Spotted: Prototype High Pivot Canyon Sender

Feb 26, 2024
by Mike Kazimer  
photo

Four years ago we were busy analyzing photos shot on a potato of Tahnee Seagrave's prototype Canyon Sender, and here we are again with an early look at what's likely the next iteration of that downhill machine.

This time around, the photo aren't as blurry, but the increasingly ubiquitous bike diaper is in place, shielding the exact suspension design from view. One thing is clear, though – the bike looks to use a high pivot suspension layout, with the idler pulley located above the front chainring, just behind the center of the bottom bracket. It also appears that there's a bearing around the rear axle, a departure from the Horst Link layout used on the current Sender.

photo

Rather than being a rough aluminum prototype, the bits of the bike that are exposed are carbon fiber, suggesting that this will be unveiled sooner than later, at least underneath Canyon's World Cup racers. The World Cup kicks off at Fort William on May 3rd, so hopefully we'll be able to get the full scoop by the time racing begins. It'll be interesting to see if Canyon has integrated their KIS steering stabilizer system into the frame, since last year we saw Troy Brosnan using the spring-loaded device zip-tied to his top tube.

It's also worth mentioning that this new bike has an idler and and O-Chain active spider, which theoretically shouldn't be required, since the idler eliminates the influence of chain growth, the issue that the O-Chain was designed to deal with in the first place. Maybe there's a secondary benefit to the device - some riders have mentioned that it helps minimize chain slap, but it's also possible the team simply wanted the build to remain sponsor-correct.


Data acquisition and steering damper on Troy Brosnan s Canyon.
Troy Brosnan's Canyon Sender in 2023.


Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,731 articles

144 Comments
  • 402 2
 Bikes come and go. Pivot locations come and go. But the Shimano Saint groupset lives forever.
  • 36 0
 No need of supermegadeluxebooster marketing..
  • 4 2
 I was gonna note that the saint rear caliper from that angle may either a bit distorted or does it look like a lot larger than the current 10 yo Saint caliper???
  • 5 0
 @orven: photo angle most likely.
  • 4 0
 @orven: there are going to be new or updated shimano brakes soon-ish as far as i heard
  • 2 0
 How are Saint brakes compared to new XT?
  • 4 1
 @pakleni: I find the new 4 pot XT bled (and burped) properly much better. I run them on all my bikes (Trail, Enduro, Eeb).
  • 5 0
 @THerman666: people have been saying that for a very, very long time. We’re still waiting.
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: they are VERY similar if not the same... IMO
  • 2 0
 @THerman666: details please?
  • 1 0
 @orven: Looks like its bit different, like entire casting more round ,
older one more edges.
  • 1 1
 @f*cktoryteam: sprmgdlxbstr marketing
  • 2 0
 well...this Saint has direct chainring on it...so it's a new one
  • 2 0
 @SimonD: what do you mean by burped?
I've always liked Shimano brakes but the wandering bite point is very annoying. I've now changed to a shigura set up. Xt levers with mt7 calipers. By far the best set up I've had. Masses of power with a consistent bite point.
  • 2 0
 @filryan: Which fluid did you use in your Shirgura? Royal Blue? If so that's what fixed it, Shimano oil is too thick. Likewater fixed my XT and Zee set.
  • 1 0
 There can be only one!
  • 1 0
 @CustardCountry: I guess that is true, rumors being rumors. But what i heard was from a certain bike manufacturer representative during a technical course. Can’t say much more!
  • 2 0
 @tempnoo1: now that interesting. Yes I used the royal blue. Running slx on another bike so I'll swap the oil out and see. Cheers
  • 2 1
 @pakleni: they’ve apparently got the same amount of power though it feels less but a lot more modulation and control but still feels like a Shimano brake. It’s still very on / off but a massive improvement over the Saints.
  • 1 0
 @ernst42: no details yet, apparently end of 2024.
  • 1 1
 @SimonD: please explain the acronym Eeb? Electric Enduro bike? Wtf is it
  • 1 0
 @skiboot1: it's not an acronym. say it out loud, eeb ebike. Blame Sam Pilgrim for it.
  • 1 0
 @cabala: Looks like the same Big ol 4 bolts on the chainring like normal to me?
  • 1 4
 @tempnoo1: whatever it is it's f*cking stupid. Just say e-bike. Not much harder. I hate reading Eeb it's senseless
  • 69 0
 is that lizard skins new frame protection?
  • 40 0
 Durex actually.
  • 10 0
 boil in the bag
  • 2 0
 Could be a new line for Tena?
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: Slippery
  • 5 0
 This comment makes me feel old and that's okay.
  • 4 0
 Digging out my Roach elbow pads....
  • 2 0
 It's for aerodynamics
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: and top tube / stem pads?
  • 2 0
 @nateb: I also had the DH trousers and kneepads (still have) in brown but no bike pads
  • 56 4
 That's not an o-chain, it's the new Saint 2x crankset. And the idler pulley moves in and out via Di2-actuated hydraulic piston to shift the chain like a front derailleur, but while simultaneously eliminating dropped chains and allowing for the rearward axle path that Canyon's racers demand. You heard it here first.
  • 24 1
 is it just me, or does it look like the chain/seat stay has a pivot concentric to the axle?
  • 9 1
 Looks like it to me, and if that is the case, that would be a much bigger change than a high pivot and idler
  • 25 4
 Yes.......and it looks like a Session
  • 9 4
 You betcha, looks like a Session
  • 4 1
 @eae903: Does that matter that much? The pivot was already quite close to rear axle. Now it becomes a single pivot with a linkage driven shock and a floating rear brake in one, just like Trek and Devinci have been doing for a while already. But doubt it would do much compared to shifting any of the other linkage pivots an equal amount. And we'd probably wouldn't notice if they'd do that (and not only because of the wrap).
  • 3 0
 @vinay: It is still a shift from a virtual pivot that changes location throughout the travel to a single fixed pivot point. In my opinion that is pretty significant, it will change the wheel path, make it a consistent arc instead of something that changes through the travel, and change how they adjust the leverage ratio. That is, if there aren't any sneaky links behind the curtain.
  • 2 1
 @eae903: Yeah, the axle will now move in a circular path with respect to the front triangle whereas it wasn't before. But how much different is it really and how much would the rider sense it? As for the leverage ration, it always changes even on a single pivot bike without a linkage driven shock. As it is now, it remains a linkage driven shock.
  • 4 0
 @vinay: The wheel path is the most significant thing. You can think of a single pivot linkage as basically the radius of a circle. The center of that circle is at the main pivot and the point that sits on the circumference is the rear axle. As the wheel moves through its travel, it will follow the circumference of that circle. You can change the part of the circle it follows by raising and lowering that pivot point, giving you a rear ward axle path or one that is rear ward and then forward, but it will always follow that circle. With a virtual pivot, the radius of that circle changes as the wheel moves through its travel, either getting shorter or getting longer. A bike like a Norco Sight, with its linkage, will have a pivot point that starts far out in front of the rear axle, and moves closer to it as it goes through it's travel, shortening that circles radius and causing the wheel to move more vertically at the begining of its travel and then arc forwards towards the rider at a faster rate near the end. The new Norco DH bike does the opposite, with a smaller radius at the beginning and a larger at the end, moving the rear wheel out and back quickly in the initial stroke and then becoming more vertically near the end of the travel. The current Sender is like the Norco Sight, starting more vertical and then moving towards the rider near the end, and this new Sender would have a rear ward axle path, that follows a consistent arc, if it is a high single pivot with a concentric axle pivot.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I guess that would depend on how sensitive the rider is to those things, it will have a different feel IMO, but not everyone would feel it.
  • 1 0
 @eae903: Yeah, I agree with what you said.
  • 1 0
 @eae903: thanks, thats a really good explaination
  • 2 0
 @Torbo24: Thank you! I love this stuff. It is so interesting!
  • 23 0
 If Kanye rode a bike
  • 4 2
 Underrated comment
  • 20 3
 Man, almost every new DH rig nowadays is some sort of high pivot design with an idler. I guess my friends at Canfield knew what they were doing when they more or less stuck with same basic design of the Jedi all of these years. Cool
  • 16 2
 I gotta say, one of the best things about being old and slow is any bike is better than me so I don’t have to worry about the latest high/ medium pivot, 6 bar, horst link, dw link, switch to infinty and beyond bike as I will probably be the same speed on a Huffy from Big Ed’s Bike and Beer Barn.
  • 4 0
 My exact philosophy that keeps me on my Rootdown. I haven’t maxed out the free upgrades (sleep, fitness, technique), why spend $8000 to increase the speed I travel while continuing to appear thoroughly mediocre.
  • 3 0
 @sfarnum: I see what your saying but there's nothing wrong with upgrades that makes things easier, body's getting old and battered and it certainly appreciated a more comfortable bike size, geometry and riding position, top level suspension that gets me out of the bad line choices I make. Slacker headangle definitely adds confidence when things get steep. The pros could ride a £50 rig better than I can ride a 10k rig for sure. But if I can make things easier for myself I sure will do. That been said my current bike is a 2020 model and I have no plans to change to anything newer. There was definitely a point where bikes made a massive jump but I think that has definitely slowed a lot. For me long travel 29er with good geo was a game changer.
Althought only been 5ft 6 ISH a mullet would of been better. Had to limit my post drop to stop seat buzz. I also wander what cornering would be link with a mullet set up. Not enough to change bikes tho. I can see me rising this one for yrs now, or untill it breaks and I take advantage of the amazing warranty Santa Cruz offers. A V2 megatower with frame storage would be good
  • 5 0
 @filryan: Oh for sure I consider modern geo, good tires, and decent brakes safety upgrades rather than “cheating”.

Also speaking only for myself, to each their own.
  • 13 1
 bike covers, so hot right now
  • 10 2
 Because they are thermal?
  • 8 0
 I put a Black cover on my bike for winter purposes (Less dirt into the shock)
Now I have people trying to Make photos of my bike with a Potato...
  • 7 1
 Has anybody tried an o chain on a hardtail? Is it just a stupid idea, or might it have some benefits?
  • 99 1
 It will help reduce pedal kickback when your chainstay snaps
  • 4 0
 It will dampen chainslap so it maybe actually just work Big Grin damn now I should test if the hardtail without chain rides better than one with
  • 4 1
 Doesn´t really make sense. The idea of the o chain is to help decouple the suspension movement from the chain. This is a problem because the chainstay effectively lengthens when compressing the rear end, which pulls on the chain, which can´t move easily because your weight already pulls on one side and the wheel is dragged by the other. So the way for the force to go is either pulling you back or turning the wheel - or if present compress the o chain. As there is no rear suspension to compress on a hardtail, the chainstay length stays the same and this force isn´t there in the first place. Maybe it would still feel different to not running one, but it´s original purpose just isn´t applicable
  • 10 0
 You can fakie for a fraction of a second before having to back pedal.
  • 5 7
 @F22: The effect of chain pulling on the cranks due to suspension movement is non existent when moving because the freehub is disengaged. The effect of chain pulling on cranks is present only when the radial speed of the wheel is very close to zero, which only happens during breaking or seriously slow drops, and even then speeds accelerate so fast it wouldn't really be noticeable. At least in theory the main benefit of o-chain is damping the chainslap, which can produce noticeable pull on the cranks. If you doubt me watch the following video from vorsprung.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=grNUgu0H9YA&t=2s
  • 1 0
 @malca: that's somewhere where I thought it was going, cheers, ta very much
  • 1 0
 @F22: it was more whether it could deal with chain slap, after narrow wide and clutch seems I can't run without a chain device as a life saver, didn't know it it would be better or worse, think I'll stick to a chain device
  • 1 0
 @malca: interesting. That the scenario I tried to explain mainly happens under (heavy) braking should be clear, there needs to be a resistance for the wheel to not just turn out of the way. Just the wheels inertia would likely not produce noticeable forces to the chain. Haven´t thought of chain slap producing that much force, that`s quite interesting. Never really bothered doing proper research on this, but maybe I should do some maths and testing. I kinda wanna know whats really going on now
  • 1 0
 @F22: but under heavy breaking to the point of the wheel locking up the suspension would likely be decompressing.

situations where the wheel would locked and the suspension would be compressing at the same time are pretty usually would generally amount to some kind of panic braking. Not something that’s happening continuously over the course of a ride.
  • 2 0
 @sino428: The wheel wouldn´t need to lock up. It would just need to resist the chain forces to a noticeable degree. Again, I don´t actually know the correct explanation. I haven´t fully watched Vorsprungs video and won´t argue against it. But I´m not convinced we can throw out the chain stay explanation just yet
  • 2 0
 @F22: the wheel does have to be moving very fast, so in practical terms your are taking about locking the wheel or being very close to locking the wheel.

The point is most people say they immediately notice a difference with an Ochain as soon as they hit the trail. I’m not doubting they do, but if they are cruising down the trail it can’t be because it’s reducing kickback or ‘decoupling’ the suspension, because that’s not happening while riding at any type of speed. As the other commenter pointed out, what the ochain likely does is dampen the feeling of the chain pulling as it slaps up and down.
  • 1 0
 @F22: our machine shop's pretty dead right now some I'm all up for trying new things
  • 1 0
 @sino428: I just did some napkin math. I don´t wanna share the exact results because they are way to rough of an estimate to be presented as fact. However they support your assumption that this effect would only be possible at lower speeds. Assuming my variables are at least in the ballpark I would expect them to be noticeable up to maybe 15kph very likely not more, wheel speed not ground speed that is. Considering that this would also need to be a fairly high speed compression through a significant portion of the travel. I would tend to agree that its not plausible to be a big of a factor in suspension feel. The more I think of it the harder it seems to find a scenario where this could be a dominant force acting on the suspension. I would still like to measure it and know for sure but I don´t think thats worth anyones effort
  • 4 0
 @F22: I remember a while back on an ochain post a commenter suggested an interesting test.

If the idea behind all this was always the idea of the "chainless feel", instead of taking the chain of the bike, remove the pawls from the freehub. This would effectively completely decouple the suspension from the pedals the same as removing the chain.

Then test the bike with no pawls in the hub (but leaving the chain on) vs the bike with no chain. I have a feeling the bike with the chain still on will feel noticeably rougher than the one with no chain, although both have the cranks completely disengaged. Then you would know exactly how much of the roughness comes from the suspension forces and how much comes simply from the chain bouncing around.
  • 4 0
 @F22: while I think chain slap probably plays a role, I think you are under estimating how many people ride their bike on a trail that would have their wheel nearly lock while also taking hits, especially on a DH bike. Think steep, steppy terrain. Or shutting down after hitting a drop and hitting roots.
  • 1 0
 @BrianColes: That`s what I thought at first. From riding my DH Bike without a chain after it snapped I would say it actually feels like there is more grip, which would suggest the rear wheel is tracking the ground better. I don´t think chain slap fully explains that, after playing around with a few calculations I don´t think chain pull fully explains it as well as I originally thought. I don´t pretend to have solved this, this is very much an open question from my pov
  • 1 0
 @sino428: A Bike with no chain absolutely feels smoother. I know that. I don´t know how close the o chain comes to that feeling. A clutch system would probably be best, but to get a reliable clutch small, light and cheap enough to be worth it would probably be a bit of a challenge
  • 1 2
 Won’t do anything at all and you can run a high engagement hub on a hardtail with no negative effects ether.
  • 5 0
 Looked like a prototype for Canyon's entry into the new enduro/bike packing category
  • 4 0
 am i the only one wondering why there is a pile of kenda tires near the table but the bikes all have schwalbe tires?
  • 1 0
 not only kenda, but specialized too
  • 2 2
 New bike day... lets cloak it up. Meanwhile someone won the mens on the old, not covered up Mondraker! The more a company is transparent these days, the more trust I would have in them, I want to know what they have gone though to get to where they are and why, why should I invest my money in your product, what were the goals, what issues did you come across in the pursuit of time on the clock and what compromises did you have to make for reliability v 1 run performance.
  • 3 0
 Frameworks >
  • 1 0
 They seem to have been testing stuff since 2022 already. Theres been pictures of a mule in Morzine in the Vital Tech Rumours section....

www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-Hub,2/2020-MTB-Tech-rumors-and-innovation,10797?page=253
  • 7 3
 Looks like a Demo
  • 5 3
 Nope, looks like a session!
  • 2 0
 Is that an o-chain? I'm not convinced it is. At least not as they currently look
  • 4 7
 Definitely an ochain but without any logos. Weird choice if they're speccing it just for sponsorship agreement, because it's useless with a high pivot...
  • 1 0
 It's not necessarily useless with an idler. If you mess around in Linkage, you can put the idler in a good place for anti-squat but with theoretical pedal kickback. I say theoretical as it's claimed quite often that it's not real or not a problem...
  • 4 4
 Lot's of HP rider run an o-chain, myself included. Yes it makes a difference. Perhaps less than other buts bike it certainly improves performace by a couple %'s.

Don't believe me? Just ask Loris Vergier:

www.vitalmtb.com/photos/features/pit-bits-1-world-champs-2023/loris-vergiers-trek-session
  • 9 8
 Let me guess, you're also the guys that put those vibration dampening stickers on your frames?
if you claim that you can feel a difference with an ochain on a high pivot bike, I'd suggest you also invest in some homeopathic remedies while you're at it.
  • 5 1
 @ratedgg13:

No dampening stickers for me, but I will attest that the o-chain, makes my high pivot Session feel better in a straightline through rough chunder and under heavy breaking points in the steeps. No adverse effects noted.
  • 6 6
 @skimtb1: well if you want to spend extra money on a placebo, do whatever works for you. I'm gonna trust people like @R-M-R who have crunched the numbers on the engineering side to show it probably doesn't do much, if anything.
  • 3 2
 @ratedgg13:

Why don't you bring it up with the world's fastest racers to discuss further? I'm sure you would change Loris' mind using your supreme logic and facts!

I've A/B'd it on my session and it's a bit better... I'd say 5% improved in certain situations. No noted downsides. But I'm sure Waterloo Ontario provides the ultimate testing grounds for DH, so what do I know?!
  • 3 1
 @ratedgg13: Useless on a high pivot? Strange perspective considering the number of top racers / teams in the world that do serious testing and decide to run Ochain on high pivot bikes? The worlds not flat and Ochain is the shit. You just have to be from somewhere with mountains to know what I'm talking about.
  • 1 0
 @tjhill: Makes it less likely to have your rear derailleur ripped off from mysterious chain forces, which happened twice to Seb in testing with the high pivot dreadnought.
m.pinkbike.com/news/review-forbidden-dreadnought.html
  • 2 2
 @tjhill: pathetic attempt at profiling me based on my current listed location on pinkbike. I'm from bc, and used to be PMBIA instructor, trail builder (you've probably ridden trail I've worked on) and raced the BC/Canadian national enduro. So nice try, but wrong. And keep in mind that many of those same riders have used products in the past like those sticker on vibration dampeners - all in the name of product endorsements. So again, I'll stick with people who have done analyses on the legitimacy over a placebo effect.
  • 3 2
 @skimtb1: Sure, because people have never been wrong about hype and trends before. Commencal race team literally used to be sponsored by Axxios anti-vibration stickers.
  • 1 1
 @ratedgg13:

O-chain absolutetly works. If it didn't, you wouldn't see half the WCDH field using them. The benefits get a bit fuzzier on idler-equipped bikes, however I can tell you that in MY experience, the o-chain provides an improvement on the HP Session. Given that TFR is also using repping o-chain on their race bikes, it would appear that I am not just some kool-aid guzzling kook.

On the flipside, it's you who seems to be the band-waggoner here... Have you A/B'd an idler equiped DH bike with an o-chain? Or are you blindly follwing the gospel of some dude on pinkbike with some fancy words and a computer program?
  • 2 0
 @skimtb1: I haven’t ridden an ochain but after all I’ve seem and read about it (and pedal kickback) I still think the main benefit is that it dampens the forces of the chain slapping around as pedal kickback is only happening in very limited situations.

With that said I think some people assume that an idler eliminates all chain growth. But it’s really dependent on the placement of the idler in relation to the pivot and it’s not usually fully eliminated. So even if you believe the ochain helps with kickback, that would still apply to high pivot bikes.
  • 2 0
 @sino428:

Exactly! My previous Commencal Supreme v4 had quite a bit of feedback through pedals (or whatever you want to call it) under heavy braking in steeps. It's not like the presence of an idler autmatically elimates all those forces. Does an idler reduce these forces? Yes, but they arent necessarily erased.

The HP Session has something like 9 degrees of pedal kick back. The older model lower pivot Session had something like 25+ degrees.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/20406540

I'm running my o-chain on 6 degrees and notice a subtle improvement on my bike.
  • 3 0
 Potatoes must have evolved a lot the last years!
  • 2 0
 They must've used a superior potato en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superior_potato.

"The Superior is a white-skinned, white-fleshed, mid-season variety." Ok then
  • 2 0
 Look like floating brake to me ..sick u can seen the shape threw the sleeve if u zoom in looks nice
  • 5 2
 I spotted them first. The all new scratch free stanchions from Fox.
  • 1 0
 Where you see that? All those are just standard Kashima
  • 1 0
 @Cooper09: the Fox38 on the Torque is leaning against the table with the stanchions. And we all know that this is against the rules.
  • 1 0
 @maintrail: woooow. That is sooo wrong!
  • 2 0
 Don’t you guys watch moimoi tv? The wrap just helps keep the carbon compliant Smile .
  • 2 0
 The shimano saint cranks do not have a removable spider to install the ochain, is this a new unrealeased cranks?
  • 2 0
 What kind of savage uses the fork stanchion to lean their bike against something? Ouch!
  • 1 0
 Just another Aero cover pretending to hide industry secrets. Skin suits and deep sections wheels are just around the corner :0)
  • 1 0
 So funny how the hide this crap it’s seriously a bike there are so many places to put a chain, crank, handlebar, and brakes
  • 4 2
 Did Treks ABP patent run out?
  • 4 0
 Never understood that patent, Orbea, Merida, any DW Split Pivot Bikes, and others all used the concentric axle pivot, don't know what really made them different.
  • 6 0
 @eae903: Trek's ABP patent covers "a concentric pivot in combination with much more sophisticated and varied types of rear suspension designs". Based on that, it seems like the Trek patent covers certain suspension designs + a concentric pivot. As far as Split Pivot is concerned, per Bike Radar, "in the US government’s eyes, that Trek and Weagle developed their similar systems separately, rather than one copying the other... they're legally allowed to co-exist."
  • 2 0
 That is a ginormous chain ring. Is it more than 36T?
  • 1 0
 count the teeth and report back.
  • 3 0
 I mean, just use yours and 3 buddies fingers to count them... I'll give you a hint... Its between 37 and 39.
  • 1 0
 @workingclasswhore: I tried and seemed like it was 38 or 40. It is hard to keep track.
  • 4 0
 @bigtim: Sick! I've been waiting for a 39t narrow wide for some time now.
  • 1 0
 thats also the new spectral with 160mm fork isntead of 150.. im willing to bet the shock is longer aswell Wink
  • 1 0
 Is the pivot at chain and seatstay something similar to the Trek ABP? Isn't the ABP still under patent?
  • 2 0
 how do i share with PB a pic of a prototype fork i spotted in finale?
  • 1 0
 Weird, I always forget shes on canyon. Always just associate her brand, FMD, etc.....
  • 1 0
 Can someone tell them all they don’t need to hide their protos ?
  • 1 0
 LOL, it's like hiding your license plate for those FBM ads Big Grin Might as well put a thumb or scribble out the parts that you don't want seen - way cheaper than the cover.
  • 1 0
 My brain auto completed that to potatoes. And yes, of course they need to hide their potatoes. Imagine what would happen if people saw the eyes, lenticels, or god forbid a scale leaf before it’s ready.
  • 1 0
 @tomfoolerybackground: i'd love to see a dh rig with leaf spring tech
  • 1 0
 Given how long lead times are these covers are more about drawing media attention to the fact that you have a new prototype than they are about 'protecting' the prototype from being seen and imitated by competitors.
  • 2 2
 Is it a trend now that whatever Specialized has as a successful DH bike Canyon will do the identically same?
  • 7 0
 Err, the new demo looked like the old sender, not the other way round. Canyon did it first
  • 2 0
 Stop using bike diapers
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Forbidden
  • 1 4
 The Tahnee Seagrave prototype was a hiding-under-the-covers type of affair. But this bike is like a Kardashian, desperate to be splashed across headlines, no matter who you are. If you look closely behind the KIS stabilizer (Sadly I don't, as I need full health to view the photos) you can see what I think are guide pulleys for some kind of front derailleur, possibly a clutch-style or the Shimano XTR synchronizing unit? One thing I've noticed on all the Sender shots I've seen, the drivetrain is never in profile as it's never 100% clear, on a high pivot, what the deriveur routing looks like. You could almost think the animators at Pixar designed a "Who framed Roger Rabbit" style of chain Stay, displaying a perfect straight chain line with Teflon coated chain guides but only to offset the drivetrain 135 degrees to run inline with the swing round like a rubber band chain-guide they make it point toward the down tube. The only other thing I didn't notice was, "Rosalia, Where is Karina's Can?", whoever Karina is. The caption also mentions we'll know more when the World Cup kicks off. My money is on a system where the RC's can carry a big sign behind the bike which tells them what lever they are pulling, what way they are leaning, telling them if its aixben or rear spring, front or rear bleed. Although thou she will swivel it around Karina could improve the cleaning protocol at The Nick by rotating the sign and letting them know that today is Kickstands up Wednesday.
  • 2 3
 The high pivot trend is just to make acoustic bikes heavy, sluggish, boring and inefficient enough that you want to buy an e-bike. Resist, for the betterment of humanity.
  • 1 0
 It’s been a while since Mavic where on a DH bike yes?
  • 1 0
 Liking the look of the Spectral in the foreground
  • 2 1
 Looks like a session
  • 1 0
 Kanyen Sender
  • 2 5
 Hopefully a motor and big battery under that cover.
  • 4 2
 You should get into moto at that point
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