Pinkbike Poll: Adjustable Geometry - Necessity or Nuisance?

Sep 13, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
Yeti SB165
Confidence: Yeti's SB 165 offers no adjustments and makes no apologies.


Taken to the extreme, every aspect of your bike's geometry and suspension could be adjustable. Telescoping tubes, hinged steerers, slotted dropouts and eccentric bottom brackets are past innovations. Suspension flip chips, sliding shock mounts and offset bushings are nothing new, nor are forks with variable offset and travel options. You could buy a mountain bike based solely upon your favorite components, color, and frame material of the moment without sweating the numbers. Imagine, for instance, the Specialized Enduro of the future:

Once assembled with the wheel diameters you've selected, setting up your Specialized Enduro PGSHT (Personalized Geometry & Suspension Harmonizing Technology) would ensure perfection.
Adjustable head tube angle? Check.
You'd need only to enter your size, weight and your assumed level of radness into the PGSHT smartphone app, then follow its baseline recommendations. Pair the PGSHT app with Strava and you'd get periodic coaching metrics to improve your Enduro P's geometry and suspension kinematics based upon data learned from riders who are significantly faster than you.

Rocky Mountain Ride Nine chip
Rocky Mountain's Ride 9 chip offers nine adjustments that affect suspension kinematics and geometry.
Liteville 601
Liteville 601's forward shock mount can be adjusted fore and aft to alter its geometry or adapt different shocks.

Doubt Medication and a Great Sales Tool

Somewhat closer to reality is that adjustable suspension and geometry devices are a form of mechanical medication. Self doubt sells. "Should I stick with what I know best, or should I buy into an emerging trend?" It's human nature to straddle the fence. That's why sliver SUVs are so popular.

Flip chips are powerful anti-anxiety pills for finicky customers and a wonderful sales tool for bike brands. "If you don't like long, low and slack, you can always return to familiar territory." Adjustable features assure timid buyers that expensive mountain bike purchase will be future proof.
Canondale's 2004 Prophet could be switched from a Freeride to an XC Bike.
Canondale's 2004 Prophet could be switched from a Freeride to an XC Bike.

Flip chips allow bike brands to avoid risk of being first adopters. Geometry adjustments let bike makers lag safely behind the long low and slack curve until the movement had gathered enough momentum to eliminate financial risks. Not pointing fingers, but there's some conspicuous names proudly waving that flag today who missed the wedding.

 Photo by clint trahan clinttrahan.com
Scott's 2020 Gambler's shock chip alters BB height and shock rate.
 Photo by clint trahan clinttrahan.com
The Gambler's two-position dropout chip. The head tube angle can also be set from 62 to 64 degrees.

Once You Know, You Don't Need It

"Pro racers are constantly changing their setups, right?" True that, but they're surrounded by experts and searching for one or two seconds from a bike that is near perfect. That's not us.

Granting the power to adjust your chassis doesn't automatically empower you to get it right. Candid conversations with bike demo technicians and and pro suspension tuners suggest that, while many riders have a working knowledge that can get their bikes in the ballpark, relatively few possess an accurate and comprehensive understanding of proper suspension tuning and bike setup.

Datalogging with Formula
Race teams and bike makers go to great lengths to understand and replicate suspension settings and kinematics. Subtleties that amatuer knob twisters largely ignore.

Those who score in that top ten percentile are also capable of choosing a bike with the correct suspension and geometry to suit their riding styles. They don't need flip chips. The rest of us probably have a fifty-fifty chance of getting it right so, providing the bike maker has a competent engineering staff, an argument could also be made that the absence of chassis adjustments would guarantee better than average performance.

Fox Live Valve
Fox's Live Valve (prototype in this pic) dramatically simplifies high amplitude riding by reading the terrain and responding with just right pedaling and suspension control.

"Less-is-more" and "simpler is better" are becoming keynote marketing phrases. Bikes are pretty good across the board. Both trends suggest that the next wave of performance improvements may be strategies to reduce the complexity of our technology, while extending the useful range of the mountain bike's handling and suspension. Less dials and more smiles. That said, today's poll asks:


Adjustable geometry and kinematics: a necessity or a nuisance?




146 Comments

  • 114 8
 Set it low and fuhgedaboudit.
  • 141 18
 then, after a month of constant pedal strikes, set it back to high
  • 79 1
 @f00bar: then increase fork travel and back to low
  • 9 1
 Set er low and open that there compression wide open- let er buck
  • 6 1
 @youandwhosearmy ever tried a stump evo?
  • 19 1
 @Mntneer: and buy offset bushings set it lower.
  • 4 3
 Shapeshifter is Cool !
  • 11 1
 I have to say Santa Cruz's high/low and short/long chainstay adjustments is pretty rad. As a taller rider the ability to adjust bb height and chainstay length while also using different air springs in the fork to adjust travel is really cool to have on a high end bike. May also come in handy now that mullet bikes are all the rage.

Plus the execution is pretty clean and seems minimal maintenance and weight wise.
  • 1 2
 @brappjuice: that there compression lol yeeeehawwww!!!!
  • 1 3
 @B650wagon: really? You ride a Strive? How is it? Do you use it as much as a dropper?
  • 3 2
 @chyu: offer bushings slacken STA - that's totally not popular these days.

Angleset is what you want Razz
  • 1 2
 @fracasnoxteam: had a strive and never touched the shape shifter...disconnected it, ran it slack, put a coil on it and an angleset. It was a beast and climbed very well considering I never touched the climb switch.
  • 2 2
 I don't own a Strive but I really like the concept, hear good things and it gets good reviews. I'd try and/or buy.
  • 5 1
 @f00bar: or run 165 cranks.
  • 2 3
 @B650wagon: Yep. 2 bikes in one is how i view my Strive. Long fire road grind? Set it to lycra mode. Change it at the top to party mode for the decent.
  • 1 2
 I used to want the option to change geo, but I just use the slackest setting. Super rare, if ever, do i adjust it.
  • 1 2
 Kind of like the talas fork, set it long and forget about it
  • 1 2
 I use Talss and like it, climbs are steep here. But I think I would prefer the Shapeshifter and a Float fork, makes more sense.
  • 1 1
 @fracasnoxteam: I ride a strive and don’t use the shapeshifter near as much as my dropper, usually I keep it on dh mode, but for long climbs the xc mode is nice and you can feel the difference (2018 strive al 6.0)
  • 1 1
 @f00bar: or get a 29 front
  • 42 1
 That poll is kind of limiting. Some things, the rocky, are way overkill and unnecessary. The Scott makes a ton of sense and is an easier one to deal with. Each position has a purpose that is easy to understand and adjust for. With multiple wheel size options in a frame and people wanting to play with the mullet, the argument for slight adjustments makes sense. When a brand adds a flip chip that only changes head angle by .3 degrees and bb by 4mm, that is a bit unnecessary. Not to say normal riders are anywhere near as tuned in as someone like Minnaar. But he has been adding and removing an extension off the chainstay depending on track, same as a lot of riders do for the headset and reach.
  • 3 1
 Completely agree, especially for wheel size differences. I’m wanting to build a mullet bike and I’ve found that the flip chip directly offsets what a different sized rear wheel does to the geo. But companies don’t put a lot of adjustment into their flip chips. They would need to be a full degree or 15mm of bb height to make sense for going mullet style.
  • 13 1
 Totally agree. Do I think flip chips are absolutely necessary for every frame? Not really. Do I think they're a great idea, and would it make a bike more attractive to me? 100%

If you don't live in an area where you can demo every bike on the market (or that just sounds like a costly pain in the ass... it does to me), having more options to dial in the bike or adapt it to different terrain if you're going on vacation to a totally different riding spot (for example) is awesome.

I'm also a massive fan of the modular / flip-chippy approach to frame design being adopted by Guerrilla Gravity, Intense, etc. Getting more geometry and wheel size options out of fewer molds and SKUs should allow for lots of options for customers and hopefully more wallet-friendly bikes in the long run.
  • 7 1
 Totally down with the flip chip at the shock. The other thing that's cool is adjustable chainstay length.
  • 2 1
 @mountainyj
Rocky's system allows for rider weight to factor in as well, so if you know your weight, you'll only be looking at 3 positions.
  • 21 1
 I was using 3 out of the 4 flip chip positions on my RM slayer, along 2 wheelsets and 3 tire combinations.
I only have one (mtb) bike, and want to do everything with it : freeride, enduro racing, bike park, xc marathon, bikepacking trip, etc..

I don't change it every day, but when I do something different from usual, I'll spend the 10mins I need to set up the bike accordingly.
  • 19 1
 Do bike manufacturers expect customers to change these geometry options often, or is the purpose instead to offer two options for initial set up, and assume a customer will set it up one way and leave it? I'd always assumed the latter. I had an Intense Primer and set it to the 130mm setting with a matching 140mm fork, and never once thought about changing to 115mm based on the ride. Intense could have left it at 130mm permanently, but some portion of the market also likely left it at 115 (maybe with a shorter fork and a lighter build).

Intense could have manufactured a 115mm and 130mm version, but that would cost them more, no?
  • 11 3
 I change mine all the time - super easy - swap the coil out for air if I want too - not a pain at all on my rocky - the ride 9 chip I can reset in less than a minute on trail.
  • 6 11
flag Laymo (Sep 13, 2019 at 11:38) (Below Threshold)
 90% of downhill-oriented riders just put it in the slackest position and leave it there. But I guess if you live where the trails are lame and tame it's good to have the steep setting.
  • 2 1
 Yeah but at the time the primer released is was 130 130 or 130 115. it was also their"xc" bike so i get it

but im with you the flip is kinda eh. i would like to have seen a new link to do 120 140 when they re did it to a 140 fork
  • 2 1
 I always thought of it as a set and forget adjustment. Spend the time to try all the different adjustments, then leave it in the optimized position unless you change some components.

I also think that single adjustments are useless because nothing works in isolation. If all you have is a shock flip chip to raise/lower the BB, you'll also be changing the head angle, reach, stack, and often the shock progression curve. In that scenario, and angle set headset could really help to bring the head angle back into line, then the bar/stem/spacers combo adjusted to correct for reach and stack.

I used to have an Altitude with RIDE-9. I left it in the slackest setting because the head angle was too steep (even in the slackest position), but sacrificed a good saddle position. I would have rather been in a mid position for a steeper seat angle, and less pedal strikes, then used an angle set to reduce the headtube angle with a longer travel fork to bring the stack height back to original.
  • 2 1
 A bit of both I would think. I personally wouldn't go changing it all the time, but if I lived somewhere where the trails were slow and techy and took a vacation to somewhere fast and flowy (or vice versa) I'd def use it.

Along the same lines, it might make the same bike design marketable to people in multiple different regions (more of the "set it up once" point you made) - I know east coast riders who def shy away from really low BBs and mega slack head angles, for example.

Then again, if the chip only changes HA and BB height by some trivial amount it doesn't really matter anyway. So it depends on how well it's implemented (obviously).
  • 2 1
 @Laymo: this is true.
  • 18 1
 Bike reviewers wax lyrical about geometry and the supposed benefits of an extra degree here or a few milimeters there. For those of us that don't get to ride tons of different bikes for a living, a single bike with a flip-chip or some adjustable chainstays might be the only way we can assess these kinds of claims for ourselves.
  • 18 1
 Idk how a component that most folks don't even realize they have, could ever qualify as a "nuisance". Go home Pinkbike, you're drunk.
  • 11 0
 I think the biggest point to make is that there's a bigger reason/advantage to have adjustable geometry over not having. Having adjustable geometry allows you to modify your bike and let it change and adapt to the way you ride. Some people aren't as tech oriented and that won't be for them. If you're someone who likes to have options - you'll never have the nagging question of what if? Modifying your position is HUGE I mean HUGE and when you talk with a real mountain bike expert they'll tell you that GEO is everything and also that GEO is very different for people. One person leverages a bike very differently than another - I think most of this is dependent on how our hips move and how long our torso is. That all equals a very unique leverage that not everyone will find to be the sweet spot. So having a few different positions to play with rather than spending a ton of money on a new stem and bar and setback saddle - yea it's pretty nice to have. Rolling a Rocky Mountain Custom allows me to set it for bike park riding one minute - trail riding the next - or steep and fast for racing. Blah blah blah - go ride your bike - find the position you like and keep it there - but just remember there's always another option if you ever want to mess around with it.
  • 3 2
 Can I choose to save $500 and not have it?
  • 1 0
 @gticket: It doesn't cost anywhere near that. For a flipchip setup all it is: Machine in the hole for the flip chip, and two small pieces of aluminum.
  • 11 1
 Tall people with bigger bikes and longer front centers need longer chainstays, short people with smaller bikes and smaller front centers need shorter chainstays. Ditto for shock tunes and leverage rates. "One size fits all" means "One size fits... most people, kinda, but it could definitely fit more people better." Adjustments aren't for the same rider to fiddle with constantly, they're to accommodate different people with one unified design. Duh.
  • 10 1
 My Altitude has ride nine. The previous owner had set it in the slackest position. This didn't work where I live, too many pedal strikes. I have currently set it to the middle position and am quite happy with it for 95 % of my riding. The complaint that I have is that the guide on Rockys website is rather vague and I feel like I might be missing out on the best possible performance. Yet I don't want to spend days testing and taking notes, I just want to ride.
  • 1 1
 Agreed, I have the same setup. I started in the middle, then moved it to slack-ish. Waaay too many pedal strikes so I moved it back and the bike just feels fun. I did put it in the slackest setting once more for a park day, but that's it. I've basically moved it 3 times in ~5 years. I like the idea, but it's not necessary.
  • 1 0
 Ive got an altitude, ride 9 is too much man. played with it the first few weeks then left it. Only time its been touched since is when went to the alps.
  • 7 1
 I've got a fugitive lt I'm waiting for at the moment. I'm planning on getting a backup shock to let me run it in the 120mm configuration so when I go roadtripping I can bring one bike and toss the shorter shock in at the steeper head angle position when I end up somewhere like Allegrippis that doesn't need more than a rigid forked karate monkey. Some geometry adjustment is good and can be a great asset and selling point, but necessity is a strong word.
  • 3 1
 Also have a Fugitive LT... don't think I'd ever bother swapping the shock and fork to run it in the non LT version (hell, I already overforked it a bit with a 160mm), but it's nice to know it's an option and it does make the bike hugely versatile to more markets, riders and types of terrain. I think it's a smart move to allow riders the ability to slightly adapt a bike to their riding style and terrain.

But, when I first got the bike, I did swap back and forth between the neutral and slack positions a lot (nice that Knolly made it so simple to do trailside... one bolt!!). Wanted to find out which position I preferred for most riding and what each position felt like, as well as strengths and weaknesses in both. Now I'm pretty much settled into keeping it in slack (and with the 160 fork, my head angle 64.Cool and love it. That decision is based soley on the fact that 90% of my riding is on steep fast and chunky terrain. But if or when I ever do some longer more xc style rides, it's nice to know I can toss it in neutral and gain some efficiency. I also have the MRP Ribbon fork, so changing the travel is as simple as doing a lower leg service... you just swap out some spacers. So I guess, if I ever came across a good deal on the shorter shock... it might be worth picking it up and give me lots of options.

In the end, I agree, it's a nice to have, but isn't what ultimately sold me on the bike and is not a necessity.
  • 4 1
 I change up my warden between neutral and slack all the time. For the really long climbing slogs, it does feel better in neutral, and definitely descends very steep stuff more confidently in the slack setting. And even if the advantage is only psychological, it takes two minutes to swap it over so why not?
  • 8 2
 There weren't enough options on this poll. My bike (Guerrilla Gravity) has 2 shock settings and you can run 2 shock lengths for 4 different configurations (lots more including fork changes and even more if you swap stays.) I set it up like a trail bike most of the time but can put a coil on it, lengthen the fork travel (MRP Ribbon) and put some DH tires on it and it's a park brawler. I very much like my adjustable geometry. I use it to effectively have 2 bikes in one package.
  • 6 1
 I think it's nice to have but use sparingly - I leave mine in the high setting all the time for trail riding but when I do a bike park a couple times a summer, I take 5 minutes and flip it to the low setting. Isn't necessary but certainly doesn't hurt.
  • 6 1
 From the article:

"Self doubt sells. "Should I stick with what I know best, or should I buy into an emerging trend?" It's human nature to straddle the fence. That's why sliver SUVs are so popular."

I couldn't finish the article cause I don't understand this statement about silver SUV's ....
  • 1 1
 Also the spelling mistake
  • 5 1
 I'm a fan of having a simple flip chip on a longer travel trail/ Enduro bike. For shuttling/ bike park it's nice to have a super slack bike, but for longer trail rides I prefer something a little more upright.
  • 5 1
 All I could care about are adjustable chainstay lengths. Short for playful manual happy bike and long for park smashing. .5 degree HA adjustment doesn't really mean much to me.
  • 7 2
 I liked how the article said flip chips were a risk-aversion move for the manufacturer, paired with a picture of a 'gambler.'
  • 5 1
 Nice to see a shoutout to the Prophet, a bike with an apt name that was ahead of it's time but LOL that a head angle of 67 deg was considered slack
  • 3 1
 I rocked the Prophet MX, which had the 12mm rear through axle and had the option of a 67°/65.5° head tube angle, which is pretty reasonable even for today's bikes. It was definitely ahead of its time considering that was 13 years ago. Good memories on that bike!
  • 1 1
 Yeah I had the Prophet too until last year, when I changed to a slacker and more downhill-oriented bike (which also has two settings - needless to say I run in low-and-slack!). Great bike for its time, and those welds... Smile Although I did find that the 67.5 setting, while still preferable, left the BB far too low and thus lots of pedal/crank strikes - could be hair-raising when pedalling out of corners! Would definitely have benefited from a 165 crankset.
  • 2 0
 I think it CAN be beneficial, but isn't a requirement for me. If it was simple to change on the fly (Shapeshifter) and was a pretty large change (more than 1 degree) then I could see it being used mid-ride. The flip chip option I see as a fine option but I'd probably set it once and forget it. But it's still not bad to have that option when you buy a bike to set it up a couple different ways.
  • 4 2
 Adjustability makes sense on a bike like the Delirium, where you can set it up as a downhill shredder with a double crown for park, or with a single crown for freeride/enduro. I leave it mostly in the steeper enduro setting, unless I know it will be a shuttle day. I think a flip chip on an enduro bike wouldn't get much use by me. I'd find a setting I like, and never touch it again. Still, it's nice to have the option. As long as having the adjustability doesn't negatively impact any other aspect of the design, I don't see a problem with them at all.
  • 3 1
 If all the chips and whatnot are problem free in the field? Seems like a good thing, even if it's more complex. If it's creaky or a hassle? Not worth it at all.

I'm really happy with the flip chips on my Megatower, especially the dropouts. It's SO FUN in the long setting, which balances the bike out with a 170mm fork. Hassle free thus far. Two thumbs up.
  • 4 1
 The Rocky Mountain's Ride 9 adjustments on my Altitude are very subtle differences and sometimes hardly noticeable, but I do like having the options.
  • 2 1
 It does have a place! Drop the BB and slacken HA and of to the bike park! It seems that one of the big brands adopted it and of course all of the others simply don't want to get left behind! I have just received an email from Nukeproof launching the new Reactor which has it and they have called it 'trail or rail'. However, it's nothing new of course, if I remember correctly I saw this on a Liteville a whole decade ago!
  • 6 1
 My hard tail has a harder tail setting
  • 3 2
 No adjustments at all, or 1 that makes an actual big change. I've been lucky to work with top riders for many years and LOTS of them can barely tell the difference between 0.5º of head angle or 5mm of wheelbase, yet every other poster on here can feel 1 shim, 5% of more shock progressivity or the ramp up of having a tyre insert fitted!!! The fact is that body position on the bike, or correct use of brakes will make such a way more radical change to handling, yet very few people are prepared to spend time (or money) getting the basics on point. (for the record i'm a shit rider who still gets it wrong, but i know its me, not the 432.5768mm chainstay to blame)

Mind you, thats not what sells bikes. Get them adjustments slapped on!
  • 2 1
 Having a bike that can have two settings is great and I enjoy it, i.e Guerilla Gravity, Foes, etc. The ability to go from a great trail setup, to getting a slacker bike with more travel for bike park days just by moving a bolt position is awsome.
  • 2 1
 I flip my chip to suit the trails I will be riding that day. I'm a big fan of my Instinct's Ride-9. The difference between Slack (66 HTA with low BB) and Steep (67 HTA with high BB) is super noticeable. Flip chips also change shock progression. Riding mellow trails? Ride the HI position and gain linear shock progression. Riding steep and deep, flip to LO and gain better bottom resistance.
  • 2 1
 I think the option is nice, but not a necessity. If given a choice between two bikes that both ride well and feel good to me, but one has some adjustable features (flip chip, reach adjust) I'd go with the adjustable bike. I keep my flip chip in LOW, but I do like the @GuerrillaGravity concepts of chain stay kits and reach adjust in addition to a flip chip. However I feel like the @RockyMountainBicycles Ride 9 might be a bit too much adjustment for the average joe like myself.
  • 2 1
 IMO as long as its simple and easy to use I like it. For example my trek's mino link is easy light and simple, but the shape shifter stuff on canyons scares me. I also like the flip chip on the dropout for changing wheel base
  • 1 0
 People saying that it's not necessary because most people just "set it and forget it" confuse me because of their logic.
If someone sets it and forgets it that means that same someone accesses the chip or other mechanism to set their geometry to their liking.
  • 1 1
 I'll consider buying a bike if at least one of its settings suits my needs. If a non-adjustable bike doesn't suit me, it blew its one and only chance to appeal to me. It's mostly set-and-forget for me. Though, I do value the first-hand knowledge of playing around with different settings, considering that I've been buying bikes without demo. I'd like to believe I can predict how bikes will handle with enough understanding...
  • 3 1
 "Fox Live valve reads the terrain", silly boy!!
It only "reads" what is transmitted from the suspension.. albeit very quickly..
  • 2 3
 @jjhobbs : The sensors are below the "suspension."
  • 5 1
 @RichardCunningham: mmmm...maybe one at rear(40%) but at front, looks fork based. It's most definitely not reading anything infront of bike ,ie, the terrain ahead of front wheel. It's just a fancy blow off valve me thinks...
  • 2 1
 Yeah the fork is def not adjusting to terrain the front wheel has not already engaged.
  • 1 1
 I used to feel the need to adjust my geometry on my 2004 RMB ETSX.
Since the advent of the "New Geometry", I don't find I need to alter anything much.
Yes, Rock Shox Dual Position Air or similar is nice to lower the front end a bit (20mm) for climbing, but not absolutely necessary as it was in the past.

I bought a Kona Process 153, and now I just go ride.
  • 1 1
 On my Remedy I tried the low position and it was pedal strikes all day long. Put it back to high and have never touched it since.
On the Banshee Prime I played with long chainstays (ace) and the high / low position and it's stayed in the long and low position.

As I'm tall, I definitely prefer the longer chainstays and adjustability.
But once I land on a setting I leave it alone.
  • 1 1
 Adjustable geometry means the bike isn't ready for production.

I think it makes sense for prototype bikes to dial in the final product.

But if you give the customer 9 options 8/9 times they are gonna get it wrong.

Let the engineers, professional racers, and industry riders determine what's best for the bike in question. Then set it up that way for the customer.

They will not even know to thank you for it. And that's the mark of a great bike.

If you want a downhill bike. Its gonna be slack and low.

Enduro bike slightly less slack and less low.

Trail bike even less slack and even less low

Xc bike the least slack and least low

DJ bike dont have to adjust nothin.
  • 1 1
 I walked into a bike shop yesterday to buy a saddle. Owner says I have a computer that can measure you and tell you want size saddle you need. Ok, then questions start. Have you ever had a bike fit? I say I have, In the last few years? No, well, you should have one every year! Really, How much? $350 it takes 3 hours... Sorry I think my bike fits pretty good and I have been riding long enough to know what I need to change. The conversation sinks into all the tech etc. I leave with no saddle. Did all that just lose the shop business, yes. Do some folks need a $350 maybe. Does everyone who has a numb butt need a bike fit? NO. The coolest thing about bicycles is; consumers have access the highest technology. Richard’s question is does everyone really need all these adjustments,? Well no, but heck if that is your thing, then go for it - who am I to judge?
  • 1 2
 I could do without all the other stuff, but adjustable horizontal dropouts (correctly done) are great. My Giant STP dirt jumper has 390mm chain stays and it's really fun to ride, but the slides also allow me to go longer if I want to run fatter tires.
  • 2 1
 Flip chips have allowed ability to long shock or mullet certain bikes well even though it may not have been the manufactures intent.
  • 2 1
 If you love a bike and dont like the geometry why cant I set up how o love it to be!!!!! With no need to be a pro to get it like I love it to be!!!!
  • 2 3
 read this article just after reading the ohlins shock review below it. one thing stuck in my mind,

"Öhlins choose to use fewer adjuster clicks than some of the competition. While not only reducing the risk of landing on a poor setup it also means that each adjuster has a perceivable change on the bike."

That statement, written by pinkbike staffer writing the review has relevance here too.. not saying its right or wrong, just relevant, that statement alone is making me consider the ohlins on my next bike..
  • 1 1
 I also don't think it's correct.

If you're covering the same span of adjustability, then you're going to end up with the same probability of landing on a poor set up. If you have 12 clicks and half work, then randomly you have a 1/2 chance if landing on one of the 6 that are bad. If it's the same ratio with 6 clicks, you have the same chance of landing on one of the three bad ones. It's not as if Ohlins could somehow just remove the clicks that would end up as bad for the rider.

That being said, I'm perfectly happy to have less clicks. I'm not skilled enough to tell the difference between 12 and 13 clicks of LSC, so bigger steps are fine by me.
  • 2 1
 Not to bothered about flip chips because offset bushings usually do the same thing.

I won’t buy a bike with an integrated headset though - got to have angleset options...
  • 1 1
 My next bike will be like that!

No IS standard...
What annoys more is the creaks & cracks + not angleset compatible!

+1 on non-adjustable things (less problems/easier for manufacturing = less money!!! ----> it's just bikes that are ridden a couple of times per week!!!)
  • 1 2
 Adjustable geo allows the manufacturer to produce a frame with broader appeal. You may set it to your one setting and leave it there without any further experimentation but the setting allows you to get what you want out of the frame while another person gets what they want.
  • 1 1
 Anyone have any problems with the adjustable bits wearing out prematurely? I can't help but think adding more pieces at high stress points could mean more wear and tear and even more places for creaks and clicks to develop.
  • 1 1
 Every bike ive ever owned has had some sort of adjustment. Mostly commonly a flip chip for the shock and or a dropout adjustment. I tinker, find what I like (usually long and low) and hardly touch them after.
  • 3 1
 Just ride. The more you obsess the less that you realise that the one factor holding you back is your head.
  • 1 1
 TRUE ADJUSTABLE GEOMETRY like the Cannondale Jekyll, Canyon Strive, Scoot Genius and other bikes with 2 stage shocks and forks REALLY do help on the uphill to make it easier. Other than that, flip chips are silly.
  • 1 1
 My 2001 Specialized Enduro had a four position chip. Set it where I wanted it, and it never changed again. I think my cousin who still rides that bike has it in the same position.
  • 3 3
 Too many people worrying about all these PIGSHIT details on their bike and not enough going out riding. You can get used to any bike and have fun. Its about having fun not angles, wheel size, geometry and all that crap.
  • 2 1
 Such a let down when someone writes a whole dam page for a comment....only to get 1 upvote. Just an observation over the years.
  • 1 1
 In my opinion there a missing choice on the answers. I feel the flip chip are needed when they allow to use different or mixed wheelsize. Like on the new scott. On that bike is possible to change wheels configuration.
  • 2 1
 More options to tweak your bike to your liking is better. You don't have to use those options but it is better to have the choice.
  • 2 1
 Bars, stem, stack and saddle. All the adjustment I need. Fiddling with the bike just gives me trust issues and too much to think about.
  • 3 1
 Can anybody tell me what I’m supposed to be seeing in the thumbnail picture
  • 1 1
 That's the most interesting thing about this article.
  • 1 2
 The low/high setting is not as useful as it looks. How many of us who have that on our bikes set it high? A flip chip on the chainstay to change the wheelbase will be more useful to add stability on shuttle rides.

Wait, that would mean the rotor won't have the proper distance with the caliper, right? So both the wheel and the caliper will have to be adjusted. Ah, too much work.
  • 1 1
 For me , I see low/high like the sport / economy modes in cars.

When I'm on my bike, my balls are temporarily released from her handbag. Out the shrink wrap and out to play. Low and slack me up mother fukka
  • 1 1
 At the very least, frames should have head tubes that can allow riders to tweak reach and angle headsets. Changing stem length is a hack which can lead to unwanted steering characteristics depending on the fork offset
  • 3 1
 I think adjustable geo is nice to give your bike a different feel once in a while without having to buy another frame
  • 1 1
 I have adjustable drop outs to adjust my head angle on my banshee that I leave in the high setting 99% of the time but often switch to slack and low for races or bike park days.
  • 1 1
 I’m a pretty simple guy. I like to set and forget. The only adjustments I need is a high/low BB and a travel reducer on my Rockshox Lyrik. Drop the fork for XC and raise it for DH
  • 1 1
 I really notice the difference on my strive when doing long climbs. I just press the lever and hump the bike, it's no effort. That said, if I had to use a tool to change it I'd never bother.
  • 3 2
 Everyone who says nuisance are the same people who don't know what the compression and rebound knobs on their suspension do.
  • 3 1
 I’m so done with the geo bullshit, makes me want to buy an ebike.
  • 7 1
 true, I love that ebikes don’t have geometry!
  • 2 2
 Let me explain my sarcasm.. the bike industry’s job is to sell us bikes. Today’s sales tactics are through modern geometry.. I have more interest in buying something completely different, like an e-bike, than upgrading my current 2017 yeti because my geo is “outdated”. 1 to 2 degrees here and there and making it a few mm longer/ shorter in the same category of bikes just doesn't make that big of a difference.
  • 3 4
 Get rid of the stupid flip chips and make my bike CHEAPER! Cut down on the parts, R&D, tooling, design, everything. Better to get used to one bike, one setup, and how it rides rather than endlessly tinkering.
  • 2 1
 Yes! After-work XC rides on my enduro bike, that happens to be the only bike I own.
  • 2 1
 I love the theory of it, but I'm far to lazy to flip chips. Set it and forget it.
  • 3 1
 Just pick your Geometry and be a D!(K about it...
  • 4 1
 Or pick two geometries and be a dick twice.
  • 3 1
 Canyon strive with shapeshifter is a perfect example, probably the best.
  • 2 1
 Yeah, I have a strive and the difference between XC and DH mode is huge, helps a lot for pedalling. Once you put it into dh mode, the bb drops significantly and the bike becomes plusher and longer. But it's a different example as you can't align geometry for your preference rather change geometry for the riding mode. Which makes more sense I think.
  • 2 1
 Set it and forget about it. Get rid of them and drop the price of the bike.
  • 2 1
 Its simply not possible to ride true Downcountry without adjustable geometry.
  • 2 1
 Geometry chips are more for the manufacturer than the customer. 99% of riders set it once and never again
  • 2 1
 Poorly worded choices. I selected "necessity", but really just see it as a nice option.
  • 2 1
 Ain't a nuisance either if ya don't touch it.
  • 1 1
 @zephxiii: For sure.
  • 1 1
 Flip chip should be +\- 1 degree and slotted dropouts for +\- 15mm,that’s all you need.

Any more adjustment is too much to get wrong.
  • 1 1
 A twin tube damper is way more important to me than adjustable geometry. It's shocking how much a well tuned shock changes how a bike rides.
  • 1 0
 Necessity 100% if you are not living in mountains but spend your vacations over there
  • 2 5
 Seems to me this is for bike engineers who either couldn't make their minds up on which is better OR couldn't get enough information out of marketing on what people want. Choose a personality, design for them. You will generally have a much better product that trying to design for everybody! That's my 2 cents.
  • 3 6
 Yep, all the adjustable geometry is just a marketing gimmick. Trail bike geometry is what enduro geometry was like 3-4 years ago. It should be pretty obvious by now that for general trail riding, longer, slacker is the way to go. Pedaling performance be achieved with linkage design and suspension.

Besides, we already have adjustable geometry in the bikes - simply adjust the rear sag. Run the rear at 20% for trail, and get a higher BB, steeper head angle, more anti squat, firmer pedaling platform. Run it at %30 to get more compliance and a slacker head angle.
  • 1 1
 not to nitpick but who put livevalve on that kona process? like it's not THAT old, but for livevalve? really?
  • 1 1
 I had a Carbine 29c once and i used the lower for a short travel bike. Thank god for the travel adjustment.
  • 1 1
 Rocky Mountain Altitude with the bb set high for my all mountain/trail needs. Never think about it. I love how it rides.
  • 1 1
 The Jeffsy's two positions are useful when switching between 2.6" and 2.3" tires.
  • 1 1
 Anyone run their Nomad V4 in the slack configuration, for anything other than a chairlift, I find it kinda useless.
  • 4 7
 No one needs adjustments, just by the bike with the angles you want.. I always set it and forget it, if you do any different you're just wasting time you could be riding and getting faster..
  • 2 1
 Wen you get faster you need them small ajustment = upgrades on the bike!!!
And thats how you get faster!!!!!!
  • 2 1
 What a faff.....
  • 3 4
 Buy and ride a damn good steel aggressive hardtail and stop pissing us off with your unicorn sciences!
  • 2 1
 oh shut up
  • 1 1
 Is that Lapierre new rig?
  • 1 1
 I just own multiple bikes...
  • 1 1
 So the new Specialized Enduro comes with PiGSH!T??
  • 1 1
 Just one for air or coil shock running please.
  • 1 1
 Option 5: can't find what you want so build it yourself
  • 2 2
 Bend your arms and ride.
  • 2 3
 Stupid! Just ride ya bike!
  • 3 5
 NOBODY USES THE FLIP CHIPS
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