First Look: Schwalbe Fat Albert Tires and EVO Tubes - Eurobike 2015

Aug 25, 2015
by Paul Aston  

Schwalbe Fat Albert Tires

Schwalbe had two new tires on display at their annual evening reception in the Friedrichschafen air base museum. The Fat Albert's namesake is taken from one of the German brand's oldest mountain bike tires - but these new tires couldn't be more different:


Schwalbe Fat Albert Front
Schwalbe Fat Albert Rear

The new Schwalbe Fat Albert front tire (left) will be initially available in Trailstar triple compound and the rear tire (right) will be available in the harder Pacestar compound. Schwalbe are only planning on offering Snakeskin casing at this stage and they will weigh approximately 740 grams for 27.5" x 2.35" and 780 grams for 29" versions. Expect to see them on the shelves in early 2016.


bigquotesThe new Fat Albert came about from a design study we did with Gerrit Gaastra, an external consultant for Ralf Bohle who has worked with us for nearly fifteen years. He had a very new idea for a different approach to mountain bike tire design, and as you can see the biggest difference is the rounded tread blocks. The idea behind it is that when you are braking mainly, the force vectors coming at any angle are entering the blocks in the right direction.

The second idea behind it is that the front tire is very aggressive and very open. This means more rolling resistance, but the front tire is not as important for rolling. It's like a downhill tire with almost separate ridges for the inner and outer blocks. The rear tire is made for braking and accelerating grip - it's a trail tire which can create massive traction for climbing hills. Of course, because it is very open the disadvantage is that there's a rough feeling when rolling on road or hardpack surfaces, but otherwise you can't feel it. We wanted to make really grippy trail tires which come in 27.5" and 29" sizes. - Markus Hachmeyer, Head of Product Management



Schwalbe EVO Tubes


Schwalbe EVO tube
Schwalbe EVO tube


As well as the fresh rubber, Schwalbe had these new super light tubes on show. Made from a material called Aerothan (licensed from BASF) with a clear thermoplastic valve stem. The main advantage of these tubes is that they weigh between 68-76 grams, dependant upon size. Compare this to butyl tubes that weigh 130-200 grams, but giving similar air retention and puncture resistance properties. They're 100% recyclable and will cost €19,90 when they arrive in early 2016.


MENTIONS: @schwalbe




162 Comments

  • + 71
 $30CAD for a tube! Yeah. . . .right. . . .
  • + 25
 but it only weighs 100 grams! cuz i know we all put every part on a scale before we install it on our bikes, that valve stem is some alien technology tho
  • + 14
 But the valve stem is clear!
  • + 4
 Man, here in Brazil will cost R$80 with actual currency excludind 60% of taxes from imported products Wink

You're not in hell yet.

Think positive, about weight, tubeless system is a lot more expensive than this.
  • + 5
 Did they mean to make it for road biking?!?!
  • + 3
 @Monacchesi but the tubless system is equal to like 15-20 tubes.
  • + 5
 Lots of riders still prefer tubes, and most tubeless setups weigh more than these tubes.
  • + 13
 @Monacchesi What do you mean tubeless is more expensive? My tubeless setup cost exactly $20.49.
That is some Gorilla tape and Stans tubless sealant. I had an old tube lying around, made a valve and BAM
enough sealant and tape to make more tubeless conversions.
One of my tires isn't even "tubeless ready" so yeah went tubeless... don't ever want to go back. No issues so far.
  • + 24
 @deeeight - I'd rather have a 1/4 lb of latex spinning in my tires than ever have to deal with another snakebite. Tubes suck.
  • - 3
 And lots of folks know the proper air pressure for themselves and their trails and never experience snakebite flats. I haven't experienced one myself in a decade. And its not just the first quarter pound... its every time you refill it with new sealant... just because the liquid evaporates doesn't mean the latex magically vanished. Its still there inside the tire casing. Along with the heavier tire casing of having made it tubeless-ready. Plus all the weight used in sealing the rims up. Tubeless sealing tapes are not particularly light, especially not those running gorilla tape setups.
  • + 3
 I had some plastic-y blue stuff on my rims that weighed nothing. Plus just clean out the dried up sealing before putting in more. Problem solved. I run maxxis Exo casing. Never had an issue.
  • + 1
 Maxxis exo casing, the one which is not advertised as tubeless compatible? I've got one which I want to try out tubeless but I was worried it was too flimsy.
  • + 2
 Mine says tubeless ready. It's the 2.3 DHF. I run them front and rear. 26-30 psi. If they dip to the 20 psi range I got some casing roll but maybe wider rims could provide more support. I'm happy with them though since I never run psi that low anyway.
  • + 2
 My ardent just says exo protection, no mention of tubeless. I might give it a go anyway, or just buy one of these fancy blue tubes!
  • + 2
 wtf I accidentally negative propped you pm148, my bad.

@jaame I i'm running a High Roller 2 In EXO casing and it has been wonderful as a tubeless setup.

If you are going to try tubeless just make sure the tire bead properly and it should be good.
  • + 17
 I run tubeless, but carry a spare tube. I'd pay a bit more for a really light spare tube to carry around.
  • + 1
 I run tubeless on schwalbe sg and it's been reliable. I tried it before with maxxis single ply minions and rolled the tyre off after about a minute. They weren't very tight though so it was my fault. The exo seems to be in between the two regarding casing stiffness.
  • + 1
 I love it because it's so light. Noticeably quicker accelerating.
  • + 7
 I just saved 50 grams!
  • + 5
 tire setup largely depends on where you live, too. When I lived in the desert, tubeless was mandatory. Now I live in the pacific northwest and tubes are fine here since you rarely flat even with low PSI's. I'd definitely be interested in a tube that is lighter and more puncture resistant. It would probably mean that, at least in the loamy dirt, you would rarely if ever get a flat, while reducing the rotational weight.
  • + 4
 DMal gets it, tubeless ftw, but carry this as a superlight get you home solution if something goes wrong with your tubeless setup.
  • + 1
 @jaame

I currently run 26" HR2 Exo as tubeless without any issues (albeit on a UST rim).

I have previously done the same with non tubeless 29er Ikon and Ardents - the Ikon's were harder to get to seal up initially, but both worked fine.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the intel
  • + 2
 but they are eco-friendly! Don't you guys care about the environment?
  • + 2
 @SpinningAddiction, thinking about puncture, sure you're right, tire pressure too, tubeless will rule the world.

@enduro94, when i wrote, I was thinking about brazilian market, here everything is so expensive :/ to make an UST Compatible here, you will pay 3x more for a tubeless tire, valve, selant, and rim tape. In my case I own a pair of Mavic EX823, that costs 3x more than other rims made here, matematically the investment doesn't fit, you will save a lot more using any conversion kit than buying EX823... And will save a lot, lot, lot more, if use this EVO tube, because with any rim made in Brazil, for example: (Stan's Tubeless kit here: R$ 280 + R$ 270 for a tubeless tire) against ( R$ 100 for a good 'national' rim + R$190 for a normal tire)

I know, for many who lives outside Brazil, this EVO tube isn't the best choice, but here in monkeyland it will save a lot of $$$ for those who are addicted on weight loss
  • + 1
 I love tubeless but you have to run a tubeless tire. For Maxxis this means its says TR on the sidewall. They fit tighter so leakage and burping almost never happens. They also seal and seat with a hand pump. It's easy, light, and they never flat. Love it.
  • + 1
 For those who say that in a loamy place there's no need for TL : even with a Crossmax inflated rock hard it only takes a end of trail destroyed road and pigeon hole and bam ! flat tire in your rear wheel. This hole has made 3 flats... Now I run TL.
  • + 2
 @aserta22 not necessarily no need for it, but the cactus and super sharp square edged rocks found is some desert locations (Nevada and utah) mean there's really no way around going tubeless there. In Washington I've ridden most trails and while it's possible to flat, it's not nearly as common. I've only flatted once at whistler. To me it's not even worth the pain to set them up for the benefits... But then i'm also pretty lazy.
  • + 1
 Especially if it doesn't chaff through while it's folded in my pack. Had to carry my fatbike for 4 mi because my spare tube had a hole rubbed through while shifting in my pack and accidentally forgot to put my patch kit back after i patched my son's tube.
  • + 1
 I'll carry on running tubeless but that tube looks great for carrying in my bike pack as a lightweight "just in case" tube so I'm carrying less bag weight
  • + 1
 If procore never comes out (still waiting!!!) then I may consider those superlight blue tubes!
  • + 57
 Gees make 26" this is f*cking stupid, oh look at these awesome new treads, but you can't use them on a primitive 26" caveman wheel. See this is why people are pissed at the bike industry, already companies are refusing to make tires, a basic necessity, in 26". Why? Because people should throw their bikes away when their tires wear out. I love my old fat alberts too bad I can't get the new ones, if you're reading this, f*ck you schwalbe .
  • + 7
 Lots of companies still make 26" tires, but its pointless wasting development time/money on premium top model tires in a format whose sales were slumping five years ago when the only alternative in wide production was 29ers, never mind today when the majority of premium mountain bike sales are in 650B.
  • + 12
 I'm certain the majority of bikes are still 26". Aftermarket tyre sales must still be strong for 26". I have a pile of tyres at home but I'm not changing wheel size until those bikes are ducked. Unless I can't get new tyres, that is. It's a conspiracy.
  • + 2
 @jaame I agree the majority of mountain bikes out there are 26", but all developers are interested in is what sells now. There can be no denying that the most sold wheel size now for mountain biking is 27.5, so if you can design a tyre that all the bike manufacturers purchase to spec on there bike? Mass sales instantly
  • + 3
 Doh silly me you're right. It's all about oem isn't it. Excuse my retardedNess
  • + 4
 @deeeight-- How would the development time and money be any different when applied to 26" tires than it is on 650b or 29? Production for sure.
  • + 0
 Tread patterns that work in one diameter/width don't necessarily also work the same in another as the contact patch is different. Schwalbe makes different tread versions of the Racing Ralph for example in the 29er size. Hell Kenda changes the tread of a tire just in different widths of the same diameter.
  • + 4
 I hate the industry sometimes. They are purposely excluding the majority of the MTB user base to try and promote the 'next' big thing . On my commute each day I see maybe 20 MTB riders each morning, 90% have 26" bikes. The mind boggles that they are not offered the newest tire offerings. This is why I switched to Bontrager from Maxxis for my every day riding/commuting tires - they allow me to run my preferred tire across all 3 wheelsizes. (XR3 front, XR2 rear).

With Frank Stacy on board, the tires are excellent.

I still run Maxxis HR2s on my 26" Slash as I love the tire, but thinking of going to the Bontrager XR4 next time around.
  • - 1
 @jaame I also agree that there are more 26 inch bikes in existence but in my experience most of the people that are still on 26 inch bikes do not care as much about tire performance as people on the larger sizes
  • - 2
 They make what they sell. You people are completely delusional.
  • + 4
 Deeeight, current new bike sales has little in common with people replacing tires, there's plenty of people still riding their 26" wheels, and those people want replacement tire options for their bikes. I highly doubt sales have been slumping for 26" tires, where do you get your stats? I'm sure you are aware that they've been selling 26" for many more years than 27.5, and like I said people don't throw away their bikes when the tires are worn out. Also my three year old carbon nomad is still a premium bike, 26" wheels or not, and I want a set of new fat alberts!
  • + 0
 This is going to sound cruel, I will try to be easy here. You are wrong. In the grand scheme, no, there are not "plenty" of people still riding 26 to warrant the production of new 26 inch designs. I look around at my own bikes, my friends bikes and at the trails and I do not see 26 everywhere. They quickly became a minority. I myself still ride a 26 inch trail bike so I am not biased here, I'm just speaking objectively. They are, like it or not, a dying breed. I have no problem finding parts and tires for my 26, in fact the new DHR2 I just fitted comes in 26 so there are some still kindly supporting this segment. I am not afraid or apprehensive, at least not anymore. My new DH bike is 27.5 and there is nothing not to like. I embrace the future. This is not a conspiracy-we did this- we readily bought 27.5 bikes and proceeded to love them.
  • + 4
 Darkstar, it doesn't matter what you or your buddies ride, you can't make an assumption about an entire market based on you current demographic. Think about this, when all your buddies bought new 27.5 bikes did they throw their 26" bikes away? I doubt it, they probably sold them, and do you think that maybe the people who bought their bikes might want some tires for them. I'm not interested in debating what wheel size is better, that's not my point. My point is that they have been selling 26" wheeled mountain bikes for many more years than 27.5, and all those 26" bikes didn't go instantly into the garbage. There's still a lot of them out there, and people want tires for them plain and simple. You're right it's not a conspiracy, it's planned obsolescence and it's obvious. When I buy a new bike I'll buy what is available, but right now I just want some tires.
  • + 4
 Lets look at some of the few actual figures we have:

www.pinkbike.com/news/what-people-are-riding-whistler-opening-weekend-2015.html

90% 26"
10% 650b

I obviously expect this to change for 2016 as people upgrade and find no other option to their old 26" bike - will 650b go up 20%, 25%? Even in the high estimates, it means that they would still outnumbered by 26" offerings... which need tires.

26" MTBs have been sold for 25+ years. 29er's since about 1999 with Fisher and 650b have been pushed to the masses for the last ~2 years by the big brands - I am pretty sure that the user/install base (for lack of a better phrase) of 26" bikes has not been so significantly effected (as yet) to make producing tires uneconomical.
  • + 2
 Whistler has chair lifts and hotels and is a mountain bike resort destination. Its also relatively unique in Canada. Most trail centers however do not have a slopestyle park or a world cup DH course and most riders will never visit whistler or any spots like it. It is a drop in the bucket compared to the real numbers of riders in canada alone and what sorts of bikes they own/buy. All the DH bikes ever in the past twenty years made combined with every freeride bike and every slopestyle/dirtjump bike MIGHT equal one year's worth of XC bike sales alone. And the problem is that the people with all those existing gravity bikes didn't buy new bikes often enough because specialized bike types don't get used that often compared to XC bikes, so they tend to last longer and get upgrades/maintenance/repairs/spares purchased for them less frequently. Tire manufacturers will continue to offer 26" models of course, but why waste money on top end new model work for a size that is less likely to be purchased in new bike stores that aren't selling very many new 26er models ? Schwalbe has little interest producing ten thousand tires that will then sit on shelves for years waiting to be sold when they can produce ten thousand that will sell in a month.
  • + 2
 @laerz What I'm saying is you do have tires. There are plenty available, companies just aren't necessarily going to design new treads in 26 inch sizes. It makes no sense. @Marc2211 that Whistler stat is more irrelevant than what I pointed out (which btw was simply food for thought not a hard stat- I go to dh races, xc races, group rides, ect) one day at a lift serviced bike park. DH bikes are such a small fragment of overall sales it's not even funny.
  • - 1
 So Deeeight what is your basis for your claims of whistler being a drop in the bucket? What are the real numbers of riders in canada and how do you know what they are and what people own or ride? You make assumptions based on what? Your local riding circle. Your generalizations about how and what people ride are absurd.

"All the sales of dh, freeride and slopestyle bikes of the past 20 years is equal to one year's sale of xc bikes"
? Are you serious, where is your proof, I'm willing to bet that there are more riders in BC than in the rest of canada, and the majority of the bikes are dh, freeride and all mountain bikes, and I've been all over BC. Don't forget that up until a few years ago most xc bikes had 26" wheels, so I highly doubt that a few years of 27.5 sales have outnumbered all the 26" made in the past 30 years
  • + 2
 I don't know what the exact numbers are but quite honestly it doesn't matter. No one is under obligation to make something just because you think they should. Schwalbe likely has a fairly good idea of how many tires they sell in each size. If it was in their best interest to develop and sell this tire in 26 they would. Plain and simple. There is nothing to debate.
  • + 2
 Actual bike industry sales numbers are a great fact source that folks on PB don't wanna acknowledge while defending their imaginary 26 for life ideas.
  • - 2
 Ok Deeeight, where are these numbers, please post up a link so we can all see them. Also my point has nothing to do with "26 for life" it has to do with tires being available for 26" wheels, and just for your info I own a 650b hard tail and two fatbikes, so I'm not a "26 for lifer". I do own three other 26" bikes and I would like to buy tires for them, is ok with you, seeing as how you are the authority on what people all across canada buy.
  • - 1
 Darkstar how do my comments obligate schwalbe in any way. These are my opinions, and based on the props of my first comment at least 50 people agree and want 26" tires, who's backing you up, Deeeight? I want 26" fat alberts plain and simple, besides what does it matter to you if people still want to buy 26" treads.
  • + 0
 Yes fifty people, who ride 26, think companies should be obligated to design fresh new products for clapped out bikes that no one is going to actually buy. People like to talk, they ought to have put their money where their mouths were and I suppose we wouldn't have 27.5 at all. Companies "refusing" to make tires- as you state.... Huh?? I will say it again, there are TONS of options still on market and being produced for 26. Just because this tire is initially being offered 27.5 only, people are having kittens......"people should throw their bikes away when the tires wear out" .....where are you getting this from? Way over dramatic. Yes, the bike industry is evil - full of villains, laughing maniacally while they imagine you riding down the trail on bare rims.
  • - 1
 Ok here you go Deeeight, here's some bike industry stats for you www.statista.com/topics/1448/bicycle-industry-in-the-us
First paragraph clearly states that for 2014 26" bikes were the number in sales in the US. Here's another source that lumps all bike sales in one category of 20" and over, yet separates them by class ie mountain, cruiser, hybrid etc , nothing about wheel size.
nbda.com/m/articles/industry-overview-2014-pg34.htm. Please show me your industry number's to back up your claim showing the specific amounts of 27.5 vs 26" sales.
  • + 1
 In the USA the number one distribution chain for bicycles are walmarts, toys r' us, costco, sears, target and other department stores, NOT independant bike dealers. But keep searching, you'll find the correct info eventually I'm sure since this matters so much to you.
  • + 0
 Haha that was my exact thought, this guy is up all hours of the night trying to prove this- I immediately thought "well of course if you lump dept store bikes...." If you like at high end mountain bikes 26 is almost entirely gone. Let it go man. Set your soul free.
  • - 1
 Read page 5 paragraph three if your interested, BC is the biggest hotspot for mountain biking in all of canada www.destinationbc.ca/getattachment/Research/Travel-Motivations-(TAMS)/U-S-Travel-Motivations/U-S-TAMS-Visitors-to-B-C-Report-by-Sector/Recreational_Cycling_and_Mountain_Biking.pdf.aspxTAMS. Also whistler is not just a resort with lifts there is a ton of cross country and all mountain riding in the area.
  • + 1
 Are you trying to substantiate the opening day bike stat provided by pinkbike? This is such a small sliver of the world wide bike market and - its a DH mountain. And if you do that same sample now or a year from now, giving some time for people to buy new bikes (27.5 just exploded for Dh bikes, WC guys were still on 26 two seasons ago) you will find the bar graph is shifting. I don't want to burst your bubble I just feel as though I have to. So many people complain about the bike industry not giving them what they want when the exact opposite is true. The industry feeds off "innovation"," new and improved". You can debate the legitimacy of these improvements all you like but what you can not debate is that we buys these things. We want this. People riding mountain bikes and wanting "better" mountain bikes each year. I'm not in defense of all new bikes and standards, I'm really not. I think some of them are silly. But I know that people will buy. This is a consumer driven phenomena imo. The industry doesn't hate you. The industry loves you. Plus, they still make 26 inch tires. Just not this one. So you can sleep well at night, and know that eventually you will have a bike to fit these new Schwalbes.
  • + 1
 Yeah...something written EIGHT years ago for BC tourism when Kingdom trails in vermont hadn't taken off yet, there was no Velo Mont Saint Marie in quebec with two big bike fests now in a row, etc. Ottawa's South March Highlands hadn't yet been designated by the city as an MTB forest whose care and maintenance has now been trusted completely to the Ottawa Mountain Bike Association, etc. That's real solid evidence alright.
  • + 1
 Look I agree with what your saying I know 26" bikes havnt really been produced in this last couple years, and It doesnt bother me, my point is that there's still a lot of them out there, and that there is still a demand for tires. Yes I know that there are still tires available, however if tire makers continue to do what schwalbe is doing then there won't be very many options left for 26". Like I said before I am in no way a "26 for lifer" I currently own bikes with several different wheel sizes, but I still want to buy tires for the 26" bikes I own, and I think some others would agree. Also none of my bikes are clapped out. But your scenario of rolling down the trail on naked hoops was pretty funny, so ya peace
  • + 0
 Ok we don't see eye to eye, but I also don't see any evidence to back up anything you're saying. Your also missing the point BC is the mountain bike Mecca of Canada, people travel from all over the world to visit whistler, so it's actually a good sample of riders from all over, and it's not just dh riders there are tons of cross country trails. Sincerely I would like to see some stats to back up what your saying, and no I'm not being facetious, I've looked and havnt found any other numbers, so...enlighten me, maybe you're right
  • + 0
 I'm not picking on your bike, or you for that matter. I have a 26 inch Trek Remedy myself and I love the thing. I am in no particular hurry to replace it. But it is an aluminum full suspension bike and like all things it will die. I recently reached a point with this bike where I kind of want a new fork, but I won't shell out for a high end fork because I know my next bike will be 27.5. I like my current fork, it's just heavy. So I do admit there are some transitional pains that take place. There are a ton of great 26 rubbers out there still and I can get stan's flow rims in 26 so I've been content to shred this bike into the ground.
  • + 2
 Totally agree there are still great tires available I just hope there continues to be, and I have nothing against wheel size options, I own two fatbikes, yup I admit it I like fat bikes, I really like my nomad carbon too and hope to still get good tires for it in the foreseeable future. Cheers
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63 "I'm just speaking objectively." = my point of view is closer to the truth than yours, because it is mine.
  • + 2
 In this particular instance I would have to insist that, yes, my point of view is closer to the truth. But quite honestly I don't really care. It's Monday and I rode bikes all weekend. I'm in a good mood.
  • + 1
 I've been involved in a few discussions in which someone has claimed to have inside information about something. To this day, not one has actually produced any figures.
  • + 1
 huh?
  • + 43
 Take my money........... Elsewhere.
  • + 10
 I'd pay $30can for a tube that performs like my current mid-weight DH tube but weighs half as much.(I rarely go thru tubes tho...so not really an expense concern for me)
  • + 2
 Instead of debating the types of tyres and pressures for tubeless.
Has anybody actually weighed their wheel to see the weight difference by using tubeless?
I'm very interested in these tubes, when it comes to wheels it doesn't take much weight to feel a difference.
If this I lighter than tubeless Id be tempted to go for it.
  • + 1
 I'm worried about the idea of thermal plastic valve stems more than the tube. Plastic in that diameter and that location worries me.
  • + 1
 I converted my wifes Operator to tubless and it was a 100 gm weight difference per tire. Lighter. Same tires, weighed before and after. Gorilla tape and Stans.
  • + 30
 Panaracer Dart up front and Smoke in the rear. Full circle on tread design.
  • + 1
 haha well spotted , still got a dart in the shed mounted to a D521, tread life is perfect but it's got the texture of a crumbling brick
  • + 2
 more like the OnZa Dan & Dave
  • + 23
 Make a Magic Mary that will last me more than 3 weeks and you have my attention. Love the tire, it's my all time favorite, but they don't last worth nothing.
  • + 8
 Story of everybody I knows life.
  • + 20
 You know why the MM is your all time favorite? because the rubber is soft and it grips like crazy. You know why the MM only lasts 3 weeks? because the rubber is soft and it grips like crazy. You can't have one without the other. Why do people think that tire manufactures can make miracles happen.
  • + 10
 Then why give it a 4/5 durability on the schawble site?
  • + 3
 And three weeks is an eternity compared to some of the grippy tires we had twenty years ago that you were lucky to get THREE runs down a DH course out of.
  • + 1
 Tioga psycho biscuit
  • + 1
 Yep, and they're worth a shitload today. About $100 each for NOS examples, same goes for Specialized Umma Gumma tires. Original Onza Porcupines in white though can fetch nearly a grand for mint condition tires... pretty good return on a tire that was $40 in 1991 and won't last more than 10kms of riding at Mont Saint Anne.
  • + 0
 Balls, sorry @RMWB neg prop. Which is the absolute opposite of what I wanted to do! Seeing as I completely agree with you. You can't have everything you want!
  • + 1
 Try the Continental Baron in 2.5, they grip like crazy and last much longer than the Magic Mary.
  • + 1
 I personally have had a magic mary in the front last over 6 months. Worked the same as the day it was new, I think.
  • + 1
 @AdamChed Lasted 3 weeks doing what I might ask? Full on DH runs, riding at the bikepark from opening to closing time? As a front tire or as a back tire? Vertstar or Trailstar? What casing?
I run a front MM tire with vertstar compound in SG casing and it lasted a year (though riding time probably 6months).
  • + 21
 Why don't they make a tube that weights the same as a normal tube at 130 grams but is 5X more puncture resistant. That might be worth the extra cash. Someone one might pony up the cash for a tube like that for their DH bike so they can drop 300 grams from a standard DH tube.
  • + 11
 No, don't you dare to offer real solutions for the MTB industry. How come will they come up with new crap nobody asked for every single season? They would have to fire all the marketing team if started to produce useful stuff. Do you hate the marketing team? What did they do to you?
  • + 0
 Do people really use thick tubes for dh? I kinda assumed that everyone just uses regular tubes. My boss always tells us at the shop that thicker tubes messes with the the ride of the bike and how the tire takes small bumps.
  • + 4
 @Vans4life14 - Maxxis dh casing tyre and a dh inner tube combo will virtually never puncture or pinch... it just weighs nearly 2kg for tyre and tube - I used to run that setup after getting sick of pinch flats, but you're rolling weight is horrendous
  • + 3
 It might, but rolling around on your rim will mess with it a hell of a lot more.
  • + 3
 I like the extra weight of DH tyre n tube, the rotational mass keeps me upright Smile
  • + 5
 You didn't think it through. Imagine if you took this new schwalbe inner tube and made it 5 times thicker to get 5 times the puncture resistance - you wouldn't believe the lack of compliance that the inner tube would have. You might as well stuff your tyre with old newspapers. There isn't a material that exists that would be as flexible and compliant as a standard inner tube but with the amount of punture resistance you're after - especially a material that will cost less than 20 EUR.
  • + 3
 lol, I wasn't thinking 5 times thicker. If you look at the Maxxis tubes for example a standard tube is .9mm, freeride is 1.2 and DH is 1.5 however the thicker tubes provide way more puncture protection. I run the freeride tubes as they are a good mix of weight (294 grams) vs puncture protection and yes they retail for like $20 US so I think Schwalbe could do something similar with good results
  • + 2
 @badbietz - yeah, sorry I was exaggerating to make my point. The trouble is they're very unlikely to put in the materials R&D or license the tech from someone for a product that is going to be a little niche due to a small market and so many people running tubeless (due to lower weight, though marginal, and significant puncture protection). Also, quite frankly I'd imagine they'd prefer getting repeat sales of a weaker inner tube than put all that money and effort into something that you might buy once in a blue moon because it doesnt go pop. In summary, they can't be arsed because theres no money in it - despite there being a need for it for some people.
  • + 22
 What no 26"...? Oh well i run maxxis anyways....
  • + 13
 If they came in 26" I would buy a pair of there tires
  • + 9
 @Schwalbe
I love your tires and tubes. However, every time I get a flat it is on the bottom where my tire is contacting the ground. I think you should make a tire/tube that flats on the top of the wheel where the air pressure is unneeded. Then I could still ride, you know? Thanks
  • + 1
 ^ This comment is gold
  • + 11
 Schwalbe, my offer of designing your tires still stands.
  • + 2
 Oh come on, the braking traction on that front thing looks incredible!
  • + 7
 I'm trying to make sense of that front tyre and not getting anywhere.
  • + 7
 90 degree bar turn plowing into the ground - that kind of traction it probably has in spades.
  • + 7
 never, never ever use offset knobs on any tire, especially the front. My god that looks like something off a Chinese atv.

...and rounded knobs. Never ever use those. No matter what you theorize about supposed traction, rounded shapes do not quantify traction in the real world. Remember the first High Roller? Decent tire, but had that hideous rounded braking edge. Compare it to the HR2 and tell me why a rounded edge should be used in off road bicycle riding.
  • + 6
 Front and rear specific.

This is all I'm sayin.....

media.nashbar.com/images/nashbar/products/1500/WT-VLSE-NCL-PAIR.JPG


Bravo schwalbe. Once again keeping those early 90s dreams alive!
  • + 4
 Ha! The Velociraptors were the first thing I thought of as well. Worst front tire ever.
  • + 2
 @kidwoo And they still needed an external consultant to achieve that...
  • + 6
 I would have them tubes definitely. 40 quid to save around 300-400 gram of unsprung mass.?? I'm in.

I change my tires too often to run tubeless. if its raining, wet tires, if its dry...dry tires etc etc.

I live in the UK.

Which has UK weather,

The UK weather does not know how to Weather.
  • + 1
 wow, you got a lot of time in your hands. I hate changing tires. I still want to buy one of those tubes as spare. Pricey but will not be a big burden on the back on long trips
  • + 9
 It's just a play to make the pro core seem more affordable.
  • + 9
 That much for a tube, when tubeless is the biggest thing out there?
  • + 17
 A lot of people carry a tube racing. Saving some grams there is always nice.
  • + 3
 Its an interesting concept for a tube as well, quite different to what everyone else currently does
  • + 3
 Would make a great back up tube for someone that runs tubless and rips a tire. Currently carrying a maxxos super light tube which I would have nearly no confidence in if I needed to use it mid ride. Better than walking though.
  • + 0
 This is a really good point. I stopped carrying tubes after converting to tubeless and never having punctures, but 30$ for an ultra light packable tube for emergencies isn't totally crazy.

I guess these are a good value for conservative riding anti-tubeless weight weenies too, but those people have nothing to do with me.

f*ck it 30$ buys 2 cases of beer.
  • + 6
 If it doesn't pinch flat or puncture then it might be worth replacing tubeless. It has to last a year and be able to run low pressure. Can it do this?
  • + 2
 si
  • + 1
 muy bien. Yo quiero comprar a dos
  • + 6
 I had really hoped that read "Afrothan" on the tube... Because aerothan isn't nearly as fun
  • + 2
 I can't believe we are still having this tubes vs tubless debate. I was forced into tubless by moving to rockier terrain and suddenly suffering more snakebites . Now I can't believe I didn't switch earlier. Facts:
1) I weighed my wheels before and after... They are lighter running tubless.
2) No snakebites running tubeless
3) some standard tyres will still run tubeless. I have a standard high roller and ardent running tubeless, admittently on stans rims
4) I can run lower pressures for better grip on tubeless

It is harder to change a tyre but I will always put up with a little grief in the garage over grief on the trail.
  • + 2
 20€ x 2. I can get 3 500ml bottles of DocBlue for that. Need aprox 60ml per tire, 90 for fresh ones.That's 16-25 tire changes per pair of tubes.
Might be interesting for those who change tires regulary and don't want to miss out on the weight savings of tubeless.

They better be as flat resistant as tubeless though.
  • + 2
 I love the grip of schwalbe tyres have always used them , but i hate the fact that they wear out faster than my toilet roll and are expensive at £ 50-55 a pop for the time they last for, finally i have had enough so have ordered some michelin wild gripr advanced reinforced for £69 a pair , have read good things about these , hopefully they will last longer! . michelin are not one of the oldest tyre manufacturer in the world for nothing! have been using WTB vigilantes , these are excellent too but way too tight on my spank beadbite rims....... lets see waht the michys bring.....
  • + 4
 Schwalbe: "We really liked WTB Velociraptors but no one was making them in 27.5" and 29" so we did it"
  • + 1
 I just went back to bolt on schrader valves because they are so much better its not even an argument. So much easier to live with tubeless compared to presta. Dump all the air quickly? Take out the valve core. Inflate it quickly, use a compressor. No adapters required. And you have a real nut that you use a wrench to tighten it down. None of this knurled micro nut that you can't get tight without a pair of pliers. I have also broken off the end of presta valves more than I care for. Sometimes it was my fault, sometimes it was a stick. Plus, you can just use a cut down moto tube which are cheaper and 1000x more reliable than presta valves.
  • + 1
 Ghetto tubeless on my bikes.
Stans + £1.99 BMX tube (slit and trimmed) and some cheap electrical tape for rim tape. No problems, even when running Maxxis EXO, folding single ply or 2 Ply DH tubes. Also ran specialized and Scwalbe tyres as well.

Probably not much lighter than running tubes but it's more about puncture protection for me.
  • + 1
 "The idea behind it is that when you are braking mainly, the force vectors coming at any angle are entering the blocks in the right direction".
WTF does that even mean?
I know from primarily riding MX, but also DH, that the back of the knobs on your rear tire wears quickest and also tends to get chewed up(especially with Schwalbe Hans Dampfs*cough cough*), "so when you are BRAKING mainly", the force vectors are 'entering the blocks' FROM THE FRICKEN REAR.
If that's what the heck they are saying here, then I guess I agree.
  • + 1
 The new Fat Albert rear tyre tread looks appealing, not too sure about the front..The only problem is I can't get any current 2.35 Schwalbe tyres to fit my frame unfortunately. Maybe this will be just a little narrower..just by a few mm should do it.
  • + 1
 I will be trying out those tubes for sure. If they're half as durable as my foss tubes, I'll be satisfied. After 4 years I still have the foss tube from a similar material on my enduro hardtail. I've had two but one is leaking at the stem because of my bad installation when I was struggling with a dh tyre. Other than that, no snakebites and no punctures and I've been riding rocky terrain and bike parks hard and even on a low pressure like 1,5bar but mostly on 2.1bar.
  • + 1
 Everyone's freaking of about the price of the tube-who cares, don't buy it then, there's price comments like that on every article. What's really interesting is that front tread design, I want a review on that asap. Gut reaction was 'WHAT'RE THOSE' but after staring at the photo for a while I'm at least interested in a ride report.
  • + 2
 I wonder how the intermittent knobs on the rear affect cornering when leaning over, a bit less predictable?

The front looks good for looser terrain. Either way I am looking forward to some reviews.
  • + 2
 $23 tubes with "similar puncture resistance" as $3 butyl? AAAAAAaaahahahahahahhahahahahhaha

f*cking Schwalbe. Greedy bastards.
  • + 1
 now the treads should be rounded??? and what about the old blocked treads design? they are not good?
loved the Muddy MAry and now the MAgic Mary.
loved that tube if it works good
  • + 3
 26" ?

There are still bikes with this ancient wheel size.
  • + 2
 I think some companies will unfortunately stop altogether at some point, but anyone wanting to cater for the still current 26" will win hearts and minds.
  • + 1
 PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE stop developing new tires Schwalbe - and put the ones you already "have" in the shops... been waiting for 650b Magic Marys for 3 months now.
  • + 2
 Are those tubes repair'a'ble???

An that tyre looks like something from the 90's
  • + 1
 if it's anything like their procure system it will be available in 2 years but in the mean time they will just push back the delivery dates by a month
  • + 1
 Just for shits and giggles they should re-release the old Fat Alberts. They worked great and didn't tear knobs left and right.
  • + 3
 Tubeless
  • + 1
 I take a decent shit, put regular tubes in my tires and save enough to eat for a week.
  • + 1
 Lmfao!! At all the velociraptor comments. That's exactly what they look like. What was Schwalbe smokin on.
  • + 1
 This. With rims getting wider start drilling for schrader. Only presta benefit is you dont need a valve cap.
  • + 2
 Mtb is officially more expensive than golf
  • + 3
 tubes are back!!!!!
  • + 1
 So tubes are back in fashion now?, cool I want to try some of these. Sod messing about with leaky valve tubeless.
  • + 2
 Round knobs? The square ones on my wtb vigilantes seem to work well.
  • + 2
 Not worried about the price, I'm sure it'll make me 10% more Enduro.
  • + 1
 the fat albert F and R look cool!!
  • + 2
 Fatal Berts!
  • + 1
 Schwalbe's product naming is on point.
  • + 1
 LOOKS A LOT LIKE A FOSS TUBE TO ME
  • + 1
 just cant wait to buy this shit.
  • + 1
 Hmmm....PricePoint 27.5 prestas are $5.98....just sayin'....
  • + 7
 But you don't get a clear valve stem...
  • + 6
 ^That clear valve stem, that's enduro, right?
  • + 1
 Muddy Mary's ftw
  • - 1
 "Expect to see them on the shelves in early 2016". Like Procore then?
  • - 2
 Why are presta valves even an option? Schrader or gtfo.
  • - 2
 Because they are a superior design ? Gee...why let that stop a company from using them....
  • + 1
 How so? Presta valves are finicky and always need an adapter to use a compressor with a schrader attachment. Every car in production comes with, wait for it, schraders. "Superior in design" hahahahahahah!!!! I've never had a schrader fail on me. Presta, on the other hand, that's a different story.
  • - 2
 Well they do make compressor heads that work with either valve without an adapter but cheap folks don't use them, and they're superior in design and air retention. I've had dozens of shrader valves fail on me and see way more than that working in shops.
  • + 2
 The compressor heads that "work" with both, ultimately do not. You must be some sort of anomaly. Presta valves suck. There is a reason they are not used throughout the industrial industry.

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