instructions are here.

EDC Lite cross section

If you need more tools and inflation, check out the OneUp EDC Pump with storage for the full 20-Function EDC Tool & Tubeless plug kit.

OneUp Components, Squamish, BC.
WORK LESS RIDE MORE





209 Comments

  • 348 5
 OneUp is certainly steering tools in the right direction...
  • 112 4
 Whoever down-voted this probably kicks puppies too.
  • 13 2
 They're a real rising star.
  • 13 39
flag anothermtnbiker (Nov 16, 2020 at 17:31) (Below Threshold)
 I think the specialized swat tool on the water bottle holder is better
  • 5 0
 @anothermtnbiker: I don’t know man, I have a few of those SWAT bottle cage tools and they’ve either broken off the cage, got stuck in the sleeve or rusted out. Hopefully the EDC tool will last at least partly because it’s in a semi-protected location????‍♂️
  • 4 0
 @kingpine: I have two of the under the cage SWAT tools - one on my Honzo and the other on my Druid. Both have been used extensively for 2 full seasons. They continue to function flawlessly, as do the Zee cages they are attached to. I use those in conjunction with a Bandit bolted under the saddle of my Honzo, which holds my CO2, CO2 head, levers and a tube (I keep this stuff in the reverse Swat hole on my Druid). The Zee cage and tool, and the Bandit (and reverse Swat hole), allow me to ride packless whenever I want. All top quality accessories.
  • 1 0
 @mtnbkrmike: Post a link. You seem proud and made me curious despite completely steering away from complimenting the pun you quoted.
  • 108 0
 All I want for Christmas is yoooooouuuuu!
  • 18 1
 Seriously, this rocks. While I love the idea of the tool in the pump (my riding buddy has one), it is rather inconvenient to pull out and assemble on the trail, esp. for small adjustments like lightening your seatpost collar or adjusting your cane creek. This is so much faster and convenient.

All it needs is a chainbreaker tool! I snap chains occasionally, and being stuck without a chain is almost as bad as an unfixable flat.
  • 16 0
 @hamncheez: I agree - a chainbreaker is a necessity.
  • 3 0
 @zeedre: I still prefer my pump version, mainly because, well I need a pump with me anyway (plus it has the chain breaker, tire lever, bacon jabber and holds quick links), but I love that this is less than half the cost (once you factor in threading the steerer).

Perfect xmas gift idea.
  • 5 4
 @bishopsmike: no need to thread the steerer mate
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Seems like this is good for quick fiddles while your friends catch up. You can carry a separate chain tool with your tube etc. somewhere else.
  • 3 0
 @donpinpon29: I think what @bishopsmike means is that 2x the cost of a Lite is less than the total cost of buying the full tool and paying your LBS to do the thread cutting (that the full tool does require)
  • 55 1
 Kudos to @OneUpComponents for delivering a sensible product at a realistic price point. It's rare that the engineers ingenuity is not overrun by idiotic marketing and costing 'projections'. The most desirable products from a customer prospective are the ones that market themselves, and this checks all the boxes. And somebody did their dFMEA homework. A+.
  • 38 0
 You mean you don’t want a handlebar alignment tool for $250?
  • 30 0
 @nickfranko: Only if it works in radians...
  • 31 1
 So where would I put the drugs to now?!
  • 106 0
 The old prison wallet.
  • 3 0
 Prison purse.
  • 28 1
 @nyhc00: too enduro for my liking
  • 10 3
 @nyhc00: Too many years getting shafted by the man, I have to put it in a waterbottle and pop it in; it's the only way it stays put.
  • 7 0
 @RelapsedMandalorian: gonna have to start doing kegels.
  • 2 0
 EDC dubetube ftw
  • 2 0
 Coming soon... the OneUp butt plug Enduro and Enduro lite tools, also a version with a small shifter spanner and coffee press for the hipster fixie crew
  • 1 0
 SWAT box
  • 19 1
 this is the correct way to make an after market tool like this, making it compatible with forks that already have a starnut is perfect. plus for the price, I would argue this is functionally the same as a SWAT tool, because lets be honest who's ever actually used the chain breaker on the swat tool?
  • 6 0
 I have, twice. But over the course of probably 5 years.
  • 1 0
 For comparison sake - how much does the SWAT steerer tool cost?
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: I believe the Swat tool is 80 usd
  • 2 1
 @G-Minion: To be fair the SWAT tool does have the nice aluminum headset compression bolt instead of a star nut.
  • 38 8
 To me any multitool is worthless without a chainbreaker
  • 11 0
 @hamncheez: you mean a deal breaker.
  • 10 0
 @hamncheez: Unless you prefer your chainbreaker as a separate tool anyway. I think this is something you pull out for a quick adjustment whereas when you pull out the chainbreaker, you accept that it is going to take a little bit more time.

Either way, I think this is a good alternative for more than a few people.
  • 36 0
 SWAT Steerer Tool - $80 - has chain break
Bontrager Steerer Tool - $90 (does not require threading) - has chain break.
OneUp EDC V2 - Chain tools and lots of options for various setups, $60 - requires threading.
OneUp EDC Lite - No chain tool, $40, no threading required.

Giant Clutch Crank - $85, chain break, no 8mm hex.
Granite Design Bar End Chain Break - $25
Granite Design Steerer Tool - $54 - No 8mm. No chain break. No threading required.
All In Multitool (Crank Based) $85 (I think) no 8mm, but easy to add, chain break.
Wolftooth EnCase Hex Driver (probably the most elegant solution with biggest assortment) is $50, but handlebar storage tubes are $35, so combining it with the Granite Design Bar End Chain break isn't any cheaper than just buying Wolftooth's complete EnCase system for $120. If Wolftooth included a crank tube holder for the Hex Driver at $50 it'd be a real winner.

I carry a tube and pump so inflator, plugs and spike aren't necessary for me. Chain break, quicklink pliers, and levers are.
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: I love my Giant Clutch Crank tool. I like that its has a valve core remover and two different size spoke wrenches which I use more often than an 8 mm hex.
  • 4 0
 Me reading this article with no place to carry a water bottle legitamitely on my bike and knowing I'm gonna carry a bag/hip pack regardless.....still wanting it
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: Ya, the convenience of uber quick access can't be beat.

@OneUpComponents the best feature of this is the installation that requires essentially no modifications. The v2 needs modifications.

@PHeller I've started riding with just some bacon and no tube, which I realize is a gamble. I also installed the new tubless Tannus at the same time, so I haven't had any tire issues whatsoever. I still anticipate breaking chains tho.
  • 6 0
 @PHeller: thank you for your service
  • 6 0
 @OneUpComponents: If by covered you mean all sold out then you are his man.
  • 3 3
 @OneUpComponents: False! The chainbreaker on your multi-tool is useless for new 12 speed chains. Especially the new Shimano chains!! If you try to fix a Shimano chain you will have BOTH a broken chain AND a broken tool. Ask me how I know.
  • 3 0
 @garrisond5: Are you trying to press the partially removed pin back in? It won’t work, you need either a quick link or connecting rivet (if those are even available for 12s).
  • 3 0
 @MaplePanda: If you break a chain it typically blows apart the wide link on one end. This leaves the other end still firmly attached, so you have to push out another pin in order to use a quick link. You will be sadly disappointed if you try this with the one-up chainbreaker. It will either strip the screw/pin or break off the mounting bolt for the tool itself. I have done this twice now and broken TWO of the one-up chainbreakers. New Shimano 12 speed chains no longer use the stand alone pin/rivet of the older style chains. I have had success with the wolftooth multi-tool chainbreaker.
  • 3 1
 @PHeller: AliExpress BB tool for $15 with everything including chain breaker and bits are easily replaceable and changeable.
US $15.10 27%OFF | SRWRN Aluminum Bike Bicycle Invisible Repair Tool Set Multi Portable Upgraded Version Hexagon Screwdriver T25 Wrench,Black
a.aliexpress.com/_mM8cLAN

Add 4-5$ more for tubeless plug kit and you're set
US $4.36 34%OFF | Car Tire Repair Tool Tubeless Tire Repair Kit Auto Car Truck Motorcycle Bike Wheel Tire Puncture Plug Repair Kit Tools D5 CSV
a.aliexpress.com/_mOpTJYD
  • 2 0
 @msusic: that BB tool looks amazing. Have you used it? Is it durable, or chinesium? What range of cranks would this be compatible with?

I wonder how hard it would be to adapt for a steerer tube....
  • 2 5
 @PHeller: Hey Nerd!! Can you tell me if anal retentive needs to be hyphenated or not?? lol
  • 2 0
 @garrisond5: Yeah, I'm wondering if the v2 tool works better on the 12spd Shimano chains.

I managed to size a chain using the old tool when I was on the road, but it was an ugly affair involving vice grips and a 6" wrench. Those plates in the chain are too long for the tool & pins to line up properly.

Someone nicked my v1 tool the other day, necessitating that I pick up one of the newer versions. I'll report back with further findings. Science!
  • 1 1
 @garrisond5: the only time ive need a trailside chain breaker, it broke. Now I carry a separate chain tool if at all.
  • 7 0
 @garrisond5: that doesn't sound great does it. Happy to supply you with replacement parts and with some direct conversation we can probably get to the bottom of what's going wrong there. Please email us at info@oneupcomponents.com and we'll be there for you. Cheers
  • 2 4
 @OneUpComponents: that's very nice of you but I expect nothing. I'm very picky about my kit and have found an amalgamation of bits to suit me. Your pliers actually made the cut after I filed notches for stubborn tubeless valves, so congratulations.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: This alliexpress BB tool has too weak megnet and can separate from crank in case of crash. Have one, lost one bit in the first crash. Not worth it.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: I still wonder if it could be adapted for steerer tube use.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: I use this BB tool from November of 2017. First step - replace the magnet.
  • 10 1
 I am bewildered that people are unwilling to cut a clean, neat thread into a steerer tube, then happy to apply brute force to place the star nut in.
Maybe an engineer can explain the different effects both techniques have on the steerer?
  • 5 0
 Totally spot on point! It seems like many of the top EWS team mechanics have zero issues doing it either! The stat nut is antiquated to be sure. This solution makes use of already placed start nuts, it OneUps the star nut really.
  • 4 0
 "Unwilling", or just don't fancy buying a single-use tool to thread the steerer, or paying a shop to do it, when they already own a perfectly good hammer?
  • 5 1
 It does void your fork warranty though :/
  • 2 0
 @dsut4392: true, but I only bought the tap once. Every fork since is threaded. The cap transfers to the next bike unless the buyer has/likes/wants EDC. If friends ask I thread their fork too.
  • 2 0
 @Mayzei: evidence? Not chasing anecdotes about a bro’s cousin’s Uber driver.

This is why I would like an engineering perspective. Why would it void warranty in comparison to a star nut? EDC is arguably safer, neater, and more precise. I’ve seen star nuts go in crooked, never seen an EDC installed incorrectly.

Only my view...
  • 1 0
 @itsajoke: You neeed to watch Sam Pilgrim intalling star nuts. Did they go crooked ? Absolutely , does it have any bad impact ? No. youtu.be/4Bkf6OaNMS4?t=175
  • 3 0
 @Mayzei: so say there is 8mm of threads at the top of your steerer, you have concerns it may void a warranty claim on your steerer, you see your hacksaw... you set your mind at ease by removing this concern...
Also, it sounds like zero cases of warranty denial due to threading have ever occurred. Hell, the Fox EWS athletes basically all run it.
  • 1 0
 @steviejks: for sure, plenty have gone in crooked. Hence the second flared section to assist with alignment.

I am trying to see why a thread voids a warranty and a scraping force does not.
  • 13 3
 You guys remember when we just put little multi tools in our pockets?
  • 113 0
 Like Savages
  • 7 0
 For me it's about the not remembering and a short checklist. I don't have to remember to pack my mtb tools on my mtb, or move things over to my gravel bike. I just ride it. If I flat, or something breaks, I have everything.
  • 35 5
 @Mtmw: It would be great if they made some kind of like a back pack that held water, tools and food, and let you drink on the fly. Then you could ride multiple bikes and just remember the pack.
Think I've got an idea for kickstarter
  • 4 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: I'll buy one! maybe they could come in different colors too...
  • 6 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: I have a bucket in my laundry that will hold 10L with a length off garden hose some tape and zip ties I think I could make you a prototype?
  • 4 0
 @T-Bot: I like your thinking. Perhaps some waterproof bags in the bucket for tools and food, and maybe some kind of lid? Duct tape on the outside to hold a cellphone.
  • 14 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: Carry all that on my bak? What, do you think I'm a camel or something?
  • 3 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: That wouldn't work for me. I have different tire sizes on both bikes so I can't carry the same tubes. I don't have the same chain width (12 speed vs 11 speed) so my quick link collection is different. I have to carry a special mavic spoke wrench for the mavic wheels on my gravel bike. Even the multitools are different because I insist on being able to field-tighten cranks. The shared overlap between the two bikes is maybe 20% tops. Id either need to carry twice as much stuff or have two backpacks.

Right now I have two bikes I can ride anytime and have full tools and the ability to fix anything without picking up or remembering a single item. It adds up over time and I love it.

You do you! There isn't a right way, just your way.
  • 1 0
 @igxqrrl: Good point. Will need a creative name that somehow describes this pack.
  • 4 0
 @Mtmw: I'm not saying there's a right way or a wrong way. I just like grabbing one pack knowing I have a shock pump, tyre pump, multitool, tube, tyre levers, small bits etc. Rather than taking another bike that has no tools, or I've pulled it out for some reason.
Surely you could cover that stuff almost with a pack? Carry 12 and 11 quick links, leave your spoke wrench in the pack, buy one multi tool that has those sizes? What size are the crank bolts? 8mm? 10mm? The only duplicate is the tube. My wheels are all the same size fortunately.
And as I said, 90% of the time none of these tools are used to fix my own bike. Rather everyone elses! I will admit that more than a few times I've ridden with others who take nothing and I'm tempted to let them walk. But that's another discussion.
  • 2 0
 I remember landing on a tool and tearing open my leg. I also remember the time I forgot a multi tool in my pocket, it came apart in my washer and blew up the ejector pump. I also remember the time my tool fell out of my pocket and I rode back to my car and saw it sitting in the lot.
  • 4 1
 Pepperidge farm remembers
  • 1 0
 @ChazzMichaelMichaels: It's two tubes and a single bag makes four. I keep my bag packed with the ten essentials and a water filter and I keep bike stuff on the bike. The spoke wrench is a combo lever and I run different levers for carbon and Alu rims. It's a lot easier to pull an accidental gravel century when you're always ready.

You're right though about always using my tools to help others. I swear I carry so much just to help people I find on the trail. Somehow I think people who prepare like us also have bikes that break down a lot less. Go figure.
  • 2 0
 @Mtmw: Why don't you just attach your cranks properly at home rather than insisting on being able to field-tighten them?
I've seen a few broken cranks, and once bent some raceface cranks so they wobbled on the spindle, but it's been many years since I've seen any just come loose on the trail - the last time I remember was in the early 2000s with ISIS spline cranks.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: summer of 2018 i went through 3 cranks. At first the bike shops solution was "carry a 10mm and tighten the cranks every chance you get". My crank kept coming loose, then sheared off my chainring. Stuff a tool couldn't fix, but i ended up walking to the car probably 7 different times with crank related problems in one summer and my bike was in for warranty work half the time.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: I sheared off my first crankset, square taper, and dropped a crank off a cliff in the woods. Then it was octolink and carrying that stupid tool all the time. It's been fifteen years since I've had a crank problem, but you never forget disaster.
  • 6 0
 @Mtmw: 27.5 tube will fit in 29 and 26 perfectly fine in my experience, so you can just have 1 for getting out of a pinch.
  • 9 0
 ooo baby that looks nice!
  • 5 0
 Not to be a tool but... if you could replicate the functions of the Topeak Ninja16+, in the same weight range, I'd be sold. Or, some kind of super slim sleeve or slot that attaches under saddle, more minimal than even a small saddle bag.
  • 2 0
 Yeah something like meridias seat tool, but done Oneup style, would be cool.
  • 4 0
 I think the topeak Hexus is the best portable multitool out there. I was installing a tire insert and broke two of my "high quality" tire levers. I only had the small levers inlcuded on the hexus, and against my better judgement I gave them a try. They worked without issue. Also, on a ride later I had to take a few links out of my chain, as I had mis-measured it when I put it on. I first tried my friends chainbreaker and it couldn't get the pin out, but did mushroom his chain tool. The Hexus came through for me again on that one.
  • 4 0
 @OneUpComponents - By any chance, have you tested it with a larger Garmin/Wahoo and a K-edge stem mount? I'm worried that the top of the EDC Lite may interfere with the GPS. Mount seen here:

www.backcountry.com/k-edge-stem-mount-for-garmin-computers-adjustable

If it doesn't interfere, I'm in for one.
  • 3 0
 @OneUpComponents So do I read it correctly, that my 2018 Rockshox Pike must measure 210mm minimum from underside crown to top of spacerstack in order to fit this tool? I thought I had quite a normal steerer length with a healthy spacerstack on top, but I'm justttt under that limit.

Damnit.. Was already in the checkout-process of ordering this when I wanted to double check If it'd fit.
  • 1 0
 Check out granit stash.
  • 3 0
 Hey Svenie, Sorry to hear that. Your options are to add a few mm of spacers to get above the 210mm or go with a threaded version where the minimum is 185mm. I hope that helps...
  • 1 0
 Oops, I've just ordered one and IIRC my steerer is about 180mm... I'm going to have a damn good go at getting it to fit though as it looks awesome. PM me and let you know how it goes.
  • 5 1
 @fartymarty: Having tried to fit one to a steerer tube that is under @OneUpComponents recommended limits, I would urge you to not give it a damn good go Smile .
  • 1 0
 @paulhaysom: I need a new pair of forks anyway...
  • 1 0
 You would like the SWAT tool instead. Steerer tube length is irrelevant with the SWAT system.
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: you guys should replace the star nut with something like the Brand X Headlock. Then you could use a longer plastic insert and full length tool with gas without the hassle of threading your steerer. It would also make installation quicker and be a much better solution than the star nut which are a crap solution to pre loading your headset.
  • 4 0
 Damn, after hesitating with the EDC, I just bought a set of ultralight mutli-tools and strapped them to my frames. Would have gone this route otherwise! Nice execution.
  • 7 1
 $40 gets me a tool inside my Fox 40... must try.
  • 3 0
 Everyone here debating the EDC/this/seat post option, all while forgetting oneup also makes a pump tool combo option that is also very easy and convenient. Well worth looking into.
  • 4 1
 damn, this is tempting. well done guys. i always hesitated to buy the original one because i didnt want to thread my $800 fork. this looks like just what the doctor ordered
  • 3 0
 non-issue. Each family member has one installed in the house. For the kids, if something happens and I am not there, they can sort it out or someone else can with their tool. Richie Rude has had one for years on the ews. YOu can easily install a star nut afterwards too
  • 2 0
 It can seem daunting. But the tap system is absolutely foolproof. That said, we're glad to make other option available. Cheers!
  • 4 0
 Does anybody know if you can purchase just the plastic shell and use a older Oneup Multitool?
  • 2 0
 So I could move my edc tool from
My pump into here? @OneUpComponents:
  • 5 0
 @sostokedaboutthat: The multitool, once taken out of the pump, separated from the tire lever /cradle assembly will fit with the EDC LITE PLASTICS KIT and stow in your steerer yes. Make sure your steerer is compatible in length etc first of course.

If you ever have any more questions, hit us up at info@oneupcomponents.com and we'll continue to assist.
Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: This is excellent! I have the EDC pump/tool. The plastic kit will be great for my quick local rides to drop the pump (My house in Bentonville is less than a 1/2 mile from my garage)
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: trying to gift a EDC v2 for the upcoming holidays. Any chance that will be back in stock soon?
  • 2 0
 @OneUpComponents: Why is the star nut torque value so low? The install instructions claims max 2Nm, most other headset claim 4-5 Nm. I want to buy this tool for my Fox40 but I don't want to deal with bearing play.
  • 5 0
 I'd ignore torque values. No headset needs to be tightened to 5Nm. One is literally just tightening the system up enough to remove play. It's kept tight by the stem bolts (I used to use an Azonic Headlock BITD and once the headset was tightened I'd just remove it and have a bare steerer remaining and never had an issue).
  • 1 0
 From the looks of it it's made of plastic. There's a good reason most top caps aren't made of plastic.
  • 1 0
 @wallheater: Integrated headsets often do need to be tightened more than normal (since there’s no cup, the clamping force is the only thing keeping your bearings in place).
  • 3 0
 It's tough to assign a value because as @wallheater noted 5Nm would likely seize your steering. There is plenty of strength in the EDC lite carrier to preload your headset.
  • 2 1
 @OneUpComponents: What happens if it comes loose on a ride ? Don't you need a long handle.
  • 1 1
 @brentg198 you could install your stem with a normal top cap and then once you have your stem bolts tight take off the top cap and insert the edc lite
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: the frame is the cup.
  • 1 0
 @wallheater: Right, but in order to keep the bearings pressed against the frame, you need more force than would be normally needed to just take the slack out of the assembly. My road bike has a integrated headset, and I have to tighten that thing way harder than my MTB with a ZS in order to eliminate creaking and wobble. Oh well, I’m sure OneUp knows what they’re doing and that the product works well.
  • 2 0
 @holdandhope: if you read the install instructions, you can use the 4mm on the tool, extend it, and use the rest of the the keys on the opposite side to create the L and make your long Allen to tighten it mid ride
  • 1 0
 @mstokman: Nice, think i'll buy one !
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents I run a Hope Head Doctor. The top cap is basically a top cap, just the lower part clamps differently. Would the system fit if I'd just replace the top cap with your system (and slide the lower section of the system lower down)? Total steerer length is a bit of a guess (haven't measured it yet). My headtube is 150mm, 25mm of spacers, 30mm stem, maybe 30mm total stack height for the headset (ZS44/EC44). Not sure how tall the fork crown is, maybe 30mm or so. So my guess is that my total steerer is about 265mm tall. The lower section of the Head Doctor is a bit taller than a standard starnut though. Would you this be an option? Initially I thought I couldn't get this system unless I ditched the Head Doctor but now I'm wondering if this could still work. Thank you!
  • 1 0
 OK, I like this - I have the EDC pump combo already, but this time of year it's covered in mud, so only for emergency use. Sounds like I only need the holder as I have the tool already. I'd get one if available in black, though for some reason only stocked in 6 colours which no one wants!
  • 3 0
 Super interesting- were there any issues with the standard EDC that used the compression stem / compression cap?
  • 34 0
 Just another option. We still believe strongly in our original threaded system.

The EDC Lite can be used more widely (DH bike, Commuter, Pub Bike etc).
  • 9 16
flag ColeLancaster (Nov 16, 2020 at 9:08) (Below Threshold)
 Ya, the stem system is a pain to set up, and with come loose if not done perfectly.
  • 5 0
 I think a lot of people just didn't want to thread their very expensive forks. Or didn't have a local bike shop to do it for them. I've got the original, and it's great. Though my headset keeps coming loose at the moment. I'll clean up and add some friction paste before I blame one up though
  • 8 0
 I use one... and it can be a little finicky to get the preload set right... not difficult, just finicky. And i did have it loosen up on my during my first ride, which I could fix on the trail due to having the tool right there. It was pure user error and once I set it up properly... it hasn't needed any adjustment since I set it up 5 months ago.

but the biggest barrier is needing to use their stem or threading your steerer tube. This tool doesn't require any of that.

I'll be continuing to use the original version (which was just updated as well) because it offers more "stuff" (I have it setup with a jabber, extra bacon, quick links, quick-link tool, chain breaker and tire lever) which helps keep me totally pack-less... in addition to the pump on my water bottle cage and a tube + zip ties + co2 + inflator in a strap on my frame.

But this looks like a great option for those just looking for a place to stash a mini-tool in combo with other items strapped to their frames.
  • 17 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I understand the concern, it can seem daunting. But the tap system is absolutely foolproof.

The warranty of the fork is not affected unless the failure is a direct result of the threading and have not seen a single case of a threaded steerer leading to damage. As such, we are also not aware of a single denied warranty claim for things like a creaky CSU.
  • 3 0
 @ColeLancaster: I heard of people having trouble with the stem, but for what it's worth, I can report that mine is working 100% as intended, on a Fox36. Easy to take on/off and tension after I got the hang of it. If I had the choice I'd still go full EDC tool instead of this minimal option, as I like to have the tire lever/chain tool/storage box with me at all time, for carrying bacon strips and emergency cash.
  • 10 0
 @OneUpComponents: Can confirm, Fox warrantied my creaking CSU. They commented on the fact the steerer was threaded with a statement along the lines of "we wouldn't recommend it" but were still happy to provide a replacement. I needed the re-thread the new steerer however...
  • 1 0
 @ColeLancaster: The top cap coming loose has happened a couple of times I agree. A bit more annoying is how damaged the lock ring profile gets, it's mega shallow and not a strong metal so easy to slip and destroy the engagement. A couple of people I know binned their systems for this reason and bought the pump instead.
  • 4 0
 @OneUpComponents: ROAD and GRAVEL!
  • 1 0
 The hex screws that hold the tool together loosened enough enough on mine to prevent me from removing my tool. I had to use pliers to grip the lock ring and unscrew as I couldn't get a freehub tool onto the lock ring with tool stuck inside. Frustrating, but hopefully with a little lock tight it won't happen again. Just another screw (s) to ensure are tight, but overly so.
  • 2 0
 @OneUpComponents: I have a oneup pump 100 cc within EDC and it's the best system! But I would like to thread my fork for stash inside the EDC tool for the quickest after-work trail,but I can't find anywhere the tools to do that. Also on your site not available!
  • 1 0
 @jenksy: He is referring the the EDC stem, which allows use of one up steered tool V2 without threading the fork steerer.
I agree with him. I had it come loose on me several times (despite being setup as recommended), crashed a few times and had to loosen the setup to straighten my bars trailside and setup the preload trailside (which was a royal pain to do by yourself and it happened once during an enduro race which was a massive time waste).
Ended up selling it a couple months after purchase, waste of money. Just thread the steerer or use the EDC lite..
  • 2 0
 @philneuve:

This tool screams road and gravel but lots of those bikes have carbon steerer tubes.
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: aye fair enough, can't comment on that
  • 1 0
 @p0zi: true!
  • 1 0
 @Jaylynx: had exactly the same thing in morzine - think the roughness of the trails loosened the bolts. I couldn't work out what had happened or how to deal with it. Managed to use BFI and tyre levers in the end.
  • 2 0
 I would use this as a stash box for those soul rides and carry my mini Park tool with a chain breaker in one of my back pockets
  • 1 0
 Great idea!
  • 1 1
 But with the screw now deep down in the steerer I'd need to carry an extra allen key if I want to be able to readjust the preload. But I like the basic idea of being able to easily retrofit this tool to an existing fork with a star nut.
  • 6 4
 Ironically this is the perfect tool for everything except to tighten the headset then...
  • 19 2
 The 4mm hex of the EDC tool can reach the preload bolt. Although we recommend using a long tool in the shop, you can still tighten your headset in the field.
  • 1 3
 @OneUpComponents: shame you didnt go with a 6mm, less chance of stripping the bolt
  • 2 4
 @OneUpComponents: Please make a longer 4mm integrate somewhere else on my frame so I can correctly adjust my headset.
  • 4 0
 @OneUpComponents: haha love to be wrong!
  • 2 2
 @DanielP07: Nobody has ever stripped a topcap bolt.
  • 3 0
 Is the multi tool the same as the one that comes with the full edc?
  • 4 0
 One up one hitter
  • 1 2
 sweet, i absolutely hated the thought of cutting threads into a steerer tube, i dont feel the fork manufacturers intended their designs around this its like drilling holes in your frame to route a stealth dropper... sure... but..... would rather not.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a great product, but similar to the Wolf Tooth tool, no chain breaker. Which means you still have to have a separate tool with you.
  • 1 0
 If by chance you are around and you have to unscrew or loosen the spider screw what do you need the multitool for if you don't have a long Allen key ...
  • 1 0
 All i want is an air pump that fits in the cranks hollow axle(now with 30 mm axles there's more room). I like my bike to look clean.
  • 1 0
 I use a top cap that is compatible with my Garmin computer, is there any way or option to integrate a mount to the top of the EDC tool, so you can have both?
  • 3 1
 Like SWAT on Big S. Love it.
  • 2 0
 Shut up and take my money. Ordered one in black.
  • 1 0
 So cool, thanks ! But, for a SrSuntour Durolux, wich min length ? As a fox or rs ?
  • 2 4
 Overrated tool and seatpost by O.U. LMAO If a tool is to be so minuscule just put it in your pocket or pack for heavens sake! The post can not handle moister, causing drag on the return and if not cleaned off and a dab of grease under the collar often it will drive you nutz with slower return or not fully extending!
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: does it need a spacers between the top of the stem and and the top cap?
  • 1 0
 No spacer required. Only requirement is enough steerer tube length.
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: I heard that I have to buy a OneUP stem to be able to install this tool. Is this true??
  • 1 0
 so like the Granite Stash tool then. www.granite-design.com/stash-multitool
  • 1 0
 Not exactly because granite is heavier and does not have a 8 mm allen key(for me it;s a must as my pedal require 8 mm)
  • 1 0
 Just great! But you guys forgot the most used bike colour. Where is BLACK option?
  • 2 3
 I still would have liked to see a long screw from the bottom, that I don't have to slam in those archaic star nuts like a wild animal.
  • 3 0
 This way you can still use all the space under the star nut to stash additional items and use a fork cork (or similar).
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: and if your steerer is short enough that the star it falls into the taper? Then thru bolt is the only option.
  • 2 2
 Star nuts work extremely well. Why change?
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: no doubt, they work good. But if I can find a solution that works equally well, does not scratch my shaft and is easy to remove without leaving a mark, why would I stick with a starnut?
  • 2 1
 @MaplePanda: extremely well? They were a hack when they were first used, and just carried on through inertia. There are many better options, from reusable compression plugs to thru bolts, that actually work really well, and are even designed to be reused!
  • 2 1
 @mrti: A few scratches inside your steerer tube won't hurt anything, and you can't see them anyways. How often do you find yourself needing to remove your star nut? See my response to just6979 as to why they're better than alternatives.
  • 3 0
 @just6979: Star nuts are cheap, lightweight, and simple. A compression plug is much heavier for the same purpose and runs the risk of loosening. I've never heard of a thru bolt headset before, care to show me an example?
  • 1 1
 @MaplePanda: www.specialized.com/us/en/swat-conceal-carry-mtb-tool/p/157285?color=232294-157285&searchText=53218-1170

A good compression plug (Hope's, for example) is not "much heavier", and does not magically loosen (though it actually doesn't matter if it did because the star-nut or plug is only used to preload, it does not serve a structural purpose in the bike).

I would argue that star nuts are not simple. They need a special tool to be easily installed correctly, it takes a decent amount of force applied with a hammer to a brand new fork, and are not supposed to be reused if it ever needs to be reinstalled. A compression plug you slide in, tighten, and it's done; and it can be removed and re-used easily.
  • 1 0
 nvm, saw question answered
  • 1 0
 is it only me who had multiple bikes but needs only 1 set of tools?
  • 2 0
 The reading:

"Extra carriers are available for $15 so you can run a single multi-tool on all your bikes."
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: good pointing that out, but I'm happy with the old backpack solution (also holds a small first aid kit, pump, some energy, a rain jacket sometimes....)
  • 1 0
 @pirati: rockbarcycling.com .. Have you seen their bag?
  • 1 0
 Why would you want to put 75g of weight to your steerer tube?
  • 1 0
 What...they got rid of the Roach container!
  • 3 1
 Eat the roach like a man.
  • 1 0
 Flat screwdriver not a Phillips screwdriver?
Odd choice.
  • 1 0
 If only the top were a Garmin mount...
  • 1 0
 Not one of those colors matches my bike
  • 2 0
 Clearly you need to by another bike for the N+1 collection in an appropriate colour then! :-D
  • 1 0
 I heard that I have to buy a one up stem to have it fit. Is this true?
  • 1 0
 From the cutaway pic and install instructions at the very bottom of the article it look like you don't?
Just need enough fork steerer to run 1 spacer above the stem.... at least that's what the pic looks like to me.
  • 1 0
 That is nice. You can also use a small bar bag from Rock Bar Cycling
  • 1 1
 I need a lite tool for a fork that has already been tapped
  • 1 0
 Smash in a star nut?
  • 1 0
 Why not use the regular EDC?
  • 1 1
 @islandforlife: I bought my bike used and it came tapped. Bike didnt come with the tool and I dont really care to spend $90 for another multi tool. $40 isn't so bad though. I know that makes me sound incredibly cheap, but whatever haha
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