Bontrager Rapid Pack - Review

Jan 23, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
Bontrager Rapid Pack review


Bontrager may not be the first name that springs to mind when it comes to hip packs, but last year they quietly debuted the Rapid Pack, which is designed to carry a water bottle and all the essentials needed for shorter rides. The pack is has a similar shape to a kidney belt – it's wider in the middle, and then tapers where it wraps around a rider's hips. A thin, mesh-covered foam keeps the pack's contents from poking you in the back, along with helping the pack to maintain its shape when it's not fully loaded.
Rapid Pack Details
• Two zippered pockets, middle water bottle pocket
• Foam back panel
• Weight: 233 grams
• 100 cu. in. (1.364L) capacity
• MSRP: $59.99 USD
www.bontrager.com

Two stretchy neoprene sleeves that are sized to fit a smartphone, a smaller mesh pocket, and a key clip are all located inside the right zippered pocket. The left zippered pocket has two smaller mesh sleeves that can easily hold tire levers, a multi-tool, or similarly sized items. MSRP: $59.99.


Bontrager Rapid Pack review
The neoprene pockets on the right side help keep tools from rattling around, and are large enough to fit a smartphone.
Bontrager Rapid Pack review
Loaded up and ready to go. The water bottle pocket can also be used to carry a light windbreaker or rain jacket instead.


Performance

I'm a big fan of hip packs, especially for rides that are under three hours, and with a little bit of creativity, I've been able to go on even longer rides sans-backpack. Yes, I know there are still riders out there who see wearing one as an inexcusable fashion faux pas, but I wouldn't have started mountain biking if looking cool was my number one priority.

When the Rapid Pack first arrived it didn't immediately capture my attention. It seemed a little flimsy, and when I grabbed onto the pull tab to open the water bottle holster the tab came off in my hand. In other words, not the most promising start. But then I started using it, and now, after over eight months of regular usage, I'd say that it's hands-down the most comfortable hip pack that I've found so far, even when carrying a full water bottle.

The Rapid Pack's shape helps spread out the load, allowing it to wrap comfortably around my back rather than sticking out in one misshapen lump. I usually adjust the waist belt a couple times at the beginning of a ride to fine-tune the fit, but after that, it's rare that I'll need to think about it at all. Tools and water are easily accessed by rotating the pack forwards, and all of the pockets help keep any unwanted rattling at bay. It is possible to pull a water bottle out on the fly, but returning it into its pouch is a little trickier – it's not something that you'd want to try while riding anything remotely technical.


Bontrager Rapid Pack review
My typical cargo when wearing the Rapid Pack. Not pictured: one peanut butter and jelly sandwich.


I typically strap a tube to the frame of whatever bike I'm on, and then carry a mini-pump, multi-tool, tire levers, tire plugs, zip ties, and my phone in the pack. If you don't need to carry a water bottle on your back, that central holster can also be used to hold a windbreaker or a light rain jacket in case of a change inclement weather. On the topic of weather, the Rapid Pack isn't waterproof, but its shape is low profile enough that it's easy enough to tuck it under a rain jacket or a jersey. If it does get saturated, the fabric is very quick drying, and even after big rides in the pouring rain I was able to hang it up and it would air dry overnight.

The detaching pull tab that occurred early on was the only durability issue I ran into – other than that the pack has exceeded my expectations, especially for how light the fabric is. It's now sporting a few permanent mud stains, and the fabric on the back panel has pilled up in a couple of spots, but those are acceptable signs of wear considering the number of rides it's been on.



Boris Beyer photo
In use, the Rapid Pack is barely noticeable, which meant I could focus on more important things, like not sliding off the trail. Photo: Boris Beyer



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesBontrager got it right with the Rapid Pack. It's light, unobtrusive, and has plenty of room for carrying the essentials for shorter rides. Mike Kazimer








199 Comments

  • 79 3
 I love the idea of a hip pack, and this one looks REALLY well thought out and designed - but I still can't wrap my mind around spending anything more than $30 for one... because it's just a hip pack... you know?
  • 9 1
 go check mountainsmith, there some really small ones that can carry couple of these runner's water bottles, tool & phone and a bar...
  • 7 5
 Agreed. At that price one can get a really good backpack that will prevent any back injury in case of a fall. Yes, it has shoulder straps but they are so well vented (e.g. Deuter pack), light, unobtrusive and can take water bottles as well as hydration pack.
  • 4 0
 I have been riding a Macpac module for the last few months. I can fit a 2 litre bladder in it plus tools and tube. It would be hard to go back to a pack now.
  • 15 32
flag otrider (Jan 23, 2018 at 10:23) (Below Threshold)
 It's still just a fanny pack.
What’s in a name? that which we call a turd
By any other name would smell as foul
  • 12 3
 How much does a bottle of sealant cost those days? Pink bikers be so cheap!
  • 3 3
 Yep, I thought exactly the same thing. So I bought a 4L LoweAlpine belt pack (not enduro approved) for $30.

Same could be said as in this review: "barely noticeable, which meant I could focus on more important things, like not sliding off the trail... It's light, unobtrusive, and has plenty of room for carrying the essentials for shorter rides.

one thing that I recommend for belt pack riders are "quick stow flasks". They are brilliant.
  • 9 3
 @teschenbrenner: care to explain to me why it's a turd then? Comments like this show how immature the PB crowd really is. Hip packs are really common among trail/long distance runners and I have yet to hear one complain about it not looking 'cool'.
  • 2 0
 I tried a small hip pack (Osprey), but didn't get on with it. I found it tended to ride up and sit around my stomach which wasn't great. Maybe others don't do that but it has put me off them. I use a frame bag instead now.
  • 11 0
 @bonkywonky: that's because runners don't care about looking cool. in great contrast is the number of mountain bikers who not only care about looking cool, seem to *primarily* care about looking cool
  • 14 1
 @bonkywonky: okay i'll bite! It's a sarcastic reference to marketing, a fashion statement gone by and a play on Shakespeare. Branded as a fanny pack it would never have come back but rebranded by any other name and with purpose it becomes acceptable. We also had Modpeds in the 80's, now we have e-bikes. Better engineering, better design, better aesthetics but in the end still just a motorized pedal bike aka Moped. If you like it, and it fits your need then by all means wear it proud. I'm just having fun remembering fad gone by.
  • 10 12
 @bonkywonky: it doesnt matter whay you wear running you will always be uncool.
  • 10 0
 @RERCowie: Thanks for proving my point.

@teschenbrenner Why would it be a fad? I bloody hate riding with a backpack (sweaty back, feeling restricted, despite having tried loads of proper packs) but a hip pack really works for me, same for lots of other guys.
  • 6 1
 @bonkywonky: OMG the fad was in the 80's. but you're not N.American so maybe it didn't hit as hard in the
Netherlands to get the joke. Only time will tell it's reincarnation is a fad or not. Sorry to hear about your sweat issues.
  • 4 0
 It is well worth the $ Fits my 29 plus tube, 4 co2s and inflator, tire plugs, Tire lever, multitool, Cellphone, keys, a 16oz Beer #winning
  • 8 5
 $30 eh. So, that's $15 wholesale. take off $10 for materials, how long do you think it takes to make one of those? 2 hours if you're damn fast. so, you want to pay someone $2.50/hour to make your bag for you?
  • 5 0
 @nwarren: Little hands make amazing things
  • 3 2
 Not hip pack #Stravapack
  • 3 0
 @DDB1: One thing @pinkbike didn't do is take pictures of the inside zipper pockets. Has a great layout of individual smaller pockets to keep everything in it's place.
  • 1 0
 I've had it since last spring, maybe best option out there holds tools keys and 750ml bottle. 1000ml bottle rubs your back, just strap inner tube to frame or use a backcountry strap
  • 6 3
 I just spent $180 on a High Above limited edition (10 available) Black Ops hip pack, didn't even flinch Still cheaper and more usable than the Gucci bag my lady just bought.
  • 5 0
 But after your ride, you can turn it to the front and wear it to your favorite restaurant along with your sweat pants and socks with flip flops!

Thats gotta be worth something extra, right?
  • 2 0
 @Dethphist: Gotta rock the Crocs
  • 61 0
 i think the new cool enduro thing could be pannier bags ! you could carry a whole 24 case of beer
  • 1 0
 Yeah but who wants to drink a beer that's been bounced around and warmed for the last several hours?
  • 23 0
 looks like this is probably the first fanny pack i'm going to try.
  • 7 0
 Bonus tip: You can pretty easily pop your jersey over the top of it and have it underneath without too much trouble.
  • 7 3
 But where does the beer go?
  • 9 1
 @paulhaysom: because looking like you have a giant odd-shaped tumor on your lower back still gets less funny looks than a fanny purse? ;-)
  • 1 1
 @karoliusz: It goes in my EVOC FR Lite, that's where it goes. It has a nominal spine protector for after the all the beer has gone down.
  • 3 0
 @ckcost: Truly honestly, it's not even that bad!
  • 6 0
 @paulhaysom: Honestly I would rock one....but they are incompatible with my current beer-belly standard.
  • 6 1
 130+ comments for a backpack! Damn, winter is long
  • 9 0
 I’ve ran this pack since it came out and it’s the tits!
  • 2 0
 @ckcost: No, because a fanny pack needs to be worn quite tightly. So when you have a jersey under the belt it causes a lot of sweat (blocks air flow under the jersey).In summer I always wear jersey over the fanny pack in.
  • 4 0
 @endlessblockades: You have already drank it all to help manage the fact youre riding around in the woods with a Fanny Pack
  • 2 1
 @MrDiamondDave: I don't do 1 beer rides - too short. I need to ride longer to work off the beers I drink on longer rides.
  • 2 0
 @endlessblockades: I try to start with many beers in me
  • 1 0
 @ckcost: I can load this pack up on one side and fit a 16oz can on the other side. The fabric stretches like no other.
  • 14 0
 To think I used to make fun of my Dad for wearing one of these things as a kid when we were on holidays and now I am thinking of getting one!
  • 12 1
 As a rider who is fused at the spine from L3-S1, just looking at this product makes me hurt even more than I already do. I have a CamelBak Palos LR4 with the self contained water bladder and I've used it a few times, but in the end, I always go back to what works for me - my trusted CB Rogue back pack.
  • 12 2
 My only issue with this is, what if you land on it ? Remember that guy who broke his back when he landed on his camelback.. it had a shock pump in it. I know this is lower, but screw landing on a bottle!

I do actully use a raceface rip strip, but keep bulky items in the sides, not the central pocket.
  • 2 0
 If you don't land on the bag contents, you can always land on trailside rubble so yeah it could get nasty. Having said that, yeah having a bottle there seems uncomfortable to land on.

My current favourite is the Ergon BE1 pack (though they have larger models for who carries more stuff). If you don't like backpacks, look at it as a hip pack with shoulder straps and a CE certified back protector Wink . Because the water bladder in my older camelbaks have saved my back so often (or at least it always felt like that) I actually feel uncomfortable riding without some kind of coverage on my back. Kind of like being used to wearing a seatbelt whilst driving the car. Only downside is my relatively tall Park Tool pump doesn't fit so I currently have it strapped to the bag but I'm getting one of these clamps to attach it to my frame. My tubes go in the bag though, so the opposite of what Mike is doing. But I think this bag protects me more than that it could potentially hurt me.
  • 3 0
 This is why I really like strapping things to the frame even though I'm not very enduro. Even if the folding knife, pump, multitool and purple thing all miss your spine they can still embed themselves nicely in your pelvis giving you grief for several month/decades.
  • 3 0
 There's also been anecdotal accounts of go pro's causing additional complications with skull and chest injuries when riders have landed on them. It caused pressure points that negated the protection of the helmet by focusing the blow through the gopro mount.
  • 1 0
 @discotone: is that even with helmets with breakaway mounts for the gopro? I don't ride a with a cam (no one wants to watch my crappy riding on youtube). But it does seem like something helmet companies are trying to address.
  • 9 0
 I've crashed on a water bottle while carrying it in my fanny pack. Saved me! The bottle acted like a pillow! Water all came out and I was wet...but my body was fine.
  • 3 0
 It seems like with a hard impact the stopper or lid would pop off the soft plastic bottle draining a bit of water and cushioning the blow somewhat.
  • 1 0
 @pancakeflatted: This probably depends on the type of bottle you were using. Some lids press on so they can release when you land on them. If you have a screw-on lid, this would likely not have come off.

@Konyp: I don't know how much that helps. The only hard parts in my pack are a small tool, a chain breaker and a spoke key. Other stuff is are some tubes and of course the water bladder. But none of these are easily going to penetrate the back protector. The pump already goes on the frame as it is too tall for the pack. I don't see how the contents of my pack are ever going to hurt me, especially through the back protector.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: +1 , I've used the ergon be3 now for a couple of years, it's by far the best I've used, I don't use a bladder in it. From full (18l) to empty I genuinely forget it's there. No question that without is better, but sometimes you need to carry and for me it's the best when you do.
  • 11 1
 Better option - go on eBay, buy a cheap road cycling jersey one size smaller than usual, cut it in half an inch above the rear pockets, wear the lower half with pockets under your mtb top. Sorted. Mine cost 99p and works a treat!
  • 2 0
 My first thought! They took the pockets off the jersey and sold them back to us for $60. I don’t mind wearing club fit jerseys and looking like an XC dad. But that’s me.
  • 1 0
 The below-boob tube
  • 11 0
 I rock this thing on short rides and I am totally happy with it. I do not let fears of injury enter my mind as they become a self fulfilling prophecy.
  • 4 0
 I'm very happy with mine also. If you are really nervous about the bottle being centered on your back, you can use a Poland Spring type bottle instead. That will just crush easily if you landed square on your lower back. I have no problem with the bottle where it is and I use an additional bottle in the cage for longer rides. I've ditched the backpack for good.
  • 2 0
 Exactly..people are worried about a bottle landing on the exact spot that would hurt you and not mention the Manzanita tree stump that just gouged their arteries...ride your fucking bike.
  • 17 8
 I love my EVOC fanny pack, but placing a bottle there is asking yourself for trouble. Just don't pop wheelies with this thing on: signed your lumbar spine.
  • 5 0
 Dakine's Hot Laps has the bottle holder on the side, and is easy to get in/out. Most importantly, your jersey can cover it.
  • 26 3
 Or just don't loop wheelies like a pleb?
  • 8 2
 @nvranka: cut me some slack I don’t have Hope brakes
  • 3 0
 I've got the EVOC and think I would prefer this. Integral bladders are a pain in the ass to fill and keep clean. This looks just big enough to include a mini hand pump and compressible windbreaker without being oversized like most of the 3-5L bags. Yes, I'm an unabashed champion of the bum bag.
  • 2 0
 @bvd453: Give it a try. I borrowed a buddy's EVOC and did not like it. I'm done dealing with hydration bladders.

Also, the side holster bottle bags always felt weird because the weight is not centered and the bottle can stick out and hit trees on tight turns.
  • 1 2
 Erm Evoc has a bottle holder on the sideof the main compartment. It is not easy to reach but You just use this bottle to refill the one in the frame. Bladder? I never ride with the bladder in my evoc, makes the whole thing huge and jump on my back which is why I ditched the back pack in the first place. I never carry more than 2 pounds of stuff in it including water. If I need lots of water for an all day ride in high temperatures
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Fair enough. I'll give that a try, but I'll be pissed I spent almost $100 on "regular" hip bag the whole time. On the other hand, now I've got more room for cookies.
  • 2 2
 @bvd453: most of my rides are 2-3h so that’s what makes most sense to me. I did a one long ride with evoc once, with bladder and everything but it was just a pain above the arse Smile for short afterworks I use even smaller fanny wher I just put keys wallet and the phone Smile
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I've used the CamelBak Palos LR 4 with the bladder, and as long as it isn't filled to the gills with other crap it doesn't bother me at all. I have a small frame pack (blackburn corner bag) for tools and a tube, so I just need water and snacks covered for most rides.

For longer rides, or any ride that I want extra layers for I use a backpack.
  • 6 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I must admit, I've always got on better with smaller fannies.
  • 2 0
 @metaam: giggity
  • 10 3
 Budget-minded Canadians - consider this bad boy from MEC for a 3rd of the price: tinyurl.com/ybxhqyxg

I've been rocking it all summer with no issues, plus it carries TWO water bottles!
  • 2 1
 Or one bottle and one bear cozy! I might try this one after not being able to source this bontrager pack for months.
  • 1 0
 This is an interesting option. However, I only see a place for one bottle. How do you carry 2? How stable is it when loaded and riding on rough terrain? The strap and buckle look pretty flimsy...
  • 1 0
 @freerider11: There is only 1 bottle holder. I use another bottle in a cage on the bike when I need more water.

The pack is very stable since the material is stretchy. It feels more like a lumbar support belt than a hip bag.

I've tried a number of hip packs and this is the best for me by far. Strap and buckle are perfect.
  • 1 0
 @Endurahbrah: Thanks for the info. However I was replying to superman-4 on the budget MEC pack he linked, where he said it will carry 2 bottles.
  • 1 0
 @freerider11: I think he may have accidentally linked the wrong item. I see one underneath for $32 and it comes with 2 bottle holders
  • 1 0
 @Crooks: Thank you. Yes I see it now. I may give this a shot. However I'm not sure how stable it will be loaded with 2 bottles when riding techy trails...
  • 5 1
 I started MTB in '88...rocked a slim '80's style faux plether fanny pack for minimal tools and it rocked. Be sure to check the packs for Runners/hikers....can get stuff as slim as what is essentially a 'money belt'. My latest acquisition is from a thrift store, $3. Still on the lookout for a nice Spongebob kids fanny pack or something similarly funny to rock(just need to add a longer waist strap).....cuz people without a sense of humour are just a*sholes, that's why Smile
  • 1 0
 @freerider11: I've ridden with a 2 Bottle Osprey hip pack for years (switch it out with my longer ride hydration backpack) and find that with two full large bottles, it feels a little awkward while standing. Sits better in a riding position and get used to it quickly.
  • 1 0
 @Crooks: Yup - my mistake, I linked the wrong one (they look identical in the photo) - but the $32 model has 2 holders. To be honest I've never used both holders, that's alot of weight in water to carry in a fanny-pack, if I need that much liquid I'll just bring a full-size hydration pack.
  • 1 0
 @loopie: damn, faux plether must be as chintzy as it gets.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: Funny thing is...the fake leathery crap is quite a bit more durable than cheap nylon...and more moisture resistant. Who knows if they're even made anymore....lol....anyways, slim, low profile waist bags/belts are super handy. And I don't pay 50% more than anything is worth just because of the logo on it....who gives a shit!!! (I mean, I know who cares ..but that's their problem Smile
  • 7 0
 Something I found out last year: do not call it a "Fanny Pack" whilst biking in Ireland. Means something entirely different.
  • 5 0
 Australia and New Zealand too!
  • 2 0
 Everywhere in the world except North America and please...never tell anyone you gave your daughter a fanny boost either. You will be arrested or your family tree is spiral.....
  • 1 1
 The naughty bits up front..
  • 5 1
 Storage bibs like Specialized SWAT and Sombrio Smuggle carry stuff just as well, but are more comfortable than a tight belt. A bottle or two in the pockets also stay clean. EDC tool and pump on my bike, bottle or two, phone, and windbreaker in the pockets.
  • 4 0
 I bought a fanny pack for $12.00 US at Big 5 Sporting Goods two years ago. its stupid looking, has two water bottle holders that have their own straps to hold the bottles in. It has three pockets and one can fit a packable jacket inside with spare tube and my tools. the thing even has a thin padding for better comfort and ergonomic fit. With all of its room, it is still relatively small looking. I have been very tempted to purchase a higher end pack, but i cannot justify as this cheap, crappy upper-ass pack works like a dream and i feel like it would be hard find a better replacement... oddly. The day i do replace it, i will probably get one of Higher Aboves larger packs, as they are local to me and I like the simple style and design.
  • 9 2
 Are fanny packs a thing now ?
  • 17 7
 Not anymore, back packs are starting to be cool now since they are so trail. They are the next big thing. Just remember to not strap a single thing to your super long, short travel frame. People may think you are Enduroing
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: you forgot to mention flannel shirts!
  • 2 1
 Ive seen a few people riding with them, I know some claim they "cannot ride with backpacks" blah blah blah. I'm still using a Dakine camelback type that I have had at least 10 years, doesn't affect my riding in the least and carries all my tools, spares, pump, snack, etc. It always comes along whether I'm doing bikepark laps or trail rides, think I will keep my bag thanks...
  • 11 0
 @VPS13: if you never ride without it how do you know it doesn’t effect your riding? Riding in a bag is a massive handicap for me I find them super restrictive I recommend going for a quick blast without a bag and I think you’l see the difference maybe.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I will ride the small local bikepark without and used to ride without all the time. Its not a big bag by any means, just enough for a water pack and to hold my gear, I stuff it pretty tight with all my shit. Just like being prepared for some of the larger bikeparks and rides I do as walking out sucks. Its probably a habit that has grown out of backcountry snowmobiling but I just feel more comfortable with tools and gear when out in the boonies. To each their own I suppose, I just find its no big deal for me. I also like being able to keep my full face on it when doing hike a bike trails.
  • 4 3
 @stab0905: flanel shirt washed with organic nuts from India smelling of sour bread and dry washed single origin coffee beans growing above 1500m in Kenya
  • 3 0
 I often ride alone. For safety, I rely on two things: always telling friends and family where I'm going, and my phone. Now, I really like hip packs, I feel less encumbered when riding techy stuff. But there is always the dreadful possibility on crashing directly ON my phone and end up in trouble.
The risks are somehow limited in a backpack, where you can pad your phone a little bit more, but still.
So I ask: can I have a protector vest or a backpack with a pocket on my chest, where a phone should be reasonably safe?
That said pocket could be large enough to accommodate a phone from 2018, not a flip antique from 2008?
  • 1 0
 @geek81: good idea buddy. actually yes, last saturday I smashed my phablet (or 5.5 inches phone, depends on how you put it) that was in my pocket unprotected. maybe with a case like that it would have survived.
on the other hand, as you say, big phones or phablets need bigger cases, and it can get very cumbersome.
  • 3 0
 I've been trying to buy this pack for the last 6 months. Can't find it anywhere, and Trek/Bontrager have none in their warehouse either...apparently.
@mikekazimer - any suggestions?
  • 1 0
 I had the same problem. F*ck’n vaporware.
  • 1 0
 @mungbean: I had the same problem when I looked for one last year. I contacted my local Trek dealer, they ordered it for me, and they took my info and called me when they got one in stock.

I was a little surprised that it actually came in though.
  • 1 0
 I highly recommend it! I ordered mine through Westwood cycles. But you already knew that
  • 1 0
 @Jwanamaker: thanks!
  • 5 0
 I love this pack, I hold all my tools, phone, and an extra bottle, yet I barely notice it's there!
  • 2 0
 I used to have a fanny pack during middle school in the late 80's. I carried my pencils, pens, erasers, pencil sharpener, lunch money, key to the padlock in my locker, candy or gum, and other odd and ends.
  • 2 0
 Picked up one back in October and it's holding up extremely well. I have had a few different hip packs over the years and this the most thought out and comfortable one to date.
  • 2 1
 I am Pro hip pack; I've been riding with one for over 25yrs. But I wouldn't be interested in this one.
The bottle holder smack in the middle, excactly where the mud comes up off your tire?!?!
It should be off to one side, for both, ease of use and to avoid the Filth!
I've also been using a Hydration Pack for over 25yrs; that alone has saved my bacon more than once.
While navigating a tech Rock garden, I came off the bike and was skating backwards back down into it. After picking up some speed I fell on my back, on a ROCK. The thought that "today IS a good day to dye" came to mind.
I ruptured the bladder and eventually got up and kept riding. LBS replaced the bladder, guaranteed for life. The camelbak saved me!
  • 1 0
 For all the Brits, check this out!!

www.trespass.com/vasp-5-litre-bum-bag?gclid=CjwKCAiA15vTBRAHEiwA7SnfcwyIE-RbysK1vkDeebrpxxtZuQveLF-RLZ_coQbFjl1nC65L2gAg-xoC5TMQAvD_BwE#color=Blue&size=EACH

It’s £6.99 and a similar storage layout to this Bonty one. I’ve had mine about 2 years now and it is nothing but FANTASTIC. Perfect size, loads of clever storage and nice durable material that seems to stand up to a bit of rain! Smile when in the alps I took;

2x tubes, hand pump, 3x CO2 cart. + Inflator Head, multitool, tyre lever, patches, chain-splitter, wallet, Phone and even a v.small first aid kit! Smile

Just my two cents but the best £7.00 I ever spent!
  • 1 0
 I have this Solomon XT hydration belt (www.wigglestatic.com/images/salomon-106384-XT-zoom.jpg) which has now been discontinued but you can find it on ebay sometimes. Its the best hydration belt I have tried (I have tried the camelback and the source one). They released it for runners before fanny packs for MTB were a thing and for some reason stopped producing them since. This belt stays in place no matter how much jumping you do. If you can find it anywhere (probably costs around 25-40$) get it.
  • 2 1
 I get that packless is coolest, as you look just like your WC or rampage hero; but can any fashion conscious person tell me why there is the idea that bag over shoulders is cool, whereas smaller bag round the waist is uncool?
  • 1 0
 Don't see much use in moving the bottle off my bike and onto a hip pack, rather shed the weight off my body.

I've got a project 76 piggy on my bottle cage so all that stuff is off me. Use a strap for extra stuff so that if I do take my fanny pack (super hipsterish steath bike bag) its just for extra stuff.....
  • 1 0
 I have one, use it regularly on shorter rides. I have a bottle cage on the frame and use the bag's bottle compartment either for extra water or a light jacket. It's damn near impossible to take the bottle from the bag (and put it back!) without stopping. Other than that, I like it. Surprisingly, it stays in place even when it gets rough.
  • 3 0
 Don't really understand why your regular bike jersey with 3 rear pockets should be replaced with a t shirt and this contraption.
  • 4 0
 Looks good but not waterproof in buttsprayland eh?
  • 3 0
 You will never catch me riding with a scroat sac on my bike... this is a nice one though
  • 1 2
 oops other than the one that's already attached. I wear bum bags when hiking, but not riding.. that is all.
  • 2 1
 Own one. The bottle is difficult to remove and replace when snug on your back. Bottles located on the side like Osprey and EVOC tend to be easier to access while riding or even stopping for that matter.
  • 1 1
 Got an Osprey Talon 4, easy access indeed but I do have regular encounters with trees as it sticks out quite a bit..
  • 1 0
 Got a Deuter Pulse 2 which I can re-insert the bottle into while riding. The Bonti looks more compact with an interesting use of materials, but Deuter make great outdoor kit and the Pulse was less than £20. I'm more than happy with it.
  • 2 0
 @PimpmasterJazz: +1 to the Deuter Pulse 2. Carries a large bottle, TV sized smartphone, tools, gas and sealant plus some snacks and carkeys. Comfy, well made and reasonably priced.
  • 1 0
 Yeah i would totally ant to put my phone together with some tools on a place thats very likely to meat the ground if i crash sounds like a brilliant idea and i love back sweat best thing ever so nice
  • 2 0
 Have this pack. It was the first hip/waist/fanny/doyouendrobro pack that looked appealing to me. It's not too bad for hiking either...
  • 2 2
 I cant imagine going over the bars and landing on my back with this thing on. My pack has save my back numerous times when I've went over the bars. I like my pack to protect my spine from rocks and sticks. Great idea but not for where and how I ride.
  • 3 0
 Looks great! I need a new pack and ought to give this a whirl. Decent price, good performance. I like.
  • 1 1
 What is consider shorter rides? 7-10 miles? Let me see, my local trail is 11 miles and some parts can hurt you and make you beg for water but during this time of the year when it is cool I don’t even bother with water let alone have a third kidney on my back. I like to not carry anything at all. Don’t know about ya but Carrying a 10 pound plus bag/pack just isn’t my thing. For longer, rougher trail, more d anger element such as sharp rocks to flatten your tires or unfamiliar trail I might carry the essentials. Wouldn’t bother with this $59 kidney bag.
  • 1 1
 Have tried every model of hip pack, can't understand the allure of them-Don't see many people with them, perhaps that is why. I am tall and skinny, maybe its meant for more curvy people? That being said, this one looks better than the others ive tried.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer partly due to this review, I recently purchased the bontrager rapid pack.
I'd like to thank you 'cause, so far, they have been among the best spent money in bike gears.
  • 3 0
 What is that little purple thingy?
  • 4 0
 It’s a Dynaplug Racer tool - it holds two tire plugs, one in each side. You pull the cap off, stab it through the puncture, and ideally the plug will seal it up.
  • 1 0
 Dynaplug.
  • 3 0
 Pipe for smoking mid-ride refreshments.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: One tire lever. Bold strategy Cotton.
  • 2 0
 @MortifiedPenguin, don't worry, I carry two levers. It's hard to tell from the photo, but there are two Pedro's levers in there - they stack and clip into each other.
  • 1 0
 @MortifiedPenguin: Really? I've never needed two on a MTB tyre ever and the one I use isn't under much stress to worry about breaking it. I've used tyres from most of the main manufactures and even used proper UST tyres on UST rims.

Not saying two is never required (everyone should know their own tire and rim combination) but it seems like it shouldn't be needed for a large percentage of people based on my experiences.
  • 3 0
 I'm liking my Osprey pack, gives me the option of 1 or 2 bottles.
  • 2 0
 Cheaper "light" alternative that works well for me.
Raidlight "FAST 800 EVO BOTTLE HOLDER"
  • 2 0
 Camelbak palos is a good option if water quantity is a concern. It has a 1.5l bladder which is surprisingly compact
  • 1 0
 Is that the new Bell Super DH the reviewer is wearing? Can't wait to see reviews/impressions on this not that it's finally out and shipping!
  • 3 0
 Yep, it sure is. You can read some of my initial impressions here: www.pinkbike.com/news/bell-launches-3-new-helmets-for-2018-first-look.html.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Right on, I have read the article you linked. Assume a long term review will be coming out somewhere in 2018?
  • 3 0
 I have this pack and love it. Don't even notice it's on when I'm riding!
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer I have a nearly identical setup. Minus my knife. It's been missing. Did you steal my knife??
  • 1 0
 Weevil BurroSak...these cats are making some killer gear!
weeviloutdoor.com/collections/tech-gear/products/w-o-s-c-burrosak-trail-hip-pack
  • 4 2
 Good luck riding with 1 bottle in Arizona from May to September.
  • 8 0
 I think with this you can have one bottle on the bike and one in the pack.
  • 4 0
 We know you always ride a Mule plus two bottles.
  • 1 0
 @bman33: true but hydration packs get hot. At least this is mostly off the back.
  • 2 0
 @COnovicerider: Agree, my comment was an inside jab at blaklabl. Ha!
  • 1 0
 @bman33: ha, no worries.
  • 2 0
 Cross-country skiers have been using these things for decades.
  • 1 0
 Needs some d30 foam to extend to top of bottle so if u crash bottle head wouldn't dig into ur back.
  • 1 0
 I've got bag like that ,cost £10 and has 2 dedicated bottle storage pouches
  • 2 0
 Fanny pack -must be 20ish years, still makes me smile...
  • 2 0
 My mind recalls it named "Bumbag"???
  • 1 0
 WHAT IN THE WORLD IS IN THAT BAG WHATCHA GOT IN THAT BAG? What's that purple thing.
  • 1 0
 would be way more interested in backbone protector with some space to safely carry small pump and a few mesh pockets on it
  • 1 0
 Fanny packs are uncool, but "mom jeans" and "skinny jeans" are cool again? I'm confused?
  • 1 0
 I love my pack from PINCH FLAT DESIGNS. it’s very well thought out, plenty of storage and very comfortable
  • 1 2
 fanny packs still look gay---for skiing under your jacket is one thing---but biking ---sorry fellas its still gay even 25 years later --I guess bell bottom pants will come back as well
  • 2 1
 Thag waist strap looks pretty crap
  • 2 1
 A trail running pack would probably do just as much and hold more water.
  • 2 0
 I'm not a Pack-man
  • 1 0
 camelbak palo LR4 pack. holds more and cheaper.
  • 1 0
 Might be true, but it doesn't make it better.
  • 1 0
 "Fanny Pack" has a "hole" different meaning in other countries
  • 1 0
 This thing is rad, but not $60 worth of rad....
  • 1 0
 Er, 3 rear pockets in your yersey....
  • 1 0
 Priced well. I love my Evoc one
  • 1 0
 DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY ALERT.
  • 1 0
 That won't work for fat guys
  • 1 0
 Is that a Transition engineered2party water bottle?
  • 1 0
 Could you please tell me the manufacturer of that mini pump?
  • 5 7
 I'm just happy it's not from Patagonia! This might be of use for trail running!
  • 2 0
 Works great for both running and cycling. I tried several of the cheaper options before settling on this pack.
  • 1 4
 looks pretty hipster to me
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.044685
Mobile Version of Website