Review: Shimano XT Flat Pedals

Nov 13, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
Shimano XT flat pedal review

Shimano's XT clipless pedals debuted all the way back in 1990, but it wasn't until late last year that an XT-level flat pedal was added to the mix. Of course, Shimano's no stranger to manufacturing flat pedals, it's just that they were usually part of their downhill or BMX product lines. The M8040 pedals could certainly be used for DH riding, but they're also intended to work for all-round trail riding as well.

Shimano offers two different platform sizes in order to allow riders to pick the shape that best fits their foot. The smaller platform measures 100 x 105mm, and is aimed at riders with shoe sizes between 36-44, while the larger platform is 115 x 110mm, for shoe sizes 43-48. The pedals come with two sets of replaceable pins, although the smaller ones are pretty stubby - for actual off-road riding the 5mm high ones are the way to go.
XT M8040 Flat Pedal Details
• 10 pins on each side (two heights included)
• Platform dimensions: 110 x 115mm (tested) or 100 x 105mm
• Aluminum platform, chromoly spindle
• Cup and cone bearing system
• Weight: 490 grams
• MSRP: $100 USD
www.shimano.com

While many flat pedals use a combination of bushings and tiny cartridge bearings, the M8040's use the same cup and cone bearing system found in Shimano's clipless pedals. Looking for a splash of color to brighten up your bike? You won't find it here - the XT flat pedals are only available in grey. MSRP: $100 USD.

Shimano XT flat pedal review
The M8040 pedals measure 18mm in the center, and 20mm at the front and back.
Shimano XT flat pedal review
Ten pins surround the perimeter of the large platform.


Performance

The M8040's wide platform is very comfortable, and the fact that there's no inboard bearing bulge means there's a bit more room for your foot right next to the crankarm. There's plenty of grip on tap, thanks to the concave shape and the tall pins, and even when I was wearing shoes that didn't have Five Ten's tried-and-true sticky rubber I didn't have any keeping my feet securely planted. I'd say the overall amount of grip falls in between Crankbrothers' Stamp pedals and DMR's Vaults, or slightly above average on my grip-o-meter.

The race to create the thinnest pedal possible seems to have died down a bit, but it's still worth noting that the M8040's are a little thick for a modern flat pedal, measuring 18mm in the center and 20mm at the leading and trailing edges. Whether or not that's an issue has a lot to do with bottom bracket height – on some bikes I never gave it a second thought, while on others I found myself wishing for a few more millimeters of ground clearance.
XT flat pedal
The larger of the two sizes measures 110 x 115mm, which offers plenty of support for a size 11 shoe.


Shimano XT flat pedal review


Durability

I've smacked these pedals on all sorts of rocks and roots, dragged them through deep dust, and fully submerged them in mud puddles on countless occasions. In other words, they haven't had an easy life. Other than a few scuffs and some squashed pins they've handled it very well, and they're still spinning smoothly without a hint of play. I'm a fan of Shimano's bearing system – I've found it to be more reliable than cartridge bearings and bushings, and it's super easy to adjust and re-grease when the time comes.


Issues

I wish Shimano had gone with a rear-loading pin design, something similar to what's found on their Saint flat pedals. Having pins that threaded in from the underside of the pedal body would make it possible to fine-tune the height with washers, and make it easier to replace them when they inevitably get broken or deformed. I've already mangled a few pins past the point of accepting an Allen key, which means I'll have to bust out the vice grips at to remove them.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe M8040's aren't going to set the flat pedal world on fire, but they're comfortable, grippy, and built to take a beating.  Mike Kazimer








150 Comments

  • + 41
 "Wet weather means it's prime time for flat pedals" - someone who is scared of SPDS Wink

jokes aside shimano are finally catching up on the pedal game. their new flats look pretty tidy. As do their SPDs
  • + 15
 Yeah I've always found the opposite logic - SPD's are best used in the wet, when your bike moves around the most
  • + 10
 They were the first at the game in the early 80s.

goo.gl/images/BBfgWK
  • + 5
 @davechopoptions: there were previously Deore XT bear trap pedals too. About 20 years ago.
  • + 16
 @davechopoptions: and don't forget the legendary PD-MX30 – the DX flat pedals. After many years of abuse still running smooth!
  • + 13
 “All weather is for flats.” - someone who has never ridden SPDs nor wants to.

Jokes aside, if you don’t the bikes skills you can’t ride in wet weather. What pedals your on shouldn’t matter
  • + 7
 But have they won any medals?
  • + 13
 @mkotowski1: Gee atherton Borrowed flat pedals and FiveTens for a Muddy Race that he won right after that ..... So,nope I am pretty sure flat pedals are safer choice for muddy races.
  • + 3
 @kingpin2607: one example means nothing, plenty of people have won in the mud on clips and on flats plus gee rides flats all the time anyway
  • + 5
 @WannagobacktoBC: What @davechopoptions linked to there were the original DX. All good pedals since are just a copy or evolution of the orginal Shimano DX.
  • + 2
 @jaame: Ummmm.... I guess you must be having a lot of fun ('cause time flies when you're having fun!) - those Shimano "Beartrap" pedals came out around the same time as the first 6-spd Indexed XT group - 1987, 31 years ago! Smile
  • + 1
 @jaame: No just DX pedals
  • + 1
 @jaame: they came after the original DX.
  • + 1
 @WannagobacktoBC: That was the V2 DX. Got some of those, but I’ll never treasure them like my old original DX stash.
  • + 3
 Do they fit my XT toeclips and Christophe straps?
  • + 1
 @ATBScott: Wow good knowledge! My friend had some in 1995 that he got second hand!
  • + 2
 @sam264 "scared of SPDS" Sounds like its coming from someone who doesn't get sick in the air.... Stay clipped in and on the ground.
  • + 1
 @davechopoptions: Yep. The MX30's were/are great too.
  • + 1
 @WannagobacktoBC: still got some on my '95 Zaskar......
  • + 1
 @ADGproductions: nah mate, got my pilot's license
  • + 1
 @WannagobacktoBC: the red dx pd-m636's were my jam on my bmx bike growing up
  • + 1
 @sam264: sounds like your scared of flats actually lol
  • + 25
 DMRs all the way...
  • + 3
 ^this. I’ve had the new V12s the last few years and they’re great; strong, light, cheap, grippy, comfortable. Found vaults a bit too wide for me.

These XTs look good, nice machine work, but minimal advantage over a DMR and they don’t look like they have enough concave for my liking.

I’ve found Saints and Specialized Bennys both good but too heavy for trails.
  • + 2
 @enduroNZ I have re-greased my Vaults at least 4 times.. the last 3 times I thought I was going to rebuild them completely, but they keep needing only cleanup & grease... The vaults are expensive but they will outlast your bikes.... and your shins...
  • + 4
 Vaults are nice to ride with but the aluminium is really soft on some of them and the threads in the body easily strip if the pins get a whack.
  • + 6
 I found the sealing on the V12 to be insufficient; the outside seal is loose and does nothing and the internal one is too flimsy. Dirty water would get in and wear out the bushing. I added some orings in the last re-build and will see how it holds now.
  • + 4
 Yup, sealing in my Vaults is crap. So I kind of need a new axle set (I know, shouldn't have ignored the squeaking). Which is the same price as a set of one-ups or chesters...
  • + 3
 @mountainsofsussex: Yeah, Vaults need frequent greasing and then they will run forever... three minutes job without removing them from the bike.
  • + 2
 @bikeinbih: It is sloppy design though. I open up my Time Atac XCs once a year and never have I seen any water ingress or grease contamination. They just have very well thought out seals.
  • + 1
 @Konyp: I agree on that because just after two months I had to replace the bushing on one side. Since then I'm greasing them frequently and after three seasons no rebuild is necessary.
  • + 17
 Old saints with custom added larger pins the best pedals ever made, they were cheap and bombproof, easy to service,I destroyed 2cranks with them but pedals are still working.
  • + 13
 waay too small for my feet at least. Every bike rental in my area uses them.. They´re getting replaced by RF Chesters/ other plastic pedals and I´m glad about that.
  • + 2
 Weak axles, bent two sets, not riding them that hard either.
  • + 4
 How are they anyway near sturdy? they have weak axles, I literally pedaled the platform out of axle and fly into the bushes, had to pedal on the stick home. Besides, they have rubbish pins.
They are no way near my spank spikes.
  • + 3
 @daweil: agreed. I put chesters on my dh bike and gave the saints away
  • + 3
 @knightmarerider: That says something as the Spank Spikes are way behind the times. A few rides in the rain and the bearings are shot, and the grip just isn't there.
  • + 1
 @JustinVP: agreed. The Spikes were some of the worst pedals that I had the misfortune of using; kept seiafter a wet ride.

The previous Saint pedals were far reliable, hopefully these will be better.
  • + 1
 My spikes failed pretty early as well. Expensive paperweight. Can't be bothered with rebuild, so I replaced with Chesters. Broke a spindle inside a couple months. Vaults now. Next man up.
  • + 15
 in case you were wondering:

Shimano flat pedals:

Old Saint PD-MX80 ~$55, 9 pins with one removable spacer for 2 pin length options, weight 500g, like 90mmx90mm
GR500 ~$55, 9 pins with 2 removable spacers giving 3 pin length options (longest is 5mm higher than MX80), 90x90mm (one size), weight 533g. Same platform as MX80
Deore XT M8040 ~$75, two sizes 100x105mm for shoes to US size 10.5, or 110x115mm for US size 9.5+. 10 pins are supplied in two size long, and short (no spacers), weight sm/large 469/514g
New Saint PD-M828 . ~$115 105x109mm, 12 pins long and short (no spacers), one size 553g. Pedal is concave.

MX80 and GR500 are basically the same pedal. I'd get the GR500. The M8040 uses the same spindle design as the other two, but the M828 has a narrower axle so one fewer ball bearing. The large M8040s seem like the pick of the bunch to me.
  • + 1
 Did THINK that pedal to crank conection was something that should change, but since it is one thing that is an actual standard and works well, unless you try too screw the wrong side pedal and crank together
  • + 11
 Is it just me, or is the flat pedal market actually a place where you DON'T want to be one of the big manufacturers? It's a simple part, the little guys do it just as well and with more style, and most flat pedal riders I know swear by their respective brands and like the bit of style they add to the bike.
  • + 10
 I wonder if the 'extra few mm of ground clerance' is more in the riders head than reality.

Being realistic, a 20mm V 15mm thick pedal will only give you 2.5mm of extra ground clearance, the thinnest pedals are around 12mm at the edges so have an additional 4mm but the trade off is a terrible convex shape and probably the use of huge pins which remove the benefit (though I can see 4-5mm making a difference 1-3mm isnt going to do much in the real-world)

I am a flat pedal riders and look for a good, concave shape, decent size, pins that are removable without wrecking the pedal and an acceptable weight / reliablity, so basically the Nukeproof, DMR etc - Would like to try the Tmac as I think the non-offset design makes sense.
  • + 7
 Tmacs are the best
  • + 3
 Convex or flat platforms are great if they're a) big enough and b) you ride with the pedal more mid-foot. If you're trying to replicate an SPD riding position, small concave pedals feel better, but I'd argue the midfoot position is more secure/powerful anyway.
  • - 3
 @skylerd: They may feel ok if you ride with the pedal mid-foot, they may even grip OK when climbing etc but descending grip / grip in rough terrain can only be compromised as your foot is sitting on the centre of the pedal.

Flat (not convex or convave) pedals are usually fine (many pedals that claim to be concave are infact not anyway due to the axle bulge, e.g. superstar nano / HT nano) but concave pedals need to use huge pins in an attempt to get grip from the shoe if you are going to use them in rough terrain.

I ride flats for a number of reasons, climbing prowess isnt one of them, neither is running the lightest / thinnest option as I dont have hugely rocky terrain to ride on or have an ultra low BB bike but everybody is different, if you like concave pedals and they work for you then thats that.
  • + 12
 @justanotherusername: are you confusing convex with concave? You seem to be aggressively agreeing with me...
  • + 1
 With XTR race pedals vs the budget shimano pedals a few mm less stack night made a big difference in reducing pedal strikes for me, so with platforms I would image its equally important.
  • + 1
 Thoose are prolly the worst modern pedals I've ever used tried so many different combos of pins and shoes and they couldn't get my feet to stay on. @CullenHerring:
  • + 1
 @CullenHerring: they are...some o the best, for sure..my old chromag contacts were super durable for the weather and soil conditions i ride on in the pac northwest. never serviced them in 3 years, but then i dont ride very muddy trails this year i went with the tmacs for a new build i finished in august. the tmacs have a 2.5mm concave, and are 17 mm at the outer corners. wider than most pedals but like having a wider pedal for my size 43 foot.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: I've found concave to be better with shorter pins; the design naturally sucks your foot in more than pure flat.
  • + 10
 i thought the review was a bit flat.
  • - 1
 Watch out not to clip a tree
  • + 4
 Me too, can't quite pin down why though
  • + 1
 It makes the world spin
  • + 4
 I agree. Maybe this isn't the right platform for this type of review?
  • - 7
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 13, 2018 at 1:03) (Below Threshold)
 Shimano is ahead while many other offerings are stuck in the bushes
  • + 5
 @browner: do you feel they are just pedalling the same old schtick?
  • + 2
 I thought this review was the shin dig.
  • + 5
 I have been historically a Shimano fan. I know Shimano has to keep their conservative nature, but these could be a slam dunk with a thinner height. I'll happily take 3-5mm more clearance with another brand. Could literally save my neck.

If you haven't tried the VP Harrier or the Wah Wah II, you're missing out.

I wish Shimano made current, relevant products, but they seem to make very high quality products a few years after their design specifics are already aged. How long has SRAM had a 7 speed dh group? Come on Shimano do it for the love!
  • + 4
 +1 The Wah Wah II's are sweet!
  • - 1
 So you're saying if something is 5mm shorter it makes a HUGE difference ("literally save my neck")? I don't know about you but I definitely don't have the riding precision to miss a rock by 5mm. It's either a hit or miss.
  • + 1
 @onek5: Naw, I agree with @papaweelie, the couple mm can make a difference, but let's be honest the thinner pedals also look better, imho.
  • + 1
 Loving my set of Wah Wah II's. Even with my size 13's they feel like plenty of platform...,

www.pinkbike.com/news/kona-wah-wah-ii-flat-pedals-review.html
  • + 2
 @onek5: switch from 175 cranks to 170, or 170 to 165 and I promise you will notice the extra freedom. I don't just go around promising stuff, really I don't.
  • + 1
 @Nagrom77: “I wear 13s know what I mean”
  • + 4
 After years of riding expensive metal pedals and rebuilding them, removing and replacing mangled pins, I am full converted to plastic pedals. They don't get hung up on rocks and they use machine screws and nylon lock nuts that can be had at any hardware store for next to nothing when it's time to replace the pins. Currently on one up composite and don't plan to change anytime soon.
  • + 2
 This. Been riding one ups for a couple years now and have no reason to go back to non-plastic pedals
  • + 1
 how are the one up plastic pedals holding up? or plastic pedals in general? price is nice or are the alloy versions worth double the price?
  • + 1
 I snapped my One Up Composite pedal clean In half.

Got to ride home on the spindle!

Got hung up on a pesky trail side rock and boom destroyed. That said I know many who haven’t suffered this fate... but for me, and where I ride, plastic pedals do not make sense.
  • + 1
 @funkzander: I have 2 sets of the one-up composite pedals. Low BB bikes and rocky terrain where I live (CO), so they receive plenty of hits. I haven't had any issues though.
  • + 1
 @funkzander: Play with Plastic - It´s fantastic
  • + 1
 @funkzander: mine are holding up excellent. For reference I ride in southern Arizona. My backyard is South Mountain, so there's a couple rocks there
  • + 2
 Seems like a basic replacement level pedal. Nothing exciting, nothing ground breaking. Not really worth full retail, but at 55$ ordered from some German site they aren’t such a bad proposition. Otherwise they seem like the best option for people who insist on running Shimano for everything.

I’m not sure what the next flat pedal innovation is, but it seems like Shimano could have come out with it if they wanted.
  • + 2
 I have a pair of the new XTR 9120's and they have the same crappy seals as before. In less than 15 miles of riding the seals popped out and I had to push them back in with a needle. The last gen XTR's were the same, rebuild bearings every nine months and the seals kept popping out.
  • + 2
 These look very promising. As a certified pedal breaker (not from fround strikes), I am personally interested in any pedals that aren’t using the HT “standard” internals which I separate from the pedal body in a couple hundred km of riding.
  • + 1
 Its getting hard to find a pedal that doesnt use HT's internals, then you even have companies like Superstar copying the design (and even the name 'nano') as into their home-made product.

Some of the HT pedal internals work OK, its the ones with the tiny outboard bearings that I have found horrendous - I think the Nukeproof uses a HT internal and I have found those fine.
  • + 2
 OneUp aluminium with Impacts have been flawless so far. Came from spec Boomslangs and have no complaints. Its hard to quantify but I feel like the convex shape of the OneUp's causes less fatigue and cramping in my feet compared to the concave shape of the Boomslang's.
  • + 4
 shimano pedals have always been boringly reliable and consistent even in the most garbage conditions. love em.
  • + 2
 still have a pair of xt from the early 90ies on my pub bike. had the dx and saints...never had problems with them. only changed to other ones because of weight and thickness of the shimanos.
  • + 1
 @funkzander: and higher street credibility from other brands! Because shimano is not a eyecatcher when standing in front of your local gelato dealer!
  • + 1
 The Saint pedals were quite possibly the worst pedals I had ever tried. The axles were very weak, the small bodies bent fairly quickly and the pins were a must replace from the get go. In comparison, the 50/50 by CB, even though they came apart, were simply astonishing compared to the Saints. The new XTs look quite the tenderiser, let's hope they live up to the XT name.
  • + 1
 I thought my trusty Saint MX80 were too narrow until I fitted the four outer pins as well. Now they are much more grippy. I also like the Shimano pedals for their bearings. Other more expensive boutique pedal wear out the plastic bushing really fast, but the Saints still work great. Not sure if they even have plastic bushing. After a couple of years the Saints have developed a tiny movement, but not even close to other more expensive pedals where I can see a 3 mm movement around the bushing. And fitting new bushings require specialty tools and sometimes you need a new axle. Why not go for the pedal that just keep on working?
  • + 1
 The pins are the weak point. Special Allen head grub type screws. I love the pedals themselves and the Shimano trusted bearings will go on until the cows come home but the pins are awful. I snapped one without even leaning on it when I got these and found the stock pins to be too short to be any use. And agreed, the Saint pedals where they come through and you can fine tune length with washers is a much better idea. If you snap the head off one of these you might be lucky and get it out with mole grips otherwise it's drill time. Not so with the Saint method.
  • + 1
 I wonder if a standard grub screw would have been a better option.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: They wouldn't work quite as well with standard grub screws. The tapped hole in the pedal is larger than the grippy end of the pin, so if you used a standard grub screw it would be larger diameter and then wouldn't dig in to your shoe sole as effectively and probably wouldn't grip at all.
  • + 1
 @veero: ah I didn't mean a straight swap on our part, more that they could have fitted a standard grub screw of the same diameter as the current screws exposed portion, like old HT nano pedals.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: Ah right, but a smaller grub screw would be considerably weaker. At those sizes tensiles go up by 50-100% each next size up you go if that makes sense. To counter it you could make the pedal thicker to get more meat for the screw to go into but that adds weight etc etc. I guess that's the trade off they settled on for these was to make some silly custom screw pins.
  • + 1
 @veero: Do you mean thread strength? - I think a grub screw of that size in itself is sufficiently strong unless you mash it against some rocks (in which case I am happy to see a 5 pence grub screw bend rather than damage the pedal body)

An old pair of HT's I had with grub screws lasted absolutely ages, when they occasionally bent a couple of mins with pliers and you could pop a new one in but that's only if you catch them rocks as I say - Pins should be considered a consumable.
  • + 1
 @veero: do you have any data on this or information? I’ve been trying to convince my boss to up the size of our support bolts on enclosures and he keeps just calling out the shear force of the bolt is fine. Some data would help my point out.
Cheers.
  • + 1
 @loganflores: are he bolts your boss is speccing breaking in use?

Hugely different application too, a pedal pin is only there to provide grip, it doesn't work as a fastener.

You should be able to google data sheets and find out the relevant specs of different grades and types of fastener, you will need the same type and grade as you are using to make any decision but if they are not failing in use currently your boss is probably right.
  • + 1
 @loganflores: Yeah OK it wasn't really a relevent characteristic precisely for this application but for example the UTS on an M3 screw grade 12.9 is around 6000N, jumping up to M4 this increases to around 10500N so there's a massive strength increase as the OD of the screw increases marginally.

If you're finding higher grade cap screws are failing, consider using self colour rather than plated. We build machinery here at work and periodically come across small bad batches of bright zinc plated cap screws which fail waaaaay before they even tighten properly. We think it's hydrogen embrittlement due to poor plating process control, but thankfully these are few and far between.

You shouldn't be relying on a bolt's shear strength to prevent failure in certain cases, the bolt/screw should be sufficiently torqued so that the friction between whatever is being supported against what is supporting it is high and the fasteners are experiencing force purely in tension which is where their main strength lies and shear becomes irrelevant. Consider using more of, or larger diameter fasteners to increase the compression and hence friction between the parts being held together, otherwise use another mechanical design means to reduce the shear force on your fixings, such as lugs or dowels.

With these pedals it's definitely the mashing against rocks which is the problem, but a pin/screw with a larger thread into the pedal is always going to be a shit ton stronger than the next size down. If you shear a pin off of one of these XTs flush you're almost knackered really, with the Saints the head was inboard and protected and if you did shear the pin end off you could still get the remnants out easily with an allen key.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: they aren’t failing often yet but we started making a roll in model that is held together with screws we use to hold small components and a door on a welded enclosure. The new model is held together by these and its also seeing more vibration than before. They are also Phillips so they are limited in hold strength to begin with.
  • + 1
 @veero: thanks for the comment that is generally the point I am trying to make to him. Very well put.
  • + 0
 NERD ALERT:
CLIPS used to mean the metal or plastic cages that came over one's foot and were secured by a leather strap. When Look developed a binding-type pedal it was called "clip-less." Everything old being new again, when one uses the term "clips" one is referring to the binding (clipless), rather than the cages (clips). I will get a good chuckle to myself, alone, regarding this VERY entertaining paradox.
  • + 4
 Wow Shimano has an msrp! I’ll give it month until theyre $59.99 online
  • + 4
 Straitline DeFactos, nuff said!
  • + 2
 These look nice, but if you want the best...Deity TMAC's are the best pedals I have ever owned. Awesome customer service from Deity too.
  • + 1
 I've really loved their Bladerunners but never tried the TMACs. Is there a huge difference? Only downside so far has been the pins tearing flesh from my body, but usually only when I'm messing with one of my kids trying to give the little guy a boost...and then my shin is bleeding lol.
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: The concave shape is very grippy, plus they are huge.
  • - 1
 Shimano had fantastic cage and flat pedals in the 80s and early 90s, shelving them to push SPD designs. If you are worried about pedal thickness causing strikes, flip your chip to raise the bottom bracket or stiffen you shock. Real mountain bikers learned on full rigid.
  • + 1
 This is where everyone say I LIKE PEDAL X BETTER - THEY RULE! so.....I just slapped on a pair of plastic Diety Compound V2s, and for $50 "THEY RULE!!!"
  • + 1
 Nukeproof Horizon Pro flats. Cheap, huge platform, bomb(nuke)proof and the grippiest pedals I've ever used. EWS proven too Smile
  • + 2
 Huge support for Shimano, they are the best. Given infinite money, I would own the XTR 9100.
  • + 2
 “They’re flat and, you know, you put your feet on them...”
  • + 1
 i ride it for a few months now and cant complain about anything. good pedal
  • + 1
 Gamut Podium pedals FTW. Reverse pins, thin, forged so strong and light. Can't go wrong.
  • + 2
 One up composite $50 > these
  • + 1
 DMR v12 hit tree trunk at 25mph - me broken toe and seven other fractures . DMR v12 totally fine.
  • + 1
 Big platform: check
Threaded, screwed from the top pins: check

Thank you!

Probably my next flat pedals.
  • + 9
 Not sure why anyone would want top-threaded pins. As the article points out, sufficient damage to the pin will disallow you from removing said pin with the proper tool.
  • + 11
 @seraph: because when bottom loaded pin bends you need a same tools as you would use for damaged top screwed pin, like drill, file, vice, hammer or all at the same time? And if you just try to screw it out you will damage threads? Also the shape of those pins makes it rather unlikely for them to go bust. I had similar design on Hopes and they lasted many hits at speed. The problem was that pin shape was crap. These ones work great with most shoes.
  • + 5
 @seraph: Standard grub screws threaded from the top are the best imho. Once busted just remove them with pliers and thread new ones from the hardware store, they're like 5cents/pc for stainless.
  • + 1
 @Konyp: Damn, wheres your hardware store?
  • + 2
 Used these for 3 weeks, the outer pins are already bent beyond being able to fit an allen key in. Most damage was done while climbing rocky trails. I think 2 were when descending.

On the plus side they have good grip and despite bending the pins stayed in.

In the world of wider q factors (Boost and ebikes) and low BB's, big traditional flats like these look a bit dated for the use they get, it would be good if the pedal makers started to design with this in mind so we smash less pins in the first place.
  • + 4
 @Riggbeck: nobody uses allen key to remove these... the allen key is there to insert a new one with a tiny drop of blue loctite. Use pliers, eventually file and pliers.
  • + 1
 I've been on the large version (size 9 shoes) for 6 months now.. I've hit every rock in the world.. Yes the pins bend but they dont break, allowing you to grab them with pliers.
They are super grippy with my Giro Riddence shoes amd and i know off a few bmxers who run the smaller ones with short pins cause they are awesome..
  • + 0
 @denomerdano: have you tried the latest giant crank bros? Can you compare them? I am looking for pedals for dirt/street and thought these would do lovely.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:
Sorry we don't touch crankbrothers with a ten foot pole in Canada(mostly because of shady distribution)
But i have also loved OneUp composites and the new Saints are dope too!
  • + 1
 @denomerdano: i have one ups. Too much grip, not enough platform for my needs. Are these XTs bigger?
  • + 2
 @seraph: ever try to remove a pin folded over from rock strikes? From the top, vice grips make easy work of it. From the bottom? Have fun...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns:
They sure feel bigger with the flat non pinned center..
I think the usable size is larger..
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: pins from the top is crap -sure you can get them out with an arsenal of tool, but why not do it like specialized their pins screw from the bottom but the actual pin you see is thinner. if you bend it you will get it out nevertheless.they have also a spot where they are ment to break, so if you practically can not bend it that far that you can no longer remove them. each pedal comes with 4 sparepins screwed in from the side of the pedal. super easy to work with even on the trail. my boomslangs are 3 years old by now and i have 4 sparepins left -pretty good. shape is also great, im not the biggest fan of the expensive and not very durable bearings though.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Same tools? Not a chance- bottom load pedals just need bolt cutters and a hex key, you can get them all out in two minutes. Plus they have a longer supported shank length, so they are more resistant to bending.

Top load pins are crappy engineering in every way. They save manufacturers on assembly costs, that's it.
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: had Boomslangs for about two months and sold them. I Personally didn’t enjoy them at all. Too small platform, bearing house was interfeering with my foot and they had too much grip. If i wanted so much attachment I’d clip in.
  • + 1
 @tsheep: I just said what I prefer and I prefer top load. Bottom require bolt cutter or a drill. Top require pliers or a file and pliers.you file two opposite sides for better grip and just screw it out. Besides, these have a wide base for the pin.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: i can see your point, i have small feet and used to race clips for 10 years -so i am always on the hunt for more grip while still being able to throw the bike away if a big jump or logride (oldschool baby) goes wrong. man my original post is a bit whacky -never work longer than 10hours a day kids.
  • + 1
 I think Burgtec has the best pin design. Can always be removed using only a hex key, regardless of damage. Similar to Hope, but much more grip than Hope.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: how are all of you smashing your pedals so much I just don’t understand is it little accidents or oh shi* moments? I hate play in the bushing or bearings I’m not overly concerned about smashing my pins or pedals.
  • + 0
 @loganflores: I don’t. It happens rarely to me. But when it happens I rarely have issues with it
  • + 1
 Too heavy. Buy a pair of VP001 pedals from eBay for $45.
  • + 1
 I have them and love them
  • - 3
 With cheap and light nylon pedals from China you can buy a pair each season and have better grip and performance as with these chunky and ugly metal bits.
Or buy something more fancy for the same price.

I never was happy with Shimano bearings when I had them many years ago on my clipless pedals, they developed play, some cracked. I dont know, are they more solid now?
  • + 7
 ? they are loose ball bearings. They cost like 1 cent each. You need to maintain your pedals, including lubricating them.
  • + 1
 their axle bearing design does hold up. I typically service any shimano pedal that comes into the shop with fresh grease, it usually takes out most ofthe play. I've seen some of the XTR die early
  • + 1
 Shimano!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.101070
Mobile Version of Website