First Ride: Eminent Onset 140

Apr 5, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  



Eminent Cycles’ latest carbon-framed 29er is the second trail bike from the Southern California brand. It’s called the Onset, and its bold, angular lines and four-bar AFS suspension are sure to inspire questions at trailheads.

Designer and founder Jeff Soncrant says the Onset benefits greatly from lessons learned after Eminent arrived on the scene with guns blazing and the equally wild looking 27.5-inch-wheel Haste a little more than a year ago. The Onset’s numbers are more aggressive, the suspension is more gravity friendly, and it's available in two wheel-travel options: 120 rear/130 front, or 140 rear/150 front. I chose the more aggressive, 140/150-millimeter build for this review.
Eminent Onset

· Purpose: All-mountain / trail
· Chassis: Carbon fiber, four-bar AFS suspension, 140mm or 120mm travel
· Wheel size: 29”
· Key numbers: 66°/66.8° head angle, 76°/75° Seat angle, 44mm fork offset, 407mm/467mm reach, 442mm chainstays.
· Features: ISCG 05 tabs, bottle mount, angular-contact pivot bearings
· Sizes: Small (reviewed), medium, Large
· Weight: 32.43 lbs (14.74kg) size small
· MSRP: $4,099 USD / $6,299 USD
· Contact: Eminent Cycles


Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.
Head tube reinforcement is good engineering. One bottle just fits inside the small-size frame.
Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.
A large bridge between the seat stays adds stiffness to the upper link near the shock mount.
Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.
A Magura 4-piston caliper is attached to Eminent's floating brake mount. Bronze guides allow for lateral movement at the pivot location.


Construction and Features

Eminent’s Onset is intentionally designed to split the difference between long and slack and short and nimble. If it had a mission statement, it would be the bike you’d choose for big days at Moab or high alpine loops where you’d be facing everything from mind-numbing fire-road climbs to black-line descents. The suspension’s kinematics are weighted to enhance pedaling feel and efficiency, with anti-squat peaking a bit over 120-percent and a lot of mid-stroke support. Behind its flashy looks, the Onset has a ready for anything, “just ride yer’ bike” personality, very much like the Santa Cruz Blur LT.

“Flashy,” however, is part of the Eminent ethos. Jeff Soncrant wanted to offer riders an alternative to corporate-filtered big-brand bikes like Trek and Specialized, ones that felt decidedly different under saddle and damn sure to look the part.

Much of the Onset’s angular profile is a styling exercise, but science is also involved. Rectangular tubes in the main frame and rear suspension provide more lateral stiffness, and the head tube brace is an element that most mountain bikes could benefit from. The square “Sponge Bob” seat tube, however, seems like a candidate for PB’s annual “Copious use of carbon for no apparent reason” award.

Hidden inside the frame are bonded-in carbon tubes that guide hoses and housings to their destinations. Angular contact bearings handle lateral stress better than conventional ball bearings, so they are used at each suspension pivot. Eminent has upgraded its internal seatpost clamp wedges with grippers to solve an issue that surfaced with the Haste. A single water bottle mount is located inside the front triangle, while down low, a thick carbon bash guard protects the down tube, and ISCG 05 tabs are mated to an MRP top guide.

Eminent retains its external dropper post routing. I don’t like the look, but it works fine, and if KS stops production, the recently introduced ASX wireless Reverb from RockShox will no doubt inspire a number of copycat droppers, which may end the
Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.
cable routing debate entirely. My test bike was a size small and was shipped with a 125mm-stroke post. At my ride height (32” inseam), there was room for a 150mm dropper in the frame, which was an issue with the Haste, so Eminent has responded to that criticism as well.

Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.


AFS Suspension

Fox is the suspension of choice for Eminent, and the most affordable Comp 140 model tested here is outfitted with a 150-millimeter-travel 36 Rhythm fork that has a 44-millimeter offset. The shock is a DPS EVOL in-line type. Both items have proven to be reliable performers and easy to tune.

Eminent’s “Active Floating System” is a true four-bar suspension design which inverts the current short-link, four-bar trend popularized by the dw link and VPP. Where short links are prone to dramatic (sometimes beneficial) rate changes, especially near the extremes of the suspension travel, the Onset’s longer links can provide a more gradual ramp-up of the shock’s spring and damping forces as the suspension compresses. AFS is a simple solution to create end-stroke firmness and mid-stroke support without the need for funky shock tunes or playing air-volume spacer Jenga.

The Onset’s shock is compressed between the upper link and the swingarm – a strategy that a number of suspension designers have employed to either alter the leverage rate, or more simply, to concentrate compression forces into an area that is already heavily reinforced (like swingarm yoke), thus saving the weight and complexity of an additional shock-mount location. That said, AFS requires a seat tube tunnel, much like Commencal’s original Meta trail bikes.

An aluminum extension helps span the distance between the swingarm and the upper shock mount. The extension incorporates a flip chip that Eminent uses to configure the Onset from 120 to 140-millimeters of rear-wheel travel, and also will be employed to future proof the suspension to adapt to a wider range of shocks. This test bike was the most affordable, “Comp” build, with a Fox Float DPX in-line damper. Reportedly, its AFS suspension can also be configured with a wide range of reservoir dampers and both air and coil-sprung shocks.

Soncrant wanted the new 29er to climb and pedal with class-leading efficiency and firmness. He began
Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.
The extension does not require a special shock.
with anti-squat values near 130-percent, but test mules revealed that was overkill. Reportedly, the Onset peaks at 120-percent which, in conjunction with the suspension’s ample mid-stroke support, puts the new 29er squarely in the hunt without shackling the bike’s uncanny ability to track the ground. More on that later.


Geometry

Hard to believe that it took 30 years to figure it out, but mountain bikes climb better with steeper seat tubes than the road and balloon tire bikes they sprouted from. The Haste missed the mark with its old-school, 73-degree angle, but Eminent gave the Onset a respectable 76-degree seat tube (75.5 on the 140mm version), which perfectly suits its aggressive, all-purpose mission statement. Same for its head angles, which are stated at 66-degrees for the 140mm and 66.8 for the short-travel model.

Like many contemporary frames, the Onset’s actual seat tube angle is decidedly slacker than its stated angle, which is calculated where the saddle hovers at an average ride height (some bike designers calculate effective ST angles level with stack height). I have a 32-inch inseam, which works out to a ride height of 28.375 inches from the center of the bottom bracket to the top of the saddle at the center of the seat post. The measured effective seat tube angle was 76 degrees.

Eminent Onset
Eminent Onset

Reaches are ample but stop short of the numbers vanguard builders are touting. Small sized 140 models get a 407-millimeter reach, the size medium a 432-millimeter reach, and the size large sits at 458-millimeters. Reach grows 9-millimeters for all sizes of the 120 model.

Rounding out the Onset’s sensibly modern geometry are its low enough, 330-millimeter bottom bracket height and not too short, 440-millimeter chainstays.

Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.
The Comp 400's SLX build reminded me how well Shimano drivetrains perform. The tiny 30-tooth chainring helped to showcase the Onset's technical climbing skills.


Key Components

Eminent chose Shimano as its drivetrain supplier, which bucks the SRAM trend of late. Our Comp 140 uses 11-speed SLX components, including its crankset, which sports a 30-tooth chainring, backed by an MRP top guide. Wheels are well spec’ed with 30-millimeter-wide DT/Swiss M1900 rims and capped by Maxxis Minion DHF and DHR tires. Brakes are 4-piston Magura MT Sports and, as mentioned, the 125-millimeter dropper post (150 is noted in the specs) is a KS LEV with external cable routing. Nice to see ProTaper handlebars at this level, and a comfortable WTB Volt saddle.

See all the component specs for the Onset 120 and 140 here.



bigquotesAs supple as the rear suspension feels, there was no perception that its action hindered my power output – a wonderful combination of abundant traction and pedaling support that made tricky climbs seem easy.

I found the Onset’s suspension surprisingly easy to set up. I used 30-percent for the shock sag, with the rebound seven clicks out from closed, then set the fork at Fox’s starting-point recommendations, both of which worked out well from the get-go. I cut the 810-millimeter ProTaper bars to 780 and set the tire pressures to 28 rear and 25 front. That's where I left the settings for the duration of the review.

I usually ride medium-sized frames, so I had some trepidation about Eminent’s insistence that I should be riding a size small Onset. To be honest, the wheelbase and reach still feel a little cramped, which is normal for me, as my proportions fall between most small and medium-sized trail bikes.

The standout impression of the Onset was how supple and planted the rear suspension feels. It tracks the ground so well that I automatically reached for the low-speed compression lever as I approached the first serious climb – assuming that the tail end of the bike would soon be wallowing with every pedal stroke. I need not have worried.

When the Haste debuted, Eminent’s PR touted that its AFS rear suspension was capable of remaining glued to the trail, while delivering ultra-efficient pedaling. It was a solid performing suspension under power, but not THAT good. By contrast, the Onset’s pedaling and suspension dynamics actually manage to deliver on those promises. Leave the suspension wide open and you’ll discover that the Onset is an excellent climber in or out of the saddle. As supple as the rear suspension feels, there was no perception that its action hindered my power output – a wonderful combination of abundant traction and pedaling support that made tricky climbs seem easy.


Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.


I am still experimenting with the Onset’s cornering. The rear suspension creates such a gentle release when the rear tire breaks traction that it took a while to get a feel for the boundaries. It seems to corner best when you push the tires into the apex and get the job done quickly rather than scribing a smooth arc. Either way, it’s proving to be far more trustworthy in the turns than I expected from the most compact of the three size options.

I was curious about the Onset’s floating rear brake. Normally, a designer would need to either isolate braking torque to the short link that contains the rear axle, or transfer the force through a separate link to the front triangle. In the case of the Onset AFS suspension, the brake caliper pivots concentrically around the rear axle, and braking torque is fed into the lower link through a sliding pivot.

It’s an alternative solution that, apparently, does a good job. Braking while descending tricky chutes or while trail braking into rough corners does not unsettle the suspension, nor affect the ride height of the chassis noticeably.

At speed, the Onset stays quiet. It doesn’t feel “poppy,” if you are searching for a cliché, but it is nimble enough to play off features and it jumps straight and true. The steering feels light and direct across the range, fast or slow. I aced a few skinnies that have recently tossed me into the weeds, and it gets around tight switchbacks quite well – especially for a big-wheel bike.
Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.


Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesAside from the photo shoot, most of the riding I've done aboard the Onset has been spent banging down boulder chutes and fast-paced rocky trails in the local mountains. Climbing has been split evenly between technical steeps and blue-line grinds. I have only been in possession of the bike for a number of weeks, but I do have enough miles under saddle to go on record that the Onset represents a significant step upwards in performance over Eminent's Haste - in every corner of the all-mountain/trail bike envelope. It's shaping up to be an enjoyable and capable bike, so I'm going to keep it for a while to see if I can unlock more of its potential.RC





145 Comments

  • + 148
 "sure to inspire questions at trailheads"
Such as: are you gone yet? Can I open my eyes now?
  • + 7
 I think it is gorgeous.
  • + 33
 @sspiff I think it looks cool AF. That was funny though.
  • + 12
 Still though, external dropper!? :/
  • + 8
 Who doesn’t love a square seat tube?
  • + 6
 The ying to the Ibis’ yang
  • + 14
 That thing looks like Buzz's girlfriend.
  • + 2
 @excavator666: Not possible to put a stealth one in. The seat tube ends halfway .
  • + 1
 @Patrick9-32: True. I've never felt so attracted to an old bed's iron frame.
  • + 1
 Looks like someone got a good deal on all the old frames from Taiwan.
  • + 2
 Star trek's bike
  • + 3
 @PB-J: should have a square seat post to go along with it.
  • + 1
 This is hideous
  • + 93
 There’s more space for water bottles in the rear triangle than the front!
  • - 3
 Bike should be called The Maverick. With its own soundtrack...."Highway to the danger zone".
  • + 8
 That is a bike only a paid designer can love.
  • + 5
 He had the bike for a few weeks and he can't say if the bike is good?
  • + 0
 Haha game changer!
  • + 15
 @endurocat: It is good. Some bikes (the Pole, for instance) have traits that feel significantly different. If you ride the Machine like a Blur LT, it pushes into corners and weaves all over the place. Adapting to those traits - using different setups for corners, riding in a different position, etc - often unlocks performance that would have been overlooked. That's is why I spend extra time on some bikes.
  • + 0
 @dobermon: I'm not entirely sure thats true. I'm not that in love with the looks of it.
  • + 69
 Ellsworth called and wants it’s ugly sister back
  • + 7
 Well they are only a few blocks down the road from each other.
  • + 40
 I'm sorry you had to ride that.
  • + 12
 We didn't "have" to ride it, we're just always interested in new stuff and want to give bikes a fair shake—even if they go against what's in vogue. Smile
  • + 1
 @brianpark: Where's the redalp review then? Wink
  • + 1
 @brianpark: sorry my downvote wasn’t meant for you. PB really should let us change that.
  • + 24
 I appreciate the design but the more negative space in the rear triangle than the front triangle ruins the aesthetics.
  • - 29
flag chillrider199 (Apr 4, 2019 at 22:29) (Below Threshold)
 Really? Okay. Fine. Go look at the Marin. Yeah that bike. Come back. Does this look better now?
  • + 28
 @chillrider199: I gave an objective reason why I didn't like the design. so yes really.
  • + 20
 Hold up. External dropper post?
  • + 4
 Apparently they still exist
  • + 2
 But still routed internally!
  • + 19
 Please make it look like a Session...
  • + 16
 This looks like a Star Wars bike!
  • + 24
 I was thinking Nerf gun
  • + 1
 That was my first impression. Add it to the Star Fleet.
  • + 1
 @jdemeritt: oh shit hahahaha
  • + 1
 For the Stormtroopers then.
  • + 1
 @rkstar: That's Star Trek nerd!
  • + 1
 @jdemeritt: Eminent Blaster, the long rocker's preferred weapon
  • + 1
 @jdemeritt: LOL so true tho ????
  • + 12
 Strangely, after a minute or two...
I actually like the looks. Come at me. Big Grin
  • + 39
 Stockholm Syndrome.
  • + 2
 @hifiandmtb: Hah, funny, but nah... It's polarizing, I just had to decide which side I was on. Given that I like the Foxy...
  • - 1
 That is because there will be so many wrinkles and voids in the corners of those sharp edges that the Void stares back at you.
  • + 14
 Lawwill design?
  • + 4
 Yeah that linkage, was immediately thinking of the Schwinn’s and Yeti’s from eons ago.
  • + 2
 Yes think so?
  • + 1
 Many of us who rode the Schwinn 4banger fifteen years ago have been desperate for this suspension to come back. Haters have never ridden it. It is it's own thing- not a single pivot, not a horst, not a DW. That Schwinn was an insanely fun bike. I want to demo this bike badly.
  • + 1
 THAK YOU!! As a former straight 8 rider and Moto guy I was blown away that the author didn’t give a nod to those rigs or designs. It’s been done before and just as long travel hard tails are back, everything comes full circle.
  • + 10
 Complain when bike looks like a trek, complain when it does not
  • + 7
 The real seat angle is sooooo much slacker than 76 degrees. Not sure they really addresses that and I wish Pinkbike would start calling BS on marketing lies like this.
  • + 8
 It does state it ends up at 67°. Which is shockingly slack these days.
  • + 5
 From the article: "Like many contemporary frames, the Onset’s actual seat tube angle is decidedly slacker than its stated angle, which is calculated where the saddle hovers at an average ride height (some bike designers calculate effective ST angles level with stack height). I have a 32-inch inseam, which works out to a ride height of 28.375 inches from the center of the bottom bracket to the top of the saddle at the center of the seat post. The measured effective seat tube angle was 76 degrees."
  • + 2
 Step one: ignore TT and ESTA measures. Two: visually compare HTA and STA; on many mtbs, sta is slacker. Three: contact someone at head office requesting a measurement from headtube centerline to seatpost centerline at saddle rail at a specific saddle height--they'll have little idea of or interest in request. Four: contemplate dubious measurement in comparison with your current bike, recalling that, at 6'1, J. Bryceland rides something with a sub 43mm reach....
  • + 4
 RC: “...the head tube brace is an element that most mountain bikes could benefit from...”

Me: tries to recall how many times I’ve read a bike review (here or elsewhere) where the tester complained of a flexy head tube and comes up empty.
  • + 1
 Not for lateral stiffness. A small amount of material used to triangulate the head tube junction an make a huge improvement in strength there. It's good engineering. A handful of brands, like Ibis, Specialized, and Cannondale have used a similar brace. Boxing the area is a similar strategy, but that only optimizes well with smaller head tubes.
  • + 3
 I’m old enough to remember when 440mm chainstays would be described as “not short enough” whereas now they’re labeled as “not too short” (this on a size small frame with a 76* seat tube angle) ...2018 was a funny year.
  • + 1
 So you’re 2 years old then
  • + 1
 @Naturel: the seat angle is measured at the effective top tube length. Most people don’t run their saddle too much higher than that, so the seated position is good, especially with the long chain stays.
  • + 3
 Like surfboard shapers and craft beer, um, crafters...I don't understand how all these niche bike makers can stay in business, much less make a living. I'm all for chasing your dream and passion, but this(like surfboards and beer), is a very saturated market. I'd be interested to know how many frames this guy has sold over the year, and many of the other small makers that have been shown recently.
  • + 1
 I’d be interested in how long the bearings in the rear pivots survive the design with no crossbrace/bridge between left and right seatstay. Imo this is bad engineering and if it had been made by an unknown Chinese manufacturer instead of designed by a south Californian company, I don’t think PB would have bothered reviewing it.
  • + 5
 The linkage on the shock looks like it may be placing a helluva load on the shock... Surely that will cause some long term issues?
  • + 4
 Don't usually judge looks beyond a functional analysis, but I like the Transformers-like futuristic look. It also seems to annoy the luddites, which is a bonus.
  • + 2
 $6,300
432mm reach in size medium
14,74 kg in size small
Brake mount apparently needs to be shimmed and looks like it will break on first impact

No thank you

Apparently, despite it's weight, it does climb like a goat and descends like a DH bike, but that seems to go for 95% of bikes reviewed.
  • + 6
 Great to see something different.
  • + 2
 Not only something different, but something different that apparently works. Very interested in the follow-up on this.
  • + 1
 @ninjatarian:
Well it looks "different"
  • + 7
 @emptybox: It looks like something Optimus Prime would pleasure himself with.
  • + 3
 Can someone explain the sizing chart? Large in 120mm fits up to 5’10,” but going to 140mm and seemingly shorter numbers, large suddenly fits up to 6’4”
  • + 5
 The size chart is meant to be read separately from the geo. Either way most sizing charts are completely useless, and often just get people on the wrong size bike. There's no way in hell someone who's 6' 4" will feel comfortable with those geo numbers....
  • + 1
 Honest review and probably as good a ride as any for me and all of my mediocre riding friends here on pinkbike. Come on be honest. However that water bottle is a 20 oz. in a side loader, it's looking pretty tight in there. Thanks for the review. Plus that pan shot of @RichardCunningham is mint and that top tube to seat stay flat line is beautiful to my eye.
  • + 4
 "Unidirectional carbon technology".. are you serious?
That's like saying welded aluminum technology..
  • + 1
 as an engineer, i hate seeing a skinny spindly piece with an unsupported hinge in the middle as a compression member.. its going to chew something out or break fairly quickly.
  • + 2
 I have nothing to the bike in general, looks original, more of that please, but very sharp edges on carbon frame? good luck with the layup! Very Nietzschean, lots of void Smile
  • + 2
 Those who complain about the shock support linkage being weak are the same that can't understand why they can't break an egg with their hands holding it from top to bottom.
  • + 4
 That brake mount would last 2.7 rides anywhere there's mud or grit...
  • + 1
 The term "square seat tube" makes you wonder how well anything else was thought out. Judging by that shock extender... not very.
  • + 2
 Was this thing designed by SEGA!?

"Welcome to the fantasy zone...GET READY!"
  • + 1
 I think it's beautiful, but too heavy and too short for a bike that ends with size Large. Damn interesting suspension design, though. Sounds like maybe the Holy Grail.
  • + 2
 Whats up with those little pads on the rear brake mount? I imagine they are supposed to slide . . . but seriously?
  • + 3
 Legit looks like something luke skywalker would ride
  • + 27
 Doesn't look like princess leia to me
  • + 0
 @Code98: have an upvotr, you deserve it
  • + 1
 @Code98 The only way Luke could ride his sister would be if he used the force.
  • + 2
 @excavator666: After he switched to the "dark side"
  • + 4
 ew
  • + 1
 "We think interrupted seat tubes are going to be the next big thing" Giant/Transition
"Hold my beer" Eminent
  • + 1
 Waki is onto something fibre bridging is the term for fibre not fully conforming to tight corners
  • + 1
 Woof.

Q: Did they incorporate the ugly stick it was beat with into the design?

A: No. Sticks are round.
  • + 1
 Dunno what's uglier, the Marin Mount Vision or this? I get function over form, but this just takes it too far!
  • + 2
 Eminem for sure raps better than he looks
  • + 2
 looks like macros bike Smile
  • + 2
 looks like a bike from outer space.
  • + 0
 "...AFS requires a seat tube tunnel, much like Commencal’s Meta trail bike..."

Is there a new Meta we're unaware of, @RichardCunningham ?
  • + 1
 Think he's taking about the older metav3
  • + 1
 Best design ever. Give it split pivot and modern geo=perfect
  • + 1
 People who slag off Orange and their square tubing suddenly see no problem with that kind of design.
  • + 1
 Looks pretty good to me-- better than the many swoopy MTB designs that already look pre-bent and about to fail.
  • + 1
 A motor and a gearbox couldn't fix!
  • + 1
 Now I need to figure out how to get puke out of the keyboard of my laptop.
  • + 1
 Checkmate, ''looks like session'' commenters.
  • + 1
 Amazing looking bike. Something from the 22nd century!
  • + 1
 Hideous and without structural sympathy, what a pile of shit
  • + 1
 Looks Lawill. I bet the suspension works very well
  • + 1
 Finally! Don’t look like a session.
  • + 1
 Eminent onset of anasthetia?
  • + 1
 looks like the seat tube insertion depth is only like 150mm eww
  • + 0
 Reminds me of a robot chicken. It must be all that fashionista college I did back in the day.
  • + 1
 No motor, no gearbox....what happened to all that hype?
  • + 0
 Sends a test bike out for a photo shoot with a clearly visible bike hack shim to rear brake adaptor ????????‍♂️
  • + 1
 I think round tubes are sexy but to each his own
  • + 1
 Nice photos! @lucacometti
  • + 1
 Looks a bit like a Lawwill back end.
  • + 0
 Best part of this post is that all of the image tags say "Richard wearing black because he said it was slimming". Smile
  • - 3
 doesnt the magic in the Evil bikes lie in the fact they have substantially progressive leverage ratios?

"Where short links are prone to dramatic (sometimes beneficial) rate changes, especially near the extremes of the suspension travel, the Onset’s longer links can provide a more gradual ramp-up of the shock’s spring and damping forces as the suspension compresses."
  • + 43
 The magic of evil's bikes is in the marketing
  • + 3
 The leverage curves of both the Haste and the Onset are very flat. Several well-liked companies use similarly flat curves, so it's not a huge strike against the design. Still, I prefer a more progressive leverage rate, which also tends to get more favourable reviews by journalists and folks on forums.
  • + 0
 @taquitos: and the reviews. All of them.
  • + 1
 @Mtmw: what if I told you reviews are considered marketing?
  • + 1
 that shock extension should do wonders for lateral forces
  • + 0
 Looks pretty cool, but 32.5lbs for a size small. Dayyyum.
  • + 1
 terrible look
  • - 1
 It was imenent this was hastely designed. thing looks like a carpentry project
  • + 4
 First shot in the onset of puns fired in haste...
  • + 2
 @hangdogr: Here is one forty punsters.
  • + 11
 @freestyIAM: SHUT UP!!
  • + 0
 looks like revived Yeti dh-9 Big Grin
  • + 1
 I like the DH9 better, even thought it's 18 years old
  • + 1
 Cool looking rip stick
  • + 1
 Looks like a Rotec.
  • + 1
 Ford mondeo geometry
  • + 0
 external dropper post?? wtf
  • + 1
 Looks like slim shady.
  • + 0
 Nice to hear that 12 speed SLX is now available
  • + 0
 I think it's actually a pretty good looking bike.
  • - 1
 It got uglier pretty fast!
  • - 2
 Is that a shim at the rear brake mount ?
  • + 1
 Its a brass bushing that allows the brake mount to slide as suspension compresses.
  • + 3
 What mbarosko said: The torque lever has to slide fore and aft as well as pivot.
  • + 1
 @mbarosko: I would like to see a video of the rear suspension operating through its full travel. Also a picture of the lower shock-to-swingarm link/mount. There must be another pivot at the lower cross-bolt to which said link connects. It seems that the rear caliper would need to attach solely to the orange piece between the chain stays and the seat stays, and even then maybe the caliper would not be in the proper place on the disc. I imagine the designers tried to avoid the need for sliding capability for the caliper, but couldn't make it happen.
  • + 1
 @mbarosko: you’re so smart Wink

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