The Inside Line Announces Tonton Fat Bike

Jan 11, 2024 at 10:37
by The Inside Line  
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The Tonton is our key to keeping the spark alive during the cold months.


PRESS RELEASE: The Inside Line

The desire to modernize the geometry of fat bikes is what sparked the inception of the Tonton. With the ride experience being paramount, we had to ask ourselves, what trails do we want to ride in the winter? The answer was simple, the same terrain that we ride in the summer! Thus the first iteration of the Tonton came into existence, filling a fat bike shaped hole in our hearts. After a successful season of snowy alpine adventures aboard the V1 Tonton, we devised a plan alongside our friends at Kruch Bicycles and Lone Tree Enterprises to improve what was already a unique design.


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Fast and loose.

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Just because it's fat biking, doesn't mean it has to be XC trails!

We began with a wide size range, allowing our friends of all shapes to share the ride! The new Tonton fits riders ranging from 5’ to 6’6”. The new frame is proportional to specific sizes, with chainstay lengths as short as 440mm. The headtube angle has been further slackened to 64 degrees while the headtube itself is beautifully tapered and size specific.

The new Tonton is optimized for 27.5 inch wheels. This choice has allowed us to make a number of improvements to the ergonomics and performance of the newest version of the Tonton. The width between the cranks, the Q factor, has been narrowed from 230mm to 206mm, removing some pressure and wear on the riders knees, resulting in a more natural riding stance and pedal motion. Speaking of pedaling, the chainline has been reduced to 66.5mm from an industry standard 76.5mm. The narrowed chainline results in better cog engagement and smoother shifting, especially in the climbing gears.

The frames are welded in Calgary. We used additive manufacturing to make our yokes, this process allows for a custom shape to accommodate more chainring clearance and results in less snow build up. Additionally, the additive manufacturing has come in handy when designing a UDH dropout for those looking to run a SRAM Transmission drivetrain.


Details and pricing:

• Material: 4130 Chromoly
• Wheel Size: 27.5"
• Fork Size: 120mm
• Head tube angle: 64°
• Seat tube angle: 76°
• Hanger: Sram UDH
• Frame: $2200 CAD
• Comp Build: $5200 CAD
• Pro Build: $7000 CAD
• Made in Calgary, Alberta
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The Tonton is available either fully spec’d or you can build it yourself from the frame up. With a user-friendly BSA 100mm bottom bracket, parts will always be easy to find and customization of your Tonton is limitless. An everything cage mount on the downtube is joined by an accessory mount on the top tube. You’ll be able to easily mount your light battery for those rides in the dark. The bike is polished off with Paragon cable guides and our very own ~doggo~ cable bobbins for the perfect Inside Line touch!

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Build Options

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Geo Chart

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See you out there!

Our team at The Inside Line is proud of this bike, and we cannot wait for you to experience all that it has to offer!

For more information click here.

Author Info:
TheInsideLine avatar

Member since Apr 26, 2019
3 articles

232 Comments
  • 99 2
 Fuck yes, more fatbike content! If anyones weary about a new geo fatbike, i went from the farley to the blizzard and the slack HTA takes out the stupid fatbike self steer. Think of a shopping cart wheel, more vertical the more its going to dart all over.
  • 2 1
 Also seriously considering a switch to something with a slacker HTA. The self steering sensation on an old geo (Specialized Fatboy) is unnerving…
  • 3 0
 Rim width has a big influence on the self steering of fatbikes too. I went from a 100mm rim on 26x4,0 to a 80mm rim. The annoying self steering I experienced before was completely gone just from using narrower rims.
  • 14 1
 There is no self steering on snow!
  • 1 0
 @OneTrustMan: Interesting…
  • 2 0
 @styleguide: My fatbike predominantly sees sand… We wish for snow down South…
  • 4 0
 Someone get Chris Akrigg or Danny Mac on a fatty....
  • 3 0
 I've got a -2 angle set on my ICT, really helped the handling. Tire choice also influences self steer quite a bit... I found a set of 4.8 Knards for summer riding... They were horrendous. Bud and Lou are far more neutral. I also discovered another crack on my ICT, this is my second one... Something with modern geo that doesn't fail so readily would be nice...
  • 14 0
 @bigtim: Pat Smage is on that kind of level on a fatbike.
  • 9 5
 @styleguide: 100% the reason why fat bikes have steep HT angles is to allow for agile steering and avoidance of wheel flop at slow speeds. A really slack HT angle on a fat bike will blow through corners.
  • 1 0
 @SchalkMarais: So I'm not only one that experiences that! lol Otherwise, it's a good fat bike.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: Ali Clarkson has some entertaining videos doing trials and trail riding on a fatty
  • 1 0
 @steelispossiblyreal: thats like taking a fixie to the skatepark.
  • 1 0
 @styleguide:

Oooph, definitely not my experience. I'm on a 1st generation Blizzard with Surly Bud and Lou, and as soon as you get a little fluff on the sidewalls or soft pack on the edge of some hardpack, my tires are diving in to eat cake.
  • 6 0
 @BoneDog: nope, It does not. My blizzard flys thru tight twisty singletrack. Ive taken away pr’s on my blizzard c50 from my farley 9.6. It rails corners and feels like a mountainbike.
  • 5 4
 @BoneDog: I think the real reason is the main customer is still a boomer that likes to keep their wheels on the ground and has geo charts from 1998 as their main point of reference.
  • 4 0
 The Skookum AF from Corvis bikes already solved this problem.
  • 5 2
 @BoneDog: I've never experienced blowing through corners on my 66 HTA Blizzard.
  • 7 4
 @solarplex:

The reason fat bikes have more conservative HTA's is to have a better balanced Trail to account for the larger contact area and slower speeds.

For example, have you not ridden your fat bike on dry pavement and felt how much feedback you get from the steering and front tire traction? now amplify that when you begin to add considerably more trail.

Take that same resistance you feel when riding dry pavement, and imagine that is the force you are applying to the snow when your trying to turn. The more trail , the more chance you have breaking traction in your corners.

As for HTA's

-My fat bike also as a 66 degree HTA
-My Chromag doctahawk with 275x3.0 with a (62 degree HT).
-My lowdown is 63.5 degree.

I'm all for slack HTA's but experience has proven to me that traditional HTA's make way more sense for traction in the winter and a better handling bike.

The Tauntaun is 64 degree HTA, which is alot of Trail for a fat bike. A fat bike tire 275x4.8 (8psi) has more then 2X the contact surface then a 275 X 2.8 (22 psi) mountain bike tire.
  • 4 6
 @eastonwest: its 64 dude lol
  • 4 6
 @solarplex: its 64 degree HTA, your not in the same league son
  • 4 6
 @eastonwest: its 64 HTA, different ball game
  • 5 5
 @BoneDog: I've never actually measured my HTA, but it's 66 with a rigid fork. I'm running a 140mm Mastodon so I'll venture a guess and say I'm running a 65 HTA. The front end has great traction when climbing and when descending as long as you weight the front a bit more than you would a regular summer bike. And again, no blowing through corners.

I'd argue that yes, one could tell the difference between a 69 HTA fat bike and a 64 HTA fat bike, but not so much between 66 and 64. 2 degrees isn't really a whole different ball game, lol.
  • 1 0
 @savagepooh: Thx, I never heard of this bike before! I appreciate the knowledge!
  • 2 0
 @solarplex: Same bike (Bliz C50), same experience after being on a Beargrease since 2016.
  • 1 0
 @savagepooh: For real ! I love my Skookum AF it rips so hard and is a better pricepoint than this bike
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylPjkgOjUJg - Ali Clarkson has done better IMO though.
  • 2 3
 @eastonwest: you commented BS and showed that you do not even know what geo is your bike. Everything you say now is BS Big Grin
  • 1 0
 I'm happy you liked your Blizzard. I had one and the HT angle and the 27.5x4.5 tires made this thing like a limo. I could barely ride my trails without falling off the snowpack. I've switched to a more conservative geo on 3.0 tires and its so much more reasonable.
  • 3 0
 Also have a '21 Blizzard, swap between Rigid and a 120 EXT Mastodon fork. It's not just the 66HTA, another thing to consider is the long (455) chainstays. The Blizzard is a balanced, stable ride, but that long wheelbase requires a bit of forethought. At high speed on TIGHT snowy singletrack I tend to ride the front more and pick my front tire lines carefully. Then let the rear go where it may (usually drifting). I personally love this riding style though, it's hilarious fun and less consequence anyway on snow. Good studded tires help (on Wrathchilds). I also have to imagine the longer wheelbase also adds some predictability to a slide. Admittedly, maybe more fun on steeper terrain where stability counts. So, I can't blame anyone going to a steeper HTA for their terrain (slower, rolling, or lower angle). However I've never "blown" a corner (and kept going into it) per se - I have washed out several times when I was first learning the bike. Figuring this out really helps your flat corner mtb technique. There's only so much available grip on snow... More below.

You can washout on a snowy corner easily and hit the deck quick on any fat bike. 1ft (sorry, 305mm) out of line to the right or left can have you sinking in the shoulder and/or tucking the front faster than you can blurt your favorite expletive. Groomed snow, like maple syrup, is less predictable in this sense as its quality ALWAYS depends on how the cold it got overnight. It may be completely firm, firm in the middle and soft on the sides, or just too soft to ride. Fresh powder is less grippy yet more consistent and therefore more predictable downhill. But sucky to climb on.

The reason I point this out is, on FIRM GROOMED snow, and studded tires (even on my old unstudded Cake Eaters), I've never had a problem cornering the Blizzard. It's the mixed, unpredictable conditions that will catch you out. And whether you prefer to be proactive with a steeper, but maybe more twitchy HTA, or reactive with a slacker HTA and longer wheelbase to catch a slide, is all up to your riding preference and terrain. In my case, I love the Blizzard for my terrain in VT. It also makes a fun summer trail bike in 29+ mode. Where I'd also prefer a slack HTA.

TLDR, a rambling fat dad dreams or riding his fat bike again.
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: S Blizzard feels and looks like my M Farley, you need to go size smaller for RM Blizards if you want bike to be nimble, and if not fatbike, then I do not know what bike should be nimble Big Grin
  • 86 0
 Hey Inside Line, can you make me a Tandem? hehehe !!
  • 70 0
 Hey Yoann! Pierre here, can you send me an email?
  • 13 0
 @TheInsideLine @yoannbarelli: oh hell yeah, please make that happen!!
  • 4 0
 Shotgun stoker
  • 2 0
 Hey who is goning to be pasenger on second row???
jejeje
  • 14 0
 @greg390: Good luck Steve...
  • 9 0
 @TheInsideLine: call it the Wonton, as that's how much it will weigh.
  • 1 0
 for santaclaus + deers?
  • 25 0
 Just came here to say that Reg is the fricken man! We need an edit of him riding some questionable stuff on this puppy. Stoked to see this come out, props to Cam and the Calgary Crew!
  • 7 0
 The Tonton wouldn't exist without us first riding his custom Kruch fat bike. Reg continues to inspire!
  • 2 0
 @stephanepelletier thanks for the shoutout ya beaut and enjoy that year-round skinny tire life!
  • 2 0
 @TheInsideLine: the real life V1!
  • 25 1
 Fat biking is back!
  • 15 1
 I was out on my Fatillac last night packing trail and getting loose with the pups. Once I get everything packed down on the main loops, I'll start working on packing my jump line, woot!! I have a lot of fun on a fat bike, it beats riding a trainer of driving hours to find dirt. Full suspension fat, studded snows, coil front a rear, boom baby!
  • 1 0
 @sanchofula: lol fatillac
  • 2 0
 @sanchofula: sounds awesome, snap some pics and post it.

www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=210736

I have been having a blast on my Motobecane Sturgis bought second hand. It's doubled my on trail days annually. Some of the best riding I get to do is when it snows too much for normal size tires and I get the whole trail to myself (most trails near me a stupid busy in the summer)
  • 1 0
 @mkul7r4: oh boo, it's an actual product. that would've been a cool thing to name your own bike.
  • 18 0
 I dont have this bike but I came to say the Inside Line is the best bike shop experience I've ever had. Awesome group of people.
  • 10 0
 3 We are a reflection of our community.
  • 5 0
 10% Discount for MMBTS members at Inside Line!
  • 3 0
 Awesome group of people indeed!
  • 16 1
 Looks like a Honzo ESD with big tires
  • 14 0
 I’d be keen on more fatbike content as well!
  • 10 0
 Anyone wondering if climbing ability was compromised when going with this radically different geometry? I wondered the same but after 300KM and nearly 15,000M of vertical I can firmly say it works well. Really well. Front end is glued to the ground and does not wander. It comfortably climbs steeps that look impossible in winter. Of course it is in a league of it's own when it comes to descending. It handles the alpine terrain so well that you stop missing summer riding. Insideline, Kruch and Lone Tree together have created something very special.
  • 2 0
 Always stoked to see your rides!
  • 3 1
 I set a pr on a super tight twisty trail on my blizzard c50 my farley 9.6 with 720 bars should have had a way bigger advantage on. But the slack modern geo even with 800mm bars flew through there.
  • 2 0
 I just recently followed you on Instagram and was loving your Tonton build. How's the bike on more mellow trails like at WBC?
  • 1 0
 @VonBaron: Thanks! The bike rips on WBC trails too. I find it just as playful as my outgoing Salsa Beargrease but a lot more planted and stable at speed. The real test will be the upcoming fat XC race.
  • 1 0
 I’m sure the 120 fork and steeper seat tube help it stay planted. What’s your IG handle sprung-mass? Love more fat bike content.
  • 2 0
 @Klimbnbike: also funny enough I have mine overforked to 130, have 35mm spacers under the stem and 35mm riser bars. IG= _sprungmass
  • 10 0
 Such a sick bike! Happy to see modern geometry finally break through into fat bikes. Without fat bikes the riding season around Calgary can be as short as 6 or 7 months of the year.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, finally a modern geo on a fat. It looks like my Stanton Switchback but with fatties. Badass bike!!!
  • 8 0
 Calgary and area has really been a hotbed for fat bikes in the Canadian MTB scene over the past 10+ years. Only fitting that a Calgary Bike Shop and a Calgary Custom Frame Builder would work together to make bike designed for the trails in our area. Well done to all involved and thank you for pushing the boundaries!
  • 7 0
 In the pinkbike readers survey a couple months ago I - jokingly but hopefully - asked for more fatbike content, and now that's two fatbike related articles in 2 days !

And that's indeed a very cool looking fat, a Honzo ESD with fat tires as another comment says.

(But I also appreciate the less bike-nerdy/more human articles, like Quinney's article about grieving, or Cathro's ADHD diagnosys. It's just that I had more than my fare share of crap in life so I totally focused on nerdity :p )
  • 9 0
 Really, no Star Wars Tauntaun reference?

Pinkers are slow on the uptake today.
  • 12 0
 I like to think that every time a Disney Lawyer opens his briefcase at a copyright infringement case there’s a a TIE Fighter screech sound effect.
  • 6 0
 That was its original name, but as @MrRight put it.... the tie fighters have taken flight.
  • 4 0
 I heard they smell worse on the inside than the out... Hopefully it's external cable routing...
  • 3 0
 Every time i take it out for a ride and my wife says you’ll freeze to death, I’ll just respond “then I’ll see you in hell.”
  • 2 0
 Its internal temperature is luke warm
  • 7 0
 This is so dope. I have a Blizzard and I'm seriously thinking of selling it to get this. If only the used market was at all decent...
  • 6 0
 I had a Blizzard and have the V1 Tonton. BIG upgrade.
  • 9 0
 @downhilldonnie: I have a blizzard. Actually riding it will be my upgrade. It's too cold.
  • 7 0
 @downhilldonnie: the geo difference between the blizzard and this tonton bike is not that drastic ... What do you like better? I have a blizzard and find its geo to already be somewhat decent when compared with other fat bikes
  • 3 0
 Can you fit an angle adjust headset on the Blizzard???
  • 3 0
 @wobblegoblin: Absolutely. It uses a standard zero stack (ZS) tapered headset. Wolf Tooth and Works Components both have options up to 2 degrees.
  • 4 0
 @nnowak: My blizzard is slack enough! Already a bit of a plow sled.
  • 2 0
 @dldewar: Agree to disagree. I have a 2021 RM Growler with a 140mm Bomber Z2 and a RM Suzi Q. The Suzi Q has a 2 degree angleset and is overforked with a Mastodon Pro set to 130mm. I basically converted the Suzi Q to a monster truck Growler. Net result, the Suzi is a hair slacker than the Growler and is more fun everywhere. Don't know which version Blizzard you have, but if it feels like a plow sled, that might be from the tires you are running and not the geo.
  • 2 0
 @nnowak: the blizzard I have has a 66 degree head angle and 76 seat I believe. For riding fish creek in Calgary that’s plenty slack. It has the stick 27.5 x 4.5 tires on it. At least where I am I do not need anything more than downcountry geometry.
  • 3 0
 @dldewar: yeah I agree with this. If you're shredding Moose (or some of the gnarlier stuff at the Canmore Nordic Centre, like Black Coal Chutes), I'd want something slacker.

The other nice change is the Q-factor. The stock Blizzard cranks (at least until the '24 models) have a Q-factor >220mm (227mm on the A10). The Fat5 cranks the Tonton comes with have a Q-factor of 206mm, which is much more pleasant. And they come with 170mm cranks, while I think the Rockys come with 175mm cranks. Pretty minor changes but they make a big difference.
  • 2 1
 @finblarr: Both Blizzard and Tonton are using a 100mm bottom bracket. Any crank that fits one will fit the other. As for crank length, it depends on frame size. S, M are 170. L, XL are 175.
  • 2 0
 @finblarr: It's funny, I've never had a problem with wider cranks except to fit thru things (rock gaps, hitting pedals, etc.). Otherwise I don't mind how it pedals and it doesn't bother my knees. Depends on the person I guess. My '21 A10 Blizz has 170 cranks, size medium. I beat the snot out of it, think I may have actually tweaked the rear triangle, but thing still shreds. With the EXT Mastodon I think the HTA is around 65deg static, maybe even closer to 64 (519 vs 550 ATC).
  • 6 0
 Missed opportunity to really go all in on the Tonton (Tauntaun) reference by adding some "in frame storage" ...you know to stash things to help me survive the cold winter nights on Hoth.
  • 4 0
 I don't disagree, but what are you going to store in a skinny steel tube - a freeze pop?
  • 14 0
 @R-M-R: tactical breadstick
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: one of those 100g emergency bivy sacks of course Smile
  • 2 0
 @R-M-R: You pour some sugar water in there, add a popsicle stick, then come back to an extra long popsicle in the morning.
  • 3 0
 I sold my fat bike several years ago in favor of a decently aggressive steel hardtail that could handle some plus-sized, studded tires for the winter and have had no regrets on leaving the fat life behind. That is until the other weekend when I rode with some people on Tontons. I don't think I've ever seen people have more fun on a bike in the winter. Great job by all the good people involved. This is the fat bike we've needed all along!
  • 2 0
 I used to have three fatbikes over the years. Norco Bigfoot, On One Fatty and finally Sasquatch with a Bluto. Sold the last one to get a steel RSD Middlechild with 2.8s. Now I have three wheelsets for it, 29er for summer, 27.5+ permanently setup for winter and a 27.5 with 2.6" tires for next season to try and have no regrets. This is the first fatbike since I sold mine that makes me want to get one again.
  • 1 0
 @kryten: What did you think of the On One? I've always wanted a Stooge fat bike and it seems to be the closest thing to it.
  • 1 0
 @steelispossiblyreal:
I only sold is as it was a size small and I really should have been on a medium. I wished it had a modern 197 thru axle rear end. Mine was setup with the heavy stock steel QR fork with 135 hub, full 2x XT drivetrain and BB7 brakes. So a bunch of annoying outdated standards that contributed to the decision. I loved the split top tube look. It has actual 68 deg HTA as it was rigid and it was just so much fun to ride everywhere. It was my snow bike, but it was a blast to take it out every once in a while in summer just cause it was so different. The modern Sasquatch that followed was good, but it just never had that same playful fun and confident feel. Both were 68 HTA, but with the Bluto the Sasquatch was 70+ as soon as you sat on it. It just did not made any sense financially to modernize the Fatty with 1x, hydraulic brakes and dropper considering the not ideal sizing and old standards. It is still the only one from the three fatbikes that I miss. If it was a medium I would still have it despite all its shortcomings. It was the original Fatty v1, not the Fatty Trail.
  • 3 0
 Rocky Mountain was one of the only options for a fatbike with modern geo. Fantastic seeing another option become available. Frame isn't quite perfect for what "I want", but it is a great frame nonetheless.
  • 2 0
 @nnowak RSD Mayor is another solid choice with modern geo.
  • 1 0
 Have you ever looked at the Foes Mutz? Its been out for quite awhile with very modern geo, at least for a fatty.
www.foesracing.com/bikes/mutz
  • 1 0
 @OakleyVT: Yeah, I've seen it before. Over 8lbs for the frame and 150mm of rear travel. I am sure it is fun on the downhills, but I would hate to pedal it back up.
  • 1 0
 @eastonwest: 74 seat tube and 67 head tube is modern geo? Definitely better than the ubiquitous Farleys and Mukluks, but still a bit dated.
  • 4 0
 No Overseas shipping? I think I need one of these to increase my happiness score.
  • 3 0
 Saw your email! Someone from our team will get back to you today!
  • 6 3
 very cool! ...but still, a hard tail frame at 2200 cad? (not just you guys at this price point, so more of a general comment) Must be made of supertonium
  • 7 4
 Manufacturing costs of paying people to design and hand make stuff in north America. The guys involved in this are seriously skilled, so the cost reflects the value of their time and effort.
  • 5 19
flag issasledgehammer (Jan 11, 2024 at 19:33) (Below Threshold)
 @ratedgg13: its still a hardtail fatbike. Maybe put the skill towards a better cause.
  • 5 2
 @issasledgehammer: what does a Canadian made Chromag frame cost? Same same
  • 5 12
flag issasledgehammer (Jan 12, 2024 at 4:23) (Below Threshold)
 @kiddlivid: price is the same. Value is not
  • 8 3
 Cool bike and all but $2200 for a frame is crazy sauce.
  • 14 3
 About $1650usd

A Trek Farley C frame is $3200cad and a Salsa Beargrease carbon frame is around $2500cad.

This is a small batch, handmade frame made in Canada. Right around the same price as the Chromag frames that are welded in Canada.
  • 4 0
 @jsnfschr: I suppose so.
Good examples.
  • 2 0
 I have been staring at this frame for a while. My current fat frame doesn't get a ton of use, but the geo is from 1926. Maybe with a big nasty slack frame... that would change lol
  • 1 0
 My question is what crank/chainring combo are they using to get that chainline? I would have thought they would need to use a smaller BB than a BSA100 and a 177 rear hub like what Otso does on theirs. Also, @TheInsideLine it looks like the spec listed here and on your website is wrong for the front wheel unless I am mistaken. Shouldn't that be 15x150mm for the hub spec and not 15x110mm? Great looking bike though!
  • 1 0
 Most likely 100mm bottom bracket with the chainring flipped so it is dished to the outside to accommodate the 197mm rear end. Not uncommon. If you don't flip the chainring, then you need a 120mm bottom bracket to keep the chain line correct. Otso uses a 177mm rear end and a downhill 83mm bottom bracket, again with a flipped chainring. Normally, a 177mm rear would take a 100mm bottom bracket.
  • 3 0
 Thanks for the kind words!

Good catch regarding that front hub! That was an honest typo. It is a 15x150mm front hub.

The Otso (and suzie-q) take an interesting approach at reducing q-factor by using narrower DH standard bb shells with 177 rear ends. We chose to use a Sram GX fat bike "4 inch" crankset instead. These have a 66.5 chainline, and 6mm offset chainring, and a 206mm Q-factor. They strike a nice balance of low q-factor and more inboard chainline to create better chain performance in the granny gear, yet maintain enough tire clearance for 27.5 x 4.5 tires.

Furthermore, one of our objectives with the Tonton v2 was to use the most common standards, since many of our customers are swapping build kits from other fatbikes. I'd love to keep answering your questions, happy to take a phone call about the bike any time. You can reach me (Cam) at the shop at 403-270-3256
  • 1 0
 This looks amazing. Gauntlet thrown down, Chromag. Where’s the Nice Dreams V2. I’ll help you out with the name even, Sweet Dreams for the updated Chromag fat bike. Until then, the Tonton is pretty much the best out there for people looking for a true modern geo Fatbike.
  • 1 0
 Cool to see AB company making fatbike. But I didn't get why everyone is trashing Farleys? I am all in for slack full squish, but in the winter I love my Farley so much, I will never switch to hardtail for summer but my HT farley is one of the most fun bikes to ride on the snow and ice. There is more benefits in "conservative" geo as winter speeds and cornering is usually not as fast. Especially because in AB we spend last two months of winter riding ice not snow
  • 4 0
 Do I need this? No. Do I want it? Hell yes.
  • 2 0
 Unbelievable. I'm listening to the Shut up and Build Bikes Podcast interview with Corey from Kruch as this comes across the home page. Super rad!
  • 3 0
 That’s proof they are watching you
  • 1 0
 Jumps down from your windowsill...
  • 1 0
 @TheInsideLine, wait a second, are these photos from the day we toured up Prairie/Jewel with you (I'm the guy on the beater Moose)? Sure looks like it.

Regardless, definitely cool looking bikes.
  • 1 0
 I believe these were shot a couple of days before. We were alone on this trip!
  • 2 0
 ahhhhh those pix are not REG..... jeez and to think i was going to buy one. false advertising. haahhahha jokes. bike looks sick
  • 1 0
 No mention of tyre widths/clearance? Isn't that kind of important on a fat bike? Nice that they have kept chainstays short and q factor down but if it has come at the expense of tyre width it could be a problem maybe?
  • 1 0
 It seems to me the industry has decided 27.5 is better than 26 and 27.5x4.5 is the main wheel size, maybe, because it indeed allows to limit tire width and q-factor (most "mass" produced fat are 27.5 now).
Maybe a wider tire (if you want to go 5" wide) makes more sense at the front where the snow is less packed, and a less wide (4.5) at the rear as it will mostly roll on the same path as the front wheel ?
  • 1 0
 The biggest 27.5 is 4.5 at the moment. The pro model has that size so it should be able to clear whatever size you would want to use.
  • 2 0
 Huge props to Kruch and Lone Tree for making this a reality. Can't wait to see what's next.
  • 1 0
 Is it fun? Fat biking? Where do you do it? Seems like there’s too much snow around here. You riding up and down a skin track?
  • 3 0
 It's in the foothills of the Rockies near Calgary so not a huge snow pack. With a bit of packing down quite a few of the "summer" trails can be ridden.
No skin tracks. Not enough snow most of the time for touring where the riding is happening.
  • 3 0
 Lots of the XC and "enduro" trails near Calgary are packed down with a groomer type machine to create an initial "groove" then as more people ride it gets more packed down and faster
  • 4 0
 Northern Minnesota here. My clubs GRIMBA has four groomers and tries to keep the entirety of our 27 mile system groomed for year round climbing and descending. Volunteers who weed whip in the summer month drive track sleds in the winter.
  • 1 0
 @Wanaber: man could we use something like this is Durango, CO!
  • 2 0
 @Wanaber: interesting. I’m not trolling btw…genuinely curious.
  • 3 4
 Lol no, most do it so they don't kill themselves in the winter. I wouldn't call it fun but ya have to get out. Even if you have to pretend layering up 3 inches thick in clothing to ride a smooth trail in sub zero temps is fun.
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: there’s a few picture from this year.

Roll back to last winter there should be some more pics and a few videos.
  • 1 0
 Reaaallly fun around here, in Quebec, Canada!! Groomed with SnowDog and snowmobiles with something behind, like tires a lot of time.

That's what my 2 favorite trails look like! Flowy trails in winter are suuuuper fun!!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b2XFNAn1fw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpN6Gsv_uto
  • 1 0
 @Timo82: Those are some awesome fast flow trails for the winter. We’re also snowmobile and snow dog groom.

Here’s our local propaganda video.
m.youtube.com/watch?v=4WGTOAPnjUI&pp=ygUYVGlvZ2Egd2ludGVyIHRocmlsc2Vla2Vy
  • 3 0
 Best looking fat bike I've seen!
  • 3 0
 You just made my day, thank you! - Cam
  • 3 0
 And I thought they smelled bad on the outside.
  • 2 0
 And I thought my RSD Mayor was aggressive for a fat bike (67 HTA...with rigid fork).
  • 2 0
 Looking forward to Inside Line be bringing out the Sarlaac, great for sand dunes/deserts.
  • 2 0
 I broke my Blizzard frame (used, no warranty) and this looks ideal.
  • 4 6
 Nice to see new players in the fatbike market but this bike is way too expensive!!!
And stop using those Sun Ringle rims, they don't hold scellant and the hubs are pretty cheap.

Look at the RM Blizzard C50: 4400$ or Panorama Torngat Ti: 5600$ (and they're way cheaper options), they're not as slack, no suspension but if you ride fatbike, you know 64 HTA and supension are useless in winter as everything is smoother and slower on snow.

The Tonton would make a good year-round bike for someone who does'nt enduro in summer, but still $$$$$
  • 7 2
 It's a boutique, locally made bike from a boutique shop. I don't know how many WAO Arrivals they've sold, but if the number of people riding them around here are any indication, the price isn't an issue. You don't walk into a Porsche or Ferrari dealership and complain their prices are higher than a BMW dealership.
  • 4 2
 @jsnfschr: I like to think that I'm spending my money wisely and I'm getting the most out of it, proof is: I drive a Honda.

I'd like to own the Tonton. It's good looking, as cool numbers and is surely niche but it also seems overbike and overprice for a fatbike.

To each is own
  • 4 1
 Sunringle Rims hold sealant perfectly fine. You just have to tape them properly and use the right tire. Some tires fit loose and require extra layer of tape. If you noticed the spec sheet, the Pro model is fitted with a rear DT350 hub where it matters most.

RM Blizz and other Carbon fat bikes are all mass produced in Taiwan so you can't compare the price. Also those bikes are finally keeping up with modern XC geo numbers. All other fat bikes are rocking geo numbers from 7+ years ago. Lastly suspension is a damn near needed out here in the Rockies.

Just fixating on 64HTA is silly without factoring in everything else. Look at the CS and STA numbers eg. This bike rips on XC trails too FYI.
  • 5 2
 @ElOso999: You can say it's expensive for a fat bike, but I don't think it's fair to say it's overpriced. Two different things.

Quality costs money. Something we've lost site of with the proliferation of cheap, future-garbage that we rapidly consume. While it is expensive, the price of this bike is perfectly fair for what it is. You are not paying for a name, you are not paying for clout or prestige - you are paying a price that accurately reflects the costs of designing/building the thing and the resultant quality.

So it becomes a question to the buyer - this is a fair price, is it worth it to me? And people get to make that judgement value. For some people, many Hondas are too expensive.
  • 4 0
 @shlotch: I totally understand and agree with the Made in Canada and durable things.
But, it would be unfair to say that bikes made in Taiwan are garbage.. Over the years, North American bike companies have given the Taiwan workers the opportunitie to build massive expertise. And most of those bikes last longer than the market trends. Marketing transforms usable things into garbage. "Slacker is better"
  • 4 0
 whatever on the frame price. Right or wrong, ~$2K seems to be about on par for a custom or low volume hardtail steel frame.

what made me laugh was the $1800 up-charge that only gets you a Comp > Pro fork (on a Mastodon...), Guide RSC instead of R, different tires, headset and seat.
  • 2 1
 @lwk: they're codes not guides, and those tires are pretty expensive. The bar is also carbon, and the hs2 rotors instead of centerlines. The biggest difference is probably the dt350 rear hub. You can think what you want about the pricing but there are a few things you may have missed!
  • 2 1
 @wafflecakee: Yes thx, I meant to type Code, not Guide. A quick look around manufacturer and retail websites for pricing still very strongly suggests to me that I didnt miss much and the point stands.
  • 1 1
 @ElOso999: then you are not the intended market for this bike. There is very little on the market for people that DO want something like this outside of custom and I guarantee you will pay more for that.
  • 1 0
 The real question is what kind of hubs does it have and how fast can I expect them to explode?
  • 1 0
 Our pro build has a custom laced DT350 to the Mulefut rim. It's our favourite hub!
  • 2 1
 Podcasts are making mtb frames with additive manufacturing. That's AI, right?
  • 2 0
 Who or what is Lone Tree Enterprises?
  • 9 0
 Lone Tree Enterprises is my own design company where I focus primarily on bikes and bespoke solutions for custom frame builders. Check out my Instagram @Lone.tree.enterprises for some of my work.
  • 1 0
 Wish I lived somewhere that snowed more than 2 days a year so I justify getting this frame.
  • 2 0
 I’m stoked that Vital’s podcast is releasing a snow bike!
  • 2 0
 Whats its internal temperature?
  • 1 0
 Luke warm...
  • 2 0
 And it won’t freeze before you reach the first marker.
  • 2 0
 This looks so hard!
  • 1 0
 That thing is pretty fun looking!
  • 1 0
 Need close ups of that head tube.
  • 1 0
 Super sick fat bike! If I had to go down to one bike this would be it!
  • 1 0
 Fat biking> fat biking
  • 1 0
 Presume the geo numbers are static rather than sagged?
  • 1 0
 You are correct, the geo numbers are static. When deciding on the geo we really took the sagged dimensions into account. Based on your exact setup and dymanics, the reach grows over aprox 12mm, head and seat angles steepen close to a degree. The sagged numbers become a bit more moderate in a way. Some would argue the geo feels surprisingly "regular" haha.
  • 1 0
 So sick!
  • 1 0
 Best name ever!
  • 1 0
 Joe fait moi un Fat
  • 7 9
 7000.00 for a fat bike nowadays is a recipe for bankruptcy
  • 3 7
flag ratedgg13 FL (Jan 12, 2024 at 4:55) (Below Threshold)
 Cool story bro
  • 3 4
 @ratedgg13: just like your story bro
  • 3 2
 At least it's $7k CAD.
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