OneUp EDC Tool System - Review

Aug 23, 2017
by Mike Levy  
OneUp EDC tool test review


EDC is an acronym for 'Everyday Carry,' a phrase that's commonly used to describe, well, what people carry every day. If you type EDC into Google, you'll likely be rewarded with countless photos of small knives, generic multi-tools, and funky wallets. In the case of OneUp's EDC Tool System, however, it refers to pretty much everything you might need trail-side to keep your bike rolling. And because the entire tool nests down into your fork's steerer tube (or in the handle of the large-sized OneUp mini-pump), it'll be there every day that you might need it, hence the name.

The EDC Tool System retails for $59.00 USD and weighs 116-grams, including the new top cap (an additional $25.00 USD) and plastic plug for the bottom of the steerer tube. To install it, OneUp's $35.00 USD EDC Tap Kit is also a requirement as you need to cut threads into the ID of the steerer tube, although I can see many shops having one on hand as it's a one-time job. If you decide that you'd rather store it in the handle of OneUp's 100cc mini-pump instead of your steerer tube, you can skip the EDC Tap Kit and spring for the $59.00 USD pump instead.
EDC Tool System Details

• Stored inside your fork's steerer tube
• Can also fit inside 100cc OneUp pump
• Includes storage or spot to carry C02
• Requires $25.00 USD EDC top cap
• Requires $35.00 USD EDC tap kit
• Weight: 116-grams (tool, top cap, plug)
• MSRP: $59.00 USD
www.oneupcomponents.com

Included Tools

• 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm hex keys
• T25 torx key
• One integrated tire lever
• Chain tool
• Quick link tool
• Spare link storage
• Flat head driver
• 0, 1, 2, 3 spoke keys
• Presta valve core wrench
• EDC top cap tool
• Spare chain ring bolt
• EDC thread-on storage or room for C02 cartridge


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Backpacks are still the go-to carry solution for a lot of us, sweaty backs and uncomfortable loads be dammed. Yeah, I know that many riders have no qualms about rocking a pack on any and all rides, but do you know what's even more comfortable than a backpack? Not wearing a backpack, of course. That line of thinking has lead to all sorts of storage ideas, some clever and some less so, with the general idea being that you should be able to bring what you need without having to wear a pack and to move as many of your necessities off of yourself and onto your bike.

And that's exactly the concept behind OneUp's EDC Tool System: an easy to access tool that has most everything one might need for a trail-side repair. No, this isn't a shop tool, although you could certainly use it as one; it's for those times when you need to straighten your stem after you ate shit so hard that you can't find one shoe, or tighten that loose bolt that you should have checked weeks ago, or fix your chain so you don't need to do the walk of shame back to the trailhead. The EDC Tool System isn't the first time that a company has proposed stuffing things down your steerer tube—Cannondale had a similar idea many years ago with their Head Wrench, although it only fit inside of the oversized steerer tubes that Lefty forks use. Regardless, there's some credit due there for sure.


OneUp EDC tool test review
From the top down: the carrier with the storage unit threaded on; the chain breaker/tire lever; the multi-tool.


Design

I think of the EDC Tool System as consisting of three elements: there's the multi-tool and chain breaker/tire lever; the carrier that everything attaches to; and the storage container that threads onto the bottom of the carrier. The entire unit weighs 116-grams; for comparison's sake, the Park Tool MT-40 multi-tool that has lived in my bib pocket for two years has fewer tools, weighs 235-grams, and costs $54.99 USD, although let's not forget the price of the $25.00 USD EDC top cap that the OneUp tool requires.

Multi-tool and chain breaker: The multi-tool itself consists of the following: 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm hex keys, T25 torx key, quick link tool, EDC top cap tool, and a flat head driver. The separate chain breaker is mounted onto a tire lever that doubles as the latch to hold the tool onto the carrier, and it's also home to four different spoke keys and a spare chain ring bolt.

That's a whole lot of stuff squeezed onto a pretty small piece of real estate, but it's executed in a way so as not to feel clumsy and overdone, especially because the multi-tool and chain breaker/tire lever are two separate items.
OneUp EDC tool test review
The pint-sized multi-tool has all the required bits, including an 8mm hex via combining the quick-link breaker and the 5mm hex the sits beside it. Clever stuff.

To use the chain tool, you rotate that the anodized green business end ninety-degrees so that the tire lever becomes its handle, then you use the 3mm hex key on the multi-tool to drive the pin in or out.


OneUp EDC tool test review
OneUp EDC tool test review
The chain breaker head is mounted to the end of the tire lever with a spare chain ring bolt, and you simply rotate the head and the tire lever acts as a handle for it.


Thread-On Storage Container: OneUp has included an optional thread-on hideaway spot that attaches to the bottom of the carrier and can be used to stash all sorts of stuff, from money, zip-ties, and your laughing grass to patches, a tire boot, or some small spare bits that you might need. It's even sealed with an o-ring at the threads that makes it waterproof. Don't need a secret stash spot? You can thread a C02 cartridge on in its place, although a 25-gram cartridge is a bit too big to fit down through the EDC top cap.

EDC Tool Carrier: This is what holds the multi-tool and everything else together, and it's also home to your spare quick-link. The storage container threads onto the bottom of the carrier, the multi-tool nests into it, and the chain breaker/tire lever clips into the carrier to keep it all together.


OneUp EDC tool test review
OneUp EDC tool test review
I stuffed the storage unit with a bit of cash and some tire repair supplies.



Installation

Getting the EDC tool on your bike isn't a difficult job, but it does require pulling out your star nut and threading the inside of the fork's steerer tube with the EDC Tap Kit. The kit includes a tap, a tap guide, a go/no-go gauge, and a star nut puller, and while not expensive at $35 USD, you'll need to factor that in if your local shop doesn't have a kit of their own. Cutting threads can be an understandably intimidating task, especially if you're doing it to a $1,000 USD fork, but the self-aligning tap guide and video instruction that OneUp has put together mean that you'll be hard pressed to screw it up—if I didn't mess the job up, you won't mess the job up.


OneUp EDC tool test review
OneUp EDC tool test review

OneUp EDC tool test review
OneUp EDC tool test review
You'll need to cut threads into the inside of your steerer tube if that's where you want to store the EDC tool. The job is much easier than it sounds, and the tap guide makes it virtually foolproof.


You start by pulling off your stem before using the OneUp puller to yank the star nut out; the center of my star nut pulled out and left the steel flanges wedged in the steerer tube, but I pried these out with a big screw driver in only a few seconds. Next, you'll use the tap and self-aligning guide, along with an 8mm hex key and some lube, to cut the threads into the steerer—go with a half turn forward and then a quarter turn back each time you make a cut. You use a long 8mm hex key as a tap handle, and it'll bottom-out on the top of the guide when the threads are deep enough.

I know that cutting threads sounds about as appealing to some riders as visiting the Yulan Dog Festival does to a vegetarian, but it's actually a very easy task. Total time: around ten minutes and zero swearing. Why cut threads into your steerer tube? Well, you need a big hole to slide the tool in and out of, and that'd obviously be impossible if you still had to use a standard top cap. Instead, you're now going to employ the OneUp top cap that has a big hole in the middle of it, looks a lot like a cassette lock ring, and tightens down on the threads that you've just cut into the steerer tube.


OneUp EDC tool test review
OneUp EDC tool test review
Once the threads have been cut, the EDC top cap can be used to tighten your headset with either the EDC multi-tool or a cassette lock ring tool.


Now, reinstall your stem and spacers as per normal, and then use either a lock ring tool (the same as for a cassette) or the key on the OneUp multi-tool to snug the lock ring down and tighten your headset. Align and tighten your stem, and then you're ready to install the supplied plug into the bottom of the steerer and push the EDC tool down into its new home. Viola.



Performance

Yes, the EDC Tool System is cleverly designed piece of kit, but there are a few questions that need to be answered, aren't there? Firstly, is having OneUp's tool on your bike 24/7 actually worth needing to cut threads into your steerer tube, even if the job is simple? And is the tool easier or more difficult to use than a normal folding multi-tool?


OneUp EDC tool review test
OneUp EDC tool review test
Is that a tool in your steerer tube or are you just happy to see me? No, it's just a tool...


Getting the EDC tool out of the steerer tube is easy—you just pull up on the tool's flanged cap—although the interference fit from the two o-rings is pretty tight at first. I used a few drops of lube to make it easier to slide in and out through the hollow OneUp top cap when the tool was new, and it got easier the more times I pulled it out. One thing the tool refuses to do, however, is rattle around inside the steerer tube; it never made a peep while it was down inside the MRP Ribbon's CSU, no matter how rough the ground was. It also never crept out of the steerer on its own, although that's not a surprise given how snug the fit is.


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The steerer tube hiding spot is neat, but I prefer having the tool inside the handle of OneUp's impressive 100cc, $59 USD mini-pump, and I suspect that this combo will make the most sense to a lot of riders. The obvious benefit is not having to cut threads inside your steerer tube, and it just makes sense to me to have all of your tools in one place, pump included.

A 20-gram C02 can fit down the handle in place of the thread-on storage capsule, but I don't often use C02s and liked to keep a small tube of super glue, a few zip-ties, and a tire boot in that location. Either way, there are a bunch of different combos you could run, so just pick the setup that makes the most sense for you.


OneUp EDC tool test review
OneUp EDC Tool System
Those two small holes (left) are there to hold your quick-link. You're staring down a big hole once you pull your tool out.


The bits on a lot of multi-tools, and especially those designed to be carried incognito, often have a sloppy fit and are best saved for only must-use scenarios. This isn't the case with the tiny, green OneUp multi-tool, however, with all of its bits fitting as snug as anything from a high-end tool brand, and this also goes for the spoke wrenches that are integrated into the business end of the chain tool. Even the combo 8mm hex (made by combining the 5mm hex and EDC top cap tool) fits pretty well, although the handle is a bit short to be snapping any pedal axes loose from crank arms—think if this 8mm as an on-trail-only kind of thing.

The same should be said of the chain tool; OneUp explained to me that it's really only for emergency use, and I'd have to agree—I found it a touch awkward to use compared to the one on my old Park Tool MT-40, even if it eventually does the job.

That said, the quick-link breaker took awhile for me to figure out, despite watching OneUp's how-to video, and even then it'd take me a handful of tries to snap the link open, especially if it was a new quick-link that was still tight. Yes, it works; no, I wouldn't want to do it all the time. I also wish that OneUp had figured out a way to include a second tire lever, although I'll admit that I have no clue how they would do that. One lever is sometimes not enough for my weak fingers and a tight tubeless tire.
OneUp EDC Tool System
This is a screenshot from OneUp's video of the EDC quick-link breaker because it was a bit of a brain teaser for me to figure out, let alone take a photo of it in action.

My other quibble would be that the quick-link storage spot doesn't hold the two halves in tightly, and they'll fall out if you have the tool apart and aren't paying attention. A tighter fit, or maybe an o-ring over them, would do the trick.


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So, should you be cutting threads into your fork's steerer tube so you can mount the EDC tool down into it? If it were me, I'd likely go with the 100cc mini-pump that's shown here and use that to carry the EDC tool; it isn't that I have any qualms about threading a fork's steerer tube, but I'd just prefer to have all my tools in one place, low on the bike. Besides, the big 100cc EDC pump is probably the best mini-pump that I've ever used, so I'd have it on my bike regardless of if I was running the EDC Tool System.

The tool itself is easy to use, and the bits are made to a very high tolerance, and while the chain tool and quick-link breaker are a bit finicky, the convenience of having the EDC tool stashed away inside the pump handle (or steerer tube) outweighs this. After all, I only find myself needing a chain tool on the trail once or twice a year. Of course, I probably just jinxed myself.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesFirst, a disclaimer: I can't stand riding with a backpack on, and I will look for any possible way to get around having to wear one. They're uncomfortable, hot, and more annoying than a wheel size debate. So for me, the EDC Tool System does make a lot of sense, and the setup that I'd go with is the $59 USD 100cc pump combined with the $59 USD EDC tool itself. No tap or special top cap required and the entire thing weighs only a combined 262-grams. That's less than a lot of multi-tools on their own, let alone including a very effective pump and small storage container.

I've often poked fun at a lot of these carry solutions, and I get immense amounts of joy when pointing out my very un-cool yet very functional seat bag, but I have to admit that OneUp has created something pretty cool with their EDC Tool System. Sure, I still need my dorky seat bag to carry my tube, but my go-to tool is now the one stashed inside of my bike's mini-pump.
Mike Levy

170 Comments

  • + 131
 I'm not a pervert. I'm just gonna post a diret quote from the article...see what Pinkbike thinks:

"You're staring down a big hole once you pull your tool out."
  • + 9
 "Is that a tool in your steerer tube or are you just happy to see me? No, it's just a tool..."

- just another quote from this article
  • + 2
 thought the same thing..
  • + 5
 I once got a phone call that sounded just like the audio in the first vid
  • + 8
 Ride with a mate with backpack. Sorted.
  • + 71
 you can put your weed in there
  • + 13
 He even says so in the article!

"...can be used to stash all sorts of stuff, from money, zip-ties, and your laughing grass..."
  • + 1
 You beat me to it..lol
  • + 9
 HAHA! Ive tried and tested this function and it works well. I did forget I had put it in there and was scratching round the house for two days trying to remember where I had put it. Wink
  • - 6
flag bigtim (Aug 24, 2017 at 8:29) (Below Threshold)
 @EddyStowaway: Maybe you should stop smoking weed!!
  • + 40
 This looks awesome. However I sweat like a beast so I'll be carrying a pack until someone figures out how to carry 3 litres of water on my bike.
  • + 28
 Same, water bottles only work for rides under an hour for me.
  • + 6
 Come ride in the Alps, we have mountains water troughs everywhere, so you only need a 500ml bottle Wink
  • + 3
 If you saw Kazimers last article about this pump solves the water issue. I jumped on the bandwagon and bought one. Did a ride last weekend with this, no backpack on a 4 hour, 3.5K, 25 mile ride and had plenty of water at my disposal (actually over watered). Now make sure there are creeks to use is key. In Colorado is likely harder than most places, so if you are in the PNW, I'd guess you are fine. One thing that is still not solved is the first aid kit, which for big backcountry rides I think is quite smart.
www.pinkbike.com/news/msrs-trailshot-pocket-sized-water-filter-review-2017.html
  • + 25
 fill the frame up with water, youll have to switch to external routing (unless thats what your bike already has obviously) and the sloshing at anything less than 100% full might be annoying, but it will have good vibration damping and will improve the sprung/unsprung weight ratio on your bike which should make it feel even better through rough stuff
  • + 5
 Bottles and a hip pack.

I took my hip pack out today (for the first time in about a year) and forgot it was there.

I also just bought some Summit folding bottles (about half a litre in each) and will one or 2 in my hip pack with a bottle on the frame. It's not quite 3 litres but fine for shorter rides.

For all dayers you need a back pack. End of story.
  • + 5
 @GumptionZA: I've already improved my sprung/unstrung ratio by eating 5 servings of pasta for lunch!
  • - 7
flag Jackson900 (Aug 23, 2017 at 9:06) (Below Threshold)
 Maybe you wouldn't sweat so much if you didn't carry 3 litres of water and a pack on your back?
  • + 9
 @Jackson900: dehydrate yourself and you don't sweat at all.
  • + 1
 @GumptionZA: It won't affect sprung/unsprung weight, it's all still sprung, and don't say "yes but if it's in the swingarm?"... However, centre of gravity would lower the more you drank Smile
  • + 3
 @jasbushey: yeah this won't work here in Phoenix.
  • + 2
 @jdendy: haha, more truer words have not been spoken.
  • + 1
 For me: 750 mL bottle in the cage and 2L dakine waist pack around the hips. Perfect combo IMO
  • + 0
 @GumptionZA: Hey, what if you could alter the sprung/unsprung weight ratio with a machine? They use them in Formula 1. I'm designed one for the MTB. It's called an Inerter. My design is called the Inertia Amplification System. Check out my bio.
  • - 1
 @deadmeat25: You're an idiot. And that's coming from an engineer. If you have more weight that is sprung, it changes the ratio of sprung/unsprung weight. Duh. It's one number divided by another. Simple math.
  • + 2
 @allballz: Ok Mr Enginidiot, my point was that the fluid carried, no matter where you carry it, will be sprung weight, yes the ratio will change but it will not alter the unsprung weight itself, which is all that is relevant here, adding the weight of the fluid to either the bike or yourself will simply have the same effect as the rider themselves being heavier in the first place.
  • + 2
 @allballz: well if it's coming from an engineer , your assessment must be correct . You must be great fun at parties .
  • + 16
 OneUp gear straps (for a tube and extra tire lever for @mikelevy) just arrived this week www.oneupcomponents.com/collections/edc/products/edc-gear-strap
  • + 2
 How about storing a spare tube inside your tubeless tires? Boom, problem solved.

I think Transition already beat me to the acronym though!
  • + 3
 Look quite a bit like voile straps...
  • + 2
 Yep, looks like a strap
  • + 1
 I'll stick with my Dexter's duct tape
  • + 14
 Not too many scenarios where I'd promote this, but I rode dh with a dude who had a small fanny pack under his jersey. You couldn't see it, no sweating and he saved me a long walk out. Might be an option for some....
  • + 13
 Call it a hip pack, it's far hipper. Got mine out again today. Total winner. Forgot it was there.
  • + 8
 Crazy to me that so many people ride in the bike park without tools. The EDC tool makes a lot of sense for that, especially if you have their small pump down in your steerer tube as well.
  • + 3
 @plyawn I just got made fun of in bellingham in the parking lot when a guy saw me put my little fanny pack under my shirt. Asked me if I needed a choker neckalce while I was at it. lol
  • + 2
 After riding for 8 days in whistler, in Lund definitely advocate putting an EDC tool on your DH bike. So many laps and bolts backing out, it really makes a ton of sense
  • + 2
 @dbodoggle: they just aren't ENDURO enough in Bellingham. Also why do you guys call your bum a fanny? Over her a fanny has a whole other meaning... Maybe that's part of the problem.
  • + 0
 @mikelevy: My "pump" is too big to fit down my steerer tube...
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: but seriously it makes sense to have at least a folding tool on you whenever you ride. I am surprised One-Up haven't done one for the BB axle. There's a bit of space and its nice and low so great for COG.
  • + 1
 I use a frame bag for everything now. Haven't ridden with a backpack for 3 years and never going back to one. Tried a hip pack but it kept riding up above the belt area. Loving all these tool storage options.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: It amazes me that people dont carry a first aid kit as well. Its not hard, even in a bike park to need one.
  • + 9
 Hmm, OneUp Components could create more accessories to be placed in the steerer tube,which would probably encourage people to go the threaded steerer way. For example:

- a front light battery shaped like the carrier, that would come together with a 1-2 led minimalist light;
- a powerbank (which could work also as a battery for a front light or have a hand light function;
- an empty container to allow bikers to place inside whatever they see fit (plastic cuffs, levers, energy gels, etc.);
- some sort of a security device, that could trigger an alarm or notification (when the bike is moved, unlocked etc.).
  • + 8
 I love my tool. I put it in my steerer. The main advantage compared to specialized emt system which I had before with the chain break and bottle cage tool is the either in the steerer or pump NOTHiNG gets wet or dirty. The specialized tool would gum up and the spare links in top of the chain tool in the headset would rust out. For me I like this tool. I used it to build a bike up recently. I actually test my tools. The chain tool is exactly as described -emergency only. The quick link breaker is not imitative but works once you figure it out. The steerer thing is not a big deal to me. If I get rid of the tool it will still work with a star fangled nut.
  • + 7
 Really big fan of this setup in the steerer tube, I've had it for about a month. While there are plenty of other places to put a multi-tool, this is one less thing to remember for rides. With a backcountry research strap holding a tube, CO2 and inflator, I have a nothing to remember when I head out the door. This along with a set of SWAT bibs, let's me carry 2-3 water bottles, plenty of food and a pouch with cables, chain lube, etc. for longer rides. I've been out 4+ hours with this setup and wouldn't go back to a pack.
  • + 3
 Chain lube tho?
  • + 6
 I have the OneUp EDC pump/tool combo and contest to it being freekin awesome!!! I just spent a week in the Alps with it attached to my frame and was worried it would get knocked out at some point, but no: the OneUp frame clip is secure as a rock. As an aside, the pump itself is a work of art - if that is ever a thing. It's machined aluminium and is probably the best mini pump I have ever used: add a tool to the inside of it and it is just brilliant. Really impressed with this kit. Bravo, OneUp ????????
  • + 6
 Fitted mine today , took 10 mins from start to finish , fit is solid in the steerer dosnt rattle at all .. filled the storage tube with gummy bears ????
  • + 4
 I get that backpacks are not super comfortable...but they seem crucial for proper hydration unless you have an XC bike with space for 2 bottles. I don't live where there are big mountains, but I would still die of thirst mid-ride with just one bottle...and definitely wouldn't have hit any of my BC rides without a pack. ..."stay thirsty my friends!"
  • + 1
 For all day rides maybe but for short rides one bottle is adequate. Depending on how wet it is where you ride you can rock a filter setup pretty easily aswell
  • + 1
 Agreed. Big rides you need lotsa water. For anything over 25 miles I would take my backpack, 2L bladder and a bottle. Also a small first aid kit is handy. "If you got it you aint gonna need it" philosophy.
  • + 1
 Absolutely. My next experiment will be a small MSR water filter that will allow refilling a bottle from streams. My typical rides cross many streams but I wouldn't drink that water without filtering it. MSR have one about the size of my fist and weighs about 100 grams. But for places like Moab, you need a big 3 litre water bladder and a bottle.
  • + 1
 @Someoldfart: If you want a cheaper and smaller option check out the sawyer mini. Pretty popular among ultralight hikers
  • + 1
 I use an Osprey Syncros 15 litre pack for work as I need to carry a first aid kid and tools for an entire group and it has been awesome. narrow, great harness system and plenty big for my needs without allowing uncomfortable over packing.
  • + 7
 I like the engineering, but a tool and pump in my pack is good enough for me..... Cool concept though for sure.
  • + 8
 Dakine low rider pack. That is all
  • - 3
 Evoc 3L Hip pack you basterd!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Am just about to buy a Macpac Module (L). They're 5L so should get most of my stuff in there. Was looking at the High Above ones Mike K reviewed but $40 shipping on top of the $75 put me off.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: Dakine hot laps 1.5l pack you troll!
  • + 4
 @bikeis4life: 1.5L leaves you no space for your weed and beer.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: we aren't talking about cable routing.
  • + 1
 The hot laps rocks!
  • + 0
 I recently got the Camelbak Palos 4 LR and so far I love it. I have everything on the frame/in a seat bag for shorter rides, and use the pack for extra food/water for longer rides.

The hip pack looks bulky but feels fine when riding as long as you don't stuff it to max capacity and are OK with re-cinching it down occasionally.

And the 2016 model is on sale on JensonUSA. which makes it a relatively cheap experiment.
  • + 1
 PREACH
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: that thing is still too big. The low rider is just right considering they both fit the same size bladder.
  • + 6
 I can't decide between "that's what she said" and "are we still doing phrasing."
  • + 2
 rather put this in a pack than thread my steerer. I mean i carry a water bottle, my phone, and inner tube just in case tubeless fails, some spare chain links, multitool and my sunglasses spare lenses should the weather change and it all fits in a tiny evoc back pack so i dont mind carrying it.
  • + 4
 I guess the Pinkbike crowd isn't into music festivals. Searched EDC and got about 100 pictures of the music festival before a gun came up.
  • + 3
 I want the pump with the tool, but I would also like to get the tap and that top cap. Seems like a better way to apply compression than the star nut. Wouldn't even care about the hole.
  • + 2
 OneUp is a Canadian company. So is Pinkbike. Why are product prices listed in USD? Just curious.

I saw this tool at a shop in North Van a few weeks ago. Looks like it is very well designed. Great idea. Being a happy bag-hauler myself though, I don't see any need to invest in such cleverness.
  • + 1
 which shop was that at? Are they selling it or was it just one they had?
  • + 1
 @kthorpe: Yeah they were selling it. Don't want to get them in trouble in case they weren't supposed to be selling it so early... but it's in North Van near MEC
  • + 2
 "The separate chain breaker is mounted onto a tire lever that doubles as the latch to hold the tool onto the carrier..."

So what happens if you break your tire lever? Can the tool no longer latch onto the carrier? Presumably the latching aspect isn't near the business end of the tire lever, but then you have no tire lever until 1U sends you a replacement (or you have to carry your own as a spare).
  • + 2
 I don't think I've ever broken a tire lever in 25 years of riding but yes, if you managed to break the OneUp lever, it wouldn't latch any longer.
  • + 1
 I haven't neede a tire lever in years. I'm sure there are some tire and rim combos where even pushing the entire bead into the rim well isn't enough, but I have not experienced that.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: i must be doing something wrong then because I break one occasionally
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: I've broken 3 just this season. 2 Just trying to remove a park compound Magic Mary.

Maybe I'm a clutz?
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: I might get some thin metal levers if I were you.
  • + 2
 my problem with pumps that dont have a little flexy hose on them is the movement from pumping makes my super temperamental valves leak out the side, so this pump would be a little annoying like that. However the capacity is massive if you can find a hose it might fit in the little storage compartment in the tool casing, so problem solved! man i want one.
  • + 4
 For sure, I prefer a mini pump with a thread-on hose as well. That said, the head on the OneUp pump doesn't leak any air when I'm going to town with it, which isn't the case with most mini pumps. Still need tobe careful, of course.
  • - 2
 Uhhh, the edc pump is a Co2 inflator not a manual pump
  • + 5
 Nope I'm wrong
  • + 1
 @erwick: lol brainfart
  • + 4
 backcountry research straps are working well enough for me. carry a tube, multi tool, and levers in the strap. tape co2 cartriges to the frame and set for the day.
  • + 2
 This review explains the options available better than Oneup does. I was confused by what to order in their website. I opted to go for the 70cc pump, which still houses the EDC kit but can't fit a c02 cartridge. The 100cc pump has been backordered from day 1 in Canada and last i checked its still not available. I mounted it on my water bottle holder and it has done the job so far. No play, no rattling. I just ordered a backcountry research motherlode to strap on a tube and c02 cartridge so I can ditch the backpack entirely for short rides.
  • + 1
 According to 1up 100cc not available until sept 4
  • + 2
 I ordered my 100cc on day one, got it and loving it.
  • + 1
 Just curious on water solutions when not carrying a bag. I got through 2-2.5L on my last ride, which requires a bag.bladder, which was just a warm day in the park. I'd like to ditch the bag, but I CONSTANTLY drop water bottles from cages, and ma not a fan of the bottle look. These tools are a great start but the main reason I carry a bag is for water and maybe first aid
  • + 2
 Try a different cage, or just bend that one down to be tighter if it's aluminum. My bike can fit two bottles, including a large sized Podium bottle on the down tube, so I'm pretty good for a two-hour ride, or even three hours if it's not that warm out. I also wear bibs that have storage pockets, so I sometimes put a small bottle in the middle pocket. I can't even feel it in there.
  • + 1
 Try the Fabric cageless system, looks great and won't drop the bottle. Limited to a 750ml bottle at most, unfortunately.
  • + 1
 I'm with you, @bentown. I bought the OneUp system just for short morning rides in the trails outside my house just because I'm too lazy to fill up my hydration pack everyday. But for anything else, I need a backpack. 2-3 hour rides I go through at least 2L. If it's hot out, all 3L is gone, no problem. I don't want to load up my frame with like 3 bottles. I'm able to just grab the hose from my shoulder mount and get a drink whenever I want.
  • + 2
 I sent emails to three fork manufacturers a few months back asking them if cutting threads inside of their steer tube for this voids the warranty. I have not heard back from any of them.
  • + 2
 I went for the steerer-mounted version. Easy to install, and a great solution for me since I've occasionally been dumb enough to forget a multi tool when switching/cleaning packs.
  • + 1
 One-Up Suggestion- I own 5 packs and I hate them all. So I mounted Fix-It sticks and a Lezyne pump on my W/B mounts and pretty much have 90% of issues handled with that and my Chums Wetsuit tiny fanny pack belt.

But a version of the EDC with just a large tube as storage would be a cool option I would look into doing.
  • + 1
 Not being funny but the tyre lever looked so flimsy it will snap after being inserted into a tire, the spare link will only work with certain chains in sure, the allen keys look so short that you wont get much leverage and round the heads off...im not convinced and now im gonna get so much hatred lol
  • + 2
 No hate, but all points that I can address.

The lever feels just as sturdy as any tire that I've used. If you do manage to snap it, I might suggest that you're being a bit too greedy with the tire bead. The carrier works with any type of quick-link, so no worries there. And the hex keys are short because it's a multi-tool, not a shop tool. There are larger tools out there if you need more leverage to round out your bolt heads Smile
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: so its a good piece of kit...ill keep quiet
  • + 1
 In the last nine years i've done maybe two or three rides without a backpack. But i must admit, the idea of riding packless is getting more and more intriguing (for the local, quick rides). The only issue is that you don't have any clothes to change at the top with you (i sweat a lot and like to change the baselayer and tee at the top), which isn't that much of an issue.

The actual issue though is where to put the phone. I don't like wearing it on me, so somehow mounting it to the bike and keeping it safe would be nice. Since riding packless is the best option for riding in the rain as well, it'd be best to have a waterproof solution (well that or get a waterproof storage solution). Any suggestions?
  • + 1
 how did you achieve it that the typo of the top cap is sraigt with the frame? Iguess this is kind of hard because it rotates with every thread right? or is there any need trick for that? I guess there are just two ways, first the headset sits perfectly tight but the typo is not aligned. second the typo sits perfectly but the troque is not perfeft. ok maybe third you are really lucky.
  • + 1
 Skillz
  • + 1
 Coolest tool. Someone in the 1960's would definitely be like, "kids these days" with all the gear, and stunts, and video editing. I want that tool, but I now bicycle like a poo, and cannot move very well anymore, so it's like putting all my money into my weakness. I wouldn't invest in a bad juggling instructor.
  • + 1
 Damn that tool is so awesome. Kind of want to fork out $150CAD.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy , I thought that the spare chain links would fall out but mine srea pretty tight fit , could judt run a piece of tape over them if they do
  • + 2
 +1 for the tape.
  • + 0
 Hey Pinkbike, why are prices on this site always in USD? You guys are Canadian, OneUp is Canadian. Are most of your visitors in the USA?

Ok back on track... I saw this tool a few weeks ago while I was in BC. Looks very well designed. Clever. But happily being a bag guy, I don't see a need for one personally.
  • + 1
 Just got mine. I haven't tried the chain break yet but it seems I'm not smart enough. I need an instruction video for it rather than the quick link tool video, it seems a bit different to any other I've used.
  • + 3
 Seems like too many compromises for me.

On a related note, just why did sensibly-sized seatbags go out of fashion???
  • + 2
 Shooting from the hip, Camelback (the Kleenex of hydration packs)...
And then, the "enduro" solution, a tube and C02 tapped to a top or down tube (cool bruh).
Also, they pick up mud and dirt, get saturated with water, and the contents inside can end up also getting wet and dirty as well (on some designs).

That said, I've seen some cool dry-bag style seat bags that are seam welded with a roll top style closure that do a great job of keeping things dry and also tend to shed mud well due to the PU coating on the fabric.
  • + 2
 Dropper posts brother. With my 125 dropper and a seat bag and 150 mm travel the tire hits the bag at around 130 mm travel depending how deep the seat pack is. A hardtail would be fine or any rear travel dropper combo that allows enough space. I like my EDC. I can't easily fit a pump beside my bottle cage due the external cables. Although I have been using a hydration pack for many years I recently stopped because I got a bike with a cage mount and I am really happy to not wear a pack. Last week I did a long climb to the alpine and rain was a possibility so I needed the pack for clothes water and food. I hated it for the extra weight on my back and shoulders. Stuffing things in pockets works perfectly well too but I know for myself that I will forget things and end up out there with no tools.
  • + 3
 @Someoldfart: www.lezyne.com/product-orgnzrs-caddys-roadcaddy.php

at least on my bike, this is narrow enough to not rub at full compression with the dropper down. not as convenient to open and close, but it's worth the tradeoff IMO
  • + 2
 Every seat bag I ever used rattled around and annoyed me, and always ended up being too small for what I wanted to carry.

I'm still wondering why hip packs ever went out of fashion. They've always worked well for me on anything shorter than 3 hours. Where do all the hipsters who say they don't use packs carry their outer jersey or rain jacket ?
  • + 1
 @preston67: Hip packs seem to be all the rage here in Bellingham. I use one designed for runners and it's good enough for the typical 1-2 hour ride. Our riding zone is (thankfully) dense enough that if something went really sideways, like a sidewall tear, the walk out isn't a big deal.
  • + 1
 @Someoldfart: Good points for sure. I ran a tube, levers and CO2 under my saddle, all snugged down with a pair of toe clip straps up until a few years ago. That worked really well, and tucked in between and slightly below the seat rails and it never did buzz. (125mm post, 150mm rear wheel travel.)
  • + 2
 @sngltrkmnd: I went the running belt route earlier this year. I get enough water in my bottle for 2-ish hours of riding unless its super hot like this summer has been.

I'll put everything in a camelbak hip pack (with bladder) for longer rides.
  • + 2
 @preston67: I hate that rattle. I use a rubber ski strap on my seat packs and they don't rattle and the ski straps can't loosen.
  • + 0
 Kudos to OneUp for coming up with this. However, I find that the simplest solution is generally the best. Speshy's new SWAT CC while not available for aftermarket employs a far more simple and elegant attachment. www.pinkbike.com/news/specialized-update-enduro-for-2018-first-look.html It may not have as much storage capacity, but it doesn't require any fork modification.
  • + 5
 Their setup is a pretty cool, I count 7 tools + quicklink storage. EDC has 18 tools, more storage solutions and is half the weight.
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: I have been a fan of y'all since putting on your 42t cog on my then 10 speed drivetrain back at Thanksgiving '13 allowing all the low end of of then extraordinarily costly 1x setups. Again, a simple and elegant solution. I did not see or I missed any mentioning of whether any fork manufacturers have any issues/concerns about the threading preparations. We'll be getting them in at our shop though and I look forward to checking them out.
  • + 1
 I did the measures on my 2018 Lyrik and the inner steer tube is too small diameter. Then I saw this, so this could be a good alternative
nsmb.com/articles/specialized-swat-cc-steerer-tube-tool
  • + 2
 Are you sure @BalfaGuy ? I believe, we've set up a few Lyriks.
  • + 1
 @OneUpComponents: Really? I used the end of a handlebar from the bottom of the crown to check the diameter (like your website said) and I couldn't get it to go past the lower section of the steer tube.
  • + 3
 the tool can also be stashed inside the smaller pump although it won't fit the storage or a co2 like the bigger pump
  • + 1
 For anyone interested the Mattoc Pro 2 Steerer isn't compatible. The I.D is too big. Think the Mattoc is 25mm I.D and you need 24mm.
  • - 1
 $59, $25, $35, you can also buy the pump for an additional $59....oneup is testing our math skills, and misleading marketing...clearly they think mtbers are dumb rocks. That's how the bike industry is portraying the general public these days, dumb with disposable incomes and charging deplorable amount for these disposable products!
  • + 5
 I get it; I also struggle with simple arithmetic. You should try keeping the stuff that you buy, though, instead of disposing of it all.
  • + 0
 So when you need your tool out you have to de-tension your headset??? screw having to realign my front wheel every time i need a tool. "hey man do you have a tool with you?? ... nope sorry...."
  • + 1
 Nope, no need to do that. Even when you have a traditional star nut setup, it's your stem that holds the preload on your headset after you've adjusted it correctly via the top cap. The same applies with the OneUp EDC tool.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: haha yah had a not enough coffee moment there
  • + 3
 Smoke weed everybike.
  • + 1
 I'd like to see where you mount the pump with your preferred pump storage option.
  • + 7
 It mounts up beside your water bottle
  • + 1
 It just mounts under the bottle cage like most mini pump mounts.
  • + 1
 is there room to store the co2 adapter? doesn't look like it from what I can tell.
  • + 1
 So you carry the pump and tool...where does that go? Bottle cage mount? Or does it go into a pack of some kind?
  • + 1
 The pump comes with a bottle cage mount I believe. Offset so you can mount a bottle cage too.
  • + 1
 The pump mounts under my bottle cage.
  • + 1
 Where is the bottle opener?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy do you run an under seat bag with a dropper seat post?
  • + 1
 @von-rumford he does. You can see it in the article about his Rocky Mountain Element
  • + 1
 I do, yes. I bought a seat bag that attaches to the post with a Velcro strap, and then I trimmed it to be about 1/4" thick so that it doesn't impede the post's travel.

www.pinkbike.com/news/staff-rides-mike-levys-rocky-mountain-element-2017.html
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: www.lezyne.com/product-orgnzrs-caddys-roadcaddy.php is what i use. technically a road bag, but it doesn't have the seat strap, and is nice and slim, so it doesn't rub even with the seatpost dropped
  • + 1
 That bottom compartment is the perfect place to store my weed!
  • + 1
 Ps, my clapping Emoji came out as '???????'
  • + 9
 You deserve far worse, just for using emojis.
  • + 1
 "More annoying than a wheel size debate" Baahaha
  • + 0
 I know of a special place to put your multi tool, its called pockets, I have them on my shorts.
  • + 3
 What?! I need to go see if my shorts have some of those things.
  • + 3
 who want to ride with anything in their pockets??? I can't stand stuff flopping around on my legs.
Dakine hotlaps with external tool pouch and cellphone sleeve gets me thru any hour ride. and I can slip a .75L platypus in the main pocket if I need more water since all my tools and cell are on the belt.
  • + 4
 @sam2222: meh. $3 roll of duct tape, and then just tape what you want to use directly to your thighs, torso, barbed-wire bicep, even neck. You can even tape a water bottle to your forearm and drink while riding. When you pull off the gear, some hair comes along, so soon you will look like a real pro racer with hairless legs. Strong/Light/Cheap Win/Win/Win.
  • + 1
 Not many shorts have well designed pockets. I had a few and it was very uncomfortable to carry even a very thin wallet in them. At some point I got a pair Mavic shorts (Notch was the name back then, now I believe they are called Crossmax Pro), which had 5 pockets total and quickly became my favourite. Their hand pockets are deep, but use elastic textile, so they keep stuff pretty still inside (a few times I even forgot that the multitool was there) and my smartphone does not annoy me when pedalling. The other pockets are great for wallet, levers, keys, repair kits, quick links and even a 120 ml chain lube bottle went in and didn't flop around while 'hamstering' Smile
  • + 0
 pretty cool review here as well
www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLBuEfnDjFg
  • + 1
 Real question... when will the 100cc pump be back in stock?
  • + 2
 I emailed 1up and was told they will be available to order sept 4. They must have really underestimated the popularity or taiwan messed up manufacturing
  • + 1
 Perfect solution for carrying kit when I'm racing
  • + 1
 This is BRILLIANT.
  • + 1
 Who the hell is Viola?
  • - 1
 I bet this tool will end stored ............................................in my backpack.
  • + 0
 And where do you put the pump? Tape it to the frame
  • + 4
 Under the water bottle cage, like every other small frame pump.
  • + 2
 Attached to the bottle cage mount
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