Orbea Rallon X-Team - Review

Mar 3, 2014
by Matt Wragg  

REVIEWED:
Orbea Rallon

WORDS & DETAIL PHOTOS: Matt Wragg
ACTION PHOTOS: Simon Nieborak

We first saw Orbea's all-new Rallon back in October last year, where it was unveiled to us in the days following the last round of the Enduro World Series in Finale Ligure. Our first runs on the bike were on the very stages that, just a few days before, the world's fastest enduro racers had been competing on. From the first ride on, the bike we were seriously impressed by it, so much so that we convinced Orbea to let us take the bike away with us and put some proper time and miles in on it. Was it just a holiday romance or have Orbea really created an absolute monster of a bicycle?

In case you missed our first look article, the 2014 Rallon is re-designed from the ground up to be a 160mm-travel, BOS Suspension-equipped out and out enduro race bike with 27.5" wheels. That's not to say Orbea don't want you to enjoy the bike away from the race track, but it is designed to excel at the style of riding typified by enduro racing. By this, we mean the kind of rides where you reach the top at a comfortable pace, then tear the hell out of the descents. If you're looking for a nimble mountain goat to smash technical climbs or a rolling sofa to trundle around flat, uninspiring "flow" trails, it's probably best if you stop reading now.



Details:

• Purpose: Trail/All-mountain/Enduro
• Frame: Aluminum, Single-pivot swingarm suspension with concentric rear dropout pivot, 160mm travel
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Shock: BOS Kirk
• Fork: BOS Deville, 160mm travel
• Two-position suspension adjustment
• Shimano XTR 2 x 10 drivetrain
• Sizes: Small, medium, large, X-large
• Weight: 30.29 lbs
• MSRP: Rallon X Team $6,999 USD


Aluminum Construction

Orbea know how to produce top-end carbon bikes. Take a look at the eye-watering costs of their flagship road race bikes if you aren't entirely sure - those bikes are regularly ridden at the sharp end of the biggest races in road cycling. Yet for the Rallon, they made a conscious decision not to offer a carbon version of the bike. They explain that choosing a more affordable material for the frame (carbon can add up to a $1,000 premium to the price of a frame), meant that they could offer the no-compromise BOS suspension at a more affordable price point. The Rallon's aluminium frame doesn't add much weight, with the complete bike tipping the scales at just over 30 pounds, and it is backed up by a lifetime warranty.

  Coupled with a concentric rear dropout pivot, the Rallon's rear suspension uses a simple, single-pivot swingarm that arcs around a point roughly 110mm above the bottom bracket center. On the left, is the large rocker arm that BOS required to provide a very linear shock rate.

Orbea's approach to spec'ing bikes is also different. In Europe they let you customize your spec on the lower-priced model, with some set options (this isn't available in the US as things stand). If you upgrade it with the BOS suspension and a RockShox Reverb dropper post (the two biggest upgrades over the base spec that will deliver the most performance), the complete bike comes in at a little under $5,500 (£3,283.50). While this isn't pocket change, for a bike with top-drawer suspension and one of the best dropper posts money can buy, it does start to look like rather good value.

For a full look at the construction and development of the bike, take a look at our first look at the Rallon from November 2013.

Components

Our test bike was the $6,999.00 X-Team version. The headline for the spec is its BOS Suspension, with the Deville fork out front and a Kirk shock controlling the rear end. When considering the value of the bike, it's worth keeping in mind that those two units alone would set you back nearly $2,000 if you went out and bought them at retail prices and that their OE cost is likely much higher than any of the mass-produced mainstream options. While the suspension is the headline, the rest of the spec is no less worthy of your attention, particularly the carbon RaceFace SixC cranks and 760mm wide carbon handlebar, as they are light enough for trail riding, but strong enough to be warrantied for DH racing. A RockShox Reverb internally-routed dropper post is fixed to a plush Fizik Gobi saddle, and the cockpit is finished off with a Race Face Atlas 50mm stem (70mm on the large frame) and RaceFace Strafe lock-on grips.

  While the price tag for the X-Team is sizeable, the kit is all top drawer: suspension by BOS, carbon cranks from Race Face, wheels and tyres from Mavic, brakes from Formula and plenty of Shimano XTR to keep things moving.

Mavic supply the wheels and tyres with their Crossmax wheel and tyre system - a setup proven on the Enduro World Series by Jerome Clementz, Anne-Caroline Chausson and Fabien Barel. Shimano's XTR provides the rest of the drivetrain, with a 2 by 10 setup that includes a bash on the cranks and a Shadow Plus clutch-type derailleur at the back. Stopping is courtesy of a pair of Formula T1 brakes.


Riding the Rallon X-Team


bigquotesThis isn't just a sweet handling 27.5" wheel bike, it's simply a sweet handling bike - period.

Suspension setup: We chose a race-style tune for the fork, using very little low-speed compression to keep the fork buttery in the first part of the travel and then we added a good bit of high-speed compression so the fork kept its height in the travel and we had a solid point in the stroke to work against when handling the bike. The suspension performance can only be described as flawless. This was highlighted on a section of a local trail where you launch into a rough, chattery rock garden. On other trail bikes there is a split second of kickback where the suspension tries to adapt from dealing with the initial hit from the drop, to smoothing out the rocks you just landed on. The BOS package was utterly smooth and composed. With most trailbikes, you can find the edge of its performance, the point where you run out of bike and are left to fend for yourself. In the time we had the Rallon, we never felt like we found the point where we felt we were on the limit for what is possible, something we rarely feel, apart from with the muscle of a full-on downhill bike.

Climbing: As we said at the outset, the Rallon is no mountain goat, it was never intended to be, but it isn't a pig by any means. On long fireroad drags, it is a comfortable place to be. The top tube length is nice and long, and the seat tube angle is spot on. With its climbing platform engaged, the Kirk shock does just enough to cut out the worst of the suspension bob as you make your way up. BOS tuned the so it has more low-speed compression to deal with the pedal forces, but leaves the high-speed compression virtually untouched to stop the ride from feeling too harsh. This makes the Rallon pleasant for doing steady miles to reach where the real fun starts. For technical singletrack climbing, it certainly isn't the sort of bike that begs you to attack sections. With the geometry as focused on conquering the descents, you find yourself having to work to keep the bike moving. You can lose traction quite easily on the back, so you have to plan ahead to balance the need to plant the rear tire with getting enough weight to the long front end. It was never problematic to the extent that we avoided climbing steep lines or trails, but it's fair to say that if we were going on an all-day epic, it wouldn't necessarily be the bike we'd reach for.

Descending: "Joyous" is about the most apt word for how it feels when you point the Rallon down a hill. As we noted when we first rode the bike, it is incredibly well-mannered. With the correct adjustment to the shock, anybody could jump on this bike and feel good. As easy as it may be to ride, if you let it go it is also a very, very fast bike. We were sightly unnerved by how easily you could find yourself going seriously quickly without feeling like you had done much to reach that speed, to the point where we started avoiding some of our local runs unless we had a full-face helmet and sturdy kneepads with us. A lot of this is attributable to the suspension package. BOS were very involved in designing this bike and insisted on some significant changes to the suspension layout to improve the front-to-rear feel. That has clearly paid off, because this bike is peerless in terms of balance in a downhill situation. Having both ends of the bike so well matched makes riding the bike much more intuitive - it is a big part of the reason why we felt so comfortable on it from the very first ride. The concentric dropout pivot configuration seems to offer the direct response of a single-pivot bike, coupled with braking performance of a four-bar linkage. Then there is the outright performance of the BOS fork and shock. The only products available to the public right now that they should be compared to are Cane Creek's Double Barrel and Ohlin's TTX shocks, and the fork in a league of its own.

Bike Test
  From smashing loam in the local woods, to big mountain descents, this bike handled everything we could throw at it on the downs.

Geometry: Of course, without the right geometry, the best suspension in the world would be useless, but Orbea have hit a home run there too. On our medium test bike, the 606mm effective toptube, 338mm bottom bracket (in the lower setting) and 66-degree head angle (this is roughly equivalent to a 65 degree head angle on a 26" bike) combine to create a very stable bike at high speeds. What is surprising though, is when you get to the tight stuff. Despite feeling so good flat out, it feels nimble and lithe when you are trying to be precise with the bike. This is, in no small measure, helped by the 420mm chainstays, which are shorter than most 26"-wheeled bikes and is then aided by the support from the BOS suspension. While the Rallon doesn't look as immediately wild as the bikes made by their Spanish neighbours at Mondraker, you shouldn't be fooled by the relatively conventional look of the bike - this is a pretty extreme bike - on the edges of how far you can go with trailbike geometry right now. It was a risk, for sure, but one that paid off. On the downs, there are few bikes we can think of that can match the Rallon for it's combination of stability and handling. It is also worth mentioning the 27.5" wheels too. Advantages, like being able to roll-over obstacles, added stability and carrying more speed all help to make the bike that little bit better. Those benefits, along with the geometry make this is one of the crispest handling bikes we have thrown a leg over. This isn't just a sweet handling 27.5" wheel bike, it's simply a sweet handling bike - period.

Bike Test

Component Report

BOS Suspension: Good - Simply incredible performance, sensitive in the start of the stroke, then ramping up when you need it and maintaining their ride height, no matter how hard you push the bike. BOS' input in the design of the bike make this one of the most balanced bikes, front-to-rear, out there. Bad - Out in the real world, BOS products seem to be a little fragile and in our time with the bike, we lost a compression adjuster on the fork and snapped the platform lever off the shock. We also hear reports that their service is still not consistent, which can be problematic because you cannot service it yourself. That said, if we're honest, we'd roll the dice and stick with BOS every time, as the performance is so damned good.

Mavic Crossmax WTS wheels: Good - A quick rolling wheelset and the UST system is peerless in terms of keeping the air inside your tubeless tyres. Bad - We are in no position to dispute the racing benefits of the lightweight rear wheel, however, running it out in the real world, it was not holding up well, with a dent, a loose spoke and a wobble appearing within two days of testing. We also found that the tyres dropped off a cliff in terms of the performance rather rapidly.

Formula brakes: Good - They look nice. Bad - On a bike at this price point, we would have preferred to see the XTR drivetrain expanded to include Shimano's XTR Trail brakes. A lot of brands have opted for spec'ing Formula brakes this year. For the most part, they work fine, but we have had more inconsistent sets than we find reassuring. The T1 brakes on our test bike were fine on short runs, providing plenty of power, if lacking some modulation, but they didn't cope well with heat buildup from long descents.

Shimano 2 x 10 Drivetrain: Good - We like the fact that the crank came with a bash and we cannot fault Shimano's XTR shifters and derailleurs. Bad - As a bike aimed at riders who are focused on smashing the descents, we were disappointed that it didn't have a one-by drivetrain. Orbea offers an XX1-equipped $8,799 X-LTD version, but we would like to see this bike with at least a 1 x 10 setup.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesAfter a couple of months with the Rallon, we find ourselves liking it more and more. Maybe it isn't the bike for everyone, but it is definitely one of the few bikes that deserves to be described as a real enduro bike. It would suit the kind of rider who cares more about how fast they can go down the hills than up them, offering a fast package for the race track and bags of fun away from it.. There is no single aspect we can point to and say, "This is what makes it great." Rather, it's a complete package with the geometry, suspension and wheelsize that when combined together, make something truly special. Orbea's Rallon is definitely in contention for the title of the best 160mm bike that money can buy right now. This was no holiday romance, this is the real deal. - Matt Wragg

www.orbea.com


175 Comments

  • + 63
 "Orbea Hydroformed triple butted alloy. Advanced Dynamics Enduro tunned 160mm suspension. C9-12 rear axle. Hollow linear ratio rocker arm. Enduro commited and adjustable geometry"

Enduro this Enduro that. Enduro Enduro. Not enough Enduro Technology
  • + 41
 Advanced Hyper Enduro Bullshit Technology , getting sick of all this crap....
  • + 19
 I'm not the only one who ctrl+f search enduro.
  • + 6
 single pivot
  • + 0
 Almost Bike store on my city, "salesman" tell you on every article now, gloves, goggles, helmet, is for Enduro.
  • + 5
 Enduro comes up 30 times in this review. I do actually like Enduro as a format but this is a little excessive.
  • + 1
 too much enduro .. it always depends on the Rider..
  • + 42
 My buddy's Transition Covert Carbon has C.O.C.K. and B.A.L.L.S. technology. It's far superior.
ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb8341172/p4pb8341172.jpg
  • + 19
 Damn, I was looking forward to readbing about an AM bike, too bad it's just an Enduro bike.
  • + 0
 hahahaha, moefosho!!! priceless
  • + 13
 Wow. Another slack and heavy bike thats supposed to be a trail bike? All these new bikes, can't climb, but descend really well. These things aren't any different than the freeride bikes from 7-8 years ago, they're just a little lighter. Only now, you actually have a race series called enduro that you can race your old freeride bike in. I guess designing an actual all around trail bike ain't cool right now.
  • + 7
 Try a cannondale carbon Jekyll, it will change your mind on that.
  • - 2
 Jekyll climbs like a beast! But also decends like a champ also!
  • + 3
 Yeah slowdown you have a point, these are really becoming lightweight light duty dh bikes. Let the record show I have no real issue with that, it's just an observation. Personally I think if you go too low and too slack these bikes lose their versatility, which of course an "Enduro" race bike does not really need to have- it just needs to pedal.
  • + 12
 The freeride bikes were more about soaking up big hits and drops while being a bit more nimble than DH bikes. These are more like long legged trail bikes that can handle rougher trails, they climb and pedal a lot better than freeride bikes from 7-8 years ago. I'm as annoyed as everyone with the enduro everything trend, but these bikes are good if you have the proper terrain and ignore the marketing BS. For most places though, this is just too much bike, a shorter travel trail bike will be much more fun and nimble. If you want to ride DH trails that can't be shuttled, this kind of bike is a good choice.
  • + 6
 I agree 100%, enduro is such a sales buzz word and the idea was racing bikes we all ride but it's important to remember enduro racing is not xc. It's basically long course dh.
  • + 4
 Freeride is back
  • + 2
 'The concentric dropout pivot configuration seems to offer the direct response of a single-pivot bike, coupled with braking performance of a four-bar linkage.' Is This what they're feeling or just what orbea told them it would feel like?
  • + 3
 I have a 26lb enduro carbon that I can pedal up anything on >.>
My previous bike was a 28lb Rallon that I can also climb anything on ...
  • - 1
 Slowdown - I bet you must know a lot about those then. 7-8 years ago 36lbs (average weight now) was rediculosly light for a freeride bike. My bikes now are 20lbs lighter than the bikes I owned then.
  • + 0
 Have the same thought. They just got a new name!!
  • + 5
 You can always buy a dirt bike if pedaling up is a problem. The thing with climbing is, the pain never goes away, you just make room for it. So stop whining and start pedaling....
  • + 0
 ---Insert obligatory "Enduro" comment---->
  • + 5
 Somebody call the waaaa-bulance! It used to be called All Mountain now its Enduro, its called marketing, marketing is as old as man. I don't see why people care about the use of the word Enduro? This sport used to be called cycling and then they changed it to Mountain Biking. I wonder if the forums of that day were littered with whining babies wishing that everyone would stop calling it Mountain Biking, of wait they were not bitching on forums, they were riding. I bet Justin Beiber is on a forum right now bitching about the use of the word Enduro instead of All Mountain.
  • + 3
 @dhminipinner not to be an anonymous Internet jerk to anyone, but the power of suggestion runs so strongly through the MTB media and riders who read too much of it. Like this:
@mattwragg "using very little low-speed compression to keep the fork buttery in the first part of the travel and then we added a good bit of high-speed compression so the fork kept its height in the travel" this example is practically the exact opposite of what low-speed and high-speed compression damping mean!
@dhminipinner and it's coming from a guy (Wragg) who is very well versed in bike tech and is probably a great rider. People just hear, read, and drink in this stuff and voila! they end up feeling exactly what they were told they would feel. The guy's not dishonest; he really "felt" those adjustments work. Top/pro/ful-time reviewers don't just create marketing hogwash, they end up imbibing even more of it than we do. You have to feel sympathy for them.

If I were to suggest on PB that folks are deluding themselves about the changes in ride quality with different dampers or even different damper settings, I would get flamed to a crisp by dudes in their thousands who insist they can feel a single click. It's an easy claim to make, no one can ask for proof and it makes the person seem smart and bike savvy. But then how do you explain how few riders (or suspension manufacturers) can even explain what the different adjusters do?
  • + 4
 @chris "Orbea Hydroformed triple butted alloy. Advanced Dynamics Enduro tunned 160mm suspension. C9-12 rear axle. Hollow linear ratio rocker arm. Enduro commited and adjustable geometry
Enduro this Enduro that. Enduro Enduro. Not enough Enduro Technology"

i counted more enduro's in your comment than in this entire article article
  • - 4
flag M-kat2 (Mar 4, 2014 at 4:46) (Below Threshold)
 Orbea have always been crappy bikes, not a smooth ride and always have issues. Definitely not worth buying.
  • + 1
 Is worth buying. Because enduro.
  • + 5
 Snfoilhat: If somebody cannot differentiate between different dampers and suspension layouts, they shouldn't be reviewing bikes.
  • - 1
 @mattwragg They're your words, man. "Buttery in the first part of the travel" is a small-bump thing, which is a high-speed compression damping thing (plus spring rate, plus rebound). "Kept its height in the travel" is a low-speed compression thing (plus spring rate, plus rebound). I'm just saying that overall ride feel is very complex system of which the marketing guys offer a very reductionist view: it is A that will make you feel B. I'm not so sure. Anyway, your description of the damper settings is wrong. So I don't know who should be reviewing bikes. That's not a very interesting question to me.
  • + 4
 Read the part about setting up compression damping.

www.ohlins.eu/en/motorcycle/technics/Setting-up-your-Bike-part-3-damping--3555

If you want your fork to stand up during aggressive riding, then you need high speed compression. Low speed deals with the initial part of the travel (maybe I should have been clearer with which element of ride height I referred to), and the sensitivity of the fork.
  • + 1
 Nice to see so many people rag on this. Looks like you got to the end of the article and were just pissed that you couldn't justify buying this bike.

I can, and I likely will. Might even get an "enduro" blue backpack to go with it.

I ride my 5 year old 29er Alama on DH trails, hit 10ft drops (Not to flat), hit the pump track, ride road group rides, commute to work, etc, etc. Its my only bike right now, and i've had >100 in the 22 years I have been riding. Orbea's top end bikes can compete with the best, they tend to be a bit heavy & with premium pricing, but unique and durable.
  • + 2
 LOL!!! ^^
  • + 31
 Pretty similar spec to the new YT Capra, which is carbon and $1500 cheaper ...
  • + 6
 YT sells direct though, which is how they keep prices low. So if something screws up, you're not gonna have a shop give you free maintenence, or handle warrenty issues for you
  • + 39
 Who cares about free maintenance or an actual shop. 1. if your buying a bike like this and you dont know how to Wrench you don't deserve it. 2. a YT comes with a long frame warranty and 3. your $1500 dollars up, if something breaks just replace it and your still winning.
  • + 9
 The YT Capra also comes with full XO1 as far as I can remember, 170mm travel front and back (10mm more than the Orbea) and Renthal bar and stem combo... That's what I'm getting, and if I don.t like the way it rides I could always sell the frame and buy an Orbea Rallon frame instead, so you would have the Rallon with better components for £1000 cheaper.

Sometimes it pays to live in Europe, no whistler, but cheap bikes. Wink
  • - 6
flag mnorris122 (Mar 3, 2014 at 6:00) (Below Threshold)
 Well excuse me for not having the tools or facilities to rebuild a shock or the frame...some people don't have fully equipped workshops in their houses.
  • + 3
 Luckily, suspension rebuilds and "frame rebuilds" aren't covered under any warranty...
  • - 9
flag mnorris122 (Mar 3, 2014 at 9:05) (Below Threshold)
 Yea, but if you buy a $5,000 bike from a shop, the shop will probably do that work for free/very cheap for a few years
  • + 1
 Why bring logic to a discussion on pinkbike mnorris122....
  • + 4
 YT is expanding distribution from just europe in 2015, they are going to kill it, thats my next bike.
  • + 1
 YT, bring your stuff to Canada....please!
  • + 2
 You do realize that the moment it hits the border canada customs will slap duty onto it right? And then there's the sales taxes onto that also.
  • + 2
 have to say, the yt warranty WORKS!, my bos deville fork broke after 4h riding, rear shock 118h riding, crossmax sx rear axle bend after 192h riding, 2X XO front shifters, reverb sthelt seatpost... and they fixed/warrantyed everything... just now i ordered even a dh bike and plan to get an dj bike also. great company
  • + 2
 @deeeight that's right I believe your looking at about 10% tax on that at the boarder then shipping also. People forget that one of the reasons things cost more in canada is because of the government not just because of local shops like ripping people off. I know I'm gunna pay more at my local shop but for me having someone I can talk to in person about my problems is nice also I know the money I spend is staying in my community and might come back to my local business one day.
  • + 1
 @ deeeight: I dont know how much the taxes and imports will affect bikes going to the Americas from Europe, but Its around 50% the other direction... Frown
  • + 2
 Try doing a warranty across an ocean.... not so simple. To ship a frame by air is at best, a couple hundred dollars...each way... a whole bike.... well fedex economy is $500 or so. Let's hope they don't damage it in shipping because trying to get a warranty claim filled in less than six months is next to useless.
  • + 2
 ok, i think i'll just settle for the norco range.
  • + 1
 yadayada...warranty this , export tax that...Orbea is from Spain also, last time I checked , so my guess will be that the YT range will be still waaay effortable than this bike! Seven Grand for that chunk of metal is too much! Razz
  • - 1
 74 damn times it says enduro
  • + 19
 Orbea did what more manufacturers must do. Keep the frame aluminium and give your money for better parts. I would always prefer riding with better suspension, drivetrain or brakes than saving a few grams from the frame. And I don't know if it is just me, but for me the Formula brakes are fantastic brakes. Not sure about the T1. Bad to hear if they are lacking some modulation.
  • + 26
 Then there's the new YT...
  • + 4
 Hah, that's nice point you have here, sir. I wonder what added value to the Orbea bike then? Maybe their PR department.
  • + 1
 I've seen a few bad reviews of Formula brakes lately yet only a year or so they were the best thing since sliced bread, things haven't changed that much
  • + 16
 At BOS MTB, we are working hard to improve the service to our customers.

For any questions or concerns, please email customerservice@bosmtb.com or call +33 (0)5 34 25 33 63

To find your nearest BOS certified service center, please visit the Customer Service page on our website: www.bosmtb.com/en/customer-service.html

-The BOS MTB Team
  • + 5
 It's nice to see that you are here, but that copy paste type content sounds very cold and corporate.
  • + 5
 @Jikk: sound like girl "its not what you say but how you say it"... Problem => Solution be happy !
  • + 4
 BOS, please come to the U.S.

We, like the French, also like revolutions. Moon
  • - 4
flag The-Catalan-Rider (Mar 3, 2014 at 9:59) (Below Threshold)
 Bos drop your price tags!
  • + 3
 Drop their price tags? Why? I've yet to talk to somebody disappointed with a BOS product, now the other brand with a very high price tag that I won't mention, they need to drop their price tags, I'd never consider them again after my experience, I'm just happy they were OEM. My point is that there are low cost options that are nearly as good available, if you want the best buy BOS, if you want affordable performance buy X Fusion or Marzocchi you're not forced to buy into high end stuff, it's like saying XTR should have a price drop when XT is pretty much the same and so much cheaper.
  • + 1
 I have been building my AM dreambike the last 6 monthes. Spent already EUR4000 (CAD6088 ) in bike parts. Now last step is suspension. I have heard Vip'r 2 shocks are good but they cost the same than a RS Pike! My question Is it worth the extra cash for a shock that costs as much as one of the best trail forks on the market? Do I have to pay almost twice the price of a Pike for a Deville? Is it really that good?
  • + 2
 Art's Cyclery has BOS in stock in the USA. www.artscyclery.com/catpage-BOS.html
  • + 11
 "Take a look at the eye-watering costs of their flagship road race bikes if you aren't entirely sure"

How about the eye-watering costs of an aluminum bike at 7k....?


At least they are staying consistent
  • + 2
 The spec is pretty damn good for the price... look at the suspension and price on other bikes that come with XTR. Their are options with better value but not many.
  • + 1
 I thought that at first but then I remembered that a friend just bought a carbon enduro 29 for £4600. Yes he's slumming it with a RS pike rather than BOS but then he has a full carbon frame and XX1.
  • + 6
 Something is seriously wrong with the pricing of this bike.
how can it be that YT sells the new Capra with a carbon frame and much better drivetrain, for only 5500$?
www.yt-industries.com/shop/en/Bikes/Trail/Capra-CF-Pro

now you could say they sell direct, but does it really cost Orbea more than 1500 compared to YT$
And dont forget its an aluminium frame - "choosing a more affordable material for the frame... meant that they could offer the no-compromise BOS suspension at a more affordable price point" - that one really made me lough...
suspension system is nothing new, frame is aluminium, so what makes this bike so expensive? a little tweaking with BOS when developing the frame?

sorry Orbea, but as good as you may be, you are just too damn expensive.
  • + 2
 Forget YT when you do a price comparison. They have always WAY better components than their competiors. They sell DH bikes for around 3000€ when Specialized wants 5500€ for a similar one... They sell over the internet and have no dealer network which costs money.
  • + 4
 Poncherello sorry but I still have to disagree. I understand your point and referred to it on my original comment. I simply don't think the price is justified - if companies like YT and Norco manage to offer their bikes with carbon frames, decent spec and good price, then obviously some other companies earn a little too much...
  • + 1
 Finally people are catching on. The entire price thing is completely out of hand. I'm gleefully waiting for the evil empire of 10k 'enduro' bikes to implode.
  • + 1
 The Capra indeed offers very good value, but comparing list prices from different manufacturers, in different countries, can be misleading - especially if you start factoring shipping costs when not buying local.

Take the example you brought up (since we are both from Israel): the Capra would cost around 21,000 NIS (including shipping, not including local tax) and the Rallon 22,000. Still better value for the carbon Capra but not nearly as extreme, and the Rallon is available now whereas for the Capra you'll be waiting 3-4 months.
  • + 7
 I do not understand why brands insist on putting these crap brakes formula whereas XTR have incredible power, with silence and unmatched endurance!
  • + 6
 I think they are trying to use european components with good price/quality... I also prefer shimano, or Hope if po$$ible
  • + 0
 Probably cause some people dislike their modulation? They are definitly very good brakes otherwise.
  • + 1
 indeed, there is also the hope that are very good brakes. Personally, I prefer to buy a bike that another if it has very good brakes even if it is a bit more expensive. it's something less to buy later.
  • + 1
 You just need to know how to adjust your brakes ! Mine are very "hard", they have a very short course, which allows me to brake very very strong
  • + 7
 Yes, this is exactly the opposite of modulation!
  • + 3
 I suspect even XT or SLX would be better...
  • + 1
 I have a feeling that Formula made a huge downgrade with their newer One brakes that people don't like have those brakes on their bikes,the old One brakes which I still ride are really good & still preform good on longer descends
  • + 1
 Formula's One brakes are the best brakes i've ever touched, unlimited power, perfect modulation and no fade. Granted, everyone has their own preference. But if you think formula brakes suck, it is likely that you used some that were setup wrong.
  • + 2
 @GregSpecialized

it comes down to OE pricing - its cheaper to use the Formula brake Wink

Japanese made XTR brakes are more expensive compared to the Italian made Formula (or Taiwanese made SRAM) brakes that are commonly OE spec - especially the Formula budget C1 brake or basic Elixir

they would not want to put a SLX (malaysian made Shimano) on this Orbea bike because it would be perceived as being "cheap" even though in my opinion it would easily outperform the Formula brake fitted

same reason you see cheaper FSA Gossamer cranks on many road bikes, instead of Shimano Hollowtech II like 105 or Ultegra
  • + 1
 my father had a broken collarbone, for me, two weeks of immobilization, that's why I hate these brakes. But I'm glad to see that some riders enjoy them !
  • + 1
 @GregSpecialized

I don't like the cheaper Formula C1 because I keep having to send brand new C1 brakes (fitted to a new, "boxed" bike for customer) back to Formula as the brakes are faulty, before bike has even got into customer's hands!
  • + 1
 I just got some RO from Formula. They have a bit more power than the THe One I had before but still easy to dose.
I'm also "stuck" to Formula because I'm very used to the position I find on them. I otherwise like Avid braking feeling but can't handle the position so for me so far it's Formula. Matter of how you like your brakes.
  • + 4
 "If you're looking for a nimble mountain goat to smash technical climbs or a rolling sofa to trundle around flat, uninspiring "flow" trails, it's probably best if you stop reading now."

Nah, I'm good. But I sure as hell stopped once I saw the word "aluminum" in the same table as the price tag "$6999."
  • + 4
 With all the problems with the components (dented wheels, broken shock, fading brakes), this is a bike that only a spoiled oblivious reviewer could call a good bike, while remaining completely out of touch with the reality of most riders. If you pay that kind of cash for a bike, you do not expect velveeta rims, caliper-strength braking, and junky hardware peeling off your shocks. It can "perform" as nice as you want, but if you have to replace half the stuff or worry about it lasting a season after emptying your bank account to buy it...there is NO point. Unlike reviewers, readers and riders actually place an emphasis on value.
  • + 7
 35 comments in, but it seems like everyone giving BOS compliments gets negative props…
Someone up early at Fox?
  • + 3
 To all those lucky enough to ride attend the 2014 Bike7 Borders Blast, this bike was there to be tested,
and by the way that it never made it to the stand between riders, I would say that it is not just another "enduro" bike, but also an incredible AM/Heavy-Duty Trail Monster.
  • + 2
 Looks like the best frame out at the moment in terms of geometry, but the spec on the x30, and even x10, is terrible: you need to swap the brakes, wheels and susension which adds at least €1500 to the price... Such a shame they didnt setup a deal with sram...
  • + 2
 The only pleasure I get out of reading PB reviews about bikes in this price range is knowing that the technology employed will be accessible to me in about 3 or 4 years. Even the lowest grade Rock Shox forks today will smash a Judy SL from yesteryear and the trend will likely continue. So for all of you, like me, who think you'll never have a bike like this... just give it a few years and you will. Then again, they'll have you believing it is outdated junk at that time. For you kids out there who want really nice stuff like this, pay attention in English class. You have better odds of getting free bike stuff as solid writer of reviews than you do by your great riding skills. Seriously. Pinkbike writers do a good job, they highlight product to a big audience, we lap it up, and it only cost the company one bike. I am sure the authors here have stables full of great bikes.
  • + 3
 oh wow another enduro bike. I think pinkbike should review a DJ or BMX bike one day not just enduro bike after enduro bike after 29" DH bike. D: all that crap gets boring
  • + 4
 I would actually love to see RC review a BMX bike. Maybe a cruiser? XD
  • + 1
 Maybe I am missing something, but does this not strike any of you set up guys as strange: "Suspension setup: We chose a race-style tune for the fork, using very little low-speed compression to keep the fork buttery in the first part of the travel and then we added a good bit of high-speed compression so the fork kept its height in the travel and we had a solid point in the stroke to work against when handling the bike."

I have always used low speed compression adjustment to keep the fork up in its travel under braking as the fork is compressing slowly. Yes, overdo it and the fork begins to lose some of its suppleness to small hits, but there is a balance to be struck. I have never relied on high speed compression to do this task. In fact, if I turn my low speed compression down, the fork dives thru its travel under braking and provides NO "solid point in the stroke to work against when handling the bike". I always tune high speed compression for big hits, like landing a drop or jump to modulate the rate of fork compression so as to use full travel but prevent bottoming hard.

What do the experts think?
  • + 1
 Read this guide from Ohlins:

www.ohlins.eu/en/motorcycle/technics/Setting-up-your-Bike-part-3-damping--3555

Low speed for sensitivity and high speed for support for aggressive riding. Not everybody likes suspension set this way, which is why my editor, RC, introduced the note on it being a "race-style" tune. I have talked with many people smarter than myself to work out what settings work for me on a bike, but that doesn't mean that everybody would benefit from the way I run my bikes.
  • + 4
 Im starting to like 2x10 more and more.. if you want to climb and bomb down its hard to beat 24/36 up front
  • + 4
 I concur, but even 2*9 is sufficient (and lighter).

Pinkbike has a strange obsession with the "1*11 only and nothing else" for trail bikes
  • + 1
 As much as people like or dislike Formula brakes....I'm sorry Matt, the T1s with their big pistons will not fade if properly bled. Just look a couple years ago on PB for reviews, even the R1 had people commenting on their power. The majority of the trail brakes out there now are awesome, if set up properly. It just boils down to rider preference. I like the feel of XTR, but I'm sorry, on longer descents those puppies pump up. You mean you want SAINT!
  • + 1
 Can anyone give an honest explanation as to why BOS is regarded as the ultimate MTB suspension product? I'm honestly curious. What makes a Deville "better" than, say a Fox 36 RC2 or a 55 RC3 EVO Ti? Or even a Fox 34 CTD or Pike RCT3, even though they have more limited damping adjustments...?

At the end of the day it's oil moving through damping circuits to control how a spring compresses or rebounds, right? So what is is about BOS that makes them so special?
  • + 2
 Since when did "the kind of rides where you reach the top at a comfortable pace, then tear the hell out of the descents" become 'Enduro'? I thought that's what we've been doing for decades as "Freeriders"...
  • + 1
 Bos Deville is very good,But since I rode my new Manitou Mattoc pro I know there's a fork that is even better -especially as a whole package considering serviceability, adjustability,stiffness,weight,availability of spare parts,manufacture warranty- performing at a better price. Love it! even If the trail performance was only almost as good as the Deville 's,the whole package would still be superior! Top!
  • + 1
 Can't agree with the sentiment of "just roll the dice on their poor durability and weak service department, because the suspension is that good". It's absolutely useless if your frame is left hanging in the garage without a fork or shock... A suspension product I can't count on isn't worth any measure of performance.
  • + 0
 Enduro is Trail Bike Racing … This year almost none of the TRAIL BIKES can carry water in the frame .. Riders should be PISSED OFF .. DH bikes don't need water on board but Trail Bikes DO … Most riders on daily rides rip out for an hour or two .. No need for a big backpack .. tube in frame .. water in frame .. snack and a couple tools tucked away …
  • - 1
 Completely agree. It is so nice for a short after work ride to leave the pack behind and take a bottle, a multi tool and tube/CO2.
The bosses / space are a bit of a constraint for frame design, but there seem to be plenty that appear to have the room, but lack the bosses.
  • + 3
 In order to put water in the frame they have to compromise the design, no thanks I will take my hydration pack instead.
  • + 3
 even if there were room for a water bottle, it would fall out :-) at least with my enduro riding style hahaha
  • + 0
 No need to compromise, you just need a clever design. See the Specialized Enduro.
  • + 2
 $7000 aluminum bike that weighs over 30 lbs.....you would have to be high to get this in comparison to other less expensive, lighter, higher spec'd bikes
  • + 2
 "As we said at the outset, the Rallon is no mountain goat" No but this is

enduro-mtb.com/en/yt-industries-unveils-all-new-carbon-enduro-bike-the-capra
  • + 1
 You can actually service a Bos yourself! It's a bit tricky to find the right things to do it but you can. In the details it's true it won't be as well done as a fox or rs but the performance itself is really worth it.
  • + 1
 And all I wanted to do was buy a "mountain bike" . Does anybody know where I might find a bike that is not an "enduro" a "twentyniner" (was there a niner in there) or anything else but a mountain bike ??
  • + 0
 7 grand for a bike with mavic, bos and sixc? That's actually awesome value for a top end bike! I know people will complain about Formula brakes but I've never had an issue with them personally although Shimano are better quality I like the way Formulas stop. If I was going to buy a top end bike off the shelf this would be it, I hope to work with Orbea in the future! This bike looks promising.
  • + 10
 About 5500 for YT Carpa(carbon frame) - mavic, bos and X01 - thats bang for the buck.
  • + 2
 The thing with YT is that it's only a good deal for those who can get it, which is pretty much only Europe. Also, as you can only buy YT bikes online so if you have an issue with it you will probably have a bit more hassle with sending stuff away rather than just taking it back to a shop.
  • + 1
 In Europe, you can customize some of the components when ordering Orbea (brakes included).
And, although now I also prefer Shimano, I've never had any complains on Formula stoppers. K18 were my favorite brakes for years..
  • + 2
 YT, I knew someone would mention them, compared to the majority of top end bikes this one is amazing bang for the buck. Pinkbike's review sold me on the Orbea but then again all reviews should be taken with a grain of salt, not everyone has the same riding style.
  • + 0
 This bike and others like it (YT), actually won't be a great choice for Enduro racers on this side of the pond. Aside from Whistler, the majority of events have, and will continue to include stages with moderate terrain (even climbs mid stage). Reason for this? Participation. You'll get pro's to a EWS gnar core style Enduro, but you get hundreds of Joes to pedally enduros like the Oregon events.

Pick a bike that's good for the majority of terrain that you ride in. Around here (west coast of BC), it still will be a mid travel trail bike that pedals well.

Also, one thing I've been noticing recently is the comments regarding HA and wheel size. Reviews of old use to say that a 29er felt slacker by about a degree than a 26er. But now we've moved on from that??? Now a 27" feels slacker by a degree? Which is it?
  • + 2
 That's just a nonsense argument re: participation - hundreds of people show up to Superenduro and French Enduro Series races. There were over 600 people racing the final EWS round in Finale last year - less than a hundred from that number were pro racers. The sport has been this way for a decade.
  • + 3
 7K for an aluminum frame....what is going on here?
  • + 1
 Who cares what they call it?? Why does everyone get their ginch in a knot about semantics? It is a beautiful bike, that has lots of real nice gear on it, end of story.
  • + 2
 Holy -- reach on a medium is 442mm or 17.4 inches. Is it just me or is reach getting REALLY long on new bikes?
  • + 3
 Not another $7k trail bike... I mean Enduro race steed.
  • + 1
 I recently bought a Deville instead of my 36 rc2 which i found good. I was blasted. Now i want Bos everywhere on all my bikes!
  • + 1
 I had similar experience with switching from a 36 RLC to a Lyrik RC. Lyrik is muck more consistent, can't wait to upgrade it to a RC2DH, as my only complaint is that I've pushed it to the point where I was wishing I could have less low-speed compression, but was riding too hard to dial back the single compression adjuster, as I'd have been blowing through the travel. That said, I'd love to try a Deville, though I usually prefer the "built like a tank" stuff over the "amazing performance, but needs lots of attention" stuff, like they describe BOS at the end of the review.
  • + 1
 It requires q bit more service than a sealed cartridge system would, for sure. But it's otherwise impressive in terms of damping really. On mine the thru axle tended to get a bit loose, never fully that it would be dangerous but just spinning back a few degrees. Since I fixed that I have zero issue. Concerning frequent services that's anyway something we should always do if we want to keep proper performance of the suspension, whatever the brand.
  • + 1
 I'm actually of the opposite opinion: the volume of oil in an open bath means less service in my experience, rather than more, as there's more fluid to dilute any contaminants. The Lyrik is an open bath as well. The reason you have to pull Fox float forks a part so often (recommendation by Fox is every 25 hours) is that the small amount of fluid in the air side of the fork gets dirty quite quickly. When you add the fact that they force you to pull the footnut with a single-use crush washer to do the service, and quite a bit of my disdain for Fox is explained. (My other issue with them is on-trail performance, quite honestly: I've had good Fox shocks, but I've never ridden one of their forks that I could set up satisfactorily, they always seem to end up either being too harsh, or blowing through the travel too quickly, and I can never seem to find a sweet spot in the middle that doesn't severely compromise either small-bump compliance or big-hit capability.
  • + 1
 BOS recommends oil changes once a year for "recreational riders" and twice a year for "racing." vid.artscyclery.com/pdf/CURRENT_2014_user_manual_BOS_Deville_2014_eng_04.pdf

Anyone can do an oil change. No need to send it in to BOS.
  • + 1
 @Groghunter: the "diluted" contaminants will indeed less affect the lubrication part. But compared to a sealed cartridge it will then affect the damping part.
I still believe my 36 RC2 was a good fork. But the 36 talas of my wife is worth nothing. Impossible to set rebound properly because it was so inconsistent, to little damping (and you can't set that on this model...) and incredible stiction. Why the hell make a fork which is good for uphills and unusable in the downhills? Well now she also has a Deville. Life's better Smile
  • + 1
 While that's true, due to sheer volume of oil, it takes far more contaminants to have an effect in an open bath system vs the air chamber in a Fox that has 5ml of oil on the top, and 20-30ml in the bottom. Regardless, I'll trade: pulling the top cap, dumping it out, cycling the cartridge a few times, dropping the new oil in, and sealing back up, instead of: dropping a footnut, with a crush washer that you should be replacing after one use, squirting oil in, putting that back together, then turning it right side up and squirting oil in again, only to have actually not cleaned my damping oil at all: because all that service does is keep the fork from destroying itself.
  • + 1
 We're just not talking about the same thing: you talk of lubrication issue in the air chamber and I talk about damping. Anyway servicing frequently is always the key!
  • + 1
 well, kinda: the real problem, in my opinion, is using oil instead of grease, if you are designing a suspension component with a low volume of lubricant in it. lots of open bath forks don't have this problem, because they have damping oil sharing the same circuit as the spring.
  • + 1
 Heu wait. I'm not saying it's impossible or it doesn't exist. But I've never seen a fork having the damping unit on the same side as the spring unit.
  • + 1
 It's common in older coil forks. My Shiver, for example. It used to be common to run a damper and a coil in each leg. I'm not saying we need to go back to that, but at least some manufacturers are thinking about this differently: bought a used durolux a few months ago. I take it apart, and the oil side is a sealed cartridge(quite easily user serviceable, though) and the lubrication is all handled by grease.
  • + 2
 More interested in the BOS suspension review. God, I want to know how that feels but I'm stuck on Fox CTDs.
  • + 3
 what a shame that you only have a fox fork. I'm stuck on a marzocchi
  • + 5
 2013-2014 marzocchis are way better than fox forks
  • + 1
 yeah but mine is an 07...
  • + 4
 oh, if it's made in Italy than it makes it even better Wink
  • + 1
 BOS is just incredible. That's all you need to know
  • + 1
 yeah thats true BOS stuff is damn good. i'd have them if i could
  • + 1
 So Wragg says that BOS pretty much is the best suspension out there, but really doesn't say much else about it. I'm guessing a review is coming.
  • + 1
 yeah, but out in my "real world" i can't "roll the dice" on something with words like fragile, non consistent and not serviceable as part of a review
  • + 1
 Marzo 27.5 options? no so much.
  • + 1
 @trailstar2danman: The new Marzocchi 350 NCR and CR and R models are coming soon. I've seen them at Marzocchi Canada, and they look great.
  • + 1
 that good news thnxx
  • + 3
 Purpose built to bar hump....
  • + 2
 Great review, not a bike I had heard much of before this, but it sounds positively sick!
  • + 1
 Great to see a bike company not succumbing to the carbon massive! Using there brains and sticking to good , tried and tested aluminium!
  • + 1
 30 pounds. Seven grand. Its a single pivot rear suspension. Has a life time warranty.............better for seven grand.
  • + 1
 Captain Kirk, you are needed to lower the price of this bike....bike market, the final frontier!
  • + 2
 7000$ for aluminium frame?
  • + 1
 I agree. This is truly a joke.
  • + 1
 Why? It isn't the material, it's the application.
  • + 2
 Finally a bike that is not awash in SRAM.
  • + 1
 i thought i had my hi n lo speed compression worked out, anyone else confused after reading this?
  • + 1
 Maybe its my imagination but is the fork a 26in stuffed with a 27.5 wheel. Not tons of clearance
  • + 3
 BOS forks have the same lowers between 26" and 27" forks. Only the crown changes.
  • + 2
 ORBEA makes carbon ROAD BIKES, why go aluminum now?
  • + 1
 2 MONTHS to like this bike?!!!! An ENDURo event doesn't event last that long!
  • + 1
 So is this an Enduro or AM bike?!?!?!?! You people are confusing me!!! UGH!
  • + 1
 The Italians got it all wrong. 30 lbs and 7k for a hydroformed aluminum bike. No thank you.
  • + 1
 Who are the Italians you refer to? Orbea is Spanish.
  • + 1
 Ill just stick to my Rune V2
  • + 1
 Enduro o Bienduro $$$ lol
  • + 0
 Enduro, instant 400% mark up!
  • + 1
 My Enduro is so Enduro
  • + 1
 me want
  • + 0
 ENDURO it's the new 29''.
  • + 1
 what about an eduro specific 29er! everyone will pay shed loads of money for a really boring bike! Big Grin
  • + 0
 Looks pretty SixC.
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