First Ride: Nukeproof Megawatt Carbon With SRAM Powertrain

Sep 28, 2023 at 9:30
by Seb Stott  
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Photos: Roo Fowler / Bike Connection Agency


Nukeproof are one of the first brands to spill the beans on the eMTB they've been developing with SRAM's new Powertrain motor. It's called the Megawatt Carbon, and as the name suggests, it boasts a full-carbon fiber frame alongside the new drive unit. Nukeproof will continue to make the alloy Megawatt with a Shimano motor to cater to the lower end of the market, as the new version is an unashamedly premium affair.

For the full story on the SRAM powertrain motor, check out our earlier article here. But for now, suffice it to say it offers loads of power (90 Nm torque, 680 W peak power), a quiet ride and - in combination with SRAM's Transmission gearing - the option to shift gears automatically and/or while coasting. The Megawatt uses a 720 Wh battery, which is also an improvement on the Shimano-powered bike.
Megawatt Carbon Details

• SRAM Powertrain motor, 720 Wh battery, auto shifting
• 170 mm travel front & rear
• Fully carbon frame
• Mullet wheels
• Sizes: S-XXL
• Claimed weight: 24 Kg / 53 lb
• Price: £8,799/€10,499/$9,899 - £9,999/ €11,999/$10,899
• Water bottle + internal storage
nukeproof.com

Nukeproof have also tweaked the suspension, increased the travel and adjusted the geometry while they're at it. The original Megawatt had a particularly well-balanced ride quality. We got the chance to ride the carbon version and see if it's even better.

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An integrated chainguide keeps the chain on track.

Frame & Motor

Nukeproof designed the frame so the battery slides out the bottom of the downtube and is held in place with a single bolt for easy battery swaps or off-bike charging. This design saves a bit of weight compared to a battery that slots into the underbelly of the downtube. They angled the motor so the battery slides out easily, and this left some room underneath the motor and behind the battery. Nukeproof made use of this by attaching bosses to the inside of the plastic cover, which can be used to carry a conventional tool mount with an inner tube, CO2, multitool etc. The plastic cover is held in place with a threaded cap that you can remove by hand like a fork's air valve cap. At the launch, one of these came loose and fell off, and another was too tight to remove without pliers, so hopefully, Nukeproof can improve on this for production.

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The bosses on the inside of the cover can be used to mount accessories inside the cavity.
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The finger-tightened cap used to secure the cover is prone to coming loose.

There's room for a 500 ml water bottle in all sizes and there's another accessory mount under the top tube.

The mainframe has carbon channels above the battery for easy cable installation, and the chainstay and seatstay are carbon, too. The frame is protected with extensive contoured rubber armour plus a clear protection kit to preserve the paint. The suspension pivots on full complement Enduro max bearings.

An integrated chain guide is apparently essential to ensure the reliability of the automatic shifting, which can shift gears while you're hammering through rock gardens.

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The derailleur is powered from the main battery via a power cable. This cable only provides energy; all the communication between the motor and gears is wireless. SRAM say you'll still get about two hours of shifting after the drive battery runs out. You can also use a regular AXS battery, but because Autoshift changes gear more often than a manual derailleur, it won't last as long.

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Six hub magnets supply high-frequency and precise speed data for the automatic shifting to respond to.
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The motor display is recessed neatly into the top tube but the motor is mostly controlled with the handlebar-mounted buttons



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Geometry

The SRAM motor is a little bigger than Shimano's, so Nukeproof had to extend the chainstay length compared to the alloy Megawatt - from 442 mm to 447 mm. That number is the same for all frame sizes, but the seat tube gets slightly steeper in the larger sizes to stop tall riders from ending up too far over the rear axle. The head angle is half a degree slacker than the original Megawatt too, apparently to compensate for the longer back end.



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Suspension Design

Starting with the same Horst-link design used on the Mega and Megawatt alloy, Nukeproof increased the travel slightly from 165 mm to 170 mm. They also made the linkage very slightly more progressive - there's now 24% less leverage over the shock at the end of the travel than at the start, compared to 22% previously. They also gave the bike more anti-squat by making the axle path a little more rearward. That means it should stay higher in its travel when pedalling up steep climbs.

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Bearings at the rear shock eyelet help to minimise friction where it matters most. Both carbon models use a RockShox Vivid air shock with hydraulic bottom-out adjustment.




Models, specs & pricing

Megawatt Carbon Pro - £8,799/€10,499/$9,899

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Megawatt Carbon RS - £9,999/ €11,999/$10,899

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Ride Impressions

I had a full day's ride on the Megawatt in Andalo, Italy. I won't repeat everything Mike Kazimer already said about the motor, but from my perspective I liked the ability to just ride and not think about shifting when riding casually, but when negotiating a technical climb or sudden change of gradient, you'll still want to manually override the system or even use the manual mode. It's like how an automatic car is fine for collecting shopping, but an enthusiastic driver on a tricky road will want to do it the old-fashioned way.

As for the bike, it reminded me a lot of the original Megawatt, which is a good thing as it's still among the best-handling full-fat e-bikes I've ridden. With the fork and shock damping run pretty open, it's relatively responsive for its weight. Despite the longer chainstays, it's not too hard to maneuver around, hop and manual, but there's always plenty of traction on the front tire. I rode the (recommended) XL size, which fitted me nicely at 191 cm / 6'3", providing loads of stability without feeling dead in tighter sections.

Pointed down rough pinball sections, it has even more of a downhill bike quality than the original Megawatt, thanks to the extra travel, slacker head angle and Vivid air shock with its hydraulic bottom-out control. The Continental Kryptotal DH tires also help it to feel stuck to the ground. I would prefer more than 170 mm of dropper post travel, though.

When climbing, the Megawatt's sticky tires, steep-ish seat tube and powerful yet smooth motor make it particularly forgiving.




Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
298 articles

155 Comments
  • 133 6
 White one looks like a fridge
  • 35 8
 And I want that fridge
  • 16 6
 It looks pregnant
  • 2 0
 full fat fridge
  • 5 3
 I know right, its uncanny – they look practically the same. The wheels, suspension, that saddle… it all screams ‘fridge’. I gotta stop reading these comments, I give up.
  • 3 0
 perhaps there's beer inside
  • 1 0
 That explains why I keep riding my fridge.
  • 1 0
 more like a polar bear ..... weights about the same too
  • 1 0
 @thebradjohns: Full fat milk you mean Wink
  • 2 0
 Orange bikes just pulled a "hold my beer" on you
  • 95 4
 Can't wait until these are 50% off on Chain Reaction.
  • 25 4
 Spending 10k on a nukeproof is pretty bonkers.
  • 4 6
 @moefosho: the discount is basically built in to the RRP. I think that's one of the reasons why prices have been rocketing in the last few years. Manufacturers and retailers know that no one ever pays full price so they're announcing sky high prices knowing that they can still make a profit when the sales start
  • 6 1
 @moefosho: Is that because it isn't wearing Santa Cruz stickers?
  • 32 2
 Should the benefit of carbon not be weight, the alloy one is barely any heavier and several thousand £ cheeper, why would anyone bother with this, not to mention with limited dropper length and risk of first generation electronics.
  • 29 2
 I'm no e-bike expert, but even I know 53lbs isn't very light.
  • 14 0
 You're not wrong, but the Sram motor is 400g heavier than the Shimano one, and the carbon one uses a 720wh battery vs the aluminium one's 630wh. That probably accounts for regaining the weight lost by going carbon.
  • 30 3
 I mean you have an ebike, an already massive beast of a bike, why spend 000's to make it slightly lighter, you have a motor ffs it doesnt make any difference!!
  • 13 0
 This has a bigger motor, bigger battery and more travel - so I can see why it would be heavier. These "full fat" E-bikes are a different kettle of fish to pedal bikes anyway. 22, 24, 26kg. It's heavy any which way.

This did make me laugh tho

"Nukeproof will continue to make the alloy Megawatt with a Shimano motor to cater to the lower end of the market"

Sub £8499 is the lower end of the market is it...
  • 8 1
 @tom666: The motors are 85 and 90nm so not much in it and travel is the same, the latest alloy version is also 170mm and almost identical geometry (carbon is just 0.5 degree slacker and 5mm longer chainstay)

I dare say part of it is Sram wanting there new e-bike system to appear more premiem by wrapping it in expensive carbon bikes and not cheaper alloy ones.
  • 3 0
 @maglor: In the article it says they increased the travel, but I looked it up and you're right, the alloy megawatt is 170 F&R as well, so that isn't correct.

It is still a bigger battery and motor. Slightly more motor power and 630 to 720wh battery increase.

Because the Sram motor is new and also because it's being paired with the SRAM t-type drivetrains ($$$) and new brakes, it makes sense for this to be a high-end model with carbon.

I expect an alloy version will follow, which will probably barely weigh any more and will take a grand off the pricetag.
  • 2 1
 The alu megawatt frame has a lot of flex, its a great bike and I loved mine, but when you jump on a carbon ebike back to back its very noticable how different the ride characteristics are - much more noticeable re alu vs carbon normal bikes. Most of the cost increase is due to Sram AXS stuff, nukeproof carbon models of all other bikes are not much more than the aluminium ones.
  • 10 14
flag bansheeridermike (Oct 2, 2023 at 7:56) (Below Threshold)
 @chakaping: What people that have not spent a lot of time riding full power ebikes do not get is that it does not matter if the bike is 50lb or 60lb. Once you get used to a heavier bike it is not noticeable. The heavier bike actually feels more planted and still gets air no problem when you want. I have been on a Range VLT for 8 months and would not want the light ebike. The most important thing is battery size and anything less than 900wh is not enough. There have been plenty of 4-5 hour ebike rides where a 750wh would not have made it.
  • 2 0
 @bansheeridermike: I think this speaks more to the efficiency and tune of the system rather than battery size.
I’ve got a ‘23 Levo(700wh) and have only once come close to running out of battery on a 5 hr ride and it’s when I first got the bike and had everything turned up to max. Which on the specialized system is super unnecessary. Riding at 60-70% on most trail systems I ride is very close to overkill imo
For reference, the bikes 50’ish lbs and I’m 225lbs.
Personally I’d much prefer something lighter and operating at a better efficiency. I couldn’t imagine what something 8-10lbs heavier would ride like and definitely wouldnt want the additional fatigue of more weight.
  • 5 0
 @bansheeridermike: That adds to the point of why spend thousands more for a fancy carbon one when weight doen't matter with a big ebike anyway.
  • 10 1
 The benefit of carbon ebike is that it makes you feel like you have a better bike and make more money than the guy who doesnt have the carbon bike ebike.
  • 2 4
 @bansheeridermike: couldn't agree more and it's painful to watch so many members of the mtb community keep going on for years and years embracing all these misunderstandings instead of just trying out some ebikes.

And as for the cost/weight, it's pretty well known that carbon frames ride much better. Weight has been a secondary benefit of carbon for a long time. If money is a concern you will ALWAYS have plenty of fun on the alloy version so definitely do not waste money you don't have. But if you've got the cash, carbon is pretty wonderful stuff.
  • 2 0
 @b824: Wouldn't amount of pedaling probably be the biggest impact?
  • 1 0
 @motts: the terrain you’re riding would for sure. My area on the coast of BC = steep and lots of accending. Somewhere like southern coastal Washington you’d obviously save lots of battery because it’s low angle trails and less work the motor has to do
  • 2 0
 @bansheeridermike: Having owned a few eBikes, I'm the outlier who disagrees. reasons why: 1) I don't want the weight of a 900wh battery for 90 minute after-work rides. 2) My GF who is 130lbs doesn't seem to be able to run a 750wh battery down, ever 3) So many great rides require hike-a-bike to access hidden trails 4) got tired smashing that pregnant belly on rocks and replacing motor guards 5) beyond 45lbs, the cons of extra weight outweigh the pros.
My dream bike doesn't exist yet, but this isn't it. Needs to be under 50lbs with DD tires, have a 200mm+ dropper, under $10k new, not have a belly in front of the chainring
  • 3 0
 I really like my alloy megawatt. I switched my drivetrain from shimano xt to the Linkglide 11 speed xt and it was a sweet upgrade. Added some weight, but shifting is better than ever and if I burn through a chain, it's $20 for a new one. I'd be hesitant to run t-type drivetrain on an ebike, because those parts will cost a lot to replace when they wear out.

Also, I would like the bigger battery. I've done some seriously big rides on my megawatt, but I wanted to keep going. 900wh sounds nice.
  • 1 0
 @Emailsucks98: In the case of my Norco the difference between 720wh and 900wh is only 1.5lbs. IMO this is not a problem at all for your 1 and 3 issues. As for 2, 4, and 5... fair enough. I don't envy the bike companies trying to figure out exactly what specs everyone wants, when everyone wants something a little different. My future dream is 60nm+ motor, 800+wh battery, 45lbs (I'm ok with single wall tires). Good news is I'm sure all our wildest dreams and more will come true soon given how fast these bikes are improving.
  • 2 2
 @b824: Agreed - having limited experience with a full fat (Repeater) and a mid-fat (Relay), they're very different despite having similar travel/geometry. The difference is 10-ish pounds of bike weight - the Relay felt like a slightly heavier Sentinel; the Repeater felt like a different beast altogether. And the Repeater is not a full-on beast - it's got a pretty modest battery. To me, if it were between those two bikes, I think I could slightly more range at slightly less effort out of the Repeater, but the tradeoff would be that the Relay is way more fun on descents, and way way more fun on rolling trails (as in, traversing the mountain as opposed to just climbing to get to the next descent as quickly as possible is fun rather than wallowy). The repeater, with all that extra weight, is super planted when it gets steep and rough, but needs steeps/speed to wake up.

For me, if I were buying now, I'd probably be looking at a Relay, or a Heckler SL (haven't ridden one, but sounds like a slightly nimbler, slightly shorter travel alternative). And both of those bikes are uber pricey, so I'm thinking I'll wait until the likes of Fezzari or Canyon or YT are entering the SL space.

If I got something full fat, I'd very much want to keep my trail bike. If I got something like the Relay, I could happily live with that as my only bike.
  • 2 1
 I can't see the point in carbon ebike frames. The cost/weight/stiffness argument just doesn't add up. Once a bike weighs that much a couple of 100 grams off the frame becomes irrelevant. The motor system, suspension tune and geometry have far more impact on the ride experience than the bike's weight. What's most important is the way geometry and the weight distribution of battery and motor affect the bike's handling. If you're worried about weight, full fat ebikes are probably the wrong category to be buying into.
  • 2 0
 @rirkby: ride one back to back with an aluminium, you’ll see the point. Whether its worth the extra cost is the debatable matter
  • 1 0
 @cuban-b: so same as regular bikes, then.
  • 1 0
 @Emailsucks98: a relay works for that
  • 1 0
 @rirkby: it’s because you have a lot of limitations with aluminum vs carbon. It’s also much stronger and weight does matter.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: Nukeproof website still says "170mm rear wheel travel", interesting they still claim that when you have measured different!

nukeproof.com/products/megawatt-297-2022
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: Have you measured the carbon ones real travel? i dare say if nukeproof claims both are 170mm but you know the alloy one is actually 165 then the carbon ones is likely 165 too, so still the same for comparisons sake.
  • 1 0
 Not only first generation electronics, but electronics from the company with the worst track record for motor replacements. Decoy still looking way better than this if you want carbon, and less money.
  • 2 2
 @bansheeridermike: this is the worst comment I've ever seen hahaha. 900wh is literally ridiculous for 99% of riders unless they are fat or only do 50km in a day. SL bikes are the way forward. Kenevo sl with a range extender will do more laps than an Ep8 with a 630wh, but yes it takes a bit longer to get to the top
  • 23 0
 If I’ve learned anything from Pinkbike authors lately it is that going from 442mm to 447mm chainstays will either make it virtually unrideable or the best bike ever.
  • 1 0
 Bro, do you even long chainstay?
  • 3 2
 Honestly, even a 10 mm change in RC length is pretty subtle. If you do the maths, you'd need a chainstay pushing 500 mm to make a really significant difference in weight distribution (e.g. if you wanted a Large to have the same weight distribution as a Small, or a modern bike to have the same distribution as a bike from ten years ago). But with an ebike, chainstay length becomes pretty critical because lifting the front wheel gets very hard very quickly as the chainstay grows.
  • 2 1
 @seb-stott: I've had multiple bikes that are XL's and 447 is the minimum I'd have with a 500ish reach. Anything lower and it defo feels put off the balance. And yes a 5mm does make a massive difference to ride feel
  • 1 0
 @Jordmackay: I got last month a cascade link for my bronson, and the 5mm extra length are definitively noticeable. Already on the road when trying wheelie, I needed to re-adjust my balance.
  • 1 1
 @seb-stott: Nice try attempting to apply logic to the situation, but you're forgetting the most powerful force in the equation... the human mind. If you've read enough PB articles then 1mm variation to your reach or your chainstays will ruin your day.

My Sight VLT is heavy as sh*t with 467mm RC length. Unrideable according to the armchair mafia on here, yet somehow it's insanely fun and agile on the trail. Hmmm. And I've had analog bikes that were sub 30lbs with the shortest RC possible, 29er and 27.5.... so I know what agile feels like.
  • 19 4
 It looks amazing. But the biggest flaw if Sram combining the motor controller with the AXS dropper. It means you’re limited to 170mm drop… and as someone with long legs who rides 240mm dropper, I wouldn’t buy anything that couldn’t run more than 200…
  • 19 28
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Oct 2, 2023 at 1:40) (Below Threshold)
 The biggest flaw is the rear derailleur. Even if it's a Brose it's dead on arrival in a world where Pinion is now supreme.
  • 10 3
 @DoubleCrownAddict: unfortunately, reviews of the pinion aren't amazing for proper MTB use, a second or third generation will be needed before it becomes widely adopted.
  • 7 2
 @DoubleCrownAddict: I'll have some of whatever you're smoking
  • 4 15
flag chrismac70 FL (Oct 2, 2023 at 6:05) (Below Threshold)
 @DoubleCrownAddict: the biggest flaw is it says sram on it so it will fail miserably
  • 3 2
 @DoubleCrownAddict: bahahahaha U funny
  • 6 3
 @inked-up-metalhead: they have a pinion for proper mtb use, its the one that doesn’t have a motor attached
  • 5 2
 You're only 6'1 and you require a minimum of 200mm? Interesting. I guess I'm doing it wrong despite being like 3.5-4" taller.
  • 2 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: why would you want the weight of a motor without a motor? That's just sadistic...

/Sarcasm
  • 2 1
 @nickfranko: it all depends on the bike you're riding, your preferences for saddle drop, and your proportions, not just your height. I am 5'11 and run a 240mm dropper on my Spire and it's perfect for me but I do have quite long legs for my height.
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: I'm 6'1", and have relatively short legs and a long torso. Having ridden a 210mm dropper for a while now, there's no f*cking way I'll ever buy a bike that doesn't allow that much drop. It's like one of those luxuries you don't really need - if I put in a bit of effort, I could get the bike leaning and separating from my body the same way with a slightly shorter dropper. But it's so nice to have.
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: I don’t require it, I managed ok when 150mm was all the was available. My point is with 35-36” inseam (depending on shoes on/off) a 200-240mm is now possible on most bikes, why would I go back to 170mm?

Simply 200+ is much nicer for vertical chutes…
  • 1 2
 @inked-up-metalhead: Pinion is somewhat noisy and has some clunk, but it is the future and this is outdated garbage in comparison. Piniin will get it right by the end of next year, if not sooner.
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: right, so as I said, a second or third generation...
  • 18 2
 Congratulations on your forthcoming blessing!
  • 1 0
 Twins? Triplets? A future World's Strongest Man contender?
  • 17 8
 There's not enough emphasis in these e-bike reviews of:
1. Does it do awesome power wheelies for about 1.5 meters?
2. Does it do wicked cool skids?
3. Do those super long and dorky mudguards fit that I see on so many e-bikes?
  • 5 1
 I tried a pedal wheelie on my ebike, nearly died from the loop out!
  • 5 0
 @toad321: Simon Cowell is that you?
  • 2 0
 @toad321: But 1.5m must have been doable before you died, hasn't it?
  • 9 1
 White is not a flattering colour for that belly bulge. That downtube/belly guard is going to see some action.

On a more positive note, good to see another motor option, hopefully it’s more reliable than the ep8 !
  • 8 1
 Well it's just another Brose really Big Grin
  • 5 0
 @kanioni: which isn’t too bad. At least you can get them swapped out within 24hrs unlike the 4 month waits we saw with EP8
  • 5 0
 @rich-2000: i can respect that! And a motor design by Sram could be a nightmare tbh
  • 1 2
 Could have taken a tip from actual pregnant women that black is the color of choice
  • 1 0
 @rich-2000: less than a week for me
  • 7 0
 In 2021 I bought a carbon Giga frame with a Factory X2 shipped to my house for $2400. Rip to those days.
  • 2 1
 My mate bought the full bike for less than that last year!
  • 6 3
 E-bikes are getting massive over and over. I was hoping to see smaller engines and generally less heavy bikes. Looking at an electric bike always gives me the idea of a combination between two different frames.
  • 2 0
 There are some good lighter weight options now. I generally agree with you though.

My friends and I tend to ride areas such as Golfie and Risca bike park, where the fire road simply takes you to the top of great trails and there are no uplift options. This scenario is where lighter bikes with interchangeable batteries really come into their own. I also understand people wanting bigger batteries too, for getting "out there" on rides into the wilderness.
  • 6 11
flag Stoaks (Oct 2, 2023 at 6:58) (Below Threshold)
 @Schbeemb: Yes! Let's equip these bikes with larger batteries so we can get these inexperienced riders "out there" further away from emergency services. /s
  • 2 0
 Definitely some good options. Transition Relay. That problem is, once you've accepted you're going to cheat your way up fire road climbs, the temptation to do twice as many fire road climbs with a full fat eBike vs a lightweight one is too great, even if it adds a few kg.
  • 5 1
 @Stoaks: haha haven't seen this paternalistic anti-eeb view since 2020--nice work bringing it back, it's been missed!
  • 5 2
 "It's like how an automatic car is fine for collecting shopping, but an enthusiastic driver on a tricky road will want to do it the old-fashioned way".

Best sentence of the article.
  • 4 2
 E-Bikes are expensive and expensive to own. Looking at $1000+ for a battery like every 2 years and say if you ride like 3K miles a year another $1000+ for a motor after it burns out. Then factor in resell value, who it going to buy a 2 to 3 year old ebike when the battery and motor is going to be on their last legs.
"Turbo batteries have a warranty for 2 years or 300 charge cycles — whichever comes first."
"Specialized Turbo Levo Gen 2 Battery Pack = $1,299.99"
"Motors & Drive systems components on e-bikes 2 years"
"Specialized MY19 Levo FSR Turbo 2.2 Custom RX Trail Tuned Motor Mountain = $1200"
"Electric bike motors can last up to 16,000 km (10,000 miles)"
  • 6 5
 £10k for a motor bike and you still have to pedal it. I really don’t see all the fuss. It’s an old motor that specialized have been using for years and shimano auto shift that came out months ago. I really don’t see what the point is
  • 2 6
flag cuban-b (Oct 2, 2023 at 8:40) (Below Threshold)
 Poor you
  • 6 2
 Nukeproof megawatt without Sram logo: 6000. Nukeproof megawatt with Sram logo: 10 000.
  • 1 0
 More like Nukeproof Megawatt alloy that's been out for a few years and has a reputation as a solid but not class leading bike - 6000 in small battery/low spec variant on sale, but around 9000 in higher spec variants. E-MTBs are still pretty damn expensive, unfortunately.
  • 3 0
 So what's the warranty on SRAM's motor? That was never addressed with the launch press release, and I can't find it on Nukeproof's website.
  • 2 0
 Everyone else offers 2 years including Specialized who uses this motor. Likely 2 years as well
  • 3 0
 @vanillarice19: You're probably right. I was hoping SRAM would buck the trend and do at least a 3-4 year warranty in an attempt to sell their product and one-up everyone else like they always do, but I guess not. Considering that you're rolling the dice on practically every eMTB motor's reliability, the incurred cost post-warranty would be enormous. Either spend the money on a brand new motor plus labor, or buy a brand new eMTB after 2 years and a motor failure. Motor manufacturers could make them a lot more reliable and durable, but choose not to. I never wanna hear MTB companies talk about sustainability ever again.
  • 4 1
 @Almazing: they couldn’t afford the warranty claims if they did that
  • 4 0
 @chrismac70: Then they should probably just make reliable, durable, and user serviceable motors to begin with.
  • 4 1
 Att product manager: Purple bike>white bike. Purple bike need white bike parts.
  • 2 2
 I want a light e-enduro machine with belt so I can do more laps on my favourite tracks with less noise. Don't want 25 kilo ebike which is good for excursions in the mountains.
  • 6 5
 9g... put the pipe down NP. Nobody who car ride is mad enough to spend 9g on that! Unproven motor. AI shifting. Makes a vitus even more appealing
  • 2 0
 When is someone gonna release an ebike called the "Jigowatt" in reference to Marty & Docs classic mispronunciation?
  • 2 0
 And it's a Brose motor tuned by Sram, at least motor warranty should be good, maybe, possibly, probably, er, who knows.
  • 1 0
 Man, that is a ton of mass around the bottom bracket area. It's like the ol' pregnant Tazer, Shuttle, etc., just a bit lower.
  • 1 1
 Nice but imagine how much more attractive this thing could have been with a slimmer frame using a 375W-500W battery and programmed to never allow anything like "boost or Turbo" mode
  • 1 0
 Different class of bike altogether. In some of those SRAM drivetrain first ride videos, there were a bunch of new Transition bikes being shown as well - they've got a pretty similar look to the Nukeproof one. By the time you build a full on enduro bike with a big battery and a full power drive train, that's what you get - and the market for those bikes is pretty robust, as a lot of people like what they have to offer. Transition already makes a half-fat bike, the Relay. Looking at them next to each other, the difference is about as drastic as between a Trek Rail and a Fuel EXe, both in looks and in ride feel. Tons of other half fat eebs out from other brands, too. Personally, that's probably going to be my niche eventually - the full fat ones are fun, but not necessarily my cup of tea.
  • 1 1
 I'm consistently amazed by how many ebikes I see out on the trails these days! Where the hell does everyone get this money from?! Can I have some please? I would get a new car with it though, not an ebike...
  • 2 0
 All of that amazing tech and they still can’t make a 200mm dropper
  • 4 1
 *automatic mofa
  • 3 1
 so good it doesn't look like a Levo
  • 2 0
  maybe they only changed the decals?
  • 2 0
 Unless these ebikes have a magneto hydrodynamic drive, I'm not interested.
  • 2 0
 G2 RE’s on a nearly 10K e-bike? Spec is weird.
  • 1 3
 New carbon bikes on new systems shouldn’t be coming in more than 45-50lbs.
As someone that owned a ‘23 Levo at 50lbs for the last year I wouldnt consider anything new over the 45-47lb mark.
These massive batteries that come in all the new “full fat” bikes seems like a massive overkill for the majority of average riders that only go out for 3-4 hours tops unless all you’re riding is fire and forestry service roads. Personally I wont ride in full turbo on any climb trails because it’s so overkill and usually come home with 30-50% battery after a 3-5 ride.
The Orbea Wild seems like it’s going in the right direction with 46-51lb bikes with an option of smaller batteries.
Would love it if my Levo had come with a 600-650 watt battery.
Hopefully more manufacturers follow this trend of building more sensible bikes rather than these beasts made for exploring that most people don’t take advantage of.
  • 2 0
 sounds like you would want a light weight ebike. not a full power one. They already make light weight options.
  • 2 1
 You can get a 630wh battery for the levo. Weighs about 1.5lbs less. Comes with the base model ‘22 alloy and ‘23 carbon bikes.
  • 2 0
 @MmmBones: thought it was a 500wh?
  • 1 0
 @b824: my bad, it’s a 530wh but they advertise it as 500, and the 700 is really 710.
  • 1 0
 Can we just have the Hill, Page and Carlson team announced for 2024 already?
  • 1 0
 If you look at the spec on the cheaper build, it shows G2 brakes. I thought we were over that in 2023 almost 2024 WTF
  • 1 1
 All I needed to read is that the motor is big and that this battery motor combo is actually heavier then the Shimano battery combo
  • 1 2
 At this point, you should just buy one of those Chinese “Surron” E-Dirtbikes, since it’s obvious you’re allergic to pedaling anyway.

And you’ll save $10K over this refrigerator.
  • 1 1
 Great another motorcycle/ e bike. perfect bike for over 65 years old senior citizen
  • 3 3
 what an ugly bike. I know its personal preference but it looks like already prepped for bike packing tours
  • 1 2
 A Nukeproof ebike with worse value than a Specialized levo and the Heckler sl costing less than the new trek slash, what is going on with bike prices this year?
  • 3 2
 When is the gender reveal party?
  • 1 0
 Can i put a sram motor on a gen 3 levo? lol
  • 1 0
 man, those GX cranks look so cheap
  • 1 1
 Oh, I thought SRAM were still working/prototyping the motor. Bummer. It's too large.....
  • 4 4
 I have a mountain bike and a surron...what's the point of these bropeds again..
  • 2 0
 Specifically to piss people off muahahaha.
  • 4 0
 @bansheeridermike: way more fun downhill than a Surron. Way less fun uphill though.
  • 2 0
 Want…
  • 2 2
 Are we even more expensive than Yeti here !?
  • 6 0
 A Yeti with this motor plus Transmission will be more than an Honda Civic
  • 2 0
 @Vindiu: an old honda civic. New civics are 34-40k euros
  • 2 1
 @eugenux: here in Europe. On the other side of the pond, they start at (almost) $24,000. That's not a totally unexpected price for a top-of-the-line Yeti e-bike...
  • 1 2
 Why are these new motors bigger than current offerings? The bikes look pretty fat.
  • 4 3
 Because it’s an old motor with a different badge on it hiding behind expensive shifting that shimano launched 6 months ago
  • 1 0
 It has a FUPA.
  • 2 2
 Tired of seeing heavy ebikes. Where are the new crop of lightweight ones?
  • 1 2
 I'm tired of not seeing 180-200mm ebikes capable of going where normal bikes can't go.
  • 1 1
 Captain Ahab would've wanted to hunt it.
  • 1 2
 What a tank! Compared to the lighter weight ebikes it's so ugly. No hiding that your riding a big ebike.
  • 1 2
 looks like a YT Decoy except the small link
  • 2 1
 so it doesn't look like a Decoy?
  • 2 0
 @RobKong: A decoy of a Decoy
  • 2 5
 Looks great. Wonder if you can buy a derestrictor yet for the SRAM motor?
  • 2 1
 I doubt it if you mean a physical planetary one . 6 magnets providing input. One of the ways my shimano deristrictor works is by adding a second magnet and making them both spin very slow around a planetary deresrictor. it means the 3d printed gears can be a low module and print sturdy. With 6 magnets, it looks like theres gonna be no room atall for gearing of any sort, and it looks like they've actually pulled the magnets inbetween each bolt head on a diagonal line so they areon an even tighter P.C.D than the typical bosch or shimano one. Id say if we dropped out some of the magnets to allow for adding gearing to spin them slower then the system will not function as its expecting a minimum amount of magnet passes per second perhaps.
  • 2 0
 @adamxrt: there is an electrical doodah on my specialized brose.
I guess something similar may come out for this being a brose. Depends how hard they have tried to prevent tampering.
  • 2 2
 @adamxrt: just remove 3 magnets, it will double the limit instantly.
  • 1 1
 Ask brose or specialized
  • 2 0
 I'd think the system would recognize tampering as it knows the speed and gear it's in. X-cadence with x-gear gives x-speed.
Maybe?
  • 1 0
 @Robstyle: sadly yes, would depend if theres a cadence sensor on the output shaft though
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