Wilier's Urta Hybrid is an Electric Downcountry Bike

Oct 13, 2022
by Mike Kazimer  
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When Fazua released their new Ride 60 motor system earlier this year it ushered in a new wave of lightweight eMTBs, the majority of them aimed at trail riders looking for a little extra boost. Wilier has taken a slightly different approach – the Italian company is targeting the downcountry demographic with their new Utra Hybrid. The Urta Hybrid is claimed to weigh in under 16 kg (35.2 lb), making it one of the lighter electrified options in this travel bracket.

The Urta Hybrid's carbon frame has 120mm of rear travel that's delivered via a flex stay suspension layout. According to Wilier, they based the bike on the Urta SLR, the bike that Simone Avondetto piloted to a win at this year's U23 XCO World Championships. The overall frame shape is similar, although the downtube has grown to accommodate the 430 Wh battery. It's also possible to add a 210 Wh range extender to get even more run time.
Urta Hybrid Details
• Carbon frame
• Wheel size: 29"
• 120mm travel
• Fazua Ride 60 motor
• 430 Wh battery
• Head angle: 66.7°
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Price: 7,000 - 12,500 Euro
wilier.com

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As for the geometry, those numbers sit on the more conservative side of the XC / downcountry spectrum. With a 120 mm fork the bike has a 66.7-degree head angle, a 74 degree seat angle, and a reach of 458 mm for a size large.

There are four complete models, with prices ranging from 7,000 to 12,500 Euro. The two highest end versions receive Wilier's integrated bar / stem combo, which is 760mm wide and available with a 60, 75, or 90 mm stem length, once again reinforcing the XC nature of this bike.


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Bonus points for not routing the cables through the headset.
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The top tube display indicates the ride mode and the amount of battery remaining.

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Personally, the concept of a motorized XC machine still leaves me scratching my head. I understand the push for lighter e-bikes, since not everyone wants to muscle around a 55-pound beast, but I can't say that I've ever been on a 120mm bike and thought, “I really wish this had a motor.”

Again, maybe that's just me, but given how light and capable modern short-travel bikes are it seems sort of strange to rush to electrify them. Is that additional complication really worth the hassle? Extra travel doesn't usually add that much weight, even when factoring in the additional heft of a beefier fork and wheels – I'm more intrigued by the concept of a sub-40 pound eMTB that's able to hold its own in rough terrain rather than a motorized marathon bike.

Who knows, though, there could be a contingent of retired XC racers who are looking to relive their glory days with a little less effort. If so, the Urta Hybrid could be the ticket.





Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,707 articles

146 Comments
  • 148 0
 We really don't need xc ebikes xc bikes are fast enough uphill. Make a dh ebike and the bois will be happy.
  • 39 0
 *bumps fist*
  • 9 0
 100%. I had the choice of 140 or 160mm travel versions of the same ebike. Can you guess which I went for?
  • 5 0
 Exactly, it doesn’t make much sense for me as somebody who I ride and like both ebikes and mtb.
I can only imagine being always at the cut off speed except on some punchy climbs especially in Europe where you have the cut off at 25km/h.
  • 48 0
 Remember: it could be worse, it could be an E-Dirt Jumper.
  • 1 4
 @nickfranko: Id be better than this
  • 3 0
 really defeats the purpose of an xc bike...
  • 3 0
 @bradsbikesco: no chest bumps?
  • 3 0
 @scallywagg: You're forgetting how awesome it'll be when they start racing them.
  • 1 0
 Husqvarna and forestal beat you to the idea.
  • 2 0
 Kenevo with a dual crown.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: That was only 180mm it needs to be 200
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: Sadly, one exists, and embarrasingly it's a California company.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: wasn't there such a thing recently???
  • 2 0
 Looks like shit.
  • 1 0
 @notthatfast: most hideous bike release for some time
  • 1 0
 @blesius-bikes: That shit is dope. Nothing more need be said.
  • 1 0
 Considering that most parks can be ridden without a chain, I don't see why we would need one, or how useful it would be.
  • 3 0
 @enduroelite: We got parks with no lift, just a climbing green trail. We got wild trails that are miles of hard DH but need some way to the top. Lift-served park, you're right though.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: I'm not against Ebikes at all, I just cant imagine the sticker price of a full fledged DH bike with a motor.
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite: In 10 yard its gonna be 1000
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite: Ha, fair enough!
  • 1 0
 @bradsbikesco: in ten years we'll have hover bikes made by Dyson.
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite: rumor has it that Specialized is actually working with Dyson as we speak...
  • 44 0
 I don't understand why this exists.
  • 15 0
 same reason why e-gravel bikes exist?
  • 33 0
 The e-dirt-jumper needed a friend.
  • 12 2
 @hamncheez: same reason why gravel bikes exist*
  • 10 1
 Same reason every ebike exists, it takes less effort to pedal
  • 6 4
 @rockroll: Make bikes for the lazy and rich.
  • 1 0
 @bocomtb: HAHAHA good one!
  • 1 1
 Me neither. In the EU the motor stops assisting at 25 km/h. One might expect an XC biker to be faster than that, so the motor has no use Wink
  • 7 0
 Perhaps it's for the handling characteristics? Lots of trails in the world are more fun on short wheelbase, sporty bikes. Long wheelbase, slack enduro bikes typically handle like crap on traditional singletrack.
  • 1 0
 Because people will buy anything
  • 5 0
 It's really targeting the person who might have been fit and fast when this geometry was in fashion but still has delusions of grandeur.
  • 4 1
 Depends on where you ride. I know of a couple trail systems that an E-XC bike would be super fun.
  • 1 0
 @rockroll: I've never ridden an ebike so this is a legit question - does it take less effort to pedal or do you just get more power out of the same effort?
  • 2 0
 @ElDebarge: I would say yes to both, it’s up to you how you want to ride. Realistically, on climbs or undulating terrain I think most people are somewhere in the middle, going faster with less effort
  • 26 1
 Right... like has Trek's E-caliber really sold? I never see them and live in an E-Bike dense area. The motor largely makes weight irrelevant compared to regular bikes, so why not have a bit more travel and traction....The new Fuel-ExE seems to be the sweet spot.
  • 3 0
 There's quite a lot of them here in Bavaria...
  • 3 0
 I think this category is best summed up by the last paragraph, "Who knows"
  • 1 0
 Same. I don't think I've seen an ebike with less than 130mm of travel on the rear, and thats the levo sl, 90% of them round here (and there's plenty of xc/trail bikes in regular, happy use round here, its not overly technical or steep but it's techy and steep enough that 150/160 bikes are the general norm) are full e-enduros. I don't need 180mm but I'm tempted for my next one anyway.
  • 2 0
 As someone who works at a shop that carries Trek I have only seen one sold from our shop.
  • 3 1
 Trek is discontinuing it a year after release, so I would guess sales are quite poor.
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: I think people are sleeping on this comment....well played Smile
  • 1 0
 I think 120/130 mm is actually the sweet spot if paired with a solid geometry and great kinematics. At 16–17 kilograms you don't really notice the weight going downhill. Well, you do, but it comes with a lot of benefits due to the lower center of gravity. You can still pump and jump it like you would do with a bike without a motor. And going up, you get the support and can even push over the speed limit without hitting a wall. Such a bike would be the perfect toy to fit rides with plenty of trail time into a busy schedule. And the often times not too demanding trails around home (depending on where you live of course) are more fun with a shorter travel bike anyway (if we are completely honest).
  • 23 0
 Only way this thing isn't gonna get blasted in the comments is if Brage is riding it...
  • 7 0
 I'd like to see Brage do a hack-to-flat test on it. I think Brage would find that there's actually an extra 200mm of travel in the top tube, albeit single use. I wonder how much the downtube batteries can flex before they spontaneously "release some energy"
  • 21 0
 Definitely deserves extra bonus points for the "not through the headset" cable routing.

Thank you.
  • 13 0
 I am sure there is a fringe use case, but why would one want an e-bike which features XC-oriented suspension, geometry and components? The purpose of XC bike design is to balance certain comforts (body position, descending capacity, etc.) in favor of efficiency and fitness-mediated performance.

This bike erodes the fitness requirement that XC bikes are designed for (yes, I understand - some would argue that you can cover more miles in the same time, but to what end?) while offering none of the comfort and descending performance of a more trail-oriented design.
  • 6 2
 It's a ploy to get ever more mixed-use trails banned from bike traffic. Soon as these make their way to flowy midwest singletrack the hiking peeps will get their way.
  • 6 0
 Its because e-bikes are currently a giant money grab for the industry, so they are going to pump up out all iterations of e-bikes for people to snap up. Even with analog bikes, there is a whole bunch of technically unnecessary stuff that people ride with.
  • 2 0
 It's likely for the quick handling geometry that is fun on most trail systems.
  • 1 1
 @mrkumro: I don't buy it. The "quick handling" of gravel and XC bikes is not ideal for just about any trail system, unless those trails are flat and straight. These bikes are more akin in geometry to road bikes than modern "trail" bikes, and are designed to hedge toward efficiency above all else. In fact, they are decidedly less than ideal when piloted at speeds beyond what XC-riders can average or maintain - which an ebike most certainly will.

Planning on "taking it easy" (think 100-200 watts at the pedals + ebike motor input) on the ascents? You'd probably be a more capable climber on all but the smoothest trails with more trail-bike geometry. Planning to use the platform to rip extra miles and get extra descents? Again, you'll be more comfortable, capable and safer on modern trail bike geometry. This bike is better at nothing than virtually an other design - unless your trails are flat, smooth and straight.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: I have both a short travel xc/trail bike and a longer travel enduro bike. I can tell you for certain that the xc style bike is far more fun on traditional tight singletrack. This includes the very technical ups, flats, and downs that are everywhere in the northeastern usa. I can assure you they are far from flat and strait. Outside of the bike parks, the longer travel, slack bikes are just slow and boring.
  • 2 0
 @mrkumro: couldn't agree more. My Transition Spur is an absolute blast on everything, going up and down. Perfect for 90% of the stuff I ride.
  • 2 0
 @mrkumro: what are the geo numbers on your XC/trail bike? Does it have a drop stem like this bike does? Is the stack very low (again, like this bike)?

There is a big difference between bikes like the Transition Spur or other, "recreational" XC-style bikes and this bike, which is my point. I am not arguing that a shorter travel, steeper, mountain bike is not well suited to many trail systems - I am arguing that THIS bike is closer to the XC-race/gravel side of the geo equation. Look at the bar-to-saddle position - this bike is not going to excel on even "mild" trails compared to other designs.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: My xc/trail bike is a Kona hei hei. It has a steeper head angle, higher bb, and lower stack height. No drop stem, but I've considered one. It is tons of fun. This e-bike, technically is closer to a trail bike than a gravel bike like you claim.
  • 1 0
 @mrkumro: We need to arrive at a place where we agree that we have different definitions of fun. I have trouble getting bored on any trails in Colorado on my 170mm bike.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: I don't doubt that at all. All I'm saying is the same bike isn't fun on all trails. I really love my 170 bike at the bike parks, but on all of the tight, twisty, chunky technical trails around the northeast it's really just dull. Don't discount this ebike based on its geometry just because your area is fun on huge enduro bikes. If anything, just hate on e bikes in general. Unless of course you do shuttle runs or ride a chairlift, because that's no different than having an ebike.
  • 2 0
 Imagine you are an aging XC guy or girl. All you ever rode was a 100 mm bike, maybe only in a hardtail. If you want to keep riding with the group in your club, or you kids that are currently peaking. Then this is exactly the bike you need (and want). It's still sports, you are sitting on the bike like you are used to, and you still look plenty XC. Sure, it's a relatively small group of people, that's probably still hesitant to get an E-Bike, but it's definitely there.
  • 15 1
 Gross
  • 9 2
 Wait until you're told you'll never ride again, then you'll see a need for this. EMTBs are great, but not all of us need or want a 170mm monster truck. Having already beaten the experts twice, first by pedaling with my arms, and then with the e-assist, I'm now getting older and reaching a point where I can't take the risks I used to. As such, a more efficient, lighter, shorter travel eMTB is exactly what I want. The geo on this particular bike is a little conservative for my tastes, but I welcome this and every other short travel eMTB. For what it's worth, I think something with ~65 degree HA, 120-130mm front and rear, and ~16-17kgs would be my ideal, with something like this Fazua 60, or the new TQ to power me along. For now, I'll stick to the 140-150mm bracket, as these bikes have the geo numbers I want and look right too, but chapeau to Willier, for realising that not everyone wants to huck shit, or in my case can medically afford to any more!!!
  • 7 0
 I was hope it would have through headset cable routing, so I could experience all of the things I hate about current MTB stupidity trends included ona single bicycle. Oh well I'm sure it's bound to happen soon.
  • 17 9
 so sick of e-bikes. I get it on big burly bikes, I get it on commuters. ebiking is a totally different sport.
  • 24 8
 then do not click on the articles. Sickness solved.
  • 12 8
 @kokofosho: It's not an article - it's advertising.
  • 8 4
 If getting some assist while still pedaling and basically no assist on the way down is a totally different sport then what is sitting on a chair lift expending zero energy in the way up?
  • 4 1
 @catweasel: Thats explicitly why he said "i get it on big burly bikes". This this just makes no sense. Who buys this bike with the mindset they are going to rip the descents.
  • 4 0
 @cirque4: Don't click on the advertising? Still kinda works....
  • 2 1
 @jdkellogg: so riding a large travel emtb is the same sport but riding a short travel one is a different sport? That's even more contrary
  • 1 0
 If you said that shuttles, chairlifts and ebikes are a different sport, I would disagree. It would at least be a consistent argument though.
  • 5 0
 I refuse to believe that 27.5 bikes are disappearing because "people dont buy them"

WHO is buying shit like this?? What is the target audience?

If this exists why cant I have a long travel 27 option besides the clash and spindrift.
  • 5 0
 so many people live in areas that don't have mountains and don't ride 150mm bikes, in fact its the majority of mountain bikers... so this bike is there for that reason The Trek, Specialized ultralight downcountry versions have sold out. This too will sell out
  • 9 0
 delete it
  • 5 1
 At odds with most of the comments, this category of bike makes a lot of sense to me. Riding in Colorado where my fitness, level, while decent, won't let me do anything close the 100 mile races in Leadville and Durango. I'm not even suggesting racing this type of bike. But this bike would let me see a lot more back country without the extra weight or need for more travel. Suppose that's why they make chocolate and vanilla.
  • 6 0
 You could go just as far and in more comfort on a 140mm ebike with trail geometry. The extra weight penalty of slightly more travel is trivial on a 16kg ebike, and giving it more suspension has virtually no efficiency penalty because the motor assist lets you sit and spin smooth circles.

So what does this category of bike actually do better? In my mind this is still vanilla, just low fat and sweetened with aspartame - the water is going to crystallize out, and the aspartame will leave a nasty after-taste, so what's the point if you actually have no need to diet?
  • 6 2
 "There could be a contingent of retired XC racers who are looking to relive their glory days with a little less effort." Pretty much the main target market for ebikes from the start.....washups and hasbeens that want to hold on a little longer and pretend.
  • 7 3
 Is there a way to pay not to see any e-bike content on PinkBike? I would gladly pay money each month not to see these articles. ….Why can’t PinkBike create a new website - maybe call it e-PinkBike for all of the e-bike content?
  • 2 1
 Agreed - the “filter” is poorly thought out software.
  • 1 1
 It could have an auto-load feature on links to help with all that difficult scrolling and clicking.
  • 2 0
 To be honest, e bikes aren't really any different that shuttling or riding the chairlift.
  • 9 7
 I'm probably in the minority here, but if e-bikes were allowed on my local trails something like this is exactly what I would want.

I have a 120/100mm travel xc/down country bike, which is perfect for my trails. For "rest days" or days where I want to do multiple loops or riding the 15-25 miles to a trail this seems perfect. Still light-ish so should be easier to jump and maniver. (and easier to put on the bike rack if I am not riding to the trail)

I totally understand that this won't fit the bill for some. But as a consumer having options is nice.
  • 2 0
 Serious question: Out of curiosity, why wouldn't you prefer to have something designed to be more like a 120-140mm trail bike? i.e. more supple/descending oriented suspension design, combined with a longer wheelbase (stability) and more comfortable, ergonomic and capable body position?

Even on taking-it-easy, "rest" days, this bike is going to increase your average speed dramatically - why carryover suspension and geometry design that is purpose built for lower speeds and designed to sacrifice capability for efficiency?
  • 1 0
 >Still light-ish so should be easier to jump

Keep in mind that jump worthy bikes, i.e those that won't eventually crack the frame or some components, are 30+ lbs. If an ebike weights 35 lbs, and battery and motor make up a good bit of that weight, I would have second thoughts about jumping it, just like you wouldn't really jump a dedicated xc race bike.

The argument against this type of bike is that its possible to spec DH capable bike with dual crown fork and 200 mm of travel, big motor and battery, and do the same riding as you would on this. If you wanna jump, simply put it in the highest power mode and put in a few cranks in the top gear, and instead of popping you will just ride it more like a motocross bike and use speed to get height/distance. And, unlike the lighter Ebikes, it will withstand all of the abuse.
  • 2 0
 Geo should suit the stability requirements at intended speed on intended terrain. Xc bikes are already snappy/twitchy at 12-20 mph on moderate terrain. This makes for a wondrous riding experience in those parameters given bike handing is sufficient. So with the extra power of the E-XC bike, either speed stays the same (pointless), terrain gets tamer (lame) or the stability suffers. Hmmmm
  • 6 1
 Wilier was so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should.
  • 3 1
 I can dig it. I would not buy one but I like it. I have a feeling more and more road bike centric companies will begin ot make the MTB market jump. There is a growing market and there is a lot more design freedom as the UCI has not regulated the MTB to death.
  • 2 0
 Openly admitting I am not a fan of ebikes, one thing that no one ever publishes is max charge cycles. it would be really interesting to know how many charges before the battery has to be replaced. I know it gets convoluted, but a mac book is around 1000 full charges. in the case of an Ebike if someone uses turbo mode the entire time and drains the battery every time they ride they might want to know how many rides before they have to shell out cash to buy a new battery. My assumption is no one cares because they wont actually ride it that often. But im curious, so if anyone has that info that would be great.
  • 2 3
 20,000 km, and still won't be totally dead, at 1000.00 for a battery, that is cheap! You have to replace tires, brake pads, drive trains etc, its all a cost of riding, a battery is no different. I have over 35,000 km on ebikes, they are cheaper to run and more smiles per mile.
  • 4 0
 @norona: sounds like a schill.
  • 1 0
 @cirque4: if you are using schill as in the Scottish term for snake oil salesman, I would agree. Ebikes can’t be cheaper to maintain, there are more parts that have to be replaced.

I can buy in to 20000km a battery, but how the bike is used matters. There is a huge difference between flat roads and a 5% dirt climb that lasts 7 miles.
  • 2 0
 @dpars63: well I ride mine every day, I ride for Devinci and ride between 800-1000km per month april-October and in over 35,000 km I go through an assegai rear every 900-1200 km and rear brake pads every 800 km , I had a warranty coil shock on the 2018 and that is it, I change the chain and cassette at roughly 3000km and that is it. I live in Squamish and rarely use a road or fsr on the bike, it is ridden from home and single track starts 800 meters from my house to endless single track. Some impressive things I have seen- I put 5000km on a gx drive train that was still shifting but was starting to mis shift , but usually my bikes are sold at 3000km and are sold with the current drive train in great working order and with a new cassette and chain for when they feel they want to change it. All my bikes from 2017 are still running with same battery etc , most do not put the km on the bike as I did it all happy owners. Cheers and happy riding.
  • 1 0
 @cirque4:
Yes I ride and do all my sports as my job. I am lucky but it does not change the fact of what I do and how long things last. Come join me and see for yourself. I am in Squamish, BC
  • 1 0
 @dpars63: not only that, but ebikes are heavier and the whole purpose of an ebike is that the rider’s energy is being increased by the motor. More energy going thru the drivetrain means more wear on the drivetrain - chains and cassettes replaced more often, etc. even removing the battery replacement costs from the equation, there is zero chance an ebike is cheaper to operate than an analog bike.
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: guess you won’t see it until you ride one, it actually smooths out your ride so less pressure on everything. Same reason a good rider can make stuff last longer over a new rider, being smooth matters. Cheers dave
  • 1 0
 @norona: I appreciate the honesty of your reply. As a company representative you have to adopt a position that is in sync with that of the company. I also appreciate the tenuous position of your job - there is always some hotshot snapping at your heels. The fact is e bikes and assisted riding is where the money is, so you endorse it.
The ethics of the whole thing is what bothers me. Riding a bicycle is not the same as riding an e bike. When you say you ride between 800-1000km per month on an e bike it's just not the same achievement as riding a bicycle the same distance. Call a spade a spade and be counted. As in climbing, style is everything.

As an aside. Devinci is on my shit list right now for endorsing a "loaming" video. Good god people. Has it really come down to "Fun at all Costs"? Maybe you could express mine (and other's) concerns.

Ride safe.
  • 1 1
 @cirque4:
I love when someone tells me how my life is, what I do and how and why I do it when they don’t even know me, it means you are replying to how you actually are and think, not me. Work on yourself first bro. It’s also interesting how you are mad at a mtb company that promote loamers when in fact every rider and bike company is looking for and designing their bikes to ride every type of sweet trail. Any way keep the gate high, it’s something that has been taught to you and ingrained early on, fortunately you can fix it , it just takes a lot of work on your part. So a word of advise think more , look at yourself and spend the time, energy and work there instead of ignoring that a spreading your viral spew towards others, your life will get better if you do. I have spend 20 years racing all over the world, 500 races so I am well aware of what it is like to push on a regular bike, and how it compares to the riding I do now. The problem is you have done zero close to the type of racing and at the level I have done it at, as well as you have no experience close to mine on an ebike so, come on up to Squamish and we will take u for an ebike, if you keep up to the pace I will cover you rental for the day that we will provide and address your concerns! Just pm me!
  • 1 0
 @norona: Once again I appreciate your reply and am sorry I have got under your skin. Any assumptions I have made are based on your own forthright descriptions of yourself. Social media, being what it is, leaves many issues up for clarification and debate. As a short background I can say I have ridden mountain bikes for 40 years and raced road bikes for 20. I was never “world class” but I am familiar with a lot of the bike industry.

I am a retired federally employed ecologist and I know (not assuming, or guessing) that loaming is terrible for the environment. I don’t care what company or individual supports it, it is a step in the wrong direction. If you want to ride non sanctioned areas in search of “sweet” riding you are part of the problem not the solution. Companies and individuals need to support sustainable riding. As I said “fun at all costs” is not an option.

Be safe.
  • 1 0
 I've a specy creo sl and a road ebike totally make sense for me, 35nm little battery, make me push just to train and help me just a little. I don't need a 25kg mtb ebike, i want a light ebike for trails. Trail bike are now like enduro...150mm.. I think that xc ebike will be the next big thing.. with light engines like fazua . Tq... mahle...specy sl
  • 5 0
 Electric+downcountry. Double hate from people.
  • 1 0
 I’m really hoping to get an honest review of the Fazua Ride 60 system.
I keep seeing bikes coming out with this system, but never a review.
Or are these bikes that will be coming out soon, but aren’t available to test ride yet.

Very interested in the Transition Relay.
Which is not available until 2023.
  • 1 0
 I wish I could ride more boring fire roads - said no one ever. If I ever buy an ebike, it will be the exact opposite of this wilier… I would get something with at least 170mm travel front and rear, and basically use it to shuttle myself uphill so I can ride more miles of downhill.
  • 4 0
 Riding fire roads and relatively tame trails is what lots of people consider mountain biking to be. Those people are probably not found in high numbers on this website but their money is worth just as much anyone else's. This bike doesn't really appeal to me either but i can certainly see that there's a market for it.
  • 1 0
 @n734535: makes sense. I personally ride for two reasons: fun and fitness. The problem with a cross country ebike is that it’s not going to be as fun as an enduro bike on the fun trails, and I’m going to have to ride farther/longer on the fire roads to maintain the same level of fitness. But I suppose it could allow me to explore more trails, which is nice…but an enduro ebike could also do that, but more comfortably. So I still don’t see the point of this particular ebike.
  • 1 0
 In the past I had two road bike from Wilier and they were by far the best road bike I ever rode. Just to say I like give it a try... Even if I think sweet spot is 140/150 mm bikes... And I am not for ebike!
  • 1 0
 Can I PM you about Wilier? I'm interested in getting into road and was looking into them. Trying to decide between Cervelo, Pinarello, Colnago, and Wilier
  • 1 0
 @cmi85: for sure no problem at all!
  • 2 0
 The only use I have for an e-bike is in place of a shuttle or lift. So that dictates that the bike must be Trail/Enduro level at least.
  • 3 0
 Very not pleasant to the eye
  • 5 1
 Hideous
  • 2 0
 Bonus points for the top tube battery display and not one of those awful one’s on the handlebar.
  • 2 0
 Who doesn't like to watch fast and gnarly xc racing? This makes xc even more fun to watch!
  • 2 0
 If I'm getting help up to the top I want aggressive geo and lots of squish. Racing uphill on e-bikes is DUMB!
  • 1 0
 Thank you for your honest, skeptical assessment of this bike rather than simply pushing the bike industry's PR about how great e-bikes are.
  • 1 0
 Loading and unloading the heavier ebike was becoming to hard! Remember the bragging rights of making an ebiker crash are forever!
  • 1 1
 Honda rno1 new geo ebike with showa forks and shock, intigrated mid mounted gearbox 1500w, 1000wh battery bafang motor.burn me..
  • 2 0
 When I first saw the title I thought it said “willies uterus”.
  • 3 0
 Its urtas to look at
  • 2 0
 Next up, road e-bikes and road e-bike races. Watt, watt!
  • 2 0
 same reason we dont need e-road bikes.... defeats the whole point.
  • 2 0
 I just don't see a point of this ebike and I'm not against ebikes.
  • 1 0
 How many enduro bros are on here crying about e bikes while riding the chairlift up the mountain?
  • 1 0
 I'm going to build a custom commuter bike and call it the first Upcity bike.
  • 2 0
 Cafe race bike.
  • 6 0
 Nah... cafe racers are cool
  • 2 1
 still better than that stupid cervelo
  • 3 2
 Dumb.... No HOPE FOR THE FUTURE!
  • 2 2
 I think I might have thrown up in my mouth a little bit…

I mean, just why??
  • 2 1
 Just another moped to laugh at when seen in the wild. Brap Braaap
  • 2 1
 why do you need a damn motor on an XC bike
  • 1 0
 Needs through the stem cable routing so it can be even more hated.
  • 1 0
 lets see one of those do some Rampage drops and examine the residue
  • 1 0
 I could huck this bike off curbs on the way to the grocery store. Sick.
  • 4 3
 More e-shite.
  • 1 1
 If Mr C.M. Burns from The Simpsons were a bikes, this is it
  • 1 1
 It's the long-awaited Fugazi AF
  • 2 1
 this should be illegal
  • 1 1
 Looks like shit.
  • 1 1
 Poofweed. Utra or urta?







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